Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 017256/001.

Names and composition

"XENON XE 133" is the commercial name of a drug composed of XENON XE-133.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017256/001 XENON XE 133 XENON XE-133 INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1.3-1.7 CI per AMP
017256/002 XENON XE 133 XENON XE-133 GAS/INHALATION 1 CI per AMP
017283/001 XENON XE 133 XENON XE-133 INJECTABLE/INJECTION 6.3mCi per ML
017284/001 XENON XE 133 XENON XE-133 GAS/INHALATION 10mCi per VIAL
017284/002 XENON XE 133 XENON XE-133 GAS/INHALATION 20mCi per VIAL
017550/001 XENON XE 133 XENON XE-133 GAS/INHALATION 5-100 CI per CYLINDER
017550/003 XENON XE 133 XENON XE-133 GAS/INHALATION 0.25-5 CI per AMP
017687/002 XENON XE 133 XENON XE-133 GAS/INHALATION 10mCi per VIAL
017687/003 XENON XE 133 XENON XE-133 GAS/INHALATION 20mCi per VIAL
018327/001 XENON XE 133 XENON XE-133 GAS/INHALATION 10mCi per VIAL
018327/002 XENON XE 133 XENON XE-133 GAS/INHALATION 20mCi per VIAL

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017256/001 XENON XE 133 XENON XE-133 INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1.3-1.7 CI per AMP
017256/002 XENON XE 133 XENON XE-133 GAS/INHALATION 1 CI per AMP
017262/002 XENEISOL XENON XE-133 SOLUTION/INHALATION, INJECTION 18-25mCi per AMP
017283/001 XENON XE 133 XENON XE-133 INJECTABLE/INJECTION 6.3mCi per ML
017284/001 XENON XE 133 XENON XE-133 GAS/INHALATION 10mCi per VIAL
017284/002 XENON XE 133 XENON XE-133 GAS/INHALATION 20mCi per VIAL
017550/001 XENON XE 133 XENON XE-133 GAS/INHALATION 5-100 CI per CYLINDER
017550/003 XENON XE 133 XENON XE-133 GAS/INHALATION 0.25-5 CI per AMP
017687/001 XENON XE 133-V.S.S. XENON XE-133 GAS/INHALATION 10mCi per VIAL
017687/002 XENON XE 133 XENON XE-133 GAS/INHALATION 10mCi per VIAL
017687/003 XENON XE 133 XENON XE-133 GAS/INHALATION 20mCi per VIAL
018327/001 XENON XE 133 XENON XE-133 GAS/INHALATION 10mCi per VIAL
018327/002 XENON XE 133 XENON XE-133 GAS/INHALATION 20mCi per VIAL

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Answered questions

How can a radioisotope can have decay products of 99.3% beta radiation and 36.5% gamma radiation?
http://www.drugs.com/pro/xenon-xe-133-ga… it is a table displaying the decay of Xenon133. It shows 99.3% beta radiation and 36.5% gamma radiation. how can this be? it adds up to more than 100%? Asked by Loraine Knoerzer 1 year ago.

The link I saw also lists some K-alpha and K-beta x-rays to the extent of another 47%. That is because the gamma and x-rays are energy that accompany some decay when the nuclide is produced in a metastable state (that is what that little -m following the isotope means) and has to dump energy. Not all of them have to. Answered by Delilah Panyik 1 year ago.

Apples and oranges. Answered by Ozella Miyagawa 1 year ago.


Why is there more Xenon than any other atomic element coming from Fukushima?
http://transport.nilu.no/browser/fpv_fuku?fpp=conccol_Xe-133_;region=Japan Look at the map and click Xenon compared to Iridium throughout the world and answer me why there is so much Xenon in the world. Asked by Margeret Grinder 1 year ago.

Iridium? I guess you mean Iodine. Xenon is a byproduct of nuclear fission. I expect that we you see in the maps is due to Xenon being a gas. All other radioactive elements shown in the map are heavier than air. After they fall down into the ocean after a while they do not show up on the map anymore. Xenon is a gas lighter than air and slowly rises up into space. Thats why it stays in the atmosphere longer. Answered by Lasandra Fatheree 1 year ago.


I need information on the element Xenon?
Asked by Bryce Decourcey 1 year ago.

Xenon is a chemical element in the periodic table that has the symbol Xe and atomic number 54. A colorless, heavy, odorless noble gas, xenon occurs in the earth's atmosphere in trace amounts and was part of the first noble gas compound synthesized. Xenon is a member of the zero-valence elements that are called noble or inert gases, however, "inert" is not a completely accurate description of this chemical series since some noble gas compounds have been synthesized. In a gas filled tube, xenon emits a blue glow when the gas is excited by electrical discharge. Using tens of gigapascals of pressure, xenon has been forced into a metallic phase.[3] Xenon can also form clathrates with water when atoms of it are trapped in a lattice of the water molecules This gas is most widely and most famously used in light-emitting devices called Xenon flash lamps, which are used in photographic flashes, stroboscopic lamps, to excite the active medium in lasers which then generate coherent light, in bactericidal lamps (rarely), and in certain dermatological uses. Continuous, short-arc, high pressure Xenon arc lamps have a color temperature closely approximating noon sunlight and are used in solar simulators, some projection systems, automotive HID headlights and other specialized uses. They are an excellent source of short wavelength ultraviolet light and they have intense emissions in the near infrared, which are used in some night vision systems. Other uses of Xenon: * Has been used as a general anaesthetic, though the cost is prohibitive. * In nuclear energy applications it is used in bubble chambers, probes, and in other areas where a high molecular weight and inert nature is a desirable quality. * Perxenates are used as oxidizing agents in analytical chemistry. * The isotope Xe-133 is useful as a radioisotope. Xenon is a trace gas in Earth's atmosphere, occurring in one part in twenty million. The element is obtained commercially through extraction from the residues of liquefied air. This noble gas is naturally found in gases emitted from some mineral springs. Xe-133 and Xe-135 are synthesized by neutron irradiation within air-cooled nuclear reactors. Answered by Filiberto Dozal 1 year ago.

