Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 016084/001.

Names and composition

"ZYLOPRIM" is the commercial name of a drug composed of ALLOPURINOL.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016084/001 ZYLOPRIM ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
016084/002 ZYLOPRIM ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016084/001 ZYLOPRIM ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
016084/002 ZYLOPRIM ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
018241/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
018241/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
018297/001 LOPURIN ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
018297/002 LOPURIN ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
018659/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
018659/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
018785/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
018785/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
018832/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
018877/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
070147/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
070150/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
070268/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
070269/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
070466/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
070467/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
070579/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
070580/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
070950/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
070951/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
071449/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
071450/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
071586/001 LOPURIN ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
071587/001 LOPURIN ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
075798/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
075798/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
077353/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
077353/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
078253/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
078253/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
078390/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
078390/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
090637/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
090637/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
203154/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
203154/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG
204467/001 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
204467/002 ALLOPURINOL ALLOPURINOL TABLET/ORAL 300MG

Ask a doctor

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

Has anyone tried Zyloprim?
Saw the commercial last night and was thinking about adding it to my diet and exercise routine. Has anyone tried it? Does it work? Asked by Joe Algeo 1 year ago.

No but I have heard good things about Xenical Answered by Kelly Noecker 1 year ago.


What is the classifications or classifications of each drug listed?
Medrol Diflucan NovoLOG Cardura Zyloprim Nexium Epogen Tamiflu Zosyn Plavix Asked by Gennie Ereaux 1 year ago.

i knew only a few , please write generics not trade names : cardura for hypertension and prostate plavix :blood thinner tamiflu : for influenza nexuim : for stomach Answered by Richard Repaci 1 year ago.

I don't mind the main genres, but sub-genres are just too much for me. Labeling music in general has just been taken too far. These days people focus too much with staying inside their certain limits and sub-genre and you can never progress musically if you do that. And I agree with what you said about people not even knowing what some genres are. I asked a question a couple of months ago about what exactly makes a band metal and I got completely different answers from everyone. It's just another way to squeeze everything into a certain group and label. Answered by Brice Elian 1 year ago.


What is allopurinol medication?
medication Asked by Daysi Mugg 1 year ago.

GENERIC NAME: allopurinol BRAND NAME: Zyloprim, Aloprim DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Allopurinol is used for treating gout caused by excessive levels of uric acid in the blood (hyperuricemia). Uric acid is a by product from the breakdown of certain proteins (purines) in the body. Hyperuricemia occurs when the body produces more uric acid than it can eliminate. The uric acid forms crystals in joints (gouty arthritis) and tissues, causing inflammation and pain. Elevated blood uric acid levels also can cause kidney disease and stones. Allopurinol prevents the production of uric acid by blocking the activity of the enzyme that converts purines to uric acid. Uric acid levels usually begin to fall within 2-3 days of starting treatment and return to their original levels within 7-10 days after allopurinol is stopped. It may take several months of therapy before attacks of gout are controlled. The FDA approved allopurinol prior to 1982. PRESCRIPTION: Yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: Yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets: 100, 300 mg; Powder for injection: 500 mg STORAGE: Tablets should be stored at room temperature between 15 to 25 C (59-77 F) and in a moisture proof, light- resistant container. Powder should be stored between 20 and 25 C (68-77 F) and not refrigerated. PRESCRIBED FOR: Allopurinol is used for treating acute attacks of gout, erosive destructive gouty joint disease, uric acid deposits in tissues (tophi), gouty kidney disease, and uric acid stones. Allopurinol also is used to prevent elevation of blood uric acid in patients undergoing chemotherapy for the treatment of certain cancers and in patients with recurrent calcium kidney stones and elevated uric acid levels. DOSING: The dose range of allopurinol is 100-800 mg day. It should be taken with food to avoid irritation of the stomach. In order to avoid formation of kidney stones, patients should drink plenty of fluids while taking allopurinol. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Allopurinol increases blood levels of oral mercaptopurine (Purinethol) and azathioprine (Imuran) by reducing their breakdown in the body. Therefore, the dose of mercaptopurine and azathioprine should be reduced in order to avoid toxicity. There is an increased risk of skin rash in patients taking allopurinol in combination with penicillins. PREGNANCY: There are no adequate studies of allopurinol in pregnant women. NURSING MOTHERS: Allopurinol is excreted in breast milk. To avoid adverse effects in the infant, nursing mothers taking allopurinol should consider not breastfeeding. SIDE EFFECTS: Common reactions include diarrhea, nausea, rash and itching, and drowsiness. The most frequent side effect to allopurinol is skin rash. Allopurinol should be discontinued immediately at the first appearance of rash, painful urination, blood in the urine, eye irritation, or swelling of the mouth or lips, because these can be a signs of an impending severe allergic reaction that can be fatal. Allopurinol should be avoided by patients with a prior severe reaction to the drug. Allopurinol can cause a flare-up of gouty arthritis during initial therapy. Therefore, colchicine often is used simultaneously to prevent these flares. Rarely, allopurinol can cause nerve, kidney, and bone marrow damage. Allopurinol can cause a serious allergic liver toxicity that can be fatal. Appetite loss and itching can be signs of liver toxicity. The risk of this reaction increases in patients with kidney impairment. Patients with kidney impairment should receive lower doses of allopurinol. Answered by Tyson Eveline 1 year ago.

