Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 020837/001.

Names and composition

"XOPENEX" is the commercial name of a drug composed of LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020837/001 XOPENEX LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION EQ 0.021% BASE
020837/002 XOPENEX LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION EQ 0.042% BASE
020837/003 XOPENEX LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION EQ 0.0103% BASE
020837/004 XOPENEX LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION EQ 0.25% BASE

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020837/001 XOPENEX LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION EQ 0.021% BASE
020837/002 XOPENEX LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION EQ 0.042% BASE
020837/003 XOPENEX LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION EQ 0.0103% BASE
020837/004 XOPENEX LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION EQ 0.25% BASE
077756/001 LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION EQ 0.021% BASE
077756/002 LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION EQ 0.042% BASE
077756/003 LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION EQ 0.0103% BASE
077800/001 LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION EQ 0.0103% BASE
077800/002 LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION EQ 0.021% BASE
077800/003 LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION EQ 0.042% BASE
078171/001 LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION EQ 0.0103% BASE
078171/002 LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION EQ 0.021% BASE
078171/003 LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION EQ 0.042% BASE
078309/001 LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION EQ 0.25% BASE
090297/001 LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION EQ 0.0103% BASE
090297/002 LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION EQ 0.021% BASE
090297/003 LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION EQ 0.042% BASE
200875/001 LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION EQ 0.25% BASE
203653/001 LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION EQ 0.0103% BASE
203653/002 LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION EQ 0.021% BASE
203653/003 LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION EQ 0.042% BASE
207625/001 LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION EQ 0.0103% BASE
207625/002 LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION EQ 0.021% BASE
207625/003 LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION EQ 0.042% BASE
207628/001 LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE LEVALBUTEROL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INHALATION EQ 0.25% BASE

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Answered questions

4 year old prescribed Xopenex & Pulmicort?
We gave her the 1st breathing treatment this morning and I was wondering if this 2nd treatment will keep her up all night. If your children have been prescribed this, what was it for? A couple of doctors feel my daughter may have asthma, but are reluctant to diagnose it as that without a family history and... Asked by Carmelo Iodice 1 year ago.

We gave her the 1st breathing treatment this morning and I was wondering if this 2nd treatment will keep her up all night. If your children have been prescribed this, what was it for? A couple of doctors feel my daughter may have asthma, but are reluctant to diagnose it as that without a family history and she's had allergy tests all come back negative. She has a constant cough only at night, and when she goes to the pediatrician I am told she is wheezing (this can only be heard by the doctor while she is listening to her lungs) even though during the appt she looks and feels fine. This has been going on since January. The coughing at night happens once she has been asleep for a few hours and then moves around. But the treatments make her cough really bad and since her treatment this morning she's been coughing and now has a low grade fever. We go back in the morning, but I'm hoping to hear from parents who may have been through this or may have an idea of what could be going on here Answered by Tara Faehnle 1 year ago.

Xopenex is supposed to be less bothersome in side effects than albuterol. They are closely related. They both are bronchodilators, but albuterol raises the heartrate, making the person jittery and keeping them awake. Xopenex is supposed to avoid the side effect. Pulmicort is an inhaled steroid. It is very important that she take this drug exactly as prescribed. It is a long acting drug and takes a while for you to see results. This drug will reduce the inflamation in her bronchioles, stopping the asthma attack and wheezing. This drug will be taken long term. (my daughter was on it until she was 6). We had many less asthma outbreaks while on this drug. It shouldnt keep her awake. When my daughter was young they did not prescribe singulair or other oral steroids for children, but I did have good results personally. I take care of adult patients who take the drug also. I'm not sure if it (xopenex) will keep her awake, my daughter had such bad asthma I wouldnt let them take her off albuterol once it started working for her. I have had patients tell me it is better but I have no personal experience with the drug. I wish you luck. My daughter is 8 yrs old, and never slept through the night until she was 5 due to the asthma. It does seem to get better as they get older. I think the coughing is because the secretions are able to move, and she is finally able to get them out of her lungs when she coughs. That is the goal with the xopenex. As is dilates the bronchioles, it allows the air to move better and lets your daughter get the secretions out that are stuck there. Answered by Cierra Joshi 1 year ago.

This happened to my 2 year old. We actually moved to Virginia for about 5 months and didn't have a single problem... not even a cold. Moved back to Ohio, and he's been having difficulty breathing/wheezing, so I had to take out the nebulizer (sadly). ANyways, I don't want to believe that my son has asthma either.. he's so young, and without proper testing, how do they know? I don't know what the first drug is,, but my son was also prescribed pulmicort. It's a steroid, and my doctor said that it's supposed to help develop the lungs (which seemed strange to me... i think he just thought that I was incapable of understanding the real medical term -for whatever reason...?). Anyways, I don't give it to him. I've read a lot of bad things about it, and besides that, the fact that it's a steroid isn't comforting. I took him to get a second opinion, and they prescribed a low dose of Singulair and Albuterol, which seems to be working well. It sounds to me like it's bronchitis. I also thought that my son suffers from Chronic bronchitis (which is when it keeps developing... viscious cycle). I'd go to a specialist (which is what I did). You can read about asthma/chronic bronchitis at www.drgreene.com . He's an amazing pediatrican who actually CARES about other babies. He gets online to chat with people who have health concerns with their children. Tune into one of his chats... he was very helpful to me. Good luck! Answered by Taren Yaden 1 year ago.

Xopenex is a brochodilator inhaler, which is best used for the treatment of reversible airway condition like asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) like bronchitis, emphysema. Asthma is a disease which is caused due to the narrowing and inflammation of the airway passage. Whereas COPD is regarded as a group of diseases, which occurs due to failure of lung to breath out the airs and makes the patient unable to breathe properly. The active component of this medicine is Levalbuterol hydrochloride, which is a very effective short-acting beta adrenergic receptor agonist and helps keep improving the symptoms like shortness of breath and wheezing. People suffering from respiratory disease can buy this online. It is a transparent and colorless solution. It acts by opening the airway passage and relaxing the bronchial muscles. It can be used in adults and the children between the age of 4-6 years. The molecular weight of levalbuterol hydrochloride is 275.8 and the chemical formula is C13H21NO3.HCL. For more information you can visit PharmacySell. Answered by Eula Vanwingerden 1 year ago.

Maybe it's in view that your son under no circumstances had a bacterial illness? If he had no bacterial illness, anti-biotics do not anything. They are harsh medicinal drugs, and using them will have to be limited to persons who want it. As for his cough, if he has had it for every week and a part (the throat is most probably in view that of the cough), it can be an breathing illness (reminiscent of bronchitis), or potentially strep throat if the throat is inflicting the cough. I might expect that your healthcare professional appeared in his throat to look if it was once all strep-ey. Both the ones matters may also be confirmed for. Bronchitis coughing can stay for weeks after it's cured. Usually nevertheless, if he has a top fever, it is bacterial, if this is a low(er) fever it is viral. Take your sons temperature, it's going to simply be a bloodless. But if it is been there for every week and a part, it was once/is by and large bacterial. Viruses depart beautiful rapidly. Depending on what he has, another anti-biotic perhaps wanted. Answered by Kim Lisk 1 year ago.


Med Students, Why are more doctors using albuterol and xopenex to treat pneumonia and CHF?
Why the hell would you do peak flows or a PFT on someone with pneumonia. You know they would have a poor effort before even trying. Asked by Drew Buran 1 year ago.

Albuterol and xopenex are b2 agonist that act by relaxing smooth muscle surrounding the bronchioles. But, bronchiolar smooth muscles are not usually constricted in patients with pneumonia or CHF. Pneumonia is an infectious inflammatory disease of the alveoli and surrounding bronchioles. Bronchial walls become inflamed and edemitous, but it doesn't usually cause smooth muscle constriction unless you have some kind of underlying bronchospastic disease also like asthma or COPD with a reversible component. Albuterol and Xopenex relax Smooth muscle only and do nothing for airway inflammation and alveolar consolidation (fluid), as in both of these diseases. Corticosteroids are usually prescribed to treat the inflammation as well as an antibiotic to treat the infection. For the mucus and fluid in the lungs B2 agonist are useless. Bronchial Hygeine Therapy such as deep breathing and coughing exercises, intrapulmonary percussion and PEP therapy via the Accapella, maybe even CPT are appropriate. Also some Hyperinflation therapy to recruit collapsed alveoli such as Incentive Spirometry or IPPB. Increasing fluid intake to thin secretions is also appropriate. Some people say that the moisture alone from the treatments willthin secretions but this is false. Nebulized albuterol and xopenex particles are about 0.5 microns in size and do NOT reach the terminal bronchioles and alveoli where the fluid and infection are. It would take particle sizes of at least one tenth of that size to get there. If the Patient's oxygen saturations are affected by the consolidation Oxygen Therapy should be started. Breathing treatments do not increase oxygen saturations in the blood. Patients with CHF don't need to be given any more fluid, they need to be given Diuretics such as Lasix or Bumex to get rid of some of the fluid that is pertuding into the lungs. Patients with pneumonia will improve their condition without Bronchodilator Therapy if all of the other treatment is correct, provided they don't have an underlying asthma like condition. Likewise Patients with CHF will improve if they are diuresed properly. The ONLY indication for Bronchodilator Therapy with such drugs as Albuterol or Xopenex is BRONCHOSPASMS. Answered by Kendra Wendelin 1 year ago.

Probably shouldnt be. Depends on the severity of both conditions. 1. Pneumonia that causes bronchospasm as part of the pathology definitely indicates use of bronchodilators. Peak flow measurements or Pulmonary Function Testing should be utilized to determine the appropriateness of pharmacological intervention. 2. Severe CHF can cause bronchospasm from fluid in the airways and swelling (engorgement) of tissue in the airways ... it is not always indicated. The problem becomes that it is given inappropriately for almost any respiratory complaint, i.e., cough. Although a cough could signal bronchospasm ... likely not ..... I guess it is the same reason they give antibiotics when there are clearly no indications ... appeasement of the patient .. or the need to feel like you have done something .... not sure I understand the rationalization ... our superinfections are directly related to our indiscriminate use of antibiotics .... sorry for deviating from your question Answered by Lezlie Propheter 1 year ago.

Albuterol and levalbuterol are pretty safe drugs, and work at least as well as antibiotics in the treatment of bronchitis. It makes some people feel better and isn't likely to do any harm. By extension, the same applies in pneumonia. Safety is a concern, though, in heart failure patients, who are at risk for dysrhythmias that can be aggravated by beta-agonists. Sometimes it seems necessary to use them when bronchospasm is prominent, though. If you look in the old medical literature, you'll see this referred to as "cardiac asthma," though the concept and term have fallen out of favor. But it isn't as simple as that. Lots of people with heart failure have co-existing COPD, and it's very difficult to tell which is causing symptoms, even with all the new BNP tests. And if you take the approach of using one levalbuterol nebulization and watching for the response, you're still open to the "post hoc ergo propter hoc" fallacy, so it boils down to SWAG (scientific wild-assed guess). Answered by Pok Pizza 1 year ago.


Med Students, Why are more doctors using albuterol and xopenex to treat pneumonia and CHF?
please explain in detail. medical jargon is understood. Asked by Roxanna Borio 1 year ago.

