Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 017386/001.

Names and composition

"ZAROXOLYN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of METOLAZONE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017386/001 ZAROXOLYN METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
017386/002 ZAROXOLYN METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
017386/003 ZAROXOLYN METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017386/001 ZAROXOLYN METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
017386/002 ZAROXOLYN METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
017386/003 ZAROXOLYN METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
018535/001 DIULO METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
018535/002 DIULO METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
018535/003 DIULO METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
019532/001 MYKROX METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 0.5MG
075543/003 METOLAZONE METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
076466/001 METOLAZONE METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
076466/002 METOLAZONE METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
076482/001 METOLAZONE METOLAZONE TABLET/ ORAL 10MG
076482/002 METOLAZONE METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
076600/001 METOLAZONE METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
076698/001 METOLAZONE METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
076698/002 METOLAZONE METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
076698/003 METOLAZONE METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
076732/001 METOLAZONE METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
076833/001 METOLAZONE METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
076891/001 METOLAZONE METOLAZONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG

Ask a doctor

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

Is Bumex or Zaroxolyn stronger?
My doctor said that Zaroxolyn is much stronger than Bumex. However, when I try to look up the answer on the internet every site says that Bumex is stronger. Is Zaroxolyn a new drug? That would explain articles saying the Bumex is stronger. If possible would you please give me the web site address of where you... Asked by Yessenia Sweere 1 year ago.

My doctor said that Zaroxolyn is much stronger than Bumex. However, when I try to look up the answer on the internet every site says that Bumex is stronger. Is Zaroxolyn a new drug? That would explain articles saying the Bumex is stronger. If possible would you please give me the web site address of where you found he information? I sure do appreciate your help. Thanks. Answered by Isabella Bagoyo 1 year ago.

Bumex is a loop diuretic while Zaroxolyn is a thiazide-like diuretic. Loop diuretics such as Bumex and Lasix are much more powerful then thiazide diuretics. Bumex and Lasix are what you use for patients in congestive heart failure, liver disease, profound fluid overload. Zaroxolyn and HCTZ just won't do much in those situations. Answered by Aleshia Altidor 1 year ago.


How do you pronounce demadex, lasix and bumex?
how do you pronounce hydrodiuril, lozol, zaroxolyn, diuril, aldactone, dyazide??? Asked by Dominque Hug 1 year ago.

dem uh dex lay six buu mex' hydro die ur il die ur il zuh rox e lyn al daac tone die uh zide Answered by Jeremiah Taglauer 1 year ago.


Which thiazide diuretics and related diuretics are the most prescribed??? i am a pharmacy tech student...?
I know that HCTZ is prescribed a lot... But are diuril, Lozol and zaroxolyn prescribed a lot???? Asked by Fernando Levell 1 year ago.

Most often in our clinic pt's are on Lasix, HCTZ,or spironolactone. Or a combination of some sorts. Answered by Gerardo Eichelmann 1 year ago.

I know that dyazide is often prescribed Answered by Nancee Woodly 1 year ago.


Can high dose diuretics cause severe muscle cramps, low iron and low iron saturation?
I am a 38 year old female with multiple health problems. I am on 200mg of Lasix, Spironolactone, Zaroxolyn and Hydroclorothiazide (those are only the diuretics). That being said, here is/are my question(s). Can all of those cause muscle cramping? Towards the late afternoon and all thru the night, my hands and feet... Asked by Jamie Twitchell 1 year ago.

I am a 38 year old female with multiple health problems. I am on 200mg of Lasix, Spironolactone, Zaroxolyn and Hydroclorothiazide (those are only the diuretics). That being said, here is/are my question(s). Can all of those cause muscle cramping? Towards the late afternoon and all thru the night, my hands and feet cramp so bad that I'm in tears. Other muscles cramp as well, but not nearly as bad. My dilemma is that without the diuretics, I puff up like a blowfish (no one seems to know why). Are there any alternatives? Also, can all of the medications above cause Low Iron and Low Iron Saturation? Answered by Tamisha Unck 1 year ago.

All those diuretics (with the exception of spironolactone) have the potential to cause hypokalemia (low blood potassium), by making the kidneys flush out potassium ions. This could explain the muscle cramps you've been experiencing. You should contact your doctor without delay and report this to him/her. Hypokalemia is potentially dangerous. I don't know if diuretics affect iron levels. I can't think of any reason that they would, though. Answered by Timothy Vicars 1 year ago.

uh, time to get doctors who know what they're doing. Answered by Verna Vandale 1 year ago.


CHF Patient NOT on ACE Inhibitor?
I'm not sure the 1st response answered my question. I looked up the medications and know what they are but none are ACE inhibitors. Asked by Farrah Allbee 1 year ago.

My 62 year old mother is on the following medications to treat CHF: Torsemide Metolazone Spironolactone Metoprolol Coreg Digoxin Coumadin She is also a diabetic currently on Humalog & Lantus. From my research, it does not appear that any of these medications are ACE Inhibitors which I've read are very good at treating CHF. Can someone tell me why the doctor doesn't have her on one of those? Her current infraction is about 10-15% and a couple of weeks ago the doctor told me that it won't be much longer until she passes. I just am concerned that maybe his treatment of her is not as good as it could be. Any help would be appreciated. Thank You! Cindy Answered by Marvis Faerber 1 year ago.

Torasemide (rINN) or torsemide (USAN) is a pyridine-sulfonyl urea type loop diuretic mainly used in the management of edema associated with congestive heart failure. It is also used at low doses for the management of hypertension. It is marketed under the brand name Demadex. Metolazone is a thiazide diuretic (or, rather, a thiazide-like diuretic because it acts similarly to the thiazides but does not contain the benzothiadiazine molecular structure) marketed under the brand names Zaroxolyn and Mykrox. It is primarily used to treat congestive heart failure and high blood pressure. Spironolactone (marketed under the trade names Aldactone, Novo-Spiroton, Aldactazide, Spiractin, Spirotone, Verospiron or Berlactone) is a diuretic and is used as an antiandrogen. It is a synthetic 17-lactone drug that is a renal competitive aldosterone antagonist in a class of pharmaceuticals called potassium-sparing diuretics, used primarily to treat heart failure, ascites in patients with liver disease, low-renin hypertension, hypokalemia, and Conn's syndrome as well as high blood pressure. Metoprolol is a selective β1 receptor blocker used in treatment of several diseases of the cardiovascular system, especially hypertension Carvedilol is a non-selective beta blocker/alpha-1 blocker indicated in the treatment of mild to moderate congestive heart failure (CHF). It is marketed under various trade names including Coreg (GSK), Dilatrend (Roche), Eucardic (Roche), and Carloc (Cipla) as a generic drug (as of September 5, 2007 in the U.S.).[1], and as a controlled-release formulation, marketed in the US as Coreg CR (GSK). Digoxin (INN) (pronounced /dɨˈdʒɒksɨn/[1]), also known as digitalis, is a purified cardiac glycoside extracted from the foxglove plant, Digitalis lanata.[2] Its corresponding aglycone is digoxigenin, and its acetyl derivative is acetyldigoxin. Digoxin is widely used in the treatment of various heart conditions, namely atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter and sometimes heart failure that cannot be controlled by other medication Warfarin (also known under the brand names Coumadin, Jantoven, Marevan, and Waran) is an anticoagulant. Please see the web page for more details on adverse effects of Angiotensi converting enzime inhibitors. Consult your doctor. Answered by Willetta Pressimone 1 year ago.