The problem with allopurinol medication is that their designed on the basis of “interruption” mechanism. Xanthine oxidase inhibitors disrupt the purine – uric acid cycle by suppressing the enzyme that helps to break down purine to uric acid. Look, God created xanthine oxidase to help us dispose the excess purine in the body. The degradation of purine happens in the liver, and the end product which is uric acid is released back into the bloodstream to be sent to the kidneys for disposal. Blocking this cycle with allopurinol causes the built up of purine in the liver which leads to all sorts of side effects. Answered by Barabara Ozenne 1 year ago.

It reduces uric acid production and is used to Prevent (not treat) gout. In fact it will make acutr gout worse. It needs to be started when the patient is free from acute gout, started at a low dose (50mg) and increased slowly. Answered by Vena Soult 1 year ago.

it blocks the production of uric acid which precipitates in the joints as crystals, which are needle like and cause a lot of pain and swelling. This is known as gout. Answered by Tawana Loyack 1 year ago.

neutralizes uric acid in the system....treats gout. Answered by Laure Tappendorf 1 year ago.

No it doesnt to my knowledge. I am on allopurinol, coreg, spironolactone, diovan, and several others with no side effects! Answered by Cornelius Hellman 1 year ago.

ITS FOR SOMEONE WITH A BIG UGLY TOE THAT IS FULL OF URIC ACID. IT INHIBITS THIS ENZYME CALLED *XANTHINE OXIDASE*....ITS FOR GOUT :) Answered by Tawny Solas 1 year ago.


Allopurinol medicine?
Asked by Arnette Weatherall 1 year ago.

Allopurinol (Zyloprim) is used to treat gout (joint inflammation in gout) and kidney stones (calcium stones, mainly). And it prevents high levels of uric acid in patients receiving chemo treatments. It si NOT a pain reliever, though. Most people find it easiest to take after meals to decrease upset stomach, and with a full glass of water. If taken for stones, it is also best to drink at least 3-4 more glasses of water throughout the day to prevent more stone build-up. Hope this info helps. Of course, always consult your Dr. for best medical advice. Not these yahoos!!! Answered by Yong Rayer 1 year ago.

It would help if you put more in your question explaining what you want to know. I take allopurinol every day. My body produces too much uric acid, and the allopurinol helps the body eliminate the uric acid so it doesn't build up. When uric acid builds up, it can form crystals in the joints. The bodies immune system reacts to those crystals as if they were outside organisms, and the immune response causes swelling and tenderness and lots of pain. The name for this mishap is gout. Allopurinol helps prevent gout attacks in people who have too much uric acid. Follow the link in the source section for lots of info. Answered by Miquel Bigas 1 year ago.

Allopurinol is used to treat patients with multiple recurrent gout attacks, erosive destructive gouty joint disease, hard lumps of uric acid deposits in tissues (called tophi), gouty kidney disease, or uric acid stones. Allopurinol is also used to prevent elevation of blood uric acid in patients undergoing chemotherapy for the treatment of certain cancers. NREMT-P, CPC Answered by Stacia Angelocci 1 year ago.

Commonly prescribed for gout!!! Answered by Yulanda Bouknight 1 year ago.