Albuterol and xopenex are b2 agonist that act by relaxing smooth muscle surrounding the bronchioles. But, bronchiolar smooth muscles are not usually constricted in patients with pneumonia or CHF. Pneumonia is an infectious inflammatory disease of the alveoli and surrounding bronchioles. Bronchial walls become inflamed and edemitous, but it doesn't usually cause smooth muscle constriction unless you have some kind of underlying bronchospastic disease also like asthma or COPD with a reversible component. Albuterol and Xopenex relax Smooth muscle only and do nothing for airway inflammation and alveolar consolidation (fluid), as in both of these diseases. Corticosteroids are usually prescribed to treat the inflammation as well as an antibiotic to treat the infection. For the mucus and fluid in the lungs B2 agonist are useless. Bronchial Hygeine Therapy such as deep breathing and coughing exercises, intrapulmonary percussion and PEP therapy via the Accapella, maybe even CPT are appropriate. Also some Hyperinflation therapy to recruit collapsed alveoli such as Incentive Spirometry or IPPB. Increasing fluid intake to thin secretions is also appropriate. Some people say that the moisture alone from the treatments willthin secretions but this is false. Nebulized albuterol and xopenex particles are about 0.5 microns in size and do NOT reach the terminal bronchioles and alveoli where the fluid and infection are. It would take particle sizes of at least one tenth of that size to get there. If the Patient's oxygen saturations are affected by the consolidation Oxygen Therapy should be started. Breathing treatments do not increase oxygen saturations in the blood. Patients with CHF don't need to be given any more fluid, they need to be given Diuretics such as Lasix or Bumex to get rid of some of the fluid that is pertuding into the lungs. Patients with pneumonia will improve their condition without Bronchodilator Therapy if all of the other treatment is correct, provided they don't have an underlying asthma like condition. Likewise Patients with CHF will improve if they are diuresed properly. The ONLY indication for Bronchodilator Therapy with such drugs as Albuterol or Xopenex is BRONCHOSPASMS. Answered by Masako Appell 1 year ago.

Because their patients be relieved by the effects of those medicines. Answered by Jarvis Culcasi 1 year ago.


What's with the new "levalbuterol" Xopenex?
My insurance is only open to a university doctor program, i.e. student physicians.I got this kid that was sweet and tried to do everything he needed, but he seemed confused. I asked for a refill on my medicine, including my albuterol.I've never see this Xopenex before.Just curious if there's a... Asked by Wesley Swed 1 year ago.

My insurance is only open to a university doctor program, i.e. student physicians. I got this kid that was sweet and tried to do everything he needed, but he seemed confused. I asked for a refill on my medicine, including my albuterol. I've never see this Xopenex before. Just curious if there's a difference? Answered by Ardis Hoban 1 year ago.

Xopenex and albuterol are very similar. Both are short acting bronchodilators which means they both open up your airway passages for about 4 to 6 hours. Both should work equally well.Xopenex is the newer inhaler and costs more than albuterol. The doctor knew what he was doing, I don't think you have anything to worry about. If you know anything about chemistry Xopenex is the R-isomer of albuterol. Answered by Quyen Trucchi 1 year ago.

supposedly xopenex has fewer side effects (less heart rate effects in particular) but otherwise, it's a more refined type of albuterol Answered by Lin Balfour 1 year ago.

xopenex is great! my boys use it and they have some pretty serious respiratory problems. you will like it better than albuterol. it is much cleaner. no jitters or crawly hair and half the speeding up of your heart rate. which i prefer. it tastes weird, sort of tinny, but it's much better for you. Answered by Christy Mackinaw 1 year ago.

They are close to the same thing but, I would stick to my old albuterol since it has been used for years without too many problems. I like to "wait and see" whenever a new drug comes out. Answered by Lynn Buchheim 1 year ago.


Med Students, Why are more doctors using albuterol and xopenex to treat pneumonia and CHF?
Good point about wasting money, Dr. ER. Asked by Ayako Colmer 1 year ago.

Like the previous person said, Albuterol and xopenex are b2 agonist that act by relaxing smooth muscle surrounding the bronchioles. But, bronchiolar smooth muscles are not usually constricted in patients with pneumonia or CHF. Pneumonia is an infectious inflammatory disease of the alveoli and surrounding bronchioles. Bronchial walls become inflamed and edemitous, but it doesn't usually cause smooth muscle constriction unless you have some kind of underlying bronchospastic disease also like asthma or COPD with a reversible component. Albuterol and Xopenex relax Smooth muscle only and do nothing for airway inflammation and alveolar consolidation (fluid), as in both of these diseases. Corticosteroids are usually prescribed to treat the inflammation as well as an antibiotic to treat the infection. For the mucus and fluid in the lungs B2 agonist are useless. Bronchial Hygeine Therapy such as deep breathing and coughing exercises, intrapulmonary percussion and PEP therapy via the Accapella, maybe even CPT are appropriate. Also some Hyperinflation therapy to recruit collapsed alveoli such as Incentive Spirometry or IPPB. Increasing fluid intake to thin secretions is also appropriate. Some people say that the moisture alone from the treatments willthin secretions but this is false. Nebulized albuterol and xopenex particles are about 0.5 microns in size and do NOT reach the terminal bronchioles and alveoli where the fluid and infection are. It would take particle sizes of at least one tenth of that size to get there. If the Patient's oxygen saturations are affected by the consolidation Oxygen Therapy should be started. Breathing treatments do not increase oxygen saturations in the blood. Patients with CHF don't need to be given any more fluid, they need to be given Diuretics such as Lasix or Bumex to get rid of some of the fluid that is pertuding into the lungs. Patients with pneumonia will improve their condition without Bronchodilator Therapy if all of the other treatment is correct, provided they don't have an underlying asthma like condition. Likewise Patients with CHF will improve if they are diuresed properly. The ONLY indication for Bronchodilator Therapy with such drugs as Albuterol or Xopenex is BRONCHOSPASMS. Answered by Latrina Ardizone 1 year ago.

Pneumonia Albuterol Answered by Sheba Bleazard 1 year ago.

They shouldn't be...It's called lack of education or just because it makes the patient feel better about getting some sort of treatment. Pneumonia is at the alveolar level and albuterol (and xopenex) is a B2 specific drug used to dilate the constricted bronchioles of COPD and asthma patients. I think one of the problems is that medical professional have a bad habit of calling it a "breathing treatment", which implies it helps with ALL breathing ailments when it definitely does not. An albuterol nebulizer particle is nebulized to the size of about 5 microns, which is perfect for interacting with B2 receptor cells in the bronchioles. FYI, there are no B2 receptors in the alveoli. I've had nurses argue with me about treating patients with CHF with a bronchodilator....Nurse: "But they were admitted for respiratory failure"......ME: "There are many things that can cause respiratory failure and not all are treated with bronchodilators. Fluid in the alveoli cannot be relieved with a bronchodilator." I see this trend over and over again with medical professionals trying to treat all breathing ailments with albuterol. Thats why we in the respiratory therapy field have come to call it ALL BETTER ALL. We've even made cartoons, one of which declares, "I used to be a qudrapalegic until my Dr prescribed ALBUTEROL." You get the picture...It's very frustrating to have my time wasted, not to mention the cost to patient and insurance, treating every respiratory ailment with albuterol and knowing it only works with certain respiratory problems... Answered by Bev Spinner 1 year ago.

I completely agree with Jerry. Bronchospasm is the only reason to give a bronchodilator. If they have pneumonia, give them 1 treatment and if there is no change after the treatment there probably won't be. Answered by Shery Ilic 1 year ago.

Zini what school did you learn that from. I would never give a patient with SVT a beta agonist, that's just dangerous. I also agree with Jerry. Plus it just eats up the money from the patient and hospital for giving uneeded treatment that has no effect. Answered by Anya Mcquigg 1 year ago.

Albutamol and Levosalbutamol are potent B2 recepter agonists. As you may know there are two types of Beta adregnergic receptors found in the body. B1 almost exclusively found in the sino atrial node of the heart and B2 found throughout the body including the smooth muscle of the bronchii. Pneumonia is characterised by infection, consolidation and immune response to bacteriological presence in the lung tissue. There is a large influx of fluid and lymphocytes due to the inflammatory response, this can severely decrease respiratory function and the primary cause of death due to pneumonia is metabolic acidosis and respiratory failure. B2 agonists such as albuterol act to relax the smooth muscle in the bronchii improving the airflow into the patients lungs increasing the liklihood of gaseous exchange. The inflammatory mediators act in some ways to occlude the airway in severe pneumonias, and B2 nebulisers could counteract this to a mild extent. As i mentioned above, there are 2 kinds of beta receptor. Just because albuterol and its companion are designed to act on B2 receptors only, there is always a slight affect on the B1 receptors of the heart. For the simple asthmatic patient, the simultaneous action on B1 receptors by their inhalers causes the annoying sideaffects, racing heart, dizziness, tingling and shaking. In someone with congestive heart failure however, the action on b1 receptors can be beneficial as the increase in heart rate would improve perfusion to tissues. It has also been found to be somewhat useful in supraventricular tachycardia and other arrythmias. Answered by Dannette Daigh 1 year ago.


Xopenex inhaler too much?
Was having a bit of a breathing problem, I've been prescribed xopenex for my asthma instead of what I used to take albuteral ... I ended up having to take 5 puffs instead of just the usual two because of how severe my breathing was... Think I'm headed for an overdose? Or will I be ok heh. Asked by Anneliese Jaurequi 1 year ago.

Fortunately they gave you Xopenex instead of albuterol since it has less of an effect on heart rate than albuterol. Rapid heart rate is the most common problem with overuse of albuterol, it can still be seen in xopenex although it is less common. If you are needing to use your inhaler often, or require a larger dose you should make an appointment with your doctor so they can prescribe you something such as Flovent, Symbicort, Advair, etc. which will help prevent your symptoms. Also, if you are fairly new to using inhalers you might benefit from asking your pharmacist to observe your technique to make sure you are using them properly. Answered by Mark Tatham 1 year ago.

Maybe you should call a nurse practitioner to answer this question if you are really concerned. Answered by Gabriel Delouise 1 year ago.


Medicine used in nebulizer for copd. Albuterol or xopenex?
I have heard that xopenex is easier on the heart. Yet Medicare will not approve it. Why? I am using albuterol now and it seems to cause heart fiblitatios. What tp do? Asked by Merle Sarmento 1 year ago.

They won't approve it for one reason. Cost. Xopenex is much more expensive. For one thing, your doctor can write a letter of appeal, citing the reasons for needing Xopenex. On another point, in general patients should be on more long acting "controller" medications that have less effect on the heart. "Rescue" meds like albuterol or Xopenex are designed for infrequent, occasional use. Don't listen to the 'meerkat'. Albuterol is generic, Xopenex is brand only. There are generic nebulizer meds, just not all. And there are NO OTC inhalers. Far too dangerous. Good luck. Answered by Verdie Wislocki 1 year ago.

there are no otc meds for nebulizers!!! Answered by Verna Sinibaldi 1 year ago.

1. Ask your doctor for generic name nebulizer 2. Buy an over the counter brand yourself Answered by Gordon Umland 1 year ago.


Xopenex Inhalers?
I would like to hear from anyone who has personal experience with Xopenex inhalers - do you find there are fewer side-effects than with albuterol/salbutamol (Ventolin, etc.)? Does anyone know if/when the inhaler will arrive in the UK? Asked by Tracey Balla 1 year ago.

I know that the Xopenex has less side effects than the albuterol. The most common being less shakiness. If you do not experience the side effects of the albuterol then I wouldn't take the xopenex because it costs more. Contact a pharmacy in your area to find out where it is available. Good luck. Answered by Alva Snay 1 year ago.


Has anyone else who uses Xopenex had problems with abdominal bloating?
I know this isn't a very interesting question but I am bloated all the time and wonder if it might be a side effect of Xopenex. I've already Googled Xopenex to see if I can find any reference to it as a side effect and couldn't find anything but I thought it wouldn't hurt to ask. I'm more... Asked by Naomi Cassara 1 year ago.

I know this isn't a very interesting question but I am bloated all the time and wonder if it might be a side effect of Xopenex. I've already Googled Xopenex to see if I can find any reference to it as a side effect and couldn't find anything but I thought it wouldn't hurt to ask. I'm more interested in personal experiences than something someone might find on the web. Answered by Verdie Buckhanon 1 year ago.

Xopenex can cause an "upset stomach". Bloating could be described as an upset stomach. This is a mild side effect, continue to use Xopenex inhalation and talk to your doctor if the symptoms are very bothersome. Answered by Shelba Rottner 1 year ago.

No trouble like that. Knowing the action of Xopenex i'd be suprised if the bloating is related Answered by Suk Bossard 1 year ago.


4 year old prescribed Xopenex & Pulmicort?
We gave her the 1st breathing treatment this morning and I was wondering if this 2nd treatment will keep her up all night. If your children have been prescribed this, what was it for? A couple of doctors feel my daughter may have asthma, but are reluctant to diagnose it as that without a family history and... Asked by Brooke Grines 1 year ago.

We gave her the 1st breathing treatment this morning and I was wondering if this 2nd treatment will keep her up all night. If your children have been prescribed this, what was it for? A couple of doctors feel my daughter may have asthma, but are reluctant to diagnose it as that without a family history and she's had allergy tests all come back negative. She has a constant cough only at night, and when she goes to the pediatrician I am told she is wheezing (this can only be heard by the doctor while she is listening to her lungs) even though during the appt she looks and feels fine. This has been going on since January. The coughing at night happens once she has been asleep for a few hours and then moves around. But the treatments make her cough really bad and since her treatment this morning she's been coughing and now has a low grade fever. We go back in the morning, but I'm hoping to hear from parents who may have been through this or may have an idea of what could be going on here Answered by Monte Chaudoin 1 year ago.

Xopenex is supposed to be less bothersome in side effects than albuterol. They are closely related. They both are bronchodilators, but albuterol raises the heartrate, making the person jittery and keeping them awake. Xopenex is supposed to avoid the side effect. Pulmicort is an inhaled steroid. It is very important that she take this drug exactly as prescribed. It is a long acting drug and takes a while for you to see results. This drug will reduce the inflamation in her bronchioles, stopping the asthma attack and wheezing. This drug will be taken long term. (my daughter was on it until she was 6). We had many less asthma outbreaks while on this drug. It shouldnt keep her awake. When my daughter was young they did not prescribe singulair or other oral steroids for children, but I did have good results personally. I take care of adult patients who take the drug also. I'm not sure if it (xopenex) will keep her awake, my daughter had such bad asthma I wouldnt let them take her off albuterol once it started working for her. I have had patients tell me it is better but I have no personal experience with the drug. I wish you luck. My daughter is 8 yrs old, and never slept through the night until she was 5 due to the asthma. It does seem to get better as they get older. I think the coughing is because the secretions are able to move, and she is finally able to get them out of her lungs when she coughs. That is the goal with the xopenex. As is dilates the bronchioles, it allows the air to move better and lets your daughter get the secretions out that are stuck there. Answered by Boris Trevorrow 1 year ago.

This happened to my 2 year old. We actually moved to Virginia for about 5 months and didn't have a single problem... not even a cold. Moved back to Ohio, and he's been having difficulty breathing/wheezing, so I had to take out the nebulizer (sadly). ANyways, I don't want to believe that my son has asthma either.. he's so young, and without proper testing, how do they know? I don't know what the first drug is,, but my son was also prescribed pulmicort. It's a steroid, and my doctor said that it's supposed to help develop the lungs (which seemed strange to me... i think he just thought that I was incapable of understanding the real medical term -for whatever reason...?). Anyways, I don't give it to him. I've read a lot of bad things about it, and besides that, the fact that it's a steroid isn't comforting. I took him to get a second opinion, and they prescribed a low dose of Singulair and Albuterol, which seems to be working well. It sounds to me like it's bronchitis. I also thought that my son suffers from Chronic bronchitis (which is when it keeps developing... viscious cycle). I'd go to a specialist (which is what I did). You can read about asthma/chronic bronchitis at www.drgreene.com . He's an amazing pediatrican who actually CARES about other babies. He gets online to chat with people who have health concerns with their children. Tune into one of his chats... he was very helpful to me. Good luck! Answered by Julieann Greenhouse 1 year ago.

Xopenex is a brochodilator inhaler, which is best used for the treatment of reversible airway condition like asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) like bronchitis, emphysema. Asthma is a disease which is caused due to the narrowing and inflammation of the airway passage. Whereas COPD is regarded as a group of diseases, which occurs due to failure of lung to breath out the airs and makes the patient unable to breathe properly. The active component of this medicine is Levalbuterol hydrochloride, which is a very effective short-acting beta adrenergic receptor agonist and helps keep improving the symptoms like shortness of breath and wheezing. People suffering from respiratory disease can buy this online. It is a transparent and colorless solution. It acts by opening the airway passage and relaxing the bronchial muscles. It can be used in adults and the children between the age of 4-6 years. The molecular weight of levalbuterol hydrochloride is 275.8 and the chemical formula is C13H21NO3.HCL. For more information you can visit PharmacySell. Answered by Cary Hoskins 1 year ago.

Maybe it's in view that your son under no circumstances had a bacterial illness? If he had no bacterial illness, anti-biotics do not anything. They are harsh medicinal drugs, and using them will have to be limited to persons who want it. As for his cough, if he has had it for every week and a part (the throat is most probably in view that of the cough), it can be an breathing illness (reminiscent of bronchitis), or potentially strep throat if the throat is inflicting the cough. I might expect that your healthcare professional appeared in his throat to look if it was once all strep-ey. Both the ones matters may also be confirmed for. Bronchitis coughing can stay for weeks after it's cured. Usually nevertheless, if he has a top fever, it is bacterial, if this is a low(er) fever it is viral. Take your sons temperature, it's going to simply be a bloodless. But if it is been there for every week and a part, it was once/is by and large bacterial. Viruses depart beautiful rapidly. Depending on what he has, another anti-biotic perhaps wanted. Answered by Maida Triguro 1 year ago.


Med Students, Why are more doctors using albuterol and xopenex to treat pneumonia and CHF?
Why the hell would you do peak flows or a PFT on someone with pneumonia. You know they would have a poor effort before even trying. Asked by Sol Fioravanti 1 year ago.

Albuterol and xopenex are b2 agonist that act by relaxing smooth muscle surrounding the bronchioles. But, bronchiolar smooth muscles are not usually constricted in patients with pneumonia or CHF. Pneumonia is an infectious inflammatory disease of the alveoli and surrounding bronchioles. Bronchial walls become inflamed and edemitous, but it doesn't usually cause smooth muscle constriction unless you have some kind of underlying bronchospastic disease also like asthma or COPD with a reversible component. Albuterol and Xopenex relax Smooth muscle only and do nothing for airway inflammation and alveolar consolidation (fluid), as in both of these diseases. Corticosteroids are usually prescribed to treat the inflammation as well as an antibiotic to treat the infection. For the mucus and fluid in the lungs B2 agonist are useless. Bronchial Hygeine Therapy such as deep breathing and coughing exercises, intrapulmonary percussion and PEP therapy via the Accapella, maybe even CPT are appropriate. Also some Hyperinflation therapy to recruit collapsed alveoli such as Incentive Spirometry or IPPB. Increasing fluid intake to thin secretions is also appropriate. Some people say that the moisture alone from the treatments willthin secretions but this is false. Nebulized albuterol and xopenex particles are about 0.5 microns in size and do NOT reach the terminal bronchioles and alveoli where the fluid and infection are. It would take particle sizes of at least one tenth of that size to get there. If the Patient's oxygen saturations are affected by the consolidation Oxygen Therapy should be started. Breathing treatments do not increase oxygen saturations in the blood. Patients with CHF don't need to be given any more fluid, they need to be given Diuretics such as Lasix or Bumex to get rid of some of the fluid that is pertuding into the lungs. Patients with pneumonia will improve their condition without Bronchodilator Therapy if all of the other treatment is correct, provided they don't have an underlying asthma like condition. Likewise Patients with CHF will improve if they are diuresed properly. The ONLY indication for Bronchodilator Therapy with such drugs as Albuterol or Xopenex is BRONCHOSPASMS. Answered by Jerilyn Beckers 1 year ago.

Probably shouldnt be. Depends on the severity of both conditions. 1. Pneumonia that causes bronchospasm as part of the pathology definitely indicates use of bronchodilators. Peak flow measurements or Pulmonary Function Testing should be utilized to determine the appropriateness of pharmacological intervention. 2. Severe CHF can cause bronchospasm from fluid in the airways and swelling (engorgement) of tissue in the airways ... it is not always indicated. The problem becomes that it is given inappropriately for almost any respiratory complaint, i.e., cough. Although a cough could signal bronchospasm ... likely not ..... I guess it is the same reason they give antibiotics when there are clearly no indications ... appeasement of the patient .. or the need to feel like you have done something .... not sure I understand the rationalization ... our superinfections are directly related to our indiscriminate use of antibiotics .... sorry for deviating from your question Answered by Joi Higgason 1 year ago.

Albuterol and levalbuterol are pretty safe drugs, and work at least as well as antibiotics in the treatment of bronchitis. It makes some people feel better and isn't likely to do any harm. By extension, the same applies in pneumonia. Safety is a concern, though, in heart failure patients, who are at risk for dysrhythmias that can be aggravated by beta-agonists. Sometimes it seems necessary to use them when bronchospasm is prominent, though. If you look in the old medical literature, you'll see this referred to as "cardiac asthma," though the concept and term have fallen out of favor. But it isn't as simple as that. Lots of people with heart failure have co-existing COPD, and it's very difficult to tell which is causing symptoms, even with all the new BNP tests. And if you take the approach of using one levalbuterol nebulization and watching for the response, you're still open to the "post hoc ergo propter hoc" fallacy, so it boils down to SWAG (scientific wild-assed guess). Answered by Ernesto Portolese 1 year ago.


Med Students, Why are more doctors using albuterol and xopenex to treat pneumonia and CHF?
please explain in detail. medical jargon is understood. Asked by Shayla Manser 1 year ago.

Albuterol and xopenex are b2 agonist that act by relaxing smooth muscle surrounding the bronchioles. But, bronchiolar smooth muscles are not usually constricted in patients with pneumonia or CHF. Pneumonia is an infectious inflammatory disease of the alveoli and surrounding bronchioles. Bronchial walls become inflamed and edemitous, but it doesn't usually cause smooth muscle constriction unless you have some kind of underlying bronchospastic disease also like asthma or COPD with a reversible component. Albuterol and Xopenex relax Smooth muscle only and do nothing for airway inflammation and alveolar consolidation (fluid), as in both of these diseases. Corticosteroids are usually prescribed to treat the inflammation as well as an antibiotic to treat the infection. For the mucus and fluid in the lungs B2 agonist are useless. Bronchial Hygeine Therapy such as deep breathing and coughing exercises, intrapulmonary percussion and PEP therapy via the Accapella, maybe even CPT are appropriate. Also some Hyperinflation therapy to recruit collapsed alveoli such as Incentive Spirometry or IPPB. Increasing fluid intake to thin secretions is also appropriate. Some people say that the moisture alone from the treatments willthin secretions but this is false. Nebulized albuterol and xopenex particles are about 0.5 microns in size and do NOT reach the terminal bronchioles and alveoli where the fluid and infection are. It would take particle sizes of at least one tenth of that size to get there. If the Patient's oxygen saturations are affected by the consolidation Oxygen Therapy should be started. Breathing treatments do not increase oxygen saturations in the blood. Patients with CHF don't need to be given any more fluid, they need to be given Diuretics such as Lasix or Bumex to get rid of some of the fluid that is pertuding into the lungs. Patients with pneumonia will improve their condition without Bronchodilator Therapy if all of the other treatment is correct, provided they don't have an underlying asthma like condition. Likewise Patients with CHF will improve if they are diuresed properly. The ONLY indication for Bronchodilator Therapy with such drugs as Albuterol or Xopenex is BRONCHOSPASMS. Answered by Denyse Yeldon 1 year ago.

Because their patients be relieved by the effects of those medicines. Answered by Danyel Boda 1 year ago.


What's with the new "levalbuterol" Xopenex?
My insurance is only open to a university doctor program, i.e. student physicians.I got this kid that was sweet and tried to do everything he needed, but he seemed confused. I asked for a refill on my medicine, including my albuterol.I've never see this Xopenex before.Just curious if there's a... Asked by Albina Mosquera 1 year ago.

My insurance is only open to a university doctor program, i.e. student physicians. I got this kid that was sweet and tried to do everything he needed, but he seemed confused. I asked for a refill on my medicine, including my albuterol. I've never see this Xopenex before. Just curious if there's a difference? Answered by Nisha Pichette 1 year ago.

Xopenex and albuterol are very similar. Both are short acting bronchodilators which means they both open up your airway passages for about 4 to 6 hours. Both should work equally well.Xopenex is the newer inhaler and costs more than albuterol. The doctor knew what he was doing, I don't think you have anything to worry about. If you know anything about chemistry Xopenex is the R-isomer of albuterol. Answered by Lanette Galic 1 year ago.

supposedly xopenex has fewer side effects (less heart rate effects in particular) but otherwise, it's a more refined type of albuterol Answered by Florencia Intrieri 1 year ago.

xopenex is great! my boys use it and they have some pretty serious respiratory problems. you will like it better than albuterol. it is much cleaner. no jitters or crawly hair and half the speeding up of your heart rate. which i prefer. it tastes weird, sort of tinny, but it's much better for you. Answered by Sherril Strachn 1 year ago.

They are close to the same thing but, I would stick to my old albuterol since it has been used for years without too many problems. I like to "wait and see" whenever a new drug comes out. Answered by Margery Gelbowitz 1 year ago.


Med Students, Why are more doctors using albuterol and xopenex to treat pneumonia and CHF?
Good point about wasting money, Dr. ER. Asked by Nathaniel Sundeen 1 year ago.

Like the previous person said, Albuterol and xopenex are b2 agonist that act by relaxing smooth muscle surrounding the bronchioles. But, bronchiolar smooth muscles are not usually constricted in patients with pneumonia or CHF. Pneumonia is an infectious inflammatory disease of the alveoli and surrounding bronchioles. Bronchial walls become inflamed and edemitous, but it doesn't usually cause smooth muscle constriction unless you have some kind of underlying bronchospastic disease also like asthma or COPD with a reversible component. Albuterol and Xopenex relax Smooth muscle only and do nothing for airway inflammation and alveolar consolidation (fluid), as in both of these diseases. Corticosteroids are usually prescribed to treat the inflammation as well as an antibiotic to treat the infection. For the mucus and fluid in the lungs B2 agonist are useless. Bronchial Hygeine Therapy such as deep breathing and coughing exercises, intrapulmonary percussion and PEP therapy via the Accapella, maybe even CPT are appropriate. Also some Hyperinflation therapy to recruit collapsed alveoli such as Incentive Spirometry or IPPB. Increasing fluid intake to thin secretions is also appropriate. Some people say that the moisture alone from the treatments willthin secretions but this is false. Nebulized albuterol and xopenex particles are about 0.5 microns in size and do NOT reach the terminal bronchioles and alveoli where the fluid and infection are. It would take particle sizes of at least one tenth of that size to get there. If the Patient's oxygen saturations are affected by the consolidation Oxygen Therapy should be started. Breathing treatments do not increase oxygen saturations in the blood. Patients with CHF don't need to be given any more fluid, they need to be given Diuretics such as Lasix or Bumex to get rid of some of the fluid that is pertuding into the lungs. Patients with pneumonia will improve their condition without Bronchodilator Therapy if all of the other treatment is correct, provided they don't have an underlying asthma like condition. Likewise Patients with CHF will improve if they are diuresed properly. The ONLY indication for Bronchodilator Therapy with such drugs as Albuterol or Xopenex is BRONCHOSPASMS. Answered by Sandy Schaecher 1 year ago.

Pneumonia Albuterol Answered by Tommye Learman 1 year ago.

They shouldn't be...It's called lack of education or just because it makes the patient feel better about getting some sort of treatment. Pneumonia is at the alveolar level and albuterol (and xopenex) is a B2 specific drug used to dilate the constricted bronchioles of COPD and asthma patients. I think one of the problems is that medical professional have a bad habit of calling it a "breathing treatment", which implies it helps with ALL breathing ailments when it definitely does not. An albuterol nebulizer particle is nebulized to the size of about 5 microns, which is perfect for interacting with B2 receptor cells in the bronchioles. FYI, there are no B2 receptors in the alveoli. I've had nurses argue with me about treating patients with CHF with a bronchodilator....Nurse: "But they were admitted for respiratory failure"......ME: "There are many things that can cause respiratory failure and not all are treated with bronchodilators. Fluid in the alveoli cannot be relieved with a bronchodilator." I see this trend over and over again with medical professionals trying to treat all breathing ailments with albuterol. Thats why we in the respiratory therapy field have come to call it ALL BETTER ALL. We've even made cartoons, one of which declares, "I used to be a qudrapalegic until my Dr prescribed ALBUTEROL." You get the picture...It's very frustrating to have my time wasted, not to mention the cost to patient and insurance, treating every respiratory ailment with albuterol and knowing it only works with certain respiratory problems... Answered by Jessenia Ballew 1 year ago.

I completely agree with Jerry. Bronchospasm is the only reason to give a bronchodilator. If they have pneumonia, give them 1 treatment and if there is no change after the treatment there probably won't be. Answered by Sima Halen 1 year ago.

Zini what school did you learn that from. I would never give a patient with SVT a beta agonist, that's just dangerous. I also agree with Jerry. Plus it just eats up the money from the patient and hospital for giving uneeded treatment that has no effect. Answered by Marleen Didion 1 year ago.

Albutamol and Levosalbutamol are potent B2 recepter agonists. As you may know there are two types of Beta adregnergic receptors found in the body. B1 almost exclusively found in the sino atrial node of the heart and B2 found throughout the body including the smooth muscle of the bronchii. Pneumonia is characterised by infection, consolidation and immune response to bacteriological presence in the lung tissue. There is a large influx of fluid and lymphocytes due to the inflammatory response, this can severely decrease respiratory function and the primary cause of death due to pneumonia is metabolic acidosis and respiratory failure. B2 agonists such as albuterol act to relax the smooth muscle in the bronchii improving the airflow into the patients lungs increasing the liklihood of gaseous exchange. The inflammatory mediators act in some ways to occlude the airway in severe pneumonias, and B2 nebulisers could counteract this to a mild extent. As i mentioned above, there are 2 kinds of beta receptor. Just because albuterol and its companion are designed to act on B2 receptors only, there is always a slight affect on the B1 receptors of the heart. For the simple asthmatic patient, the simultaneous action on B1 receptors by their inhalers causes the annoying sideaffects, racing heart, dizziness, tingling and shaking. In someone with congestive heart failure however, the action on b1 receptors can be beneficial as the increase in heart rate would improve perfusion to tissues. It has also been found to be somewhat useful in supraventricular tachycardia and other arrythmias. Answered by Kamala Sterlace 1 year ago.


Xopenex inhaler too much?
Was having a bit of a breathing problem, I've been prescribed xopenex for my asthma instead of what I used to take albuteral ... I ended up having to take 5 puffs instead of just the usual two because of how severe my breathing was... Think I'm headed for an overdose? Or will I be ok heh. Asked by Bert Piedigrossi 1 year ago.

Fortunately they gave you Xopenex instead of albuterol since it has less of an effect on heart rate than albuterol. Rapid heart rate is the most common problem with overuse of albuterol, it can still be seen in xopenex although it is less common. If you are needing to use your inhaler often, or require a larger dose you should make an appointment with your doctor so they can prescribe you something such as Flovent, Symbicort, Advair, etc. which will help prevent your symptoms. Also, if you are fairly new to using inhalers you might benefit from asking your pharmacist to observe your technique to make sure you are using them properly. Answered by Marquis Hole 1 year ago.

Maybe you should call a nurse practitioner to answer this question if you are really concerned. Answered by Sparkle Mundahl 1 year ago.


Medicine used in nebulizer for copd. Albuterol or xopenex?
I have heard that xopenex is easier on the heart. Yet Medicare will not approve it. Why? I am using albuterol now and it seems to cause heart fiblitatios. What tp do? Asked by Melba Rosseau 1 year ago.

They won't approve it for one reason. Cost. Xopenex is much more expensive. For one thing, your doctor can write a letter of appeal, citing the reasons for needing Xopenex. On another point, in general patients should be on more long acting "controller" medications that have less effect on the heart. "Rescue" meds like albuterol or Xopenex are designed for infrequent, occasional use. Don't listen to the 'meerkat'. Albuterol is generic, Xopenex is brand only. There are generic nebulizer meds, just not all. And there are NO OTC inhalers. Far too dangerous. Good luck. Answered by Hung Levens 1 year ago.

there are no otc meds for nebulizers!!! Answered by Donetta Katzmark 1 year ago.

1. Ask your doctor for generic name nebulizer 2. Buy an over the counter brand yourself Answered by Rosalina Thate 1 year ago.


Xopenex Inhalers?
I would like to hear from anyone who has personal experience with Xopenex inhalers - do you find there are fewer side-effects than with albuterol/salbutamol (Ventolin, etc.)? Does anyone know if/when the inhaler will arrive in the UK? Asked by Brittni Tartaglia 1 year ago.

I know that the Xopenex has less side effects than the albuterol. The most common being less shakiness. If you do not experience the side effects of the albuterol then I wouldn't take the xopenex because it costs more. Contact a pharmacy in your area to find out where it is available. Good luck. Answered by Vern Holms 1 year ago.


Has anyone else who uses Xopenex had problems with abdominal bloating?
I know this isn't a very interesting question but I am bloated all the time and wonder if it might be a side effect of Xopenex. I've already Googled Xopenex to see if I can find any reference to it as a side effect and couldn't find anything but I thought it wouldn't hurt to ask. I'm more... Asked by Luciana Debraga 1 year ago.

I know this isn't a very interesting question but I am bloated all the time and wonder if it might be a side effect of Xopenex. I've already Googled Xopenex to see if I can find any reference to it as a side effect and couldn't find anything but I thought it wouldn't hurt to ask. I'm more interested in personal experiences than something someone might find on the web. Answered by Lorena Melendres 1 year ago.

Xopenex can cause an "upset stomach". Bloating could be described as an upset stomach. This is a mild side effect, continue to use Xopenex inhalation and talk to your doctor if the symptoms are very bothersome. Answered by Minda Drescher 1 year ago.

No trouble like that. Knowing the action of Xopenex i'd be suprised if the bloating is related Answered by Eliza Bucher 1 year ago.


4 year old prescribed Xopenex & Pulmicort?
We gave her the 1st breathing treatment this morning and I was wondering if this 2nd treatment will keep her up all night. If your children have been prescribed this, what was it for? A couple of doctors feel my daughter may have asthma, but are reluctant to diagnose it as that without a family history and... Asked by Courtney Hayhoe 1 year ago.

We gave her the 1st breathing treatment this morning and I was wondering if this 2nd treatment will keep her up all night. If your children have been prescribed this, what was it for? A couple of doctors feel my daughter may have asthma, but are reluctant to diagnose it as that without a family history and she's had allergy tests all come back negative. She has a constant cough only at night, and when she goes to the pediatrician I am told she is wheezing (this can only be heard by the doctor while she is listening to her lungs) even though during the appt she looks and feels fine. This has been going on since January. The coughing at night happens once she has been asleep for a few hours and then moves around. But the treatments make her cough really bad and since her treatment this morning she's been coughing and now has a low grade fever. We go back in the morning, but I'm hoping to hear from parents who may have been through this or may have an idea of what could be going on here Answered by Shelby Melonson 1 year ago.

Xopenex is supposed to be less bothersome in side effects than albuterol. They are closely related. They both are bronchodilators, but albuterol raises the heartrate, making the person jittery and keeping them awake. Xopenex is supposed to avoid the side effect. Pulmicort is an inhaled steroid. It is very important that she take this drug exactly as prescribed. It is a long acting drug and takes a while for you to see results. This drug will reduce the inflamation in her bronchioles, stopping the asthma attack and wheezing. This drug will be taken long term. (my daughter was on it until she was 6). We had many less asthma outbreaks while on this drug. It shouldnt keep her awake. When my daughter was young they did not prescribe singulair or other oral steroids for children, but I did have good results personally. I take care of adult patients who take the drug also. I'm not sure if it (xopenex) will keep her awake, my daughter had such bad asthma I wouldnt let them take her off albuterol once it started working for her. I have had patients tell me it is better but I have no personal experience with the drug. I wish you luck. My daughter is 8 yrs old, and never slept through the night until she was 5 due to the asthma. It does seem to get better as they get older. I think the coughing is because the secretions are able to move, and she is finally able to get them out of her lungs when she coughs. That is the goal with the xopenex. As is dilates the bronchioles, it allows the air to move better and lets your daughter get the secretions out that are stuck there. Answered by Tameka Spackman 1 year ago.

This happened to my 2 year old. We actually moved to Virginia for about 5 months and didn't have a single problem... not even a cold. Moved back to Ohio, and he's been having difficulty breathing/wheezing, so I had to take out the nebulizer (sadly). ANyways, I don't want to believe that my son has asthma either.. he's so young, and without proper testing, how do they know? I don't know what the first drug is,, but my son was also prescribed pulmicort. It's a steroid, and my doctor said that it's supposed to help develop the lungs (which seemed strange to me... i think he just thought that I was incapable of understanding the real medical term -for whatever reason...?). Anyways, I don't give it to him. I've read a lot of bad things about it, and besides that, the fact that it's a steroid isn't comforting. I took him to get a second opinion, and they prescribed a low dose of Singulair and Albuterol, which seems to be working well. It sounds to me like it's bronchitis. I also thought that my son suffers from Chronic bronchitis (which is when it keeps developing... viscious cycle). I'd go to a specialist (which is what I did). You can read about asthma/chronic bronchitis at www.drgreene.com . He's an amazing pediatrican who actually CARES about other babies. He gets online to chat with people who have health concerns with their children. Tune into one of his chats... he was very helpful to me. Good luck! Answered by Jimmy Nishida 1 year ago.

Xopenex is a brochodilator inhaler, which is best used for the treatment of reversible airway condition like asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) like bronchitis, emphysema. Asthma is a disease which is caused due to the narrowing and inflammation of the airway passage. Whereas COPD is regarded as a group of diseases, which occurs due to failure of lung to breath out the airs and makes the patient unable to breathe properly. The active component of this medicine is Levalbuterol hydrochloride, which is a very effective short-acting beta adrenergic receptor agonist and helps keep improving the symptoms like shortness of breath and wheezing. People suffering from respiratory disease can buy this online. It is a transparent and colorless solution. It acts by opening the airway passage and relaxing the bronchial muscles. It can be used in adults and the children between the age of 4-6 years. The molecular weight of levalbuterol hydrochloride is 275.8 and the chemical formula is C13H21NO3.HCL. For more information you can visit PharmacySell. Answered by Angelo Galdames 1 year ago.

Maybe it's in view that your son under no circumstances had a bacterial illness? If he had no bacterial illness, anti-biotics do not anything. They are harsh medicinal drugs, and using them will have to be limited to persons who want it. As for his cough, if he has had it for every week and a part (the throat is most probably in view that of the cough), it can be an breathing illness (reminiscent of bronchitis), or potentially strep throat if the throat is inflicting the cough. I might expect that your healthcare professional appeared in his throat to look if it was once all strep-ey. Both the ones matters may also be confirmed for. Bronchitis coughing can stay for weeks after it's cured. Usually nevertheless, if he has a top fever, it is bacterial, if this is a low(er) fever it is viral. Take your sons temperature, it's going to simply be a bloodless. But if it is been there for every week and a part, it was once/is by and large bacterial. Viruses depart beautiful rapidly. Depending on what he has, another anti-biotic perhaps wanted. Answered by Adeline Eslava 1 year ago.


Med Students, Why are more doctors using albuterol and xopenex to treat pneumonia and CHF?
Why the hell would you do peak flows or a PFT on someone with pneumonia. You know they would have a poor effort before even trying. Asked by Jeana Lokaphone 1 year ago.

Albuterol and xopenex are b2 agonist that act by relaxing smooth muscle surrounding the bronchioles. But, bronchiolar smooth muscles are not usually constricted in patients with pneumonia or CHF. Pneumonia is an infectious inflammatory disease of the alveoli and surrounding bronchioles. Bronchial walls become inflamed and edemitous, but it doesn't usually cause smooth muscle constriction unless you have some kind of underlying bronchospastic disease also like asthma or COPD with a reversible component. Albuterol and Xopenex relax Smooth muscle only and do nothing for airway inflammation and alveolar consolidation (fluid), as in both of these diseases. Corticosteroids are usually prescribed to treat the inflammation as well as an antibiotic to treat the infection. For the mucus and fluid in the lungs B2 agonist are useless. Bronchial Hygeine Therapy such as deep breathing and coughing exercises, intrapulmonary percussion and PEP therapy via the Accapella, maybe even CPT are appropriate. Also some Hyperinflation therapy to recruit collapsed alveoli such as Incentive Spirometry or IPPB. Increasing fluid intake to thin secretions is also appropriate. Some people say that the moisture alone from the treatments willthin secretions but this is false. Nebulized albuterol and xopenex particles are about 0.5 microns in size and do NOT reach the terminal bronchioles and alveoli where the fluid and infection are. It would take particle sizes of at least one tenth of that size to get there. If the Patient's oxygen saturations are affected by the consolidation Oxygen Therapy should be started. Breathing treatments do not increase oxygen saturations in the blood. Patients with CHF don't need to be given any more fluid, they need to be given Diuretics such as Lasix or Bumex to get rid of some of the fluid that is pertuding into the lungs. Patients with pneumonia will improve their condition without Bronchodilator Therapy if all of the other treatment is correct, provided they don't have an underlying asthma like condition. Likewise Patients with CHF will improve if they are diuresed properly. The ONLY indication for Bronchodilator Therapy with such drugs as Albuterol or Xopenex is BRONCHOSPASMS. Answered by Dewitt Wiens 1 year ago.

Probably shouldnt be. Depends on the severity of both conditions. 1. Pneumonia that causes bronchospasm as part of the pathology definitely indicates use of bronchodilators. Peak flow measurements or Pulmonary Function Testing should be utilized to determine the appropriateness of pharmacological intervention. 2. Severe CHF can cause bronchospasm from fluid in the airways and swelling (engorgement) of tissue in the airways ... it is not always indicated. The problem becomes that it is given inappropriately for almost any respiratory complaint, i.e., cough. Although a cough could signal bronchospasm ... likely not ..... I guess it is the same reason they give antibiotics when there are clearly no indications ... appeasement of the patient .. or the need to feel like you have done something .... not sure I understand the rationalization ... our superinfections are directly related to our indiscriminate use of antibiotics .... sorry for deviating from your question Answered by Cher Officer 1 year ago.

Albuterol and levalbuterol are pretty safe drugs, and work at least as well as antibiotics in the treatment of bronchitis. It makes some people feel better and isn't likely to do any harm. By extension, the same applies in pneumonia. Safety is a concern, though, in heart failure patients, who are at risk for dysrhythmias that can be aggravated by beta-agonists. Sometimes it seems necessary to use them when bronchospasm is prominent, though. If you look in the old medical literature, you'll see this referred to as "cardiac asthma," though the concept and term have fallen out of favor. But it isn't as simple as that. Lots of people with heart failure have co-existing COPD, and it's very difficult to tell which is causing symptoms, even with all the new BNP tests. And if you take the approach of using one levalbuterol nebulization and watching for the response, you're still open to the "post hoc ergo propter hoc" fallacy, so it boils down to SWAG (scientific wild-assed guess). Answered by Kamala Vecchio 1 year ago.


Med Students, Why are more doctors using albuterol and xopenex to treat pneumonia and CHF?
please explain in detail. medical jargon is understood. Asked by Shea Rasnic 1 year ago.

Albuterol and xopenex are b2 agonist that act by relaxing smooth muscle surrounding the bronchioles. But, bronchiolar smooth muscles are not usually constricted in patients with pneumonia or CHF. Pneumonia is an infectious inflammatory disease of the alveoli and surrounding bronchioles. Bronchial walls become inflamed and edemitous, but it doesn't usually cause smooth muscle constriction unless you have some kind of underlying bronchospastic disease also like asthma or COPD with a reversible component. Albuterol and Xopenex relax Smooth muscle only and do nothing for airway inflammation and alveolar consolidation (fluid), as in both of these diseases. Corticosteroids are usually prescribed to treat the inflammation as well as an antibiotic to treat the infection. For the mucus and fluid in the lungs B2 agonist are useless. Bronchial Hygeine Therapy such as deep breathing and coughing exercises, intrapulmonary percussion and PEP therapy via the Accapella, maybe even CPT are appropriate. Also some Hyperinflation therapy to recruit collapsed alveoli such as Incentive Spirometry or IPPB. Increasing fluid intake to thin secretions is also appropriate. Some people say that the moisture alone from the treatments willthin secretions but this is false. Nebulized albuterol and xopenex particles are about 0.5 microns in size and do NOT reach the terminal bronchioles and alveoli where the fluid and infection are. It would take particle sizes of at least one tenth of that size to get there. If the Patient's oxygen saturations are affected by the consolidation Oxygen Therapy should be started. Breathing treatments do not increase oxygen saturations in the blood. Patients with CHF don't need to be given any more fluid, they need to be given Diuretics such as Lasix or Bumex to get rid of some of the fluid that is pertuding into the lungs. Patients with pneumonia will improve their condition without Bronchodilator Therapy if all of the other treatment is correct, provided they don't have an underlying asthma like condition. Likewise Patients with CHF will improve if they are diuresed properly. The ONLY indication for Bronchodilator Therapy with such drugs as Albuterol or Xopenex is BRONCHOSPASMS. Answered by Avery Helliwell 1 year ago.

Because their patients be relieved by the effects of those medicines. Answered by Diamond Fellinger 1 year ago.


What's with the new "levalbuterol" Xopenex?
My insurance is only open to a university doctor program, i.e. student physicians.I got this kid that was sweet and tried to do everything he needed, but he seemed confused. I asked for a refill on my medicine, including my albuterol.I've never see this Xopenex before.Just curious if there's a... Asked by Inger Sperling 1 year ago.

My insurance is only open to a university doctor program, i.e. student physicians. I got this kid that was sweet and tried to do everything he needed, but he seemed confused. I asked for a refill on my medicine, including my albuterol. I've never see this Xopenex before. Just curious if there's a difference? Answered by Glynis Sakamaki 1 year ago.

Xopenex and albuterol are very similar. Both are short acting bronchodilators which means they both open up your airway passages for about 4 to 6 hours. Both should work equally well.Xopenex is the newer inhaler and costs more than albuterol. The doctor knew what he was doing, I don't think you have anything to worry about. If you know anything about chemistry Xopenex is the R-isomer of albuterol. Answered by Maple Sandlin 1 year ago.

supposedly xopenex has fewer side effects (less heart rate effects in particular) but otherwise, it's a more refined type of albuterol Answered by Eric Willford 1 year ago.

xopenex is great! my boys use it and they have some pretty serious respiratory problems. you will like it better than albuterol. it is much cleaner. no jitters or crawly hair and half the speeding up of your heart rate. which i prefer. it tastes weird, sort of tinny, but it's much better for you. Answered by Sheba Defouw 1 year ago.

They are close to the same thing but, I would stick to my old albuterol since it has been used for years without too many problems. I like to "wait and see" whenever a new drug comes out. Answered by Adela Halat 1 year ago.


Med Students, Why are more doctors using albuterol and xopenex to treat pneumonia and CHF?
Good point about wasting money, Dr. ER. Asked by Dot Willey 1 year ago.

Like the previous person said, Albuterol and xopenex are b2 agonist that act by relaxing smooth muscle surrounding the bronchioles. But, bronchiolar smooth muscles are not usually constricted in patients with pneumonia or CHF. Pneumonia is an infectious inflammatory disease of the alveoli and surrounding bronchioles. Bronchial walls become inflamed and edemitous, but it doesn't usually cause smooth muscle constriction unless you have some kind of underlying bronchospastic disease also like asthma or COPD with a reversible component. Albuterol and Xopenex relax Smooth muscle only and do nothing for airway inflammation and alveolar consolidation (fluid), as in both of these diseases. Corticosteroids are usually prescribed to treat the inflammation as well as an antibiotic to treat the infection. For the mucus and fluid in the lungs B2 agonist are useless. Bronchial Hygeine Therapy such as deep breathing and coughing exercises, intrapulmonary percussion and PEP therapy via the Accapella, maybe even CPT are appropriate. Also some Hyperinflation therapy to recruit collapsed alveoli such as Incentive Spirometry or IPPB. Increasing fluid intake to thin secretions is also appropriate. Some people say that the moisture alone from the treatments willthin secretions but this is false. Nebulized albuterol and xopenex particles are about 0.5 microns in size and do NOT reach the terminal bronchioles and alveoli where the fluid and infection are. It would take particle sizes of at least one tenth of that size to get there. If the Patient's oxygen saturations are affected by the consolidation Oxygen Therapy should be started. Breathing treatments do not increase oxygen saturations in the blood. Patients with CHF don't need to be given any more fluid, they need to be given Diuretics such as Lasix or Bumex to get rid of some of the fluid that is pertuding into the lungs. Patients with pneumonia will improve their condition without Bronchodilator Therapy if all of the other treatment is correct, provided they don't have an underlying asthma like condition. Likewise Patients with CHF will improve if they are diuresed properly. The ONLY indication for Bronchodilator Therapy with such drugs as Albuterol or Xopenex is BRONCHOSPASMS. Answered by Bettye Justo 1 year ago.

Pneumonia Albuterol Answered by Tad Schurz 1 year ago.

They shouldn't be...It's called lack of education or just because it makes the patient feel better about getting some sort of treatment. Pneumonia is at the alveolar level and albuterol (and xopenex) is a B2 specific drug used to dilate the constricted bronchioles of COPD and asthma patients. I think one of the problems is that medical professional have a bad habit of calling it a "breathing treatment", which implies it helps with ALL breathing ailments when it definitely does not. An albuterol nebulizer particle is nebulized to the size of about 5 microns, which is perfect for interacting with B2 receptor cells in the bronchioles. FYI, there are no B2 receptors in the alveoli. I've had nurses argue with me about treating patients with CHF with a bronchodilator....Nurse: "But they were admitted for respiratory failure"......ME: "There are many things that can cause respiratory failure and not all are treated with bronchodilators. Fluid in the alveoli cannot be relieved with a bronchodilator." I see this trend over and over again with medical professionals trying to treat all breathing ailments with albuterol. Thats why we in the respiratory therapy field have come to call it ALL BETTER ALL. We've even made cartoons, one of which declares, "I used to be a qudrapalegic until my Dr prescribed ALBUTEROL." You get the picture...It's very frustrating to have my time wasted, not to mention the cost to patient and insurance, treating every respiratory ailment with albuterol and knowing it only works with certain respiratory problems... Answered by Adelina Ilg 1 year ago.

I completely agree with Jerry. Bronchospasm is the only reason to give a bronchodilator. If they have pneumonia, give them 1 treatment and if there is no change after the treatment there probably won't be. Answered by Homer Pulgarin 1 year ago.

Zini what school did you learn that from. I would never give a patient with SVT a beta agonist, that's just dangerous. I also agree with Jerry. Plus it just eats up the money from the patient and hospital for giving uneeded treatment that has no effect. Answered by Celeste Matice 1 year ago.

Albutamol and Levosalbutamol are potent B2 recepter agonists. As you may know there are two types of Beta adregnergic receptors found in the body. B1 almost exclusively found in the sino atrial node of the heart and B2 found throughout the body including the smooth muscle of the bronchii. Pneumonia is characterised by infection, consolidation and immune response to bacteriological presence in the lung tissue. There is a large influx of fluid and lymphocytes due to the inflammatory response, this can severely decrease respiratory function and the primary cause of death due to pneumonia is metabolic acidosis and respiratory failure. B2 agonists such as albuterol act to relax the smooth muscle in the bronchii improving the airflow into the patients lungs increasing the liklihood of gaseous exchange. The inflammatory mediators act in some ways to occlude the airway in severe pneumonias, and B2 nebulisers could counteract this to a mild extent. As i mentioned above, there are 2 kinds of beta receptor. Just because albuterol and its companion are designed to act on B2 receptors only, there is always a slight affect on the B1 receptors of the heart. For the simple asthmatic patient, the simultaneous action on B1 receptors by their inhalers causes the annoying sideaffects, racing heart, dizziness, tingling and shaking. In someone with congestive heart failure however, the action on b1 receptors can be beneficial as the increase in heart rate would improve perfusion to tissues. It has also been found to be somewhat useful in supraventricular tachycardia and other arrythmias. Answered by Son Mayor 1 year ago.


Xopenex inhaler too much?
Was having a bit of a breathing problem, I've been prescribed xopenex for my asthma instead of what I used to take albuteral ... I ended up having to take 5 puffs instead of just the usual two because of how severe my breathing was... Think I'm headed for an overdose? Or will I be ok heh. Asked by Masako Jurica 1 year ago.

Fortunately they gave you Xopenex instead of albuterol since it has less of an effect on heart rate than albuterol. Rapid heart rate is the most common problem with overuse of albuterol, it can still be seen in xopenex although it is less common. If you are needing to use your inhaler often, or require a larger dose you should make an appointment with your doctor so they can prescribe you something such as Flovent, Symbicort, Advair, etc. which will help prevent your symptoms. Also, if you are fairly new to using inhalers you might benefit from asking your pharmacist to observe your technique to make sure you are using them properly. Answered by Librada Swoopes 1 year ago.

Maybe you should call a nurse practitioner to answer this question if you are really concerned. Answered by Janey Larcom 1 year ago.


Medicine used in nebulizer for copd. Albuterol or xopenex?
I have heard that xopenex is easier on the heart. Yet Medicare will not approve it. Why? I am using albuterol now and it seems to cause heart fiblitatios. What tp do? Asked by Dimple Sheaks 1 year ago.

They won't approve it for one reason. Cost. Xopenex is much more expensive. For one thing, your doctor can write a letter of appeal, citing the reasons for needing Xopenex. On another point, in general patients should be on more long acting "controller" medications that have less effect on the heart. "Rescue" meds like albuterol or Xopenex are designed for infrequent, occasional use. Don't listen to the 'meerkat'. Albuterol is generic, Xopenex is brand only. There are generic nebulizer meds, just not all. And there are NO OTC inhalers. Far too dangerous. Good luck. Answered by Clarita Lohmiller 1 year ago.

there are no otc meds for nebulizers!!! Answered by Janey Irigoyen 1 year ago.

1. Ask your doctor for generic name nebulizer 2. Buy an over the counter brand yourself Answered by Jerrold Jandrin 1 year ago.


Xopenex Inhalers?
I would like to hear from anyone who has personal experience with Xopenex inhalers - do you find there are fewer side-effects than with albuterol/salbutamol (Ventolin, etc.)? Does anyone know if/when the inhaler will arrive in the UK? Asked by Yolonda Skura 1 year ago.

I know that the Xopenex has less side effects than the albuterol. The most common being less shakiness. If you do not experience the side effects of the albuterol then I wouldn't take the xopenex because it costs more. Contact a pharmacy in your area to find out where it is available. Good luck. Answered by Aja Weissberg 1 year ago.


Has anyone else who uses Xopenex had problems with abdominal bloating?
I know this isn't a very interesting question but I am bloated all the time and wonder if it might be a side effect of Xopenex. I've already Googled Xopenex to see if I can find any reference to it as a side effect and couldn't find anything but I thought it wouldn't hurt to ask. I'm more... Asked by Rosalia Rehnquist 1 year ago.

I know this isn't a very interesting question but I am bloated all the time and wonder if it might be a side effect of Xopenex. I've already Googled Xopenex to see if I can find any reference to it as a side effect and couldn't find anything but I thought it wouldn't hurt to ask. I'm more interested in personal experiences than something someone might find on the web. Answered by Gabriel Boehnlein 1 year ago.

Xopenex can cause an "upset stomach". Bloating could be described as an upset stomach. This is a mild side effect, continue to use Xopenex inhalation and talk to your doctor if the symptoms are very bothersome. Answered by Kum Omura 1 year ago.

No trouble like that. Knowing the action of Xopenex i'd be suprised if the bloating is related Answered by Yessenia Blackmoore 1 year ago.


4 year old prescribed Xopenex & Pulmicort?
We gave her the 1st breathing treatment this morning and I was wondering if this 2nd treatment will keep her up all night. If your children have been prescribed this, what was it for? A couple of doctors feel my daughter may have asthma, but are reluctant to diagnose it as that without a family history and... Asked by Sid Alveraz 1 year ago.

We gave her the 1st breathing treatment this morning and I was wondering if this 2nd treatment will keep her up all night. If your children have been prescribed this, what was it for? A couple of doctors feel my daughter may have asthma, but are reluctant to diagnose it as that without a family history and she's had allergy tests all come back negative. She has a constant cough only at night, and when she goes to the pediatrician I am told she is wheezing (this can only be heard by the doctor while she is listening to her lungs) even though during the appt she looks and feels fine. This has been going on since January. The coughing at night happens once she has been asleep for a few hours and then moves around. But the treatments make her cough really bad and since her treatment this morning she's been coughing and now has a low grade fever. We go back in the morning, but I'm hoping to hear from parents who may have been through this or may have an idea of what could be going on here Answered by Damaris Trifone 1 year ago.

Xopenex is supposed to be less bothersome in side effects than albuterol. They are closely related. They both are bronchodilators, but albuterol raises the heartrate, making the person jittery and keeping them awake. Xopenex is supposed to avoid the side effect. Pulmicort is an inhaled steroid. It is very important that she take this drug exactly as prescribed. It is a long acting drug and takes a while for you to see results. This drug will reduce the inflamation in her bronchioles, stopping the asthma attack and wheezing. This drug will be taken long term. (my daughter was on it until she was 6). We had many less asthma outbreaks while on this drug. It shouldnt keep her awake. When my daughter was young they did not prescribe singulair or other oral steroids for children, but I did have good results personally. I take care of adult patients who take the drug also. I'm not sure if it (xopenex) will keep her awake, my daughter had such bad asthma I wouldnt let them take her off albuterol once it started working for her. I have had patients tell me it is better but I have no personal experience with the drug. I wish you luck. My daughter is 8 yrs old, and never slept through the night until she was 5 due to the asthma. It does seem to get better as they get older. I think the coughing is because the secretions are able to move, and she is finally able to get them out of her lungs when she coughs. That is the goal with the xopenex. As is dilates the bronchioles, it allows the air to move better and lets your daughter get the secretions out that are stuck there. Answered by Angelic Gilstrap 1 year ago.

This happened to my 2 year old. We actually moved to Virginia for about 5 months and didn't have a single problem... not even a cold. Moved back to Ohio, and he's been having difficulty breathing/wheezing, so I had to take out the nebulizer (sadly). ANyways, I don't want to believe that my son has asthma either.. he's so young, and without proper testing, how do they know? I don't know what the first drug is,, but my son was also prescribed pulmicort. It's a steroid, and my doctor said that it's supposed to help develop the lungs (which seemed strange to me... i think he just thought that I was incapable of understanding the real medical term -for whatever reason...?). Anyways, I don't give it to him. I've read a lot of bad things about it, and besides that, the fact that it's a steroid isn't comforting. I took him to get a second opinion, and they prescribed a low dose of Singulair and Albuterol, which seems to be working well. It sounds to me like it's bronchitis. I also thought that my son suffers from Chronic bronchitis (which is when it keeps developing... viscious cycle). I'd go to a specialist (which is what I did). You can read about asthma/chronic bronchitis at www.drgreene.com . He's an amazing pediatrican who actually CARES about other babies. He gets online to chat with people who have health concerns with their children. Tune into one of his chats... he was very helpful to me. Good luck! Answered by Michell Saice 1 year ago.

Xopenex is a brochodilator inhaler, which is best used for the treatment of reversible airway condition like asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) like bronchitis, emphysema. Asthma is a disease which is caused due to the narrowing and inflammation of the airway passage. Whereas COPD is regarded as a group of diseases, which occurs due to failure of lung to breath out the airs and makes the patient unable to breathe properly. The active component of this medicine is Levalbuterol hydrochloride, which is a very effective short-acting beta adrenergic receptor agonist and helps keep improving the symptoms like shortness of breath and wheezing. People suffering from respiratory disease can buy this online. It is a transparent and colorless solution. It acts by opening the airway passage and relaxing the bronchial muscles. It can be used in adults and the children between the age of 4-6 years. The molecular weight of levalbuterol hydrochloride is 275.8 and the chemical formula is C13H21NO3.HCL. For more information you can visit PharmacySell. Answered by Otis Alshouse 1 year ago.

Maybe it's in view that your son under no circumstances had a bacterial illness? If he had no bacterial illness, anti-biotics do not anything. They are harsh medicinal drugs, and using them will have to be limited to persons who want it. As for his cough, if he has had it for every week and a part (the throat is most probably in view that of the cough), it can be an breathing illness (reminiscent of bronchitis), or potentially strep throat if the throat is inflicting the cough. I might expect that your healthcare professional appeared in his throat to look if it was once all strep-ey. Both the ones matters may also be confirmed for. Bronchitis coughing can stay for weeks after it's cured. Usually nevertheless, if he has a top fever, it is bacterial, if this is a low(er) fever it is viral. Take your sons temperature, it's going to simply be a bloodless. But if it is been there for every week and a part, it was once/is by and large bacterial. Viruses depart beautiful rapidly. Depending on what he has, another anti-biotic perhaps wanted. Answered by Kortney Ardon 1 year ago.


Med Students, Why are more doctors using albuterol and xopenex to treat pneumonia and CHF?
Why the hell would you do peak flows or a PFT on someone with pneumonia. You know they would have a poor effort before even trying. Asked by Noma Osborne 1 year ago.

Albuterol and xopenex are b2 agonist that act by relaxing smooth muscle surrounding the bronchioles. But, bronchiolar smooth muscles are not usually constricted in patients with pneumonia or CHF. Pneumonia is an infectious inflammatory disease of the alveoli and surrounding bronchioles. Bronchial walls become inflamed and edemitous, but it doesn't usually cause smooth muscle constriction unless you have some kind of underlying bronchospastic disease also like asthma or COPD with a reversible component. Albuterol and Xopenex relax Smooth muscle only and do nothing for airway inflammation and alveolar consolidation (fluid), as in both of these diseases. Corticosteroids are usually prescribed to treat the inflammation as well as an antibiotic to treat the infection. For the mucus and fluid in the lungs B2 agonist are useless. Bronchial Hygeine Therapy such as deep breathing and coughing exercises, intrapulmonary percussion and PEP therapy via the Accapella, maybe even CPT are appropriate. Also some Hyperinflation therapy to recruit collapsed alveoli such as Incentive Spirometry or IPPB. Increasing fluid intake to thin secretions is also appropriate. Some people say that the moisture alone from the treatments willthin secretions but this is false. Nebulized albuterol and xopenex particles are about 0.5 microns in size and do NOT reach the terminal bronchioles and alveoli where the fluid and infection are. It would take particle sizes of at least one tenth of that size to get there. If the Patient's oxygen saturations are affected by the consolidation Oxygen Therapy should be started. Breathing treatments do not increase oxygen saturations in the blood. Patients with CHF don't need to be given any more fluid, they need to be given Diuretics such as Lasix or Bumex to get rid of some of the fluid that is pertuding into the lungs. Patients with pneumonia will improve their condition without Bronchodilator Therapy if all of the other treatment is correct, provided they don't have an underlying asthma like condition. Likewise Patients with CHF will improve if they are diuresed properly. The ONLY indication for Bronchodilator Therapy with such drugs as Albuterol or Xopenex is BRONCHOSPASMS. Answered by Rima Grennay 1 year ago.

Probably shouldnt be. Depends on the severity of both conditions. 1. Pneumonia that causes bronchospasm as part of the pathology definitely indicates use of bronchodilators. Peak flow measurements or Pulmonary Function Testing should be utilized to determine the appropriateness of pharmacological intervention. 2. Severe CHF can cause bronchospasm from fluid in the airways and swelling (engorgement) of tissue in the airways ... it is not always indicated. The problem becomes that it is given inappropriately for almost any respiratory complaint, i.e., cough. Although a cough could signal bronchospasm ... likely not ..... I guess it is the same reason they give antibiotics when there are clearly no indications ... appeasement of the patient .. or the need to feel like you have done something .... not sure I understand the rationalization ... our superinfections are directly related to our indiscriminate use of antibiotics .... sorry for deviating from your question Answered by Mignon Susoev 1 year ago.

Albuterol and levalbuterol are pretty safe drugs, and work at least as well as antibiotics in the treatment of bronchitis. It makes some people feel better and isn't likely to do any harm. By extension, the same applies in pneumonia. Safety is a concern, though, in heart failure patients, who are at risk for dysrhythmias that can be aggravated by beta-agonists. Sometimes it seems necessary to use them when bronchospasm is prominent, though. If you look in the old medical literature, you'll see this referred to as "cardiac asthma," though the concept and term have fallen out of favor. But it isn't as simple as that. Lots of people with heart failure have co-existing COPD, and it's very difficult to tell which is causing symptoms, even with all the new BNP tests. And if you take the approach of using one levalbuterol nebulization and watching for the response, you're still open to the "post hoc ergo propter hoc" fallacy, so it boils down to SWAG (scientific wild-assed guess). Answered by Joe Stoldt 1 year ago.


Med Students, Why are more doctors using albuterol and xopenex to treat pneumonia and CHF?
please explain in detail. medical jargon is understood. Asked by Gina Mclean 1 year ago.

Albuterol and xopenex are b2 agonist that act by relaxing smooth muscle surrounding the bronchioles. But, bronchiolar smooth muscles are not usually constricted in patients with pneumonia or CHF. Pneumonia is an infectious inflammatory disease of the alveoli and surrounding bronchioles. Bronchial walls become inflamed and edemitous, but it doesn't usually cause smooth muscle constriction unless you have some kind of underlying bronchospastic disease also like asthma or COPD with a reversible component. Albuterol and Xopenex relax Smooth muscle only and do nothing for airway inflammation and alveolar consolidation (fluid), as in both of these diseases. Corticosteroids are usually prescribed to treat the inflammation as well as an antibiotic to treat the infection. For the mucus and fluid in the lungs B2 agonist are useless. Bronchial Hygeine Therapy such as deep breathing and coughing exercises, intrapulmonary percussion and PEP therapy via the Accapella, maybe even CPT are appropriate. Also some Hyperinflation therapy to recruit collapsed alveoli such as Incentive Spirometry or IPPB. Increasing fluid intake to thin secretions is also appropriate. Some people say that the moisture alone from the treatments willthin secretions but this is false. Nebulized albuterol and xopenex particles are about 0.5 microns in size and do NOT reach the terminal bronchioles and alveoli where the fluid and infection are. It would take particle sizes of at least one tenth of that size to get there. If the Patient's oxygen saturations are affected by the consolidation Oxygen Therapy should be started. Breathing treatments do not increase oxygen saturations in the blood. Patients with CHF don't need to be given any more fluid, they need to be given Diuretics such as Lasix or Bumex to get rid of some of the fluid that is pertuding into the lungs. Patients with pneumonia will improve their condition without Bronchodilator Therapy if all of the other treatment is correct, provided they don't have an underlying asthma like condition. Likewise Patients with CHF will improve if they are diuresed properly. The ONLY indication for Bronchodilator Therapy with such drugs as Albuterol or Xopenex is BRONCHOSPASMS. Answered by Jenny Strathman 1 year ago.

Because their patients be relieved by the effects of those medicines. Answered by Miki Tramm 1 year ago.


What's with the new "levalbuterol" Xopenex?
My insurance is only open to a university doctor program, i.e. student physicians.I got this kid that was sweet and tried to do everything he needed, but he seemed confused. I asked for a refill on my medicine, including my albuterol.I've never see this Xopenex before.Just curious if there's a... Asked by Clyde Nastri 1 year ago.

My insurance is only open to a university doctor program, i.e. student physicians. I got this kid that was sweet and tried to do everything he needed, but he seemed confused. I asked for a refill on my medicine, including my albuterol. I've never see this Xopenex before. Just curious if there's a difference? Answered by Jody Ghebremicael 1 year ago.

Xopenex and albuterol are very similar. Both are short acting bronchodilators which means they both open up your airway passages for about 4 to 6 hours. Both should work equally well.Xopenex is the newer inhaler and costs more than albuterol. The doctor knew what he was doing, I don't think you have anything to worry about. If you know anything about chemistry Xopenex is the R-isomer of albuterol. Answered by Gussie Sperandio 1 year ago.

supposedly xopenex has fewer side effects (less heart rate effects in particular) but otherwise, it's a more refined type of albuterol Answered by Destiny Precissi 1 year ago.

xopenex is great! my boys use it and they have some pretty serious respiratory problems. you will like it better than albuterol. it is much cleaner. no jitters or crawly hair and half the speeding up of your heart rate. which i prefer. it tastes weird, sort of tinny, but it's much better for you. Answered by Tristan Lank 1 year ago.

They are close to the same thing but, I would stick to my old albuterol since it has been used for years without too many problems. I like to "wait and see" whenever a new drug comes out. Answered by Octavio Cotey 1 year ago.


Med Students, Why are more doctors using albuterol and xopenex to treat pneumonia and CHF?
Good point about wasting money, Dr. ER. Asked by Celinda Reick 1 year ago.

Like the previous person said, Albuterol and xopenex are b2 agonist that act by relaxing smooth muscle surrounding the bronchioles. But, bronchiolar smooth muscles are not usually constricted in patients with pneumonia or CHF. Pneumonia is an infectious inflammatory disease of the alveoli and surrounding bronchioles. Bronchial walls become inflamed and edemitous, but it doesn't usually cause smooth muscle constriction unless you have some kind of underlying bronchospastic disease also like asthma or COPD with a reversible component. Albuterol and Xopenex relax Smooth muscle only and do nothing for airway inflammation and alveolar consolidation (fluid), as in both of these diseases. Corticosteroids are usually prescribed to treat the inflammation as well as an antibiotic to treat the infection. For the mucus and fluid in the lungs B2 agonist are useless. Bronchial Hygeine Therapy such as deep breathing and coughing exercises, intrapulmonary percussion and PEP therapy via the Accapella, maybe even CPT are appropriate. Also some Hyperinflation therapy to recruit collapsed alveoli such as Incentive Spirometry or IPPB. Increasing fluid intake to thin secretions is also appropriate. Some people say that the moisture alone from the treatments willthin secretions but this is false. Nebulized albuterol and xopenex particles are about 0.5 microns in size and do NOT reach the terminal bronchioles and alveoli where the fluid and infection are. It would take particle sizes of at least one tenth of that size to get there. If the Patient's oxygen saturations are affected by the consolidation Oxygen Therapy should be started. Breathing treatments do not increase oxygen saturations in the blood. Patients with CHF don't need to be given any more fluid, they need to be given Diuretics such as Lasix or Bumex to get rid of some of the fluid that is pertuding into the lungs. Patients with pneumonia will improve their condition without Bronchodilator Therapy if all of the other treatment is correct, provided they don't have an underlying asthma like condition. Likewise Patients with CHF will improve if they are diuresed properly. The ONLY indication for Bronchodilator Therapy with such drugs as Albuterol or Xopenex is BRONCHOSPASMS. Answered by Mayola Smaldone 1 year ago.

Pneumonia Albuterol Answered by Tyrell Fiallo 1 year ago.

They shouldn't be...It's called lack of education or just because it makes the patient feel better about getting some sort of treatment. Pneumonia is at the alveolar level and albuterol (and xopenex) is a B2 specific drug used to dilate the constricted bronchioles of COPD and asthma patients. I think one of the problems is that medical professional have a bad habit of calling it a "breathing treatment", which implies it helps with ALL breathing ailments when it definitely does not. An albuterol nebulizer particle is nebulized to the size of about 5 microns, which is perfect for interacting with B2 receptor cells in the bronchioles. FYI, there are no B2 receptors in the alveoli. I've had nurses argue with me about treating patients with CHF with a bronchodilator....Nurse: "But they were admitted for respiratory failure"......ME: "There are many things that can cause respiratory failure and not all are treated with bronchodilators. Fluid in the alveoli cannot be relieved with a bronchodilator." I see this trend over and over again with medical professionals trying to treat all breathing ailments with albuterol. Thats why we in the respiratory therapy field have come to call it ALL BETTER ALL. We've even made cartoons, one of which declares, "I used to be a qudrapalegic until my Dr prescribed ALBUTEROL." You get the picture...It's very frustrating to have my time wasted, not to mention the cost to patient and insurance, treating every respiratory ailment with albuterol and knowing it only works with certain respiratory problems... Answered by Dianne Nunnelley 1 year ago.

I completely agree with Jerry. Bronchospasm is the only reason to give a bronchodilator. If they have pneumonia, give them 1 treatment and if there is no change after the treatment there probably won't be. Answered by Lenora Teaff 1 year ago.

Zini what school did you learn that from. I would never give a patient with SVT a beta agonist, that's just dangerous. I also agree with Jerry. Plus it just eats up the money from the patient and hospital for giving uneeded treatment that has no effect. Answered by Tammera Simonelli 1 year ago.

Albutamol and Levosalbutamol are potent B2 recepter agonists. As you may know there are two types of Beta adregnergic receptors found in the body. B1 almost exclusively found in the sino atrial node of the heart and B2 found throughout the body including the smooth muscle of the bronchii. Pneumonia is characterised by infection, consolidation and immune response to bacteriological presence in the lung tissue. There is a large influx of fluid and lymphocytes due to the inflammatory response, this can severely decrease respiratory function and the primary cause of death due to pneumonia is metabolic acidosis and respiratory failure. B2 agonists such as albuterol act to relax the smooth muscle in the bronchii improving the airflow into the patients lungs increasing the liklihood of gaseous exchange. The inflammatory mediators act in some ways to occlude the airway in severe pneumonias, and B2 nebulisers could counteract this to a mild extent. As i mentioned above, there are 2 kinds of beta receptor. Just because albuterol and its companion are designed to act on B2 receptors only, there is always a slight affect on the B1 receptors of the heart. For the simple asthmatic patient, the simultaneous action on B1 receptors by their inhalers causes the annoying sideaffects, racing heart, dizziness, tingling and shaking. In someone with congestive heart failure however, the action on b1 receptors can be beneficial as the increase in heart rate would improve perfusion to tissues. It has also been found to be somewhat useful in supraventricular tachycardia and other arrythmias. Answered by Lona Manco 1 year ago.


Xopenex inhaler too much?
Was having a bit of a breathing problem, I've been prescribed xopenex for my asthma instead of what I used to take albuteral ... I ended up having to take 5 puffs instead of just the usual two because of how severe my breathing was... Think I'm headed for an overdose? Or will I be ok heh. Asked by Lyndon Mccusker 1 year ago.

Fortunately they gave you Xopenex instead of albuterol since it has less of an effect on heart rate than albuterol. Rapid heart rate is the most common problem with overuse of albuterol, it can still be seen in xopenex although it is less common. If you are needing to use your inhaler often, or require a larger dose you should make an appointment with your doctor so they can prescribe you something such as Flovent, Symbicort, Advair, etc. which will help prevent your symptoms. Also, if you are fairly new to using inhalers you might benefit from asking your pharmacist to observe your technique to make sure you are using them properly. Answered by Leticia Kassis 1 year ago.

Maybe you should call a nurse practitioner to answer this question if you are really concerned. Answered by Marylouise Iseman 1 year ago.


Medicine used in nebulizer for copd. Albuterol or xopenex?
I have heard that xopenex is easier on the heart. Yet Medicare will not approve it. Why? I am using albuterol now and it seems to cause heart fiblitatios. What tp do? Asked by Esteban Yunt 1 year ago.

They won't approve it for one reason. Cost. Xopenex is much more expensive. For one thing, your doctor can write a letter of appeal, citing the reasons for needing Xopenex. On another point, in general patients should be on more long acting "controller" medications that have less effect on the heart. "Rescue" meds like albuterol or Xopenex are designed for infrequent, occasional use. Don't listen to the 'meerkat'. Albuterol is generic, Xopenex is brand only. There are generic nebulizer meds, just not all. And there are NO OTC inhalers. Far too dangerous. Good luck. Answered by Josiah Drude 1 year ago.

there are no otc meds for nebulizers!!! Answered by Terina Cridge 1 year ago.

1. Ask your doctor for generic name nebulizer 2. Buy an over the counter brand yourself Answered by Milagro Jacobus 1 year ago.


Xopenex Inhalers?
I would like to hear from anyone who has personal experience with Xopenex inhalers - do you find there are fewer side-effects than with albuterol/salbutamol (Ventolin, etc.)? Does anyone know if/when the inhaler will arrive in the UK? Asked by Jonathan Koenig 1 year ago.

I know that the Xopenex has less side effects than the albuterol. The most common being less shakiness. If you do not experience the side effects of the albuterol then I wouldn't take the xopenex because it costs more. Contact a pharmacy in your area to find out where it is available. Good luck. Answered by Margarite Teator 1 year ago.


Has anyone else who uses Xopenex had problems with abdominal bloating?
I know this isn't a very interesting question but I am bloated all the time and wonder if it might be a side effect of Xopenex. I've already Googled Xopenex to see if I can find any reference to it as a side effect and couldn't find anything but I thought it wouldn't hurt to ask. I'm more... Asked by Toney Kauphusman 1 year ago.

I know this isn't a very interesting question but I am bloated all the time and wonder if it might be a side effect of Xopenex. I've already Googled Xopenex to see if I can find any reference to it as a side effect and couldn't find anything but I thought it wouldn't hurt to ask. I'm more interested in personal experiences than something someone might find on the web. Answered by Julie Mood 1 year ago.

Xopenex can cause an "upset stomach". Bloating could be described as an upset stomach. This is a mild side effect, continue to use Xopenex inhalation and talk to your doctor if the symptoms are very bothersome. Answered by Cameron Craycraft 1 year ago.

No trouble like that. Knowing the action of Xopenex i'd be suprised if the bloating is related Answered by Carl Soto 1 year ago.


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