ZIAC Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 020186/001.

Names and composition

"ZIAC" is the commercial name of a drug composed of BISOPROLOL FUMARATE and HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020186/001 ZIAC BISOPROLOL FUMARATE; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG and 6.25MG
020186/002 ZIAC BISOPROLOL FUMARATE; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG and 6.25MG
020186/003 ZIAC BISOPROLOL FUMARATE; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG and 6.25MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020186/001 ZIAC BISOPROLOL FUMARATE; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG and 6.25MG
020186/002 ZIAC BISOPROLOL FUMARATE; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG and 6.25MG
020186/003 ZIAC BISOPROLOL FUMARATE; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG and 6.25MG
075469/002 BISOPROLOL FUMARATE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE BISOPROLOL FUMARATE; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG and 6.25MG
075527/003 BISOPROLOL FUMARATE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE BISOPROLOL FUMARATE; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG and 6.25MG
075579/002 BISOPROLOL FUMARATE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE BISOPROLOL FUMARATE; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG and 6.25MG
075632/002 BISOPROLOL FUMARATE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE BISOPROLOL FUMARATE; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG and 6.25MG
075642/001 BISOPROLOL FUMARATE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE BISOPROLOL FUMARATE; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG and 6.25MG
075672/002 BISOPROLOL FUMARATE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE BISOPROLOL FUMARATE; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG and 6.25MG
075686/002 BISOPROLOL FUMARATE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE BISOPROLOL FUMARATE; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG and 6.25MG
075768/002 BISOPROLOL FUMARATE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE BISOPROLOL FUMARATE; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG and 6.25MG
079106/002 BISOPROLOL FUMARATE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE BISOPROLOL FUMARATE; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG and 6.25MG
075469/001 BISOPROLOL FUMARATE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE BISOPROLOL FUMARATE; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG and 6.25MG
075469/003 BISOPROLOL FUMARATE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE BISOPROLOL FUMARATE; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG and 6.25MG
075527/001 BISOPROLOL FUMARATE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE BISOPROLOL FUMARATE; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG and 6.25MG
075527/002 BISOPROLOL FUMARATE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE BISOPROLOL FUMARATE; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG and 6.25MG
075579/001 BISOPROLOL FUMARATE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE BISOPROLOL FUMARATE; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG and 6.25MG
075579/003 BISOPROLOL FUMARATE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE BISOPROLOL FUMARATE; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG and 6.25MG
075632/001 BISOPROLOL FUMARATE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE BISOPROLOL FUMARATE; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG and 6.25MG
075632/003 BISOPROLOL FUMARATE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE BISOPROLOL FUMARATE; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG and 6.25MG
075642/002 BISOPROLOL FUMARATE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE BISOPROLOL FUMARATE; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG and 6.25MG
075642/003 BISOPROLOL FUMARATE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE BISOPROLOL FUMARATE; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG and 6.25MG
075672/001 BISOPROLOL FUMARATE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE BISOPROLOL FUMARATE; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG and 6.25MG
075672/003 BISOPROLOL FUMARATE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE BISOPROLOL FUMARATE; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG and 6.25MG
075686/001 BISOPROLOL FUMARATE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE BISOPROLOL FUMARATE; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG and 6.25MG
075686/003 BISOPROLOL FUMARATE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE BISOPROLOL FUMARATE; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG and 6.25MG
075768/001 BISOPROLOL FUMARATE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE BISOPROLOL FUMARATE; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG and 6.25MG
075768/003 BISOPROLOL FUMARATE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE BISOPROLOL FUMARATE; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG and 6.25MG
079106/001 BISOPROLOL FUMARATE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE BISOPROLOL FUMARATE; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG and 6.25MG
079106/003 BISOPROLOL FUMARATE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE BISOPROLOL FUMARATE; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG and 6.25MG

Ask a question

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question as quickly as possible.

Answered questions

Is Ziac (Bisoprolol) an SSRI?
Asked by Yasmin Syvertsen 1 month ago.

Ziac is a combination pill. It contains bisoprolol, a beta-1 specific adrenergic receptor blocker, and hydrochlorthiazide, a thiazide type diuretic. It's not a SSRI. Answered by Nita Warsing 1 month ago.

no,it is 4 hi blood pressure,or chest pains,or abnormal heart rhythm. Answered by Jackie Vosika 1 month ago.