I'm not sure what your question is? Can you be more specific? Answered by Rosalba Bartus 1 year ago.


Stopping acidity in gout?
my first gout attack (age 62 now) was 2 yrs ago. since then, several attacks have followed despite two gout medications. how would one consistently lower their acidity to a "normal" level? and does an acid-prone system have a tendency for cancer, over an alkaline system? thanx. Asked by Jenae Mccorkindale 1 year ago.

I suppose the medications you were taking are Allopurinol (Zyloprim) or Ulori or Colchicine (during the attack). I'm sorry to tell you that those drugs can only temporarily suppress the uric acid level (allopurinol) or provide short term pain relief and anti-inflammatory effect (Colchicine). The solution to your gout problem can be found in simple science theory. "Neutralization" is the key. Gout is the direct result of uric acid accumulation. Thus, in order to get rid of it or prevent future attack, you must lower the uric acid content in your body. There is only one thing that can effectively neutralize the acidic toxics (including uric acid) in your body, which is the alkalinity. There are 2 sources of alkalinity... You can either eat huge amount of vegetables every day or the easier and more effective alternative is to drink Ionized Alkaline Water. Check out the reference website for more details on how ionized alkaline water is the ultimate solution to your torturing gout problem. It has already proven scientifically that acidic body has higher chance to get cancer and other modern diseases. That kind of information is not widely circulated because it is contradictory to conventional medical practice and it is not in the favor of those Big Pharma... Answered by Gaylord Farhat 1 year ago.

Gout is a condition where uric acid crystals build up in the body. This can happen in the area of the big toe and cause a lot of pain. Our foods contain purines; some foods are higher in this than others. The doctor may place you on a lower purine diet (of which they will usually provide you a list of foods to avoid. There is also medications that can lower the uric acid in the blood Here an alternative way to cure gout? Answered by Chuck Arnot 1 year ago.

maybe you should see a real doctor and ask them what is causing your acidity. Aloe Vera is a herbal suppliment so it won't cure your "acidity" for good.... if that is even a legitimate problem. Answered by Hillary Burth 1 year ago.


Can someone tell me what pill this is?
I found a pill on my floor, and i want to know what it is and i cant find it on the internet. - it is round - light orange/peach color - imprint is NO21 on one side and on the other side is just a line across. can anyone tell me what it is? Asked by Bula Zarn 1 year ago.

It looks like it is a 300 mg ZYLOPRIM. Zyloprim is used to treat gout and certain types of kidney stones as well as preventing increased acid levels in patients receiving chemotherapy. Answered by Brittny Cahalane 1 year ago.

Anything you tell your doctor is private and confidential. The only time they will tell your parents or anybody else is if they believe you are in danger in any way. Go to your GP and ask for advice, if you don't want to tell them you're having sex, say you have really bad periods. Just be aware you're going to have to be able to get back to your GP every three months for a re-evaluation. You don't have to pay for your prescription and you're over 12 so you should be signing for your own anyway by now. I wonder why you don't want your mum to know though, I'd be happier that my daughter was having sex and being safe about it than her having sex and not being safe. She's your mum, she will understand. Answered by Kristie Baff 1 year ago.

probly prescription pill for somthing Answered by Adrian Maupredi 1 year ago.

you can go to webmd.com and use their pill indentifer or you can just google it Answered by Kim Abdelal 1 year ago.


Hi Triglycerides dr. put me on Allopurinol is this going to help.I thought this was for Gout.?
Triglycerides count was 268.I,m also takeing Atenol for high blood presure and was told this causes high triglcerides,Please Help Asked by Hilda Raney 1 year ago.

Gout is a condition where uric acid crystals build up in the body. This can happen in the area of the big toe and cause a lot of pain. Our foods contain purines; some foods are higher in this than others. The doctor may place you on a lower purine diet (of which they will usually provide you a list of foods to avoid. There is also medications that can lower the uric acid in the blood Here an alternative way to cure gout? Answered by Rashad Henjes 1 year ago.


What causes random pain at the tip of penis?
I went to the dr for a blood & urine tests 2 days ago & still have to wait for a week for results. I have a history of gout that could lead to kidney stones. Could that be it? I also have molluscom but its viral not bacterial so most likely its not the cause. Anyone w/ this experience pls reply. Thanks. Asked by Emmett Faughn 1 year ago.