The first answerer gives very detailed answers. Often too detailed. By 'infarction' do you mean ejection fraction? If so, 10-15 % is quite low. If she isn't seeing one now, she needs a good cardiologist. To answer your question, she SHOULD be on an ACE inhibitor. The only reason not to is either an allergy OR renal failure. I'm surprised by the metoprolol & Coreg. They are both in the same class of drugs. There's no benefit to doing both. I'd stick with as much Coreg as she can handle. Good luck. Answered by Liane Weith 1 year ago.

About 12-15 years ago these drugs were only initiated in hospital by specialists. These days however they are routinely used in the community by GPs. Answered by Echo Fulgham 1 year ago.


What is a common hypertension medication?
Asked by Bulah Chaplin 1 year ago.

Diuretics ("water pills") examples: Acetazolamide (Diamox®) Furosemide (Lasix®) Indapamide (Lozol®) Metolazone (Zaroxolyn®) Spirnolactone (Aldactone®) Torsemide (Demadex®) Triamterene (Dyrenium®) Beta blockers examples: Atenolol (Tenormin®) Bisoprolol (Zebeta®) Carvedilol (Coreg®) Metoprolol (iLopressor®, Toprol SL®) Timolol (Blockadren®) Calcium channel blockers examples: Amlodipine (Norvasc®) Felodipine (Plendil®) Idradipine (DynaCirc®) Nicardipine (Cardene®) Nisoldipine (Sular®) ACE inhibitors examples: Benazepril (Lotensin®) Captopril (Capoten®) Enalapril (Vasotec®) Fosinopril (Monopril®) Lisinopril (Prinivil®, Zestril®) Quinapril (Accupril®) Ramipril (Altace®) Trandolapril (Mavik®) Angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARBs) examples: Candesartan (Atacand®) Irbesartin (Avapro®) Losartin (Cozaar®) Telmisartin (Micardis®) Valsartan (Diovan®) Answered by Tomi Girardot 1 year ago.

A very common hypertension medicine is hydrochlorathiazide(HCTZ). It's a diuertic. It's what I've had to take for the last 6 months. It's well tolerated. Others are; Norvasc, Lopressor, Cozaar, and the list goes on and on. Yes, like all medications, they have side effects. Natural medicines also have side effects or do nothing at all. HCTZ-diuretic Norvasc-calcium channel blocker Cozaar-ACE inhibitor are all very well tolerated. Their cautions and side effects are well known, and they have been around forever. Lopressor is a beta blocker. I wouldn't take those as first line treatment unless a few other conditions were being address. Beta blockers have well established uses, but the side effects can be a bit more than some other groups of hypertension medications. Answered by Kelli Dingfelder 1 year ago.


Pharmacology question please help?
I'm taking a pharmacology class and the question is about a 76 year old woman currently taking quite a few medications (I'll list them below). I have to figure out which 2 organs in this patient's body might be functioning at a decreased level and so prolong the effect of these drugs. If anyone can tell... Asked by Thanh Cordona 1 year ago.

I'm taking a pharmacology class and the question is about a 76 year old woman currently taking quite a few medications (I'll list them below). I have to figure out which 2 organs in this patient's body might be functioning at a decreased level and so prolong the effect of these drugs. If anyone can tell me the 2 different organs that would be great! 10 points for best answer. the drugs the patient has been prescribed: Accupril Actos aspirin Catapres-TTS-1 B12 injections Lasix Glucotrol XL Humulin N K-Dur Lanoxin lorazepam Metamucil Prozac Zantac Risperdal Serevent Synthroid Celebrex Zaroxolyn Ambien Levaquin I figured the answer would be the heart and the pancreas but I am not sure. Answered by Parker Britain 1 year ago.

Liver and kidneys. Older people can't metabolize or eliminate drugs as fast because the liver and kidneys don't work as well as they used to. Answered by Donya Lipovsky 1 year ago.


Bipolar and meds combo?
What other meds combos are apart from old stand by lithium? Asked by Shanon Stamatopoulos 1 year ago.

you don't need combos for bipolar disorder because if you have one...it doesn't work, the dosage can be upped and it'll end up working. Lithium is pretty dangerous considering most medications can affect you and make the lithium not work... * acetazolamide (Diamox); * aminophylline (Truphylline) or theophylline (Elixophyllin, Respbid, Theo-Bid, Theo-Dur, Uniphyl); * sodium bicarbonate (Alka-Seltzer, Bicitra, Polycitra, or baking soda home remedy antacid); * carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); * fluoxetine (Prozac); * metronidazole (Flagyl); * potassium iodide thyroid medication (Pima); * an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik); * a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Tiazac, Cartia, Cardizem) or verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan); * a diuretic (water pill) such as amiloride (Midamor, Moduretic), bumetanide (Bumex), chlorthalidone (Hygroton, Thalitone), ethacrynic acid (Edecrin), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Hyzaar, Vasoretic,Zestoretic), indapamide (Lozol), metolazone (Mykrox, Zaroxolyn), spironolactone (Aldactazide, Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium, Maxzide, Dyazide), torsemide (Demadex), and others; * medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, such as haloperidol (Haldol), aripiprazole (Abilify), chlorpromazine (Thorazine), clozapine (Clozaril, Fazaclo), olanzapine (Zyprexa), quetiapine (Seroquel), pimozide (Orap), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon); or * celecoxib (Celebrex) or an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), diflunisal (Dolobid), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), ketorolac (Toradol), mefenamic acid (Ponstel), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. that's all that you couldn't take with Lithium. plus, it's recommended to have your blood drawn every so often while on it. and it causes weight gain....yeah, not good. BUT. Lamictal is probably the newest drug on the market for BP. i take it and have been for 2 years now since i was diagnosed with type II bipolar disorder....it's a 5 week process, but it's worth the wait. i think it's a miracle drug and doesn't cause all the side effects other drugs have. in rare cases a body rash can happen, to some people. but even with that, it's not even life threatening. i've only had to up my dosage from 100mg [stayed at that for a year and a half] to 150mg. and now...after my struggles with BP for all of high school...i'm a senior and happy 85% of the time. to the point where people wouldn't even figure somethings wrong with me. so my advice...talk to your doc about switching Lamictal. it doesn't cause weight gain. in my experience, along with my adderall i lost the 30 pounds i gained when i was depressed. back at 160 at 6'2'. research the drug...really it's probably the best. i asked my psych why he didn't put me on lithium, and told me that even though lithium is the most popular drug, he's found in that nearly 2/3 of his bipolar patients of his patients [who was put on that at first or other mood stabilizers didn't work] since the drug came out has worked very well for them. Answered by Jenae Chessor 1 year ago.