(i think what tammi gave is more tha n enough but still read the history of xenon......... Gr. xenon, stranger) Discovered by Ramsay and Travers in 1898 in the residue left after evaporating liquid air components. Xenon is a member of the so-called noble or "inert" gases. It is present in the atmosphere to the extent of about one part in twenty million. Xenon is present in the Martian atmosphere to the extent of 0.08 ppm. the element is found in the gases evolved from certain mineral springs, and is commercially obtained by extraction from liquid air. Natural xenon is composed of nine stable isotopes. In addition to these, 20 unstable isotopes have been characterized. Before 1962, it had generally been assumed that xenon and other noble gases were unable to form compounds. Evidence has been mounting in the past few years that xenon, as well as other members of zero valance elements, do form compounds. Among the "compounds" of xenon now reported are sodium perxenate, xenon deuterate, xenon hydrate, difluoride, tetrafluoride, and hexafluoride. Xenon trioxide, which is highly explosive, has been prepared. More than 80 xenon compounds have been made with xenon chemically bonded to fluorine and oxygen. Some xenon compounds are colored. Metallic xenon has been produced, using several hundred kilobars of pressure. Xenon in a vacuum tube produces a beautiful blue glow when excited by an electrical discharge. The gas is used in making electron tubes, stroboscopic lamps, bactericidal lamps, and lamps used to excite ruby lasers for generating coherent light. Xenon is used in the nuclear energy field in bubble chambers, probes, and other applications where a high molecular weight is of value. The perxenates are used in analytical chemistry as oxidizing agents. 133Xe and 135Xe are produced by neutron irradiation in air cooled nuclear reactors. 133Xe has useful applications as a radioisotope. The element is available in sealed glass containers of gas at standard pressure. Xenon is not toxic, but its compounds are highly toxic because of their strong oxidizing characteristics. Answered by Patrick Klepacki 1 year ago.


How are isotopes used in biology?
emergency bio homework! please help! Asked by Ying Tubolino 1 year ago.

Iodine-125 (I-125) and Palladium-103 (Pd-103) for treating prostate cancer Iodine-131(I-131) to image the thyroid. Xenon-133 (Xe-133) to image the lung. Carbon-14 (C-14) to date recent fossils Answered by Laure Kwilosz 1 year ago.

Isotopes Used In Smoke Alarms Answered by Ludivina Mccary 1 year ago.

they are used in carbon dating. For instance, the carbon 14 is a radioactive isotope of carbon which is used in determining the age of the fossils, and the age of other things. Other isotopes such as Iodine-131 are used in detecting throat disorders. Isotopes such as Americium 245 are used in home smoke alarms. Isotopes of other elements are used in X-ray machines..... Answered by Samatha Bloomfield 1 year ago.


How can a radioisotope can have decay products of 99.3% beta radiation and 36.5% gamma radiation?
http://www.drugs.com/pro/xenon-xe-133-ga… it is a table displaying the decay of Xenon133. It shows 99.3% beta radiation and 36.5% gamma radiation. how can this be? it adds up to more than 100%? Asked by Doloris Stahlberg 1 year ago.

The link I saw also lists some K-alpha and K-beta x-rays to the extent of another 47%. That is because the gamma and x-rays are energy that accompany some decay when the nuclide is produced in a metastable state (that is what that little -m following the isotope means) and has to dump energy. Not all of them have to. Answered by Krysten Kravetsky 1 year ago.

Apples and oranges. Answered by Sharyn Talaro 1 year ago.


Why is there more Xenon than any other atomic element coming from Fukushima?
http://transport.nilu.no/browser/fpv_fuku?fpp=conccol_Xe-133_;region=Japan Look at the map and click Xenon compared to Iridium throughout the world and answer me why there is so much Xenon in the world. Asked by Christiana Klette 1 year ago.

Iridium? I guess you mean Iodine. Xenon is a byproduct of nuclear fission. I expect that we you see in the maps is due to Xenon being a gas. All other radioactive elements shown in the map are heavier than air. After they fall down into the ocean after a while they do not show up on the map anymore. Xenon is a gas lighter than air and slowly rises up into space. Thats why it stays in the atmosphere longer. Answered by Linwood Drumgole 1 year ago.


I need information on the element Xenon?
Asked by Candyce Acocella 1 year ago.

Xenon is a chemical element in the periodic table that has the symbol Xe and atomic number 54. A colorless, heavy, odorless noble gas, xenon occurs in the earth's atmosphere in trace amounts and was part of the first noble gas compound synthesized. Xenon is a member of the zero-valence elements that are called noble or inert gases, however, "inert" is not a completely accurate description of this chemical series since some noble gas compounds have been synthesized. In a gas filled tube, xenon emits a blue glow when the gas is excited by electrical discharge. Using tens of gigapascals of pressure, xenon has been forced into a metallic phase.[3] Xenon can also form clathrates with water when atoms of it are trapped in a lattice of the water molecules This gas is most widely and most famously used in light-emitting devices called Xenon flash lamps, which are used in photographic flashes, stroboscopic lamps, to excite the active medium in lasers which then generate coherent light, in bactericidal lamps (rarely), and in certain dermatological uses. Continuous, short-arc, high pressure Xenon arc lamps have a color temperature closely approximating noon sunlight and are used in solar simulators, some projection systems, automotive HID headlights and other specialized uses. They are an excellent source of short wavelength ultraviolet light and they have intense emissions in the near infrared, which are used in some night vision systems. Other uses of Xenon: * Has been used as a general anaesthetic, though the cost is prohibitive. * In nuclear energy applications it is used in bubble chambers, probes, and in other areas where a high molecular weight and inert nature is a desirable quality. * Perxenates are used as oxidizing agents in analytical chemistry. * The isotope Xe-133 is useful as a radioisotope. Xenon is a trace gas in Earth's atmosphere, occurring in one part in twenty million. The element is obtained commercially through extraction from the residues of liquefied air. This noble gas is naturally found in gases emitted from some mineral springs. Xe-133 and Xe-135 are synthesized by neutron irradiation within air-cooled nuclear reactors. Answered by Rashida Namdar 1 year ago.