If you have a history of gout; are you on Allopurinol (zyloprim) It's the most common Rx drug for gout? It's possible you're passing a small kidney stone which might causing the pain. Is it primarily when you're urinating? I'm sure your doctor wants you to reduce dairy products as this contributes to kidney stones too. Ask the doc about dairy products. Feel better- I know they hurt like a SOB. Answered by Katheleen Tiell 1 year ago.


Has anyone tried Zyloprim?
Saw the commercial last night and was thinking about adding it to my diet and exercise routine. Has anyone tried it? Does it work? Asked by Marilyn Marlborough 1 year ago.

No but I have heard good things about Xenical Answered by Barbra Vanscooter 1 year ago.


What is the classifications or classifications of each drug listed?
Medrol Diflucan NovoLOG Cardura Zyloprim Nexium Epogen Tamiflu Zosyn Plavix Asked by Rob Logue 1 year ago.

i knew only a few , please write generics not trade names : cardura for hypertension and prostate plavix :blood thinner tamiflu : for influenza nexuim : for stomach Answered by Allan Ethridge 1 year ago.

I don't mind the main genres, but sub-genres are just too much for me. Labeling music in general has just been taken too far. These days people focus too much with staying inside their certain limits and sub-genre and you can never progress musically if you do that. And I agree with what you said about people not even knowing what some genres are. I asked a question a couple of months ago about what exactly makes a band metal and I got completely different answers from everyone. It's just another way to squeeze everything into a certain group and label. Answered by Cesar Duchesne 1 year ago.


What is allopurinol medication?
medication Asked by Filomena Kinman 1 year ago.

GENERIC NAME: allopurinol BRAND NAME: Zyloprim, Aloprim DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Allopurinol is used for treating gout caused by excessive levels of uric acid in the blood (hyperuricemia). Uric acid is a by product from the breakdown of certain proteins (purines) in the body. Hyperuricemia occurs when the body produces more uric acid than it can eliminate. The uric acid forms crystals in joints (gouty arthritis) and tissues, causing inflammation and pain. Elevated blood uric acid levels also can cause kidney disease and stones. Allopurinol prevents the production of uric acid by blocking the activity of the enzyme that converts purines to uric acid. Uric acid levels usually begin to fall within 2-3 days of starting treatment and return to their original levels within 7-10 days after allopurinol is stopped. It may take several months of therapy before attacks of gout are controlled. The FDA approved allopurinol prior to 1982. PRESCRIPTION: Yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: Yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets: 100, 300 mg; Powder for injection: 500 mg STORAGE: Tablets should be stored at room temperature between 15 to 25 C (59-77 F) and in a moisture proof, light- resistant container. Powder should be stored between 20 and 25 C (68-77 F) and not refrigerated. PRESCRIBED FOR: Allopurinol is used for treating acute attacks of gout, erosive destructive gouty joint disease, uric acid deposits in tissues (tophi), gouty kidney disease, and uric acid stones. Allopurinol also is used to prevent elevation of blood uric acid in patients undergoing chemotherapy for the treatment of certain cancers and in patients with recurrent calcium kidney stones and elevated uric acid levels. DOSING: The dose range of allopurinol is 100-800 mg day. It should be taken with food to avoid irritation of the stomach. In order to avoid formation of kidney stones, patients should drink plenty of fluids while taking allopurinol. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Allopurinol increases blood levels of oral mercaptopurine (Purinethol) and azathioprine (Imuran) by reducing their breakdown in the body. Therefore, the dose of mercaptopurine and azathioprine should be reduced in order to avoid toxicity. There is an increased risk of skin rash in patients taking allopurinol in combination with penicillins. PREGNANCY: There are no adequate studies of allopurinol in pregnant women. NURSING MOTHERS: Allopurinol is excreted in breast milk. To avoid adverse effects in the infant, nursing mothers taking allopurinol should consider not breastfeeding. SIDE EFFECTS: Common reactions include diarrhea, nausea, rash and itching, and drowsiness. The most frequent side effect to allopurinol is skin rash. Allopurinol should be discontinued immediately at the first appearance of rash, painful urination, blood in the urine, eye irritation, or swelling of the mouth or lips, because these can be a signs of an impending severe allergic reaction that can be fatal. Allopurinol should be avoided by patients with a prior severe reaction to the drug. Allopurinol can cause a flare-up of gouty arthritis during initial therapy. Therefore, colchicine often is used simultaneously to prevent these flares. Rarely, allopurinol can cause nerve, kidney, and bone marrow damage. Allopurinol can cause a serious allergic liver toxicity that can be fatal. Appetite loss and itching can be signs of liver toxicity. The risk of this reaction increases in patients with kidney impairment. Patients with kidney impairment should receive lower doses of allopurinol. Answered by Adrien Kedzierski 1 year ago.

The problem with allopurinol medication is that their designed on the basis of “interruption” mechanism. Xanthine oxidase inhibitors disrupt the purine – uric acid cycle by suppressing the enzyme that helps to break down purine to uric acid. Look, God created xanthine oxidase to help us dispose the excess purine in the body. The degradation of purine happens in the liver, and the end product which is uric acid is released back into the bloodstream to be sent to the kidneys for disposal. Blocking this cycle with allopurinol causes the built up of purine in the liver which leads to all sorts of side effects. Answered by Orlando Grat 1 year ago.

It reduces uric acid production and is used to Prevent (not treat) gout. In fact it will make acutr gout worse. It needs to be started when the patient is free from acute gout, started at a low dose (50mg) and increased slowly. Answered by Sanjuana Fillinger 1 year ago.

it blocks the production of uric acid which precipitates in the joints as crystals, which are needle like and cause a lot of pain and swelling. This is known as gout. Answered by Vanessa Flohr 1 year ago.

neutralizes uric acid in the system....treats gout. Answered by Han Pullian 1 year ago.

No it doesnt to my knowledge. I am on allopurinol, coreg, spironolactone, diovan, and several others with no side effects! Answered by Huey Schromen 1 year ago.

ITS FOR SOMEONE WITH A BIG UGLY TOE THAT IS FULL OF URIC ACID. IT INHIBITS THIS ENZYME CALLED *XANTHINE OXIDASE*....ITS FOR GOUT :) Answered by Whitney Johson 1 year ago.


Allopurinol medicine?
Asked by Dalia Uchiyama 1 year ago.

Allopurinol (Zyloprim) is used to treat gout (joint inflammation in gout) and kidney stones (calcium stones, mainly). And it prevents high levels of uric acid in patients receiving chemo treatments. It si NOT a pain reliever, though. Most people find it easiest to take after meals to decrease upset stomach, and with a full glass of water. If taken for stones, it is also best to drink at least 3-4 more glasses of water throughout the day to prevent more stone build-up. Hope this info helps. Of course, always consult your Dr. for best medical advice. Not these yahoos!!! Answered by Rich Minns 1 year ago.

It would help if you put more in your question explaining what you want to know. I take allopurinol every day. My body produces too much uric acid, and the allopurinol helps the body eliminate the uric acid so it doesn't build up. When uric acid builds up, it can form crystals in the joints. The bodies immune system reacts to those crystals as if they were outside organisms, and the immune response causes swelling and tenderness and lots of pain. The name for this mishap is gout. Allopurinol helps prevent gout attacks in people who have too much uric acid. Follow the link in the source section for lots of info. Answered by Rhea Hindson 1 year ago.

Allopurinol is used to treat patients with multiple recurrent gout attacks, erosive destructive gouty joint disease, hard lumps of uric acid deposits in tissues (called tophi), gouty kidney disease, or uric acid stones. Allopurinol is also used to prevent elevation of blood uric acid in patients undergoing chemotherapy for the treatment of certain cancers. NREMT-P, CPC Answered by Annie Hollmann 1 year ago.

Commonly prescribed for gout!!! Answered by Brandon Cartegena 1 year ago.

I'm not sure what your question is? Can you be more specific? Answered by Victoria Wigelsworth 1 year ago.


Stopping acidity in gout?
my first gout attack (age 62 now) was 2 yrs ago. since then, several attacks have followed despite two gout medications. how would one consistently lower their acidity to a "normal" level? and does an acid-prone system have a tendency for cancer, over an alkaline system? thanx. Asked by Suellen Winter 1 year ago.

I suppose the medications you were taking are Allopurinol (Zyloprim) or Ulori or Colchicine (during the attack). I'm sorry to tell you that those drugs can only temporarily suppress the uric acid level (allopurinol) or provide short term pain relief and anti-inflammatory effect (Colchicine). The solution to your gout problem can be found in simple science theory. "Neutralization" is the key. Gout is the direct result of uric acid accumulation. Thus, in order to get rid of it or prevent future attack, you must lower the uric acid content in your body. There is only one thing that can effectively neutralize the acidic toxics (including uric acid) in your body, which is the alkalinity. There are 2 sources of alkalinity... You can either eat huge amount of vegetables every day or the easier and more effective alternative is to drink Ionized Alkaline Water. Check out the reference website for more details on how ionized alkaline water is the ultimate solution to your torturing gout problem. It has already proven scientifically that acidic body has higher chance to get cancer and other modern diseases. That kind of information is not widely circulated because it is contradictory to conventional medical practice and it is not in the favor of those Big Pharma... Answered by Leilani Steinmuller 1 year ago.

Gout is a condition where uric acid crystals build up in the body. This can happen in the area of the big toe and cause a lot of pain. Our foods contain purines; some foods are higher in this than others. The doctor may place you on a lower purine diet (of which they will usually provide you a list of foods to avoid. There is also medications that can lower the uric acid in the blood Here an alternative way to cure gout? Answered by Yoshiko Numan 1 year ago.

maybe you should see a real doctor and ask them what is causing your acidity. Aloe Vera is a herbal suppliment so it won't cure your "acidity" for good.... if that is even a legitimate problem. Answered by Debbra Clunie 1 year ago.


Can someone tell me what pill this is?
I found a pill on my floor, and i want to know what it is and i cant find it on the internet. - it is round - light orange/peach color - imprint is NO21 on one side and on the other side is just a line across. can anyone tell me what it is? Asked by Bobbie Quaranto 1 year ago.

It looks like it is a 300 mg ZYLOPRIM. Zyloprim is used to treat gout and certain types of kidney stones as well as preventing increased acid levels in patients receiving chemotherapy. Answered by Alaina Golaszewski 1 year ago.

Anything you tell your doctor is private and confidential. The only time they will tell your parents or anybody else is if they believe you are in danger in any way. Go to your GP and ask for advice, if you don't want to tell them you're having sex, say you have really bad periods. Just be aware you're going to have to be able to get back to your GP every three months for a re-evaluation. You don't have to pay for your prescription and you're over 12 so you should be signing for your own anyway by now. I wonder why you don't want your mum to know though, I'd be happier that my daughter was having sex and being safe about it than her having sex and not being safe. She's your mum, she will understand. Answered by Patricia Lauby 1 year ago.

probly prescription pill for somthing Answered by Stefany Alameida 1 year ago.

you can go to webmd.com and use their pill indentifer or you can just google it Answered by Jan Fosdick 1 year ago.


Hi Triglycerides dr. put me on Allopurinol is this going to help.I thought this was for Gout.?
Triglycerides count was 268.I,m also takeing Atenol for high blood presure and was told this causes high triglcerides,Please Help Asked by Faye Burdo 1 year ago.

Gout is a condition where uric acid crystals build up in the body. This can happen in the area of the big toe and cause a lot of pain. Our foods contain purines; some foods are higher in this than others. The doctor may place you on a lower purine diet (of which they will usually provide you a list of foods to avoid. There is also medications that can lower the uric acid in the blood Here an alternative way to cure gout? Answered by Patrina Marose 1 year ago.


What causes random pain at the tip of penis?
I went to the dr for a blood & urine tests 2 days ago & still have to wait for a week for results. I have a history of gout that could lead to kidney stones. Could that be it? I also have molluscom but its viral not bacterial so most likely its not the cause. Anyone w/ this experience pls reply. Thanks. Asked by Myles Glad 1 year ago.

If you have a history of gout; are you on Allopurinol (zyloprim) It's the most common Rx drug for gout? It's possible you're passing a small kidney stone which might causing the pain. Is it primarily when you're urinating? I'm sure your doctor wants you to reduce dairy products as this contributes to kidney stones too. Ask the doc about dairy products. Feel better- I know they hurt like a SOB. Answered by Clair Brostoff 1 year ago.


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