Lithium, is by far the best for True Bipolar. You must get your blood tests regular to check your lithium levels, but it is known to work the best. My son took this for many years and he did the best on it. He now refuses and his life is a mess because of it. Answered by Seymour Ramseur 1 year ago.

For mood stabilizers, there is Depakote, Topamax, Lamitcal, Abilify... There are more, can't think of them all. Anti-depressants, Prozac, Zoloft, Effexor, Wellbutrin, Cymbalta, Lexapro, etc etc. There are also mixes like Symbyax, which is Prozac with and antipsychotic. There are a whole bunch of things... Answered by Marty Zanter 1 year ago.

There are more choice's in bi-polar meds now, like, depecote, seroquel, limictal, closeril and a host of others, only your health care provider can accurately know which combinations are safe and effective for you, the best to you, Mercee. Answered by Noel Frusciante 1 year ago.

Oh damn, please ask a doctor or pharmacist on this one. Do not trust Yahoo Answers, or anyone online for that matter, on this question. It's a really bad idea to mix similar medications, usually. Answered by Regan Dobson 1 year ago.

i take a whole bevy of medication- lithium, lamictal, paxil and wellbutrin........some sleepers if needed.....usually trazadone....... Answered by Germaine Redinbo 1 year ago.


How do i know i have edema?
what are some symptoms of edema? Asked by Margarete Spindle 1 year ago.

Abnormal accumulation of fluid beneath the skin is known as edema. This leads to a puffy appearance, often to a limb, most commonly a leg. SYMPTOM: People with edema may notice that a ring on their finger feels tighter than in the past, or they might have difficulty in putting on shoes, especially toward the end of the day. They may also notice a puffiness of the face around the eyes, or in the feet, ankles, and legs. When edema is present, pressure on the skin, such as from the elastic band on socks, may leave an indentation that is slow to disappear. Edema of the abdomen, called ascites, may be a sign of serious underlying disease and must be immediately evaluated by a doctor. TREATMENT: Over the counter diuretics containing ammonium chloride and caffeine (Aqua-Ban®) may be used to relieve symptoms related to edema or water retention when taken five to six days before menses. More severe edematous conditions require medical attention. Treatment of edema with prescription medications is limited to the use of diuretics, commonly referred to as “water pills.” Agents often used include the thiazide diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide (HydroDIURIL®), indapamide (Lozol®), and metolazone (Zaroxolyn®); loop diuretics including furosemide (Lasix®), bumetanide (Bumex®), and torsemide (Demadex®); and potassium-sparing diuretics, such as spironolactone (Aldactone®), triamterene (Dyazide®, Maxzide®), and amiloride (Midamor®). Commonly, treatment consists of managing the underlying condition, which may include inadequate nutrition; liver, heart, and kidney disease; or obstruction of blood or lymph flow. In some cases, a salt-restricted diet may be recommended. Dietary changes that may be helpful for edema: High salt intake should be avoided, as it tends to lead to water retention and may worsen edema in some people. A controlled trial found that a low-salt diet (less than 2,100 mg sodium per day) resulted in reduced water retention after two months in a group of women with unexplained edema. NUTRITION SUPPLEMENT THAT WILL HELP YOU: Several double-blind trials2 3 4 5 have found that 400 mg per day of coumarin, a flavonoid found in a variety of herbs, can improve many types of edema, including lymphedema after surgery. However, a large double-blind trial detected no benefit using 200 mg coumarin twice daily for six months in women who had arm edema after mastectomy (surgical breast removal).6 (Coumarin should not be confused with the anticlotting drug Coumadin®.) A group of semi-synthetic flavonoids, known as hydroxyethylrutosides are also beneficial for some types of edema.7 One double-blind trial found that 2 grams per day of hydroxyethylrutosides reduced ankle and foot edema in people with venous disorders after four weeks.8 Another double-blind trial found that 3 grams per day of hydroxyethylrutosides significantly reduced lymphedema of the arm or leg and lessened the associated uncomfortable symptoms.9 A combination of the flavonoids diosmin (900 mg per day) and hesperidin (100 mg per day) has been investigated for the treatment of a variety of venous circulation disorders.10 However, in a double-blind trial, this combination was not effective for lymphedema caused by breast cancer treatments.11 In a preliminary study, individuals with lymphedema of the arm or head-and-neck region were treated with approximately 230 mcg of selenium per day, in the form of sodium selenite, for four to six weeks. A quality-of-life assessment showed an improvement of 59%, and the circumference of the edematous arm was reduced in 10 of 12 cases.12 Because coumarin, hydroxyethylrutosides, and diosmin are not widely available in the United States, other flavonoids, such as quercetin, rutin, or anthocyanosides (from bilberry), have been substituted by doctors in an attempt to obtain similar benefits. The effect of these other flavonoids against edema has not been well studied. Also, optimal amounts are not known. However, in one study, quercetin in amounts of 30–50 mg per day corrected abnormal capillary permeability (leakiness),13 an effect that might improve edema. A similar effect has been reported with rutin at 20 mg three times per day.14 Doctors often recommend 80–160 mg of a standardized extract of bilberry, three times per day. Whereas vitamin B6 is sometimes recommended for reducing edema, no research has investigated its effectiveness. HOPE IT WILL HELP YOU Answered by Eldridge Menasco 1 year ago.


Is Bumex or Zaroxolyn stronger?
My doctor said that Zaroxolyn is much stronger than Bumex. However, when I try to look up the answer on the internet every site says that Bumex is stronger. Is Zaroxolyn a new drug? That would explain articles saying the Bumex is stronger. If possible would you please give me the web site address of where you... Asked by Nettie Meyerowitz 1 year ago.

My doctor said that Zaroxolyn is much stronger than Bumex. However, when I try to look up the answer on the internet every site says that Bumex is stronger. Is Zaroxolyn a new drug? That would explain articles saying the Bumex is stronger. If possible would you please give me the web site address of where you found he information? I sure do appreciate your help. Thanks. Answered by Lala Muhtaseb 1 year ago.

Bumex is a loop diuretic while Zaroxolyn is a thiazide-like diuretic. Loop diuretics such as Bumex and Lasix are much more powerful then thiazide diuretics. Bumex and Lasix are what you use for patients in congestive heart failure, liver disease, profound fluid overload. Zaroxolyn and HCTZ just won't do much in those situations. Answered by Geraldo Sundborg 1 year ago.


How do you pronounce demadex, lasix and bumex?
how do you pronounce hydrodiuril, lozol, zaroxolyn, diuril, aldactone, dyazide??? Asked by Shyla Tankxley 1 year ago.

dem uh dex lay six buu mex' hydro die ur il die ur il zuh rox e lyn al daac tone die uh zide Answered by Devin Book 1 year ago.


Which thiazide diuretics and related diuretics are the most prescribed??? i am a pharmacy tech student...?
I know that HCTZ is prescribed a lot... But are diuril, Lozol and zaroxolyn prescribed a lot???? Asked by Joann Voncannon 1 year ago.

Most often in our clinic pt's are on Lasix, HCTZ,or spironolactone. Or a combination of some sorts. Answered by Rolland Polhemus 1 year ago.

I know that dyazide is often prescribed Answered by Dewayne Zysett 1 year ago.


Can high dose diuretics cause severe muscle cramps, low iron and low iron saturation?
I am a 38 year old female with multiple health problems. I am on 200mg of Lasix, Spironolactone, Zaroxolyn and Hydroclorothiazide (those are only the diuretics). That being said, here is/are my question(s). Can all of those cause muscle cramping? Towards the late afternoon and all thru the night, my hands and feet... Asked by Tawnya Kavanah 1 year ago.

I am a 38 year old female with multiple health problems. I am on 200mg of Lasix, Spironolactone, Zaroxolyn and Hydroclorothiazide (those are only the diuretics). That being said, here is/are my question(s). Can all of those cause muscle cramping? Towards the late afternoon and all thru the night, my hands and feet cramp so bad that I'm in tears. Other muscles cramp as well, but not nearly as bad. My dilemma is that without the diuretics, I puff up like a blowfish (no one seems to know why). Are there any alternatives? Also, can all of the medications above cause Low Iron and Low Iron Saturation? Answered by Jae Korenic 1 year ago.

All those diuretics (with the exception of spironolactone) have the potential to cause hypokalemia (low blood potassium), by making the kidneys flush out potassium ions. This could explain the muscle cramps you've been experiencing. You should contact your doctor without delay and report this to him/her. Hypokalemia is potentially dangerous. I don't know if diuretics affect iron levels. I can't think of any reason that they would, though. Answered by Nina Sierzenga 1 year ago.

uh, time to get doctors who know what they're doing. Answered by Nanette Loyd 1 year ago.


CHF Patient NOT on ACE Inhibitor?
I'm not sure the 1st response answered my question. I looked up the medications and know what they are but none are ACE inhibitors. Asked by Ron Giang 1 year ago.

My 62 year old mother is on the following medications to treat CHF: Torsemide Metolazone Spironolactone Metoprolol Coreg Digoxin Coumadin She is also a diabetic currently on Humalog & Lantus. From my research, it does not appear that any of these medications are ACE Inhibitors which I've read are very good at treating CHF. Can someone tell me why the doctor doesn't have her on one of those? Her current infraction is about 10-15% and a couple of weeks ago the doctor told me that it won't be much longer until she passes. I just am concerned that maybe his treatment of her is not as good as it could be. Any help would be appreciated. Thank You! Cindy Answered by Tilda Croteau 1 year ago.

Torasemide (rINN) or torsemide (USAN) is a pyridine-sulfonyl urea type loop diuretic mainly used in the management of edema associated with congestive heart failure. It is also used at low doses for the management of hypertension. It is marketed under the brand name Demadex. Metolazone is a thiazide diuretic (or, rather, a thiazide-like diuretic because it acts similarly to the thiazides but does not contain the benzothiadiazine molecular structure) marketed under the brand names Zaroxolyn and Mykrox. It is primarily used to treat congestive heart failure and high blood pressure. Spironolactone (marketed under the trade names Aldactone, Novo-Spiroton, Aldactazide, Spiractin, Spirotone, Verospiron or Berlactone) is a diuretic and is used as an antiandrogen. It is a synthetic 17-lactone drug that is a renal competitive aldosterone antagonist in a class of pharmaceuticals called potassium-sparing diuretics, used primarily to treat heart failure, ascites in patients with liver disease, low-renin hypertension, hypokalemia, and Conn's syndrome as well as high blood pressure. Metoprolol is a selective β1 receptor blocker used in treatment of several diseases of the cardiovascular system, especially hypertension Carvedilol is a non-selective beta blocker/alpha-1 blocker indicated in the treatment of mild to moderate congestive heart failure (CHF). It is marketed under various trade names including Coreg (GSK), Dilatrend (Roche), Eucardic (Roche), and Carloc (Cipla) as a generic drug (as of September 5, 2007 in the U.S.).[1], and as a controlled-release formulation, marketed in the US as Coreg CR (GSK). Digoxin (INN) (pronounced /dɨˈdʒɒksɨn/[1]), also known as digitalis, is a purified cardiac glycoside extracted from the foxglove plant, Digitalis lanata.[2] Its corresponding aglycone is digoxigenin, and its acetyl derivative is acetyldigoxin. Digoxin is widely used in the treatment of various heart conditions, namely atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter and sometimes heart failure that cannot be controlled by other medication Warfarin (also known under the brand names Coumadin, Jantoven, Marevan, and Waran) is an anticoagulant. Please see the web page for more details on adverse effects of Angiotensi converting enzime inhibitors. Consult your doctor. Answered by Seth Izumi 1 year ago.

The first answerer gives very detailed answers. Often too detailed. By 'infarction' do you mean ejection fraction? If so, 10-15 % is quite low. If she isn't seeing one now, she needs a good cardiologist. To answer your question, she SHOULD be on an ACE inhibitor. The only reason not to is either an allergy OR renal failure. I'm surprised by the metoprolol & Coreg. They are both in the same class of drugs. There's no benefit to doing both. I'd stick with as much Coreg as she can handle. Good luck. Answered by Brittany Flook 1 year ago.

About 12-15 years ago these drugs were only initiated in hospital by specialists. These days however they are routinely used in the community by GPs. Answered by Genny Boldrin 1 year ago.


What is a common hypertension medication?
Asked by Christiana Trubey 1 year ago.

Diuretics ("water pills") examples: Acetazolamide (Diamox®) Furosemide (Lasix®) Indapamide (Lozol®) Metolazone (Zaroxolyn®) Spirnolactone (Aldactone®) Torsemide (Demadex®) Triamterene (Dyrenium®) Beta blockers examples: Atenolol (Tenormin®) Bisoprolol (Zebeta®) Carvedilol (Coreg®) Metoprolol (iLopressor®, Toprol SL®) Timolol (Blockadren®) Calcium channel blockers examples: Amlodipine (Norvasc®) Felodipine (Plendil®) Idradipine (DynaCirc®) Nicardipine (Cardene®) Nisoldipine (Sular®) ACE inhibitors examples: Benazepril (Lotensin®) Captopril (Capoten®) Enalapril (Vasotec®) Fosinopril (Monopril®) Lisinopril (Prinivil®, Zestril®) Quinapril (Accupril®) Ramipril (Altace®) Trandolapril (Mavik®) Angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARBs) examples: Candesartan (Atacand®) Irbesartin (Avapro®) Losartin (Cozaar®) Telmisartin (Micardis®) Valsartan (Diovan®) Answered by Ariel Sandefur 1 year ago.

A very common hypertension medicine is hydrochlorathiazide(HCTZ). It's a diuertic. It's what I've had to take for the last 6 months. It's well tolerated. Others are; Norvasc, Lopressor, Cozaar, and the list goes on and on. Yes, like all medications, they have side effects. Natural medicines also have side effects or do nothing at all. HCTZ-diuretic Norvasc-calcium channel blocker Cozaar-ACE inhibitor are all very well tolerated. Their cautions and side effects are well known, and they have been around forever. Lopressor is a beta blocker. I wouldn't take those as first line treatment unless a few other conditions were being address. Beta blockers have well established uses, but the side effects can be a bit more than some other groups of hypertension medications. Answered by Ronnie Crossland 1 year ago.


Pharmacology question please help?
I'm taking a pharmacology class and the question is about a 76 year old woman currently taking quite a few medications (I'll list them below). I have to figure out which 2 organs in this patient's body might be functioning at a decreased level and so prolong the effect of these drugs. If anyone can tell... Asked by Erika Karman 1 year ago.

I'm taking a pharmacology class and the question is about a 76 year old woman currently taking quite a few medications (I'll list them below). I have to figure out which 2 organs in this patient's body might be functioning at a decreased level and so prolong the effect of these drugs. If anyone can tell me the 2 different organs that would be great! 10 points for best answer. the drugs the patient has been prescribed: Accupril Actos aspirin Catapres-TTS-1 B12 injections Lasix Glucotrol XL Humulin N K-Dur Lanoxin lorazepam Metamucil Prozac Zantac Risperdal Serevent Synthroid Celebrex Zaroxolyn Ambien Levaquin I figured the answer would be the heart and the pancreas but I am not sure. Answered by Ivana Morck 1 year ago.

Liver and kidneys. Older people can't metabolize or eliminate drugs as fast because the liver and kidneys don't work as well as they used to. Answered by Dodie Liles 1 year ago.


Bipolar and meds combo?
What other meds combos are apart from old stand by lithium? Asked by Esmeralda Mangram 1 year ago.

you don't need combos for bipolar disorder because if you have one...it doesn't work, the dosage can be upped and it'll end up working. Lithium is pretty dangerous considering most medications can affect you and make the lithium not work... * acetazolamide (Diamox); * aminophylline (Truphylline) or theophylline (Elixophyllin, Respbid, Theo-Bid, Theo-Dur, Uniphyl); * sodium bicarbonate (Alka-Seltzer, Bicitra, Polycitra, or baking soda home remedy antacid); * carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); * fluoxetine (Prozac); * metronidazole (Flagyl); * potassium iodide thyroid medication (Pima); * an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik); * a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Tiazac, Cartia, Cardizem) or verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan); * a diuretic (water pill) such as amiloride (Midamor, Moduretic), bumetanide (Bumex), chlorthalidone (Hygroton, Thalitone), ethacrynic acid (Edecrin), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Hyzaar, Vasoretic,Zestoretic), indapamide (Lozol), metolazone (Mykrox, Zaroxolyn), spironolactone (Aldactazide, Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium, Maxzide, Dyazide), torsemide (Demadex), and others; * medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, such as haloperidol (Haldol), aripiprazole (Abilify), chlorpromazine (Thorazine), clozapine (Clozaril, Fazaclo), olanzapine (Zyprexa), quetiapine (Seroquel), pimozide (Orap), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon); or * celecoxib (Celebrex) or an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), diflunisal (Dolobid), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), ketorolac (Toradol), mefenamic acid (Ponstel), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. that's all that you couldn't take with Lithium. plus, it's recommended to have your blood drawn every so often while on it. and it causes weight gain....yeah, not good. BUT. Lamictal is probably the newest drug on the market for BP. i take it and have been for 2 years now since i was diagnosed with type II bipolar disorder....it's a 5 week process, but it's worth the wait. i think it's a miracle drug and doesn't cause all the side effects other drugs have. in rare cases a body rash can happen, to some people. but even with that, it's not even life threatening. i've only had to up my dosage from 100mg [stayed at that for a year and a half] to 150mg. and now...after my struggles with BP for all of high school...i'm a senior and happy 85% of the time. to the point where people wouldn't even figure somethings wrong with me. so my advice...talk to your doc about switching Lamictal. it doesn't cause weight gain. in my experience, along with my adderall i lost the 30 pounds i gained when i was depressed. back at 160 at 6'2'. research the drug...really it's probably the best. i asked my psych why he didn't put me on lithium, and told me that even though lithium is the most popular drug, he's found in that nearly 2/3 of his bipolar patients of his patients [who was put on that at first or other mood stabilizers didn't work] since the drug came out has worked very well for them. Answered by Myung Feickert 1 year ago.

Lithium, is by far the best for True Bipolar. You must get your blood tests regular to check your lithium levels, but it is known to work the best. My son took this for many years and he did the best on it. He now refuses and his life is a mess because of it. Answered by Damian Herrud 1 year ago.

For mood stabilizers, there is Depakote, Topamax, Lamitcal, Abilify... There are more, can't think of them all. Anti-depressants, Prozac, Zoloft, Effexor, Wellbutrin, Cymbalta, Lexapro, etc etc. There are also mixes like Symbyax, which is Prozac with and antipsychotic. There are a whole bunch of things... Answered by Lolita Reece 1 year ago.

There are more choice's in bi-polar meds now, like, depecote, seroquel, limictal, closeril and a host of others, only your health care provider can accurately know which combinations are safe and effective for you, the best to you, Mercee. Answered by Mercedez Longden 1 year ago.

Oh damn, please ask a doctor or pharmacist on this one. Do not trust Yahoo Answers, or anyone online for that matter, on this question. It's a really bad idea to mix similar medications, usually. Answered by Porsche Mefferd 1 year ago.

i take a whole bevy of medication- lithium, lamictal, paxil and wellbutrin........some sleepers if needed.....usually trazadone....... Answered by Roberto Hertlein 1 year ago.


How do i know i have edema?
what are some symptoms of edema? Asked by Kenda Deatley 1 year ago.

Abnormal accumulation of fluid beneath the skin is known as edema. This leads to a puffy appearance, often to a limb, most commonly a leg. SYMPTOM: People with edema may notice that a ring on their finger feels tighter than in the past, or they might have difficulty in putting on shoes, especially toward the end of the day. They may also notice a puffiness of the face around the eyes, or in the feet, ankles, and legs. When edema is present, pressure on the skin, such as from the elastic band on socks, may leave an indentation that is slow to disappear. Edema of the abdomen, called ascites, may be a sign of serious underlying disease and must be immediately evaluated by a doctor. TREATMENT: Over the counter diuretics containing ammonium chloride and caffeine (Aqua-Ban®) may be used to relieve symptoms related to edema or water retention when taken five to six days before menses. More severe edematous conditions require medical attention. Treatment of edema with prescription medications is limited to the use of diuretics, commonly referred to as “water pills.” Agents often used include the thiazide diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide (HydroDIURIL®), indapamide (Lozol®), and metolazone (Zaroxolyn®); loop diuretics including furosemide (Lasix®), bumetanide (Bumex®), and torsemide (Demadex®); and potassium-sparing diuretics, such as spironolactone (Aldactone®), triamterene (Dyazide®, Maxzide®), and amiloride (Midamor®). Commonly, treatment consists of managing the underlying condition, which may include inadequate nutrition; liver, heart, and kidney disease; or obstruction of blood or lymph flow. In some cases, a salt-restricted diet may be recommended. Dietary changes that may be helpful for edema: High salt intake should be avoided, as it tends to lead to water retention and may worsen edema in some people. A controlled trial found that a low-salt diet (less than 2,100 mg sodium per day) resulted in reduced water retention after two months in a group of women with unexplained edema. NUTRITION SUPPLEMENT THAT WILL HELP YOU: Several double-blind trials2 3 4 5 have found that 400 mg per day of coumarin, a flavonoid found in a variety of herbs, can improve many types of edema, including lymphedema after surgery. However, a large double-blind trial detected no benefit using 200 mg coumarin twice daily for six months in women who had arm edema after mastectomy (surgical breast removal).6 (Coumarin should not be confused with the anticlotting drug Coumadin®.) A group of semi-synthetic flavonoids, known as hydroxyethylrutosides are also beneficial for some types of edema.7 One double-blind trial found that 2 grams per day of hydroxyethylrutosides reduced ankle and foot edema in people with venous disorders after four weeks.8 Another double-blind trial found that 3 grams per day of hydroxyethylrutosides significantly reduced lymphedema of the arm or leg and lessened the associated uncomfortable symptoms.9 A combination of the flavonoids diosmin (900 mg per day) and hesperidin (100 mg per day) has been investigated for the treatment of a variety of venous circulation disorders.10 However, in a double-blind trial, this combination was not effective for lymphedema caused by breast cancer treatments.11 In a preliminary study, individuals with lymphedema of the arm or head-and-neck region were treated with approximately 230 mcg of selenium per day, in the form of sodium selenite, for four to six weeks. A quality-of-life assessment showed an improvement of 59%, and the circumference of the edematous arm was reduced in 10 of 12 cases.12 Because coumarin, hydroxyethylrutosides, and diosmin are not widely available in the United States, other flavonoids, such as quercetin, rutin, or anthocyanosides (from bilberry), have been substituted by doctors in an attempt to obtain similar benefits. The effect of these other flavonoids against edema has not been well studied. Also, optimal amounts are not known. However, in one study, quercetin in amounts of 30–50 mg per day corrected abnormal capillary permeability (leakiness),13 an effect that might improve edema. A similar effect has been reported with rutin at 20 mg three times per day.14 Doctors often recommend 80–160 mg of a standardized extract of bilberry, three times per day. Whereas vitamin B6 is sometimes recommended for reducing edema, no research has investigated its effectiveness. HOPE IT WILL HELP YOU Answered by Margorie West 1 year ago.


Is Bumex or Zaroxolyn stronger?
My doctor said that Zaroxolyn is much stronger than Bumex. However, when I try to look up the answer on the internet every site says that Bumex is stronger. Is Zaroxolyn a new drug? That would explain articles saying the Bumex is stronger. If possible would you please give me the web site address of where you... Asked by Elba Honchell 1 year ago.

My doctor said that Zaroxolyn is much stronger than Bumex. However, when I try to look up the answer on the internet every site says that Bumex is stronger. Is Zaroxolyn a new drug? That would explain articles saying the Bumex is stronger. If possible would you please give me the web site address of where you found he information? I sure do appreciate your help. Thanks. Answered by Sandee Lardone 1 year ago.

Bumex is a loop diuretic while Zaroxolyn is a thiazide-like diuretic. Loop diuretics such as Bumex and Lasix are much more powerful then thiazide diuretics. Bumex and Lasix are what you use for patients in congestive heart failure, liver disease, profound fluid overload. Zaroxolyn and HCTZ just won't do much in those situations. Answered by Fritz Dearden 1 year ago.


How do you pronounce demadex, lasix and bumex?
how do you pronounce hydrodiuril, lozol, zaroxolyn, diuril, aldactone, dyazide??? Asked by Tameka Delrie 1 year ago.

dem uh dex lay six buu mex' hydro die ur il die ur il zuh rox e lyn al daac tone die uh zide Answered by Jule Imbruglia 1 year ago.


Which thiazide diuretics and related diuretics are the most prescribed??? i am a pharmacy tech student...?
I know that HCTZ is prescribed a lot... But are diuril, Lozol and zaroxolyn prescribed a lot???? Asked by Cordie Obaker 1 year ago.

Most often in our clinic pt's are on Lasix, HCTZ,or spironolactone. Or a combination of some sorts. Answered by Kim Lekberg 1 year ago.

I know that dyazide is often prescribed Answered by Angel Cauthon 1 year ago.


Can high dose diuretics cause severe muscle cramps, low iron and low iron saturation?
I am a 38 year old female with multiple health problems. I am on 200mg of Lasix, Spironolactone, Zaroxolyn and Hydroclorothiazide (those are only the diuretics). That being said, here is/are my question(s). Can all of those cause muscle cramping? Towards the late afternoon and all thru the night, my hands and feet... Asked by Christena Mcgarr 1 year ago.

I am a 38 year old female with multiple health problems. I am on 200mg of Lasix, Spironolactone, Zaroxolyn and Hydroclorothiazide (those are only the diuretics). That being said, here is/are my question(s). Can all of those cause muscle cramping? Towards the late afternoon and all thru the night, my hands and feet cramp so bad that I'm in tears. Other muscles cramp as well, but not nearly as bad. My dilemma is that without the diuretics, I puff up like a blowfish (no one seems to know why). Are there any alternatives? Also, can all of the medications above cause Low Iron and Low Iron Saturation? Answered by Sherita Kopf 1 year ago.

All those diuretics (with the exception of spironolactone) have the potential to cause hypokalemia (low blood potassium), by making the kidneys flush out potassium ions. This could explain the muscle cramps you've been experiencing. You should contact your doctor without delay and report this to him/her. Hypokalemia is potentially dangerous. I don't know if diuretics affect iron levels. I can't think of any reason that they would, though. Answered by Wilburn Sessum 1 year ago.

uh, time to get doctors who know what they're doing. Answered by Hee Blady 1 year ago.


CHF Patient NOT on ACE Inhibitor?
I'm not sure the 1st response answered my question. I looked up the medications and know what they are but none are ACE inhibitors. Asked by Anibal Gemmiti 1 year ago.

My 62 year old mother is on the following medications to treat CHF: Torsemide Metolazone Spironolactone Metoprolol Coreg Digoxin Coumadin She is also a diabetic currently on Humalog & Lantus. From my research, it does not appear that any of these medications are ACE Inhibitors which I've read are very good at treating CHF. Can someone tell me why the doctor doesn't have her on one of those? Her current infraction is about 10-15% and a couple of weeks ago the doctor told me that it won't be much longer until she passes. I just am concerned that maybe his treatment of her is not as good as it could be. Any help would be appreciated. Thank You! Cindy Answered by Mirian Holje 1 year ago.

Torasemide (rINN) or torsemide (USAN) is a pyridine-sulfonyl urea type loop diuretic mainly used in the management of edema associated with congestive heart failure. It is also used at low doses for the management of hypertension. It is marketed under the brand name Demadex. Metolazone is a thiazide diuretic (or, rather, a thiazide-like diuretic because it acts similarly to the thiazides but does not contain the benzothiadiazine molecular structure) marketed under the brand names Zaroxolyn and Mykrox. It is primarily used to treat congestive heart failure and high blood pressure. Spironolactone (marketed under the trade names Aldactone, Novo-Spiroton, Aldactazide, Spiractin, Spirotone, Verospiron or Berlactone) is a diuretic and is used as an antiandrogen. It is a synthetic 17-lactone drug that is a renal competitive aldosterone antagonist in a class of pharmaceuticals called potassium-sparing diuretics, used primarily to treat heart failure, ascites in patients with liver disease, low-renin hypertension, hypokalemia, and Conn's syndrome as well as high blood pressure. Metoprolol is a selective β1 receptor blocker used in treatment of several diseases of the cardiovascular system, especially hypertension Carvedilol is a non-selective beta blocker/alpha-1 blocker indicated in the treatment of mild to moderate congestive heart failure (CHF). It is marketed under various trade names including Coreg (GSK), Dilatrend (Roche), Eucardic (Roche), and Carloc (Cipla) as a generic drug (as of September 5, 2007 in the U.S.).[1], and as a controlled-release formulation, marketed in the US as Coreg CR (GSK). Digoxin (INN) (pronounced /dɨˈdʒɒksɨn/[1]), also known as digitalis, is a purified cardiac glycoside extracted from the foxglove plant, Digitalis lanata.[2] Its corresponding aglycone is digoxigenin, and its acetyl derivative is acetyldigoxin. Digoxin is widely used in the treatment of various heart conditions, namely atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter and sometimes heart failure that cannot be controlled by other medication Warfarin (also known under the brand names Coumadin, Jantoven, Marevan, and Waran) is an anticoagulant. Please see the web page for more details on adverse effects of Angiotensi converting enzime inhibitors. Consult your doctor. Answered by Paul Sutulovich 1 year ago.

The first answerer gives very detailed answers. Often too detailed. By 'infarction' do you mean ejection fraction? If so, 10-15 % is quite low. If she isn't seeing one now, she needs a good cardiologist. To answer your question, she SHOULD be on an ACE inhibitor. The only reason not to is either an allergy OR renal failure. I'm surprised by the metoprolol & Coreg. They are both in the same class of drugs. There's no benefit to doing both. I'd stick with as much Coreg as she can handle. Good luck. Answered by Isa Saale 1 year ago.

About 12-15 years ago these drugs were only initiated in hospital by specialists. These days however they are routinely used in the community by GPs. Answered by Jessenia Felzien 1 year ago.


What is a common hypertension medication?
Asked by Marry Gracely 1 year ago.

Diuretics ("water pills") examples: Acetazolamide (Diamox®) Furosemide (Lasix®) Indapamide (Lozol®) Metolazone (Zaroxolyn®) Spirnolactone (Aldactone®) Torsemide (Demadex®) Triamterene (Dyrenium®) Beta blockers examples: Atenolol (Tenormin®) Bisoprolol (Zebeta®) Carvedilol (Coreg®) Metoprolol (iLopressor®, Toprol SL®) Timolol (Blockadren®) Calcium channel blockers examples: Amlodipine (Norvasc®) Felodipine (Plendil®) Idradipine (DynaCirc®) Nicardipine (Cardene®) Nisoldipine (Sular®) ACE inhibitors examples: Benazepril (Lotensin®) Captopril (Capoten®) Enalapril (Vasotec®) Fosinopril (Monopril®) Lisinopril (Prinivil®, Zestril®) Quinapril (Accupril®) Ramipril (Altace®) Trandolapril (Mavik®) Angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARBs) examples: Candesartan (Atacand®) Irbesartin (Avapro®) Losartin (Cozaar®) Telmisartin (Micardis®) Valsartan (Diovan®) Answered by Lynetta Lebouf 1 year ago.

A very common hypertension medicine is hydrochlorathiazide(HCTZ). It's a diuertic. It's what I've had to take for the last 6 months. It's well tolerated. Others are; Norvasc, Lopressor, Cozaar, and the list goes on and on. Yes, like all medications, they have side effects. Natural medicines also have side effects or do nothing at all. HCTZ-diuretic Norvasc-calcium channel blocker Cozaar-ACE inhibitor are all very well tolerated. Their cautions and side effects are well known, and they have been around forever. Lopressor is a beta blocker. I wouldn't take those as first line treatment unless a few other conditions were being address. Beta blockers have well established uses, but the side effects can be a bit more than some other groups of hypertension medications. Answered by Herb Hanby 1 year ago.


Pharmacology question please help?
I'm taking a pharmacology class and the question is about a 76 year old woman currently taking quite a few medications (I'll list them below). I have to figure out which 2 organs in this patient's body might be functioning at a decreased level and so prolong the effect of these drugs. If anyone can tell... Asked by Su Mayeaux 1 year ago.

I'm taking a pharmacology class and the question is about a 76 year old woman currently taking quite a few medications (I'll list them below). I have to figure out which 2 organs in this patient's body might be functioning at a decreased level and so prolong the effect of these drugs. If anyone can tell me the 2 different organs that would be great! 10 points for best answer. the drugs the patient has been prescribed: Accupril Actos aspirin Catapres-TTS-1 B12 injections Lasix Glucotrol XL Humulin N K-Dur Lanoxin lorazepam Metamucil Prozac Zantac Risperdal Serevent Synthroid Celebrex Zaroxolyn Ambien Levaquin I figured the answer would be the heart and the pancreas but I am not sure. Answered by Carl Pusateri 1 year ago.

Liver and kidneys. Older people can't metabolize or eliminate drugs as fast because the liver and kidneys don't work as well as they used to. Answered by Agustin Tannehill 1 year ago.


Bipolar and meds combo?
What other meds combos are apart from old stand by lithium? Asked by Latisha Spasiano 1 year ago.

you don't need combos for bipolar disorder because if you have one...it doesn't work, the dosage can be upped and it'll end up working. Lithium is pretty dangerous considering most medications can affect you and make the lithium not work... * acetazolamide (Diamox); * aminophylline (Truphylline) or theophylline (Elixophyllin, Respbid, Theo-Bid, Theo-Dur, Uniphyl); * sodium bicarbonate (Alka-Seltzer, Bicitra, Polycitra, or baking soda home remedy antacid); * carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); * fluoxetine (Prozac); * metronidazole (Flagyl); * potassium iodide thyroid medication (Pima); * an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik); * a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Tiazac, Cartia, Cardizem) or verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan); * a diuretic (water pill) such as amiloride (Midamor, Moduretic), bumetanide (Bumex), chlorthalidone (Hygroton, Thalitone), ethacrynic acid (Edecrin), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Hyzaar, Vasoretic,Zestoretic), indapamide (Lozol), metolazone (Mykrox, Zaroxolyn), spironolactone (Aldactazide, Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium, Maxzide, Dyazide), torsemide (Demadex), and others; * medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, such as haloperidol (Haldol), aripiprazole (Abilify), chlorpromazine (Thorazine), clozapine (Clozaril, Fazaclo), olanzapine (Zyprexa), quetiapine (Seroquel), pimozide (Orap), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon); or * celecoxib (Celebrex) or an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), diflunisal (Dolobid), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), ketorolac (Toradol), mefenamic acid (Ponstel), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. that's all that you couldn't take with Lithium. plus, it's recommended to have your blood drawn every so often while on it. and it causes weight gain....yeah, not good. BUT. Lamictal is probably the newest drug on the market for BP. i take it and have been for 2 years now since i was diagnosed with type II bipolar disorder....it's a 5 week process, but it's worth the wait. i think it's a miracle drug and doesn't cause all the side effects other drugs have. in rare cases a body rash can happen, to some people. but even with that, it's not even life threatening. i've only had to up my dosage from 100mg [stayed at that for a year and a half] to 150mg. and now...after my struggles with BP for all of high school...i'm a senior and happy 85% of the time. to the point where people wouldn't even figure somethings wrong with me. so my advice...talk to your doc about switching Lamictal. it doesn't cause weight gain. in my experience, along with my adderall i lost the 30 pounds i gained when i was depressed. back at 160 at 6'2'. research the drug...really it's probably the best. i asked my psych why he didn't put me on lithium, and told me that even though lithium is the most popular drug, he's found in that nearly 2/3 of his bipolar patients of his patients [who was put on that at first or other mood stabilizers didn't work] since the drug came out has worked very well for them. Answered by Janis Geis 1 year ago.

Lithium, is by far the best for True Bipolar. You must get your blood tests regular to check your lithium levels, but it is known to work the best. My son took this for many years and he did the best on it. He now refuses and his life is a mess because of it. Answered by Hisako Quintas 1 year ago.

For mood stabilizers, there is Depakote, Topamax, Lamitcal, Abilify... There are more, can't think of them all. Anti-depressants, Prozac, Zoloft, Effexor, Wellbutrin, Cymbalta, Lexapro, etc etc. There are also mixes like Symbyax, which is Prozac with and antipsychotic. There are a whole bunch of things... Answered by Leilani Cleasby 1 year ago.

There are more choice's in bi-polar meds now, like, depecote, seroquel, limictal, closeril and a host of others, only your health care provider can accurately know which combinations are safe and effective for you, the best to you, Mercee. Answered by Dong Dejong 1 year ago.

Oh damn, please ask a doctor or pharmacist on this one. Do not trust Yahoo Answers, or anyone online for that matter, on this question. It's a really bad idea to mix similar medications, usually. Answered by Bernarda Shober 1 year ago.

i take a whole bevy of medication- lithium, lamictal, paxil and wellbutrin........some sleepers if needed.....usually trazadone....... Answered by Linda Cuyler 1 year ago.


How do i know i have edema?
what are some symptoms of edema? Asked by Claribel Wolski 1 year ago.

Abnormal accumulation of fluid beneath the skin is known as edema. This leads to a puffy appearance, often to a limb, most commonly a leg. SYMPTOM: People with edema may notice that a ring on their finger feels tighter than in the past, or they might have difficulty in putting on shoes, especially toward the end of the day. They may also notice a puffiness of the face around the eyes, or in the feet, ankles, and legs. When edema is present, pressure on the skin, such as from the elastic band on socks, may leave an indentation that is slow to disappear. Edema of the abdomen, called ascites, may be a sign of serious underlying disease and must be immediately evaluated by a doctor. TREATMENT: Over the counter diuretics containing ammonium chloride and caffeine (Aqua-Ban®) may be used to relieve symptoms related to edema or water retention when taken five to six days before menses. More severe edematous conditions require medical attention. Treatment of edema with prescription medications is limited to the use of diuretics, commonly referred to as “water pills.” Agents often used include the thiazide diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide (HydroDIURIL®), indapamide (Lozol®), and metolazone (Zaroxolyn®); loop diuretics including furosemide (Lasix®), bumetanide (Bumex®), and torsemide (Demadex®); and potassium-sparing diuretics, such as spironolactone (Aldactone®), triamterene (Dyazide®, Maxzide®), and amiloride (Midamor®). Commonly, treatment consists of managing the underlying condition, which may include inadequate nutrition; liver, heart, and kidney disease; or obstruction of blood or lymph flow. In some cases, a salt-restricted diet may be recommended. Dietary changes that may be helpful for edema: High salt intake should be avoided, as it tends to lead to water retention and may worsen edema in some people. A controlled trial found that a low-salt diet (less than 2,100 mg sodium per day) resulted in reduced water retention after two months in a group of women with unexplained edema. NUTRITION SUPPLEMENT THAT WILL HELP YOU: Several double-blind trials2 3 4 5 have found that 400 mg per day of coumarin, a flavonoid found in a variety of herbs, can improve many types of edema, including lymphedema after surgery. However, a large double-blind trial detected no benefit using 200 mg coumarin twice daily for six months in women who had arm edema after mastectomy (surgical breast removal).6 (Coumarin should not be confused with the anticlotting drug Coumadin®.) A group of semi-synthetic flavonoids, known as hydroxyethylrutosides are also beneficial for some types of edema.7 One double-blind trial found that 2 grams per day of hydroxyethylrutosides reduced ankle and foot edema in people with venous disorders after four weeks.8 Another double-blind trial found that 3 grams per day of hydroxyethylrutosides significantly reduced lymphedema of the arm or leg and lessened the associated uncomfortable symptoms.9 A combination of the flavonoids diosmin (900 mg per day) and hesperidin (100 mg per day) has been investigated for the treatment of a variety of venous circulation disorders.10 However, in a double-blind trial, this combination was not effective for lymphedema caused by breast cancer treatments.11 In a preliminary study, individuals with lymphedema of the arm or head-and-neck region were treated with approximately 230 mcg of selenium per day, in the form of sodium selenite, for four to six weeks. A quality-of-life assessment showed an improvement of 59%, and the circumference of the edematous arm was reduced in 10 of 12 cases.12 Because coumarin, hydroxyethylrutosides, and diosmin are not widely available in the United States, other flavonoids, such as quercetin, rutin, or anthocyanosides (from bilberry), have been substituted by doctors in an attempt to obtain similar benefits. The effect of these other flavonoids against edema has not been well studied. Also, optimal amounts are not known. However, in one study, quercetin in amounts of 30–50 mg per day corrected abnormal capillary permeability (leakiness),13 an effect that might improve edema. A similar effect has been reported with rutin at 20 mg three times per day.14 Doctors often recommend 80–160 mg of a standardized extract of bilberry, three times per day. Whereas vitamin B6 is sometimes recommended for reducing edema, no research has investigated its effectiveness. HOPE IT WILL HELP YOU Answered by Felica Wildberger 1 year ago.


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