What over the counter medicine to take when taking ziac for high blood pressure medicine?
what over the counter medicine to take for headaches and sinus problems when taking ziac for high blood pressure Asked by Oleta Paciolla 1 month ago.

I would talk to your pharmacist,because with high blood pressure medicine or any thing like that you have to be so careful about what you take!! Answered by Dia Seutter 1 month ago.

Ziac Blood Pressure Medicine Answered by January Redkey 1 month ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Georgianne Gluck 1 month ago.

You have to be very careful of what products you use. Don't use anything with ephedra in it. No sudafed, actifed, and nothing that says "D". I mean no product with the letter "D" after the name, like Robitussin-D. These products have decongestants in them that speed up the heart rate and cause high blood pressure. Your best bet is to go to your local pharmacy and ask your pharmacist what medicine would be appropriate to take so that your blood pressure is not affected. Answered by Erma Spueler 1 month ago.

I was told that if you have high blood pressure you should stick with Robitussin. Call the pharmacist to be sure though please. I have high blood pressure and I can't remember where I heard that. Answered by Dewey Shumard 1 month ago.

Husband and I both have high blood pressure. He is on Verapamil and I am on Lisinipril... Our doc has allowed us to take tylenol and benadryl. ** please as others have said first consult your doc OR ask the pharmacist ** Michele R Answered by Sulema Cal 1 month ago.


I'm taking Lexapro for anxiety and Ziac for blood pressure.. Will alcohol hurt me?
I know I'm not SUPPOSED to, that's printed on the labels. I just wanna make sure I'm not gonna fall out or something. As I said with Lexapro, it didn't have any effects. Just worried, because now it's a combo. Asked by Pamula Kauder 1 month ago.

I'm not sure- but you can always call the hospital, and just ask to speak to a nurse (because you have a question) and they can usually tell you. Answered by Shawnta Herpich 1 month ago.

Drinking is bad for high blood pressure. You should not be drinking more than one drink a day if you blood pressure is over 130/80. Mixing alcohol with prescription drugs is always a risk If you are having trouble resisting the temptation to drink this may be a problem you need to deal with. You might need to attend Rehab or A.A. Talk to your doctor immediatly he will be able to point you in the right direction Good Luck Live life one day at a time. Answered by Rasheeda Schwizer 1 month ago.

You may fall out. You shouldn't mix the booze and blood pressure pills. One reason is that booze messes with your blood pressure not to mention the side effects it will cause. And you deffinatly shouldn't drink on anti-depressants cause alcohol is a depressant. Even though you don't think it effects you it really does. I'M NO DR., but I've witnessed the problems it can cause first hand. Answered by Yoshie Scarpitto 1 month ago.

i think it is bad to drink alcohol while u taking drug so ask Ur doctor to be sure Answered by Catalina Arcangel 1 month ago.


What is making me sun sensitive? Any pharmacist or MD's out there?
I am not drug addicted. I take this medicine for hypertension and tachycardia. Its prescribed by a cardiologist who added the HCTZ when my blood pressure went up borderline after using a beta blocker by itself. Ziac gives you a bigger bang for your buck by putting a small amount of HCTZ in a pill which... Asked by April Walezak 1 month ago.

I am not drug addicted. I take this medicine for hypertension and tachycardia. Its prescribed by a cardiologist who added the HCTZ when my blood pressure went up borderline after using a beta blocker by itself. Ziac gives you a bigger bang for your buck by putting a small amount of HCTZ in a pill which already containes a beta blocker. I walked down the beach for about 40 minutes in South Padre and had the worst sunburn in my life. I have very dark eyes and hair (american indian). I was surprised to get such a sunburn. I never do that until now. Thanks the great answers. I can tell when someone is knowlegable or just blowing hot air. I am a surgical/onco nurse for 13 yrs now. Work in a hospital, but not sure of all the drug side effects. So many claim allergic reactions and just dont get what an allergy is. Answered by Asha Schollmeyer 1 month ago.

The HCTZ (hydrochlorothiazide) in the Ziac is most likely what is causing the sun sensitivity. There are other optons but I don't recommend stopping it because it is the first line therapy for blood pressure. It is the most cost effective, has been used for years, has a great safety profile, and is highly effective for treating blood pressure whether it's used alone or combined with another medication, like bisoprolol (in Ziac). I guess it depends on how fair your skin is and how bad it is affecting you. Definitely talk to your doctor and wear a good sunblock (which everyone should be doing everyday anyways ;) Answered by Wilber Bookhart 1 month ago.