(i think what tammi gave is more tha n enough but still read the history of xenon......... Gr. xenon, stranger) Discovered by Ramsay and Travers in 1898 in the residue left after evaporating liquid air components. Xenon is a member of the so-called noble or "inert" gases. It is present in the atmosphere to the extent of about one part in twenty million. Xenon is present in the Martian atmosphere to the extent of 0.08 ppm. the element is found in the gases evolved from certain mineral springs, and is commercially obtained by extraction from liquid air. Natural xenon is composed of nine stable isotopes. In addition to these, 20 unstable isotopes have been characterized. Before 1962, it had generally been assumed that xenon and other noble gases were unable to form compounds. Evidence has been mounting in the past few years that xenon, as well as other members of zero valance elements, do form compounds. Among the "compounds" of xenon now reported are sodium perxenate, xenon deuterate, xenon hydrate, difluoride, tetrafluoride, and hexafluoride. Xenon trioxide, which is highly explosive, has been prepared. More than 80 xenon compounds have been made with xenon chemically bonded to fluorine and oxygen. Some xenon compounds are colored. Metallic xenon has been produced, using several hundred kilobars of pressure. Xenon in a vacuum tube produces a beautiful blue glow when excited by an electrical discharge. The gas is used in making electron tubes, stroboscopic lamps, bactericidal lamps, and lamps used to excite ruby lasers for generating coherent light. Xenon is used in the nuclear energy field in bubble chambers, probes, and other applications where a high molecular weight is of value. The perxenates are used in analytical chemistry as oxidizing agents. 133Xe and 135Xe are produced by neutron irradiation in air cooled nuclear reactors. 133Xe has useful applications as a radioisotope. The element is available in sealed glass containers of gas at standard pressure. Xenon is not toxic, but its compounds are highly toxic because of their strong oxidizing characteristics. Answered by Hermelinda Chenevert 1 year ago.


How are isotopes used in biology?
emergency bio homework! please help! Asked by Brittaney Nuzzi 1 year ago.

Iodine-125 (I-125) and Palladium-103 (Pd-103) for treating prostate cancer Iodine-131(I-131) to image the thyroid. Xenon-133 (Xe-133) to image the lung. Carbon-14 (C-14) to date recent fossils Answered by Tracy Lukan 1 year ago.

Isotopes Used In Smoke Alarms Answered by Madlyn Cayne 1 year ago.

they are used in carbon dating. For instance, the carbon 14 is a radioactive isotope of carbon which is used in determining the age of the fossils, and the age of other things. Other isotopes such as Iodine-131 are used in detecting throat disorders. Isotopes such as Americium 245 are used in home smoke alarms. Isotopes of other elements are used in X-ray machines..... Answered by Tera Cianflone 1 year ago.


How can a radioisotope can have decay products of 99.3% beta radiation and 36.5% gamma radiation?
http://www.drugs.com/pro/xenon-xe-133-ga… it is a table displaying the decay of Xenon133. It shows 99.3% beta radiation and 36.5% gamma radiation. how can this be? it adds up to more than 100%? Asked by Mark Roff 1 year ago.

The link I saw also lists some K-alpha and K-beta x-rays to the extent of another 47%. That is because the gamma and x-rays are energy that accompany some decay when the nuclide is produced in a metastable state (that is what that little -m following the isotope means) and has to dump energy. Not all of them have to. Answered by Natalia Debrie 1 year ago.

Apples and oranges. Answered by Jack Caroli 1 year ago.


Why is there more Xenon than any other atomic element coming from Fukushima?
http://transport.nilu.no/browser/fpv_fuku?fpp=conccol_Xe-133_;region=Japan Look at the map and click Xenon compared to Iridium throughout the world and answer me why there is so much Xenon in the world. Asked by Susy Salmen 1 year ago.

Iridium? I guess you mean Iodine. Xenon is a byproduct of nuclear fission. I expect that we you see in the maps is due to Xenon being a gas. All other radioactive elements shown in the map are heavier than air. After they fall down into the ocean after a while they do not show up on the map anymore. Xenon is a gas lighter than air and slowly rises up into space. Thats why it stays in the atmosphere longer. Answered by Nam Tarleton 1 year ago.


I need information on the element Xenon?
Asked by Chloe Rimel 1 year ago.

Xenon is a chemical element in the periodic table that has the symbol Xe and atomic number 54. A colorless, heavy, odorless noble gas, xenon occurs in the earth's atmosphere in trace amounts and was part of the first noble gas compound synthesized. Xenon is a member of the zero-valence elements that are called noble or inert gases, however, "inert" is not a completely accurate description of this chemical series since some noble gas compounds have been synthesized. In a gas filled tube, xenon emits a blue glow when the gas is excited by electrical discharge. Using tens of gigapascals of pressure, xenon has been forced into a metallic phase.[3] Xenon can also form clathrates with water when atoms of it are trapped in a lattice of the water molecules This gas is most widely and most famously used in light-emitting devices called Xenon flash lamps, which are used in photographic flashes, stroboscopic lamps, to excite the active medium in lasers which then generate coherent light, in bactericidal lamps (rarely), and in certain dermatological uses. Continuous, short-arc, high pressure Xenon arc lamps have a color temperature closely approximating noon sunlight and are used in solar simulators, some projection systems, automotive HID headlights and other specialized uses. They are an excellent source of short wavelength ultraviolet light and they have intense emissions in the near infrared, which are used in some night vision systems. Other uses of Xenon: * Has been used as a general anaesthetic, though the cost is prohibitive. * In nuclear energy applications it is used in bubble chambers, probes, and in other areas where a high molecular weight and inert nature is a desirable quality. * Perxenates are used as oxidizing agents in analytical chemistry. * The isotope Xe-133 is useful as a radioisotope. Xenon is a trace gas in Earth's atmosphere, occurring in one part in twenty million. The element is obtained commercially through extraction from the residues of liquefied air. This noble gas is naturally found in gases emitted from some mineral springs. Xe-133 and Xe-135 are synthesized by neutron irradiation within air-cooled nuclear reactors. Answered by Deloris Nanz 1 year ago.

(i think what tammi gave is more tha n enough but still read the history of xenon......... Gr. xenon, stranger) Discovered by Ramsay and Travers in 1898 in the residue left after evaporating liquid air components. Xenon is a member of the so-called noble or "inert" gases. It is present in the atmosphere to the extent of about one part in twenty million. Xenon is present in the Martian atmosphere to the extent of 0.08 ppm. the element is found in the gases evolved from certain mineral springs, and is commercially obtained by extraction from liquid air. Natural xenon is composed of nine stable isotopes. In addition to these, 20 unstable isotopes have been characterized. Before 1962, it had generally been assumed that xenon and other noble gases were unable to form compounds. Evidence has been mounting in the past few years that xenon, as well as other members of zero valance elements, do form compounds. Among the "compounds" of xenon now reported are sodium perxenate, xenon deuterate, xenon hydrate, difluoride, tetrafluoride, and hexafluoride. Xenon trioxide, which is highly explosive, has been prepared. More than 80 xenon compounds have been made with xenon chemically bonded to fluorine and oxygen. Some xenon compounds are colored. Metallic xenon has been produced, using several hundred kilobars of pressure. Xenon in a vacuum tube produces a beautiful blue glow when excited by an electrical discharge. The gas is used in making electron tubes, stroboscopic lamps, bactericidal lamps, and lamps used to excite ruby lasers for generating coherent light. Xenon is used in the nuclear energy field in bubble chambers, probes, and other applications where a high molecular weight is of value. The perxenates are used in analytical chemistry as oxidizing agents. 133Xe and 135Xe are produced by neutron irradiation in air cooled nuclear reactors. 133Xe has useful applications as a radioisotope. The element is available in sealed glass containers of gas at standard pressure. Xenon is not toxic, but its compounds are highly toxic because of their strong oxidizing characteristics. Answered by Lianne Goodhile 1 year ago.


How are isotopes used in biology?
emergency bio homework! please help! Asked by Jenise Kriese 1 year ago.

Iodine-125 (I-125) and Palladium-103 (Pd-103) for treating prostate cancer Iodine-131(I-131) to image the thyroid. Xenon-133 (Xe-133) to image the lung. Carbon-14 (C-14) to date recent fossils Answered by Lin Asel 1 year ago.

Isotopes Used In Smoke Alarms Answered by Alethia Eldreth 1 year ago.

they are used in carbon dating. For instance, the carbon 14 is a radioactive isotope of carbon which is used in determining the age of the fossils, and the age of other things. Other isotopes such as Iodine-131 are used in detecting throat disorders. Isotopes such as Americium 245 are used in home smoke alarms. Isotopes of other elements are used in X-ray machines..... Answered by Brooks Gierman 1 year ago.


How can a radioisotope can have decay products of 99.3% beta radiation and 36.5% gamma radiation?
http://www.drugs.com/pro/xenon-xe-133-ga… it is a table displaying the decay of Xenon133. It shows 99.3% beta radiation and 36.5% gamma radiation. how can this be? it adds up to more than 100%? Asked by Hilario Vanderjagt 1 year ago.

The link I saw also lists some K-alpha and K-beta x-rays to the extent of another 47%. That is because the gamma and x-rays are energy that accompany some decay when the nuclide is produced in a metastable state (that is what that little -m following the isotope means) and has to dump energy. Not all of them have to. Answered by Felice Gittleman 1 year ago.

Apples and oranges. Answered by Kit Treister 1 year ago.


Why is there more Xenon than any other atomic element coming from Fukushima?
http://transport.nilu.no/browser/fpv_fuku?fpp=conccol_Xe-133_;region=Japan Look at the map and click Xenon compared to Iridium throughout the world and answer me why there is so much Xenon in the world. Asked by Eliza Primeau 1 year ago.

Iridium? I guess you mean Iodine. Xenon is a byproduct of nuclear fission. I expect that we you see in the maps is due to Xenon being a gas. All other radioactive elements shown in the map are heavier than air. After they fall down into the ocean after a while they do not show up on the map anymore. Xenon is a gas lighter than air and slowly rises up into space. Thats why it stays in the atmosphere longer. Answered by Izetta Cassiano 1 year ago.


I need information on the element Xenon?
Asked by Rosy Hutley 1 year ago.

Xenon is a chemical element in the periodic table that has the symbol Xe and atomic number 54. A colorless, heavy, odorless noble gas, xenon occurs in the earth's atmosphere in trace amounts and was part of the first noble gas compound synthesized. Xenon is a member of the zero-valence elements that are called noble or inert gases, however, "inert" is not a completely accurate description of this chemical series since some noble gas compounds have been synthesized. In a gas filled tube, xenon emits a blue glow when the gas is excited by electrical discharge. Using tens of gigapascals of pressure, xenon has been forced into a metallic phase.[3] Xenon can also form clathrates with water when atoms of it are trapped in a lattice of the water molecules This gas is most widely and most famously used in light-emitting devices called Xenon flash lamps, which are used in photographic flashes, stroboscopic lamps, to excite the active medium in lasers which then generate coherent light, in bactericidal lamps (rarely), and in certain dermatological uses. Continuous, short-arc, high pressure Xenon arc lamps have a color temperature closely approximating noon sunlight and are used in solar simulators, some projection systems, automotive HID headlights and other specialized uses. They are an excellent source of short wavelength ultraviolet light and they have intense emissions in the near infrared, which are used in some night vision systems. Other uses of Xenon: * Has been used as a general anaesthetic, though the cost is prohibitive. * In nuclear energy applications it is used in bubble chambers, probes, and in other areas where a high molecular weight and inert nature is a desirable quality. * Perxenates are used as oxidizing agents in analytical chemistry. * The isotope Xe-133 is useful as a radioisotope. Xenon is a trace gas in Earth's atmosphere, occurring in one part in twenty million. The element is obtained commercially through extraction from the residues of liquefied air. This noble gas is naturally found in gases emitted from some mineral springs. Xe-133 and Xe-135 are synthesized by neutron irradiation within air-cooled nuclear reactors. Answered by Kathline Mckethan 1 year ago.

(i think what tammi gave is more tha n enough but still read the history of xenon......... Gr. xenon, stranger) Discovered by Ramsay and Travers in 1898 in the residue left after evaporating liquid air components. Xenon is a member of the so-called noble or "inert" gases. It is present in the atmosphere to the extent of about one part in twenty million. Xenon is present in the Martian atmosphere to the extent of 0.08 ppm. the element is found in the gases evolved from certain mineral springs, and is commercially obtained by extraction from liquid air. Natural xenon is composed of nine stable isotopes. In addition to these, 20 unstable isotopes have been characterized. Before 1962, it had generally been assumed that xenon and other noble gases were unable to form compounds. Evidence has been mounting in the past few years that xenon, as well as other members of zero valance elements, do form compounds. Among the "compounds" of xenon now reported are sodium perxenate, xenon deuterate, xenon hydrate, difluoride, tetrafluoride, and hexafluoride. Xenon trioxide, which is highly explosive, has been prepared. More than 80 xenon compounds have been made with xenon chemically bonded to fluorine and oxygen. Some xenon compounds are colored. Metallic xenon has been produced, using several hundred kilobars of pressure. Xenon in a vacuum tube produces a beautiful blue glow when excited by an electrical discharge. The gas is used in making electron tubes, stroboscopic lamps, bactericidal lamps, and lamps used to excite ruby lasers for generating coherent light. Xenon is used in the nuclear energy field in bubble chambers, probes, and other applications where a high molecular weight is of value. The perxenates are used in analytical chemistry as oxidizing agents. 133Xe and 135Xe are produced by neutron irradiation in air cooled nuclear reactors. 133Xe has useful applications as a radioisotope. The element is available in sealed glass containers of gas at standard pressure. Xenon is not toxic, but its compounds are highly toxic because of their strong oxidizing characteristics. Answered by Johnathan Toney 1 year ago.


How are isotopes used in biology?
emergency bio homework! please help! Asked by Tequila Sedtal 1 year ago.

Iodine-125 (I-125) and Palladium-103 (Pd-103) for treating prostate cancer Iodine-131(I-131) to image the thyroid. Xenon-133 (Xe-133) to image the lung. Carbon-14 (C-14) to date recent fossils Answered by Shan Shofestall 1 year ago.

Isotopes Used In Smoke Alarms Answered by Roxanne Vicioso 1 year ago.

they are used in carbon dating. For instance, the carbon 14 is a radioactive isotope of carbon which is used in determining the age of the fossils, and the age of other things. Other isotopes such as Iodine-131 are used in detecting throat disorders. Isotopes such as Americium 245 are used in home smoke alarms. Isotopes of other elements are used in X-ray machines..... Answered by Edith Neptune 1 year ago.


How can a radioisotope can have decay products of 99.3% beta radiation and 36.5% gamma radiation?
http://www.drugs.com/pro/xenon-xe-133-ga… it is a table displaying the decay of Xenon133. It shows 99.3% beta radiation and 36.5% gamma radiation. how can this be? it adds up to more than 100%? Asked by Cornelius Bogacz 1 year ago.

The link I saw also lists some K-alpha and K-beta x-rays to the extent of another 47%. That is because the gamma and x-rays are energy that accompany some decay when the nuclide is produced in a metastable state (that is what that little -m following the isotope means) and has to dump energy. Not all of them have to. Answered by Trinidad Justis 1 year ago.

Apples and oranges. Answered by Angle Farruggio 1 year ago.


Why is there more Xenon than any other atomic element coming from Fukushima?
http://transport.nilu.no/browser/fpv_fuku?fpp=conccol_Xe-133_;region=Japan Look at the map and click Xenon compared to Iridium throughout the world and answer me why there is so much Xenon in the world. Asked by Delmar Mcgorry 1 year ago.

Iridium? I guess you mean Iodine. Xenon is a byproduct of nuclear fission. I expect that we you see in the maps is due to Xenon being a gas. All other radioactive elements shown in the map are heavier than air. After they fall down into the ocean after a while they do not show up on the map anymore. Xenon is a gas lighter than air and slowly rises up into space. Thats why it stays in the atmosphere longer. Answered by Shelia Borkowski 1 year ago.


I need information on the element Xenon?
Asked by Miss Gerst 1 year ago.

Xenon is a chemical element in the periodic table that has the symbol Xe and atomic number 54. A colorless, heavy, odorless noble gas, xenon occurs in the earth's atmosphere in trace amounts and was part of the first noble gas compound synthesized. Xenon is a member of the zero-valence elements that are called noble or inert gases, however, "inert" is not a completely accurate description of this chemical series since some noble gas compounds have been synthesized. In a gas filled tube, xenon emits a blue glow when the gas is excited by electrical discharge. Using tens of gigapascals of pressure, xenon has been forced into a metallic phase.[3] Xenon can also form clathrates with water when atoms of it are trapped in a lattice of the water molecules This gas is most widely and most famously used in light-emitting devices called Xenon flash lamps, which are used in photographic flashes, stroboscopic lamps, to excite the active medium in lasers which then generate coherent light, in bactericidal lamps (rarely), and in certain dermatological uses. Continuous, short-arc, high pressure Xenon arc lamps have a color temperature closely approximating noon sunlight and are used in solar simulators, some projection systems, automotive HID headlights and other specialized uses. They are an excellent source of short wavelength ultraviolet light and they have intense emissions in the near infrared, which are used in some night vision systems. Other uses of Xenon: * Has been used as a general anaesthetic, though the cost is prohibitive. * In nuclear energy applications it is used in bubble chambers, probes, and in other areas where a high molecular weight and inert nature is a desirable quality. * Perxenates are used as oxidizing agents in analytical chemistry. * The isotope Xe-133 is useful as a radioisotope. Xenon is a trace gas in Earth's atmosphere, occurring in one part in twenty million. The element is obtained commercially through extraction from the residues of liquefied air. This noble gas is naturally found in gases emitted from some mineral springs. Xe-133 and Xe-135 are synthesized by neutron irradiation within air-cooled nuclear reactors. Answered by Kelly Gossen 1 year ago.

(i think what tammi gave is more tha n enough but still read the history of xenon......... Gr. xenon, stranger) Discovered by Ramsay and Travers in 1898 in the residue left after evaporating liquid air components. Xenon is a member of the so-called noble or "inert" gases. It is present in the atmosphere to the extent of about one part in twenty million. Xenon is present in the Martian atmosphere to the extent of 0.08 ppm. the element is found in the gases evolved from certain mineral springs, and is commercially obtained by extraction from liquid air. Natural xenon is composed of nine stable isotopes. In addition to these, 20 unstable isotopes have been characterized. Before 1962, it had generally been assumed that xenon and other noble gases were unable to form compounds. Evidence has been mounting in the past few years that xenon, as well as other members of zero valance elements, do form compounds. Among the "compounds" of xenon now reported are sodium perxenate, xenon deuterate, xenon hydrate, difluoride, tetrafluoride, and hexafluoride. Xenon trioxide, which is highly explosive, has been prepared. More than 80 xenon compounds have been made with xenon chemically bonded to fluorine and oxygen. Some xenon compounds are colored. Metallic xenon has been produced, using several hundred kilobars of pressure. Xenon in a vacuum tube produces a beautiful blue glow when excited by an electrical discharge. The gas is used in making electron tubes, stroboscopic lamps, bactericidal lamps, and lamps used to excite ruby lasers for generating coherent light. Xenon is used in the nuclear energy field in bubble chambers, probes, and other applications where a high molecular weight is of value. The perxenates are used in analytical chemistry as oxidizing agents. 133Xe and 135Xe are produced by neutron irradiation in air cooled nuclear reactors. 133Xe has useful applications as a radioisotope. The element is available in sealed glass containers of gas at standard pressure. Xenon is not toxic, but its compounds are highly toxic because of their strong oxidizing characteristics. Answered by Curt Feinen 1 year ago.


How are isotopes used in biology?
emergency bio homework! please help! Asked by Otha Kerman 1 year ago.

Iodine-125 (I-125) and Palladium-103 (Pd-103) for treating prostate cancer Iodine-131(I-131) to image the thyroid. Xenon-133 (Xe-133) to image the lung. Carbon-14 (C-14) to date recent fossils Answered by Dorthey Giannavola 1 year ago.

Isotopes Used In Smoke Alarms Answered by Celestina Heziak 1 year ago.

they are used in carbon dating. For instance, the carbon 14 is a radioactive isotope of carbon which is used in determining the age of the fossils, and the age of other things. Other isotopes such as Iodine-131 are used in detecting throat disorders. Isotopes such as Americium 245 are used in home smoke alarms. Isotopes of other elements are used in X-ray machines..... Answered by Shanae Hendrik 1 year ago.


How can a radioisotope can have decay products of 99.3% beta radiation and 36.5% gamma radiation?
http://www.drugs.com/pro/xenon-xe-133-ga… it is a table displaying the decay of Xenon133. It shows 99.3% beta radiation and 36.5% gamma radiation. how can this be? it adds up to more than 100%? Asked by Margarete Richie 1 year ago.

The link I saw also lists some K-alpha and K-beta x-rays to the extent of another 47%. That is because the gamma and x-rays are energy that accompany some decay when the nuclide is produced in a metastable state (that is what that little -m following the isotope means) and has to dump energy. Not all of them have to. Answered by Denise Deldonno 1 year ago.

Apples and oranges. Answered by Kaci Meshyock 1 year ago.


Why is there more Xenon than any other atomic element coming from Fukushima?
http://transport.nilu.no/browser/fpv_fuku?fpp=conccol_Xe-133_;region=Japan Look at the map and click Xenon compared to Iridium throughout the world and answer me why there is so much Xenon in the world. Asked by Reginia Foucault 1 year ago.

Iridium? I guess you mean Iodine. Xenon is a byproduct of nuclear fission. I expect that we you see in the maps is due to Xenon being a gas. All other radioactive elements shown in the map are heavier than air. After they fall down into the ocean after a while they do not show up on the map anymore. Xenon is a gas lighter than air and slowly rises up into space. Thats why it stays in the atmosphere longer. Answered by Jesusita Lynskey 1 year ago.


I need information on the element Xenon?
Asked by Gil Heubusch 1 year ago.

Xenon is a chemical element in the periodic table that has the symbol Xe and atomic number 54. A colorless, heavy, odorless noble gas, xenon occurs in the earth's atmosphere in trace amounts and was part of the first noble gas compound synthesized. Xenon is a member of the zero-valence elements that are called noble or inert gases, however, "inert" is not a completely accurate description of this chemical series since some noble gas compounds have been synthesized. In a gas filled tube, xenon emits a blue glow when the gas is excited by electrical discharge. Using tens of gigapascals of pressure, xenon has been forced into a metallic phase.[3] Xenon can also form clathrates with water when atoms of it are trapped in a lattice of the water molecules This gas is most widely and most famously used in light-emitting devices called Xenon flash lamps, which are used in photographic flashes, stroboscopic lamps, to excite the active medium in lasers which then generate coherent light, in bactericidal lamps (rarely), and in certain dermatological uses. Continuous, short-arc, high pressure Xenon arc lamps have a color temperature closely approximating noon sunlight and are used in solar simulators, some projection systems, automotive HID headlights and other specialized uses. They are an excellent source of short wavelength ultraviolet light and they have intense emissions in the near infrared, which are used in some night vision systems. Other uses of Xenon: * Has been used as a general anaesthetic, though the cost is prohibitive. * In nuclear energy applications it is used in bubble chambers, probes, and in other areas where a high molecular weight and inert nature is a desirable quality. * Perxenates are used as oxidizing agents in analytical chemistry. * The isotope Xe-133 is useful as a radioisotope. Xenon is a trace gas in Earth's atmosphere, occurring in one part in twenty million. The element is obtained commercially through extraction from the residues of liquefied air. This noble gas is naturally found in gases emitted from some mineral springs. Xe-133 and Xe-135 are synthesized by neutron irradiation within air-cooled nuclear reactors. Answered by Tennille Penas 1 year ago.

(i think what tammi gave is more tha n enough but still read the history of xenon......... Gr. xenon, stranger) Discovered by Ramsay and Travers in 1898 in the residue left after evaporating liquid air components. Xenon is a member of the so-called noble or "inert" gases. It is present in the atmosphere to the extent of about one part in twenty million. Xenon is present in the Martian atmosphere to the extent of 0.08 ppm. the element is found in the gases evolved from certain mineral springs, and is commercially obtained by extraction from liquid air. Natural xenon is composed of nine stable isotopes. In addition to these, 20 unstable isotopes have been characterized. Before 1962, it had generally been assumed that xenon and other noble gases were unable to form compounds. Evidence has been mounting in the past few years that xenon, as well as other members of zero valance elements, do form compounds. Among the "compounds" of xenon now reported are sodium perxenate, xenon deuterate, xenon hydrate, difluoride, tetrafluoride, and hexafluoride. Xenon trioxide, which is highly explosive, has been prepared. More than 80 xenon compounds have been made with xenon chemically bonded to fluorine and oxygen. Some xenon compounds are colored. Metallic xenon has been produced, using several hundred kilobars of pressure. Xenon in a vacuum tube produces a beautiful blue glow when excited by an electrical discharge. The gas is used in making electron tubes, stroboscopic lamps, bactericidal lamps, and lamps used to excite ruby lasers for generating coherent light. Xenon is used in the nuclear energy field in bubble chambers, probes, and other applications where a high molecular weight is of value. The perxenates are used in analytical chemistry as oxidizing agents. 133Xe and 135Xe are produced by neutron irradiation in air cooled nuclear reactors. 133Xe has useful applications as a radioisotope. The element is available in sealed glass containers of gas at standard pressure. Xenon is not toxic, but its compounds are highly toxic because of their strong oxidizing characteristics. Answered by Kacey Turkel 1 year ago.


How are isotopes used in biology?
emergency bio homework! please help! Asked by Adella Minning 1 year ago.

Iodine-125 (I-125) and Palladium-103 (Pd-103) for treating prostate cancer Iodine-131(I-131) to image the thyroid. Xenon-133 (Xe-133) to image the lung. Carbon-14 (C-14) to date recent fossils Answered by Viva Clayson 1 year ago.

Isotopes Used In Smoke Alarms Answered by Paz Barrois 1 year ago.

they are used in carbon dating. For instance, the carbon 14 is a radioactive isotope of carbon which is used in determining the age of the fossils, and the age of other things. Other isotopes such as Iodine-131 are used in detecting throat disorders. Isotopes such as Americium 245 are used in home smoke alarms. Isotopes of other elements are used in X-ray machines..... Answered by Kendrick Furcron 1 year ago.


How can a radioisotope can have decay products of 99.3% beta radiation and 36.5% gamma radiation?
http://www.drugs.com/pro/xenon-xe-133-ga… it is a table displaying the decay of Xenon133. It shows 99.3% beta radiation and 36.5% gamma radiation. how can this be? it adds up to more than 100%? Asked by Fe Wiggains 1 year ago.

The link I saw also lists some K-alpha and K-beta x-rays to the extent of another 47%. That is because the gamma and x-rays are energy that accompany some decay when the nuclide is produced in a metastable state (that is what that little -m following the isotope means) and has to dump energy. Not all of them have to. Answered by Vanna Dyment 1 year ago.

Apples and oranges. Answered by Seema Deonarine 1 year ago.


Why is there more Xenon than any other atomic element coming from Fukushima?
http://transport.nilu.no/browser/fpv_fuku?fpp=conccol_Xe-133_;region=Japan Look at the map and click Xenon compared to Iridium throughout the world and answer me why there is so much Xenon in the world. Asked by Nora Nickenberry 1 year ago.

Iridium? I guess you mean Iodine. Xenon is a byproduct of nuclear fission. I expect that we you see in the maps is due to Xenon being a gas. All other radioactive elements shown in the map are heavier than air. After they fall down into the ocean after a while they do not show up on the map anymore. Xenon is a gas lighter than air and slowly rises up into space. Thats why it stays in the atmosphere longer. Answered by Loise Haeder 1 year ago.


I need information on the element Xenon?
Asked by Necole Downton 1 year ago.

Xenon is a chemical element in the periodic table that has the symbol Xe and atomic number 54. A colorless, heavy, odorless noble gas, xenon occurs in the earth's atmosphere in trace amounts and was part of the first noble gas compound synthesized. Xenon is a member of the zero-valence elements that are called noble or inert gases, however, "inert" is not a completely accurate description of this chemical series since some noble gas compounds have been synthesized. In a gas filled tube, xenon emits a blue glow when the gas is excited by electrical discharge. Using tens of gigapascals of pressure, xenon has been forced into a metallic phase.[3] Xenon can also form clathrates with water when atoms of it are trapped in a lattice of the water molecules This gas is most widely and most famously used in light-emitting devices called Xenon flash lamps, which are used in photographic flashes, stroboscopic lamps, to excite the active medium in lasers which then generate coherent light, in bactericidal lamps (rarely), and in certain dermatological uses. Continuous, short-arc, high pressure Xenon arc lamps have a color temperature closely approximating noon sunlight and are used in solar simulators, some projection systems, automotive HID headlights and other specialized uses. They are an excellent source of short wavelength ultraviolet light and they have intense emissions in the near infrared, which are used in some night vision systems. Other uses of Xenon: * Has been used as a general anaesthetic, though the cost is prohibitive. * In nuclear energy applications it is used in bubble chambers, probes, and in other areas where a high molecular weight and inert nature is a desirable quality. * Perxenates are used as oxidizing agents in analytical chemistry. * The isotope Xe-133 is useful as a radioisotope. Xenon is a trace gas in Earth's atmosphere, occurring in one part in twenty million. The element is obtained commercially through extraction from the residues of liquefied air. This noble gas is naturally found in gases emitted from some mineral springs. Xe-133 and Xe-135 are synthesized by neutron irradiation within air-cooled nuclear reactors. Answered by Reynaldo Kexel 1 year ago.

(i think what tammi gave is more tha n enough but still read the history of xenon......... Gr. xenon, stranger) Discovered by Ramsay and Travers in 1898 in the residue left after evaporating liquid air components. Xenon is a member of the so-called noble or "inert" gases. It is present in the atmosphere to the extent of about one part in twenty million. Xenon is present in the Martian atmosphere to the extent of 0.08 ppm. the element is found in the gases evolved from certain mineral springs, and is commercially obtained by extraction from liquid air. Natural xenon is composed of nine stable isotopes. In addition to these, 20 unstable isotopes have been characterized. Before 1962, it had generally been assumed that xenon and other noble gases were unable to form compounds. Evidence has been mounting in the past few years that xenon, as well as other members of zero valance elements, do form compounds. Among the "compounds" of xenon now reported are sodium perxenate, xenon deuterate, xenon hydrate, difluoride, tetrafluoride, and hexafluoride. Xenon trioxide, which is highly explosive, has been prepared. More than 80 xenon compounds have been made with xenon chemically bonded to fluorine and oxygen. Some xenon compounds are colored. Metallic xenon has been produced, using several hundred kilobars of pressure. Xenon in a vacuum tube produces a beautiful blue glow when excited by an electrical discharge. The gas is used in making electron tubes, stroboscopic lamps, bactericidal lamps, and lamps used to excite ruby lasers for generating coherent light. Xenon is used in the nuclear energy field in bubble chambers, probes, and other applications where a high molecular weight is of value. The perxenates are used in analytical chemistry as oxidizing agents. 133Xe and 135Xe are produced by neutron irradiation in air cooled nuclear reactors. 133Xe has useful applications as a radioisotope. The element is available in sealed glass containers of gas at standard pressure. Xenon is not toxic, but its compounds are highly toxic because of their strong oxidizing characteristics. Answered by Desiree Hopgood 1 year ago.


How are isotopes used in biology?
emergency bio homework! please help! Asked by Ettie Moos 1 year ago.

Iodine-125 (I-125) and Palladium-103 (Pd-103) for treating prostate cancer Iodine-131(I-131) to image the thyroid. Xenon-133 (Xe-133) to image the lung. Carbon-14 (C-14) to date recent fossils Answered by Angel Coldwell 1 year ago.

Isotopes Used In Smoke Alarms Answered by Andrea Lilyquist 1 year ago.

they are used in carbon dating. For instance, the carbon 14 is a radioactive isotope of carbon which is used in determining the age of the fossils, and the age of other things. Other isotopes such as Iodine-131 are used in detecting throat disorders. Isotopes such as Americium 245 are used in home smoke alarms. Isotopes of other elements are used in X-ray machines..... Answered by Marleen Labbadia 1 year ago.


How can a radioisotope can have decay products of 99.3% beta radiation and 36.5% gamma radiation?
http://www.drugs.com/pro/xenon-xe-133-ga… it is a table displaying the decay of Xenon133. It shows 99.3% beta radiation and 36.5% gamma radiation. how can this be? it adds up to more than 100%? Asked by Mariella Roseman 1 year ago.

The link I saw also lists some K-alpha and K-beta x-rays to the extent of another 47%. That is because the gamma and x-rays are energy that accompany some decay when the nuclide is produced in a metastable state (that is what that little -m following the isotope means) and has to dump energy. Not all of them have to. Answered by Leroy Patty 1 year ago.

Apples and oranges. Answered by Season Papallo 1 year ago.


Why is there more Xenon than any other atomic element coming from Fukushima?
http://transport.nilu.no/browser/fpv_fuku?fpp=conccol_Xe-133_;region=Japan Look at the map and click Xenon compared to Iridium throughout the world and answer me why there is so much Xenon in the world. Asked by Ayana Accardo 1 year ago.

Iridium? I guess you mean Iodine. Xenon is a byproduct of nuclear fission. I expect that we you see in the maps is due to Xenon being a gas. All other radioactive elements shown in the map are heavier than air. After they fall down into the ocean after a while they do not show up on the map anymore. Xenon is a gas lighter than air and slowly rises up into space. Thats why it stays in the atmosphere longer. Answered by Mei Grunert 1 year ago.


I need information on the element Xenon?
Asked by Elvira Skjei 1 year ago.

Xenon is a chemical element in the periodic table that has the symbol Xe and atomic number 54. A colorless, heavy, odorless noble gas, xenon occurs in the earth's atmosphere in trace amounts and was part of the first noble gas compound synthesized. Xenon is a member of the zero-valence elements that are called noble or inert gases, however, "inert" is not a completely accurate description of this chemical series since some noble gas compounds have been synthesized. In a gas filled tube, xenon emits a blue glow when the gas is excited by electrical discharge. Using tens of gigapascals of pressure, xenon has been forced into a metallic phase.[3] Xenon can also form clathrates with water when atoms of it are trapped in a lattice of the water molecules This gas is most widely and most famously used in light-emitting devices called Xenon flash lamps, which are used in photographic flashes, stroboscopic lamps, to excite the active medium in lasers which then generate coherent light, in bactericidal lamps (rarely), and in certain dermatological uses. Continuous, short-arc, high pressure Xenon arc lamps have a color temperature closely approximating noon sunlight and are used in solar simulators, some projection systems, automotive HID headlights and other specialized uses. They are an excellent source of short wavelength ultraviolet light and they have intense emissions in the near infrared, which are used in some night vision systems. Other uses of Xenon: * Has been used as a general anaesthetic, though the cost is prohibitive. * In nuclear energy applications it is used in bubble chambers, probes, and in other areas where a high molecular weight and inert nature is a desirable quality. * Perxenates are used as oxidizing agents in analytical chemistry. * The isotope Xe-133 is useful as a radioisotope. Xenon is a trace gas in Earth's atmosphere, occurring in one part in twenty million. The element is obtained commercially through extraction from the residues of liquefied air. This noble gas is naturally found in gases emitted from some mineral springs. Xe-133 and Xe-135 are synthesized by neutron irradiation within air-cooled nuclear reactors. Answered by Daniele Jentry 1 year ago.

(i think what tammi gave is more tha n enough but still read the history of xenon......... Gr. xenon, stranger) Discovered by Ramsay and Travers in 1898 in the residue left after evaporating liquid air components. Xenon is a member of the so-called noble or "inert" gases. It is present in the atmosphere to the extent of about one part in twenty million. Xenon is present in the Martian atmosphere to the extent of 0.08 ppm. the element is found in the gases evolved from certain mineral springs, and is commercially obtained by extraction from liquid air. Natural xenon is composed of nine stable isotopes. In addition to these, 20 unstable isotopes have been characterized. Before 1962, it had generally been assumed that xenon and other noble gases were unable to form compounds. Evidence has been mounting in the past few years that xenon, as well as other members of zero valance elements, do form compounds. Among the "compounds" of xenon now reported are sodium perxenate, xenon deuterate, xenon hydrate, difluoride, tetrafluoride, and hexafluoride. Xenon trioxide, which is highly explosive, has been prepared. More than