Yes, the drug Ziac causes uv hypersensitivity. Avoid skin products such as benzoyl peroxide and wear a moisturizer with sunscreen in it. Answered by Jinny Gingell 1 month ago.

Check with a doctor ASAP. I am NOT a doctor or pharmacist, but I had a friend take something that made her sun sensitive and she had VERY bad effects by ignoring it/just using sunscreen. My personal advice, stay out of the sun until you get an authoritative answer. bye for now. Answered by Yuko Denard 1 month ago.


Changing meds - Is this dangerous?
I recently (two days ago) started taking Diltiazem, prescribed by a new doctor for high blood pressure. Before that, I was on Ziac for about 5 years (new doctor took me off). Since I started the new meds, I have been having shortness of breath and kind of a feeling of heart palpitations, for about a day now. Is... Asked by Joellen Lebleu 1 month ago.

I recently (two days ago) started taking Diltiazem, prescribed by a new doctor for high blood pressure. Before that, I was on Ziac for about 5 years (new doctor took me off). Since I started the new meds, I have been having shortness of breath and kind of a feeling of heart palpitations, for about a day now. Is this normal after changing meds like this? Answered by Morgan Scribner 1 month ago.

Hi, I am a pharmacist. I wanted to ask you a couple of questions so I can try and help you. First of all - this new doctor - is he/she a Cardiologist (meaning heart doctor)? Second, was your high blood pressure managed well on the Ziac? What range did you usually fall into? (120/80 being the normal range at rest for an adult) Thirdly, just for future reference, any maintanence medication should always be WEANED off - never switched abruptly. Remember your body has been used to Ziac for a while. Switching suddenly to Diltiazem is not a good idea. Also, Ziac is a combination medication (which I am sure you already know). The combination is a Ace Inhibitor with a Diuretic which act on your vascular system as a whole (meaning your arteries and veins). Diltiazem is a Calcium Channel Blocker - acts directly on the calcium channels of your heart muscle. Why the switchover into a completely different class of blood pressure medications? I am curious to know what your blood pressure measurements are. No it is not normal. And I am glad you are astute enough to be able to ask about it. Please feel free to email me if you have other questions. I hope I have given you some insight into your therapy. Please contact your doctor and ask him to re-evaluate your medication, let him know the symptoms you have been experiencing and make sure you let him know that they are causing you discomfort and worry. Answered by Enda Mattie 1 month ago.

It is not normal. You should notify your doctor immediately!!! I This is a serious problem Answered by Shaina Mardirosian 1 month ago.

this is not normal. you should contact your doctor immediately for a medication change. Answered by Douglass Plaisance 1 month ago.

I would call your Dr. and tell him..it sure doesnt sound normal too me. Answered by Karry Kanoy 1 month ago.


What are the common meds for High Blood patients?
and what are their meds that contraindicate one another? Asked by Tawny Veliz 1 month ago.

ziac,(bisoprolol/hctz, maxzide,atenolol,lisinopril and some dr's do a combination to get the bp down to where they want it. i'm sure there are other contraindications but the main ones are drugs like sudafed that raise bp Answered by Petrina Kubica 1 month ago.


If I have high blood pressure can I drink?
I'm 19 I'm on ziac clonidine norvasc aldactone bidil and hctz can I drink alcohol? And what would happen if I drink to much? Asked by Willene Wuerth 1 month ago.

not advised, it may have harmful effect and not at all beneficial. Answered by Stacee Vanderhoof 1 month ago.


Can I donate plasma when taking these medications?
can I donate plasma when taking these medications? ziac (Lowest does for mild hypertension) Levothyroxine (lowest does for mild thyroid) metformin 850mg 2x a day for PCOS Asked by Sol Sergent 1 month ago.

Call 1-800-GIVE-LIFE. They have answers to which drugs are safe or not. Answered by Paul Patwell 1 month ago.

No it a bad idea Answered by Teresita Wingate 1 month ago.


75 y/o female having undiagnosed heart and blood pressure problems - PLEASE HELP!?
I am seeking help for my 75 year old mother who is having heart and blood pressure related "spells" for the past 3 weeks but which have gone undiagnosed by the doctors. Here are the details:• Has been on high blood pressure medications for many, many years without incident (Avalide, Ziac and... Asked by Scarlet Barryman 1 month ago.

I am seeking help for my 75 year old mother who is having heart and blood pressure related "spells" for the past 3 weeks but which have gone undiagnosed by the doctors. Here are the details: • Has been on high blood pressure medications for many, many years without incident (Avalide, Ziac and Norvasc) • Approx 3 weeks ago she started having “spells” where her heart would pound in her head, her face and ears become red and hot, feels nauseous and gets a headache, has ringing in her ears, stomach and chest feel hot, and the hot feeling radiates into both arms but is worse on the left, blood pressure goes WAY up (has been as high as 214/114) • These episodes have woken her up out of a dead sleep usually around 4 or 5am • Has had to call 911 two or three times, and has been transported to the hospital, but they haven’t been able to find any evidence of a heart attack or abnormality • Family doctor put her on a 24 hour holter monitor which showed 9 abnormalities (don’t know what those were), so he sent her to a cardiologist • Cardiologist changed her medications to: Metoprolol Tartrate (25 mg twice a day), and Lisinopril 10 mg once a day, which she’s been on for 2 weeks now • Cardiologist also gave her a holter monitor to wear for a week, but she never had a major spell during that time • D/C’d holter monitor Thursday, and ended up having her worst spell ever this morning. Called 911 and paramedics took her to the hospital. Gave her an aspirin at home, plus 2 nitroglycerine pills, and another in the ambulance on the way to the hospital. The paramedic said she was having some atrial fibrillation on the EKG but this didn’t show at the hospital. The nitroglycerine did help a lot – brought her BP down and helped the other symptoms, but while she was at the hospital, her cardiologist came to see her and said the results of her week-long holter monitor showed no clogged arteries (I didn’t know you could see this on a holter monitor), but since she didn’t have one of these really bad episodes while wearing the monitor, the doctor said he thought she might need to wear one for a month. He also doubled the amount of the two blood pressure meds he has her taking. Since they couldn't find any other problem, however, they sent her home. • In spite of the fact that her meds have been changed and she’s being monitored by a cardiologist, her episodes are getting worse • One other piece of information – she had a stress test in February 2010 that was normal At this point her cardiologist seems to be stumped but something is obviously wrong and I am very, very worried. If someone (preferably a doctor) has any ideas about what may be going on with her, PLEASE let me know. If you aren’t a doctor but have either experienced something like this yourself or with someone you know and think you can help, please share your information too. Thank you so much for your time! Sincerely, Tammy Answered by Malena Benhaim 1 month ago.

There are very few doctors who have time to answer questions on Yahoo Answers. It sounds like your mother is having intermittent atrial fibrillation and her cardiologist is using the Metoprolol to try to prevent this from occurring (this is a heart rate control medication which also lowers blood pressure). They have also probably tested her thyroid function since it can give similar symptoms. Since she had no episodes while wearing the monitor, she needs to follow his recommendation for wearing it for a longer period so that they can catch episodes of whatever rhythm might be occurring. If this is atrial fibrillation, medications may be used to stop this from occurring. She probably also needs another stress test since these episodes are occuring after her last stress test - the test itself may bring on the rhythm disturbance so they could actually she the rhythm occurring. It can take multiple medication changes or dosage adjustments to get rhythm disturbances and elevated blood pressure under control which can require many doctor visits. Both of the dosages you have listed are beginning doses and may need to be increased to control the symptoms. You can go to WebMd.com and type in atrial fibrillation and read up on this condition. You can also type in low sodium, cardiac diet which lists foods that your mother should be avoiding. Salt is one of the offenders for high blood pressure. She needs to keep working with her doctors until she gets to the right medication and dosage that will control her symptoms. Answered by Ignacia Maiocco 1 month ago.

Your mom may need an echo cardiogram to help diagnose her. There are a lot of different arrhythmia's that can cause this. It could be episodes of ventricular tachycardia or supra ventricular tachycardia (most likely cause since the paramedics saw a. fib) the SVT could also be atrial tachycardia which is very common in women, but is usually transient and doesn't often manifest such Extreme symptoms. It sounds like your mom has a lot of cardiac irritability. If she drinks anything with caffeine, make sure she stops. This could be progressing and she may eventually need cardioversion or overdrive pacing. The cardiologist is probably trying to treat conservatively first until the meds no longer work. Finally, it is possibly that some of this is anxiety. Is you mom under a lot of stress right now or does she have a history of emotional problems? I just read the thyroid suggestions. I didn't think about it at first because I'm so cardiac programed as a cardiologist would be too, but your mom should definitely have a thyroid function test done! Answered by Madelyn Aggas 1 month ago.

I am sorry you and she are enduring this.... The episode that occured around 4 or 5 am is highly suggestive of a thyroid disorder. We normally release our thyroid hormone dose at this time endogenously (from our own bodies) I believe your mother should see an internist who is board certified in endocrinology, especially one who focuses on the thyroid gland. He/she can also rule out the other potential disorders such as pheochromocytoma and adrenal dysfunction. She should also be checked for anemias including pernicious anemia. Your cardiologist will know who this is in your region. I agree that this is a significant problem and needs to be managed quickly rather than simply waiting for it to evolve furthur. The runs of atrial fibrillation and hypertension alone predispose to stroke. Meanwhile, your mother must AVOID any foods which cause something we call a catecholamine release, such as chocolate, and * Coffee * Tea * Bananas * Chocolate * Cocoa * Citrus fruits * Vanilla Drugs which trigger a catecholamine release are: # Aminophylline # Caffeine # Chloral hydrate # Clonidine # Disulfiram # Erythromycin # Insulin # Levodopa # Lithium # Methenamine # Methyldopa # Nicotinic acidNicotinic acid (large doses) # Nitroglycerin # Quinidine and others Your endocrinologist may also wish to adjust some meds and add something called a beta blocker. (Something like Atenolol, Inderal, or Timolol tabs.) These appointments should be made asap. Best wishes. Answered by Maren Rosselli 1 month ago.

Click on the link below. If you can get her to do this, it will help her tremendously. It's a shame that she's been on medications for so many years when medications do nothing but stabilize her condition and drain her bank account (or that of her insurance company). Medications aren't designed to cure anything - they're designed to do exactly what they've done for your grandmother all these years - just keep the numbers within an acceptable range. In order to solve the problem, you need to address it at the source - and the cause of high blood pressure is dehydration. This should come as no surprise when you realize that after the age of 25 our recognition of thirst begins to diminish, and by the time we reach your grandmother's age, we drink practically no water at all. Clicking on the link, you'll see where the "treatment" involves increasing her salt intake. Don't be alarmed at this. Contrary to what doctors tell you, salt does not cause high blood pressure. Click on the second link to read a few facts about salt. Doctors don't recognize dehydration as the cause of health problems unless they can charge $385 to prevent / treat it in the ER. This is why they've allowed your grandmother to go this long without so much as asking about her water intake - there's no profit in prescribing water. When you click on the first link, be sure to read everything thoroughly. I think there's something that explains adjusting the treatment for children and the elderly. Also, do NOT stop any medications without your doctor's approval. Answered by Orval Ott 1 month ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Clifford Lukehart 1 month ago.

At the risk of getting lost in the sea information you have been given, I hope that you take the time to check out what ProArgi-9 could do for your mom. It contains an amino acid that produces a nitric oxide affect in the blood stream. I have many testimonials from people with some similar issues and symptom who have found complete relief AND reduced or eliminated their prescriptions drugs. Your mom is still young and she should be filled with energy and I truly believe that ProArgi-9 can get that back for her. The product is guarateed and does not interfere with any medications. I have included links to check out below. I hope this info is helpful. Answered by Shakira Leuy 1 month ago.

what you describe sounds like a phenomenon called "thyroid storm" the metabolism, heart rate and BP shoot up due to a sudden release of thyroid hormones causing massive hyperthyroidism it can be due to a malfunctioning pituitary gland or the thyroid itself, easy to check thyroid hormone levels, the fact that she gets very hot is also an indication, heavy sweating is also common Answered by Jess Escobeo 1 month ago.

stop drinking, or eating anything with caffine in it. herb tea's are the worst. keep a record of all foods, and if this happens. I had the vary same problems, it was a new herb tea I was given from a friend, on the 3rd day of drinking it, I thought I was going crazy and going to die. Answered by Shawnda Cordel 1 month ago.


My wife's feet and lower legs are severely swollen- why?
My wife is obese. She's taking several different medications right now. She has hypertension and Bipolar depression. She is taking Abilify, Ziac, Effexor, Lamictal, Congentin (sp?), and perhaps one other medication. In the past week, her feet and legs have really swollen up badly. I am worried about her. What... Asked by Ron Derosia 1 month ago.

My wife is obese. She's taking several different medications right now. She has hypertension and Bipolar depression. She is taking Abilify, Ziac, Effexor, Lamictal, Congentin (sp?), and perhaps one other medication. In the past week, her feet and legs have really swollen up badly. I am worried about her. What may be causing this? Is she not drinking enough water/fluids? Does it have something to do with her heart? Is it the high blood pressure? Please help- any info would be appreciated. Answered by Harriette Pagaduan 1 month ago.

MG, I understand your concern, and your wife *does* need to see her doctor, but I don't think you have anything to fear. There are numerous reasons for swelling in the extremities. As one immediately thinks "brain tumor" when plagued with constant headaches, it's also pretty easy to jump on the heart failure bandwagon should the extremities swell... I doubt you need to go there, MG. The simplest solution is usually correct, so I'd guess her blood pressure meds need adjusted. Beyond that, it could be her meds interacting adversely with each other. There are other, more concerning reasons for the swelling, but these are the first two which her doctor will check. Should everything prove to be OK in these areas, he will then start looking for things such as peripheral arterial disease and heart failure, but testing for these come after all other avenues have been exhausted. Usually. If your wife has no other symptoms or complaints, it's going to be blood pressure or medication related. Make an appointment with your wife's doctor. Have her drink plenty of fluids to flush excess salts out of her body, but don't allow her to guzzle water by the gallon. Normal drinking, MG. Have her lie prone and elevate her feet for 10 minutes every hour to help relieve the swelling and discomfort. When she is seated, have her keep those feet elevated. If she cannot do that, then she needs to be moving her feet around, contracting the muscles in her calves, etc... This will help to keep blood flowing and water from pooling in her feet and ankles. Both of you are to quit worrying, OK? My feet are constantly swollen, it's an RA/medication sorta thing... I know where every bathroom is located in Western Pennsylvania, LOL!.. So I feel for your wife. She'll be fine. Hugs to both of you. (((((MG and wife))))) Answered by Madelyn Beiter 1 month ago.

What you're experiencing is edema — that's when excess fluid collects in your tissue. It's normal to have a certain amount of swelling during pregnancy because you're retaining more water. Changes in your blood chemistry also cause some fluid to shift into your tissue. In addition, your growing uterus puts pressure on your pelvic veins and your vena cava (the large vein on the right side of the body that carries blood from your lower limbs back to the heart). The pressure slows the return of blood from your legs, causing it to pool, which forces fluid from your veins into the tissues of your feet and ankles. Edema is most often an issue during the third trimester, particularly at the end of the day. It may be worse during the summer. You can help relieve the increased pressure on your veins by lying on your side. Since the vena cava is on the right side of your body, left-sided rest works best. After you have your baby, the swelling will disappear fairly rapidly as your body eliminates the excess fluid. You may find yourself urinating frequently and sweating a lot in the first days after childbirth. Call your midwife or doctor if you notice swelling in your face or puffiness around your eyes, more than slight swelling of your hands, or excessive or sudden swelling of your feet or ankles. This could be a sign of preeclampsia, a serious condition. Also call your caregiver if you notice that one leg is significantly more swollen than the other, especially if you have any pain or tenderness in your calf or thigh Answered by Errol Papka 1 month ago.

I am sorry to hear about all your troubles. Be strong You know what? a number of things can cause someone's legs to swell. She need to go see a Doctor BUT the reason I decided to answer to this question was because I was amazed by the number of medications she is on. I am a pharmaceutical scientist - though I make new drugs for a living, it is only rarely that you will see me reaching for one. Drugs are good but should be seen as the last resort - not many share my point of view but it is the way I am sure. She is on too many things. Her current problem could be the result of side effects of all these drugs. I doubt it is hypertension causing that sort of problem - it is mostly asymptomatic Maybe you should try some other type of therapy Answered by Kaye Frericks 1 month ago.

I am not a doctor, and I encourage you to consult one for your peace of mind. It could be one of the side effects of the meds she takes is causing the edema. It could also be excess sodium intake coupled with too little fluids. And it could be circulation issues. I pray she feels better soon. edit: Red Queen has a great suggestion that your wife elevate her feet above heart level for half an hour to an hour. A couple of pillows should do it. I do pray that helps. Answered by Clyde Bakios 1 month ago.


Related

Browse by letter
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

© Medications.li 2015-2017 - Blog - All rights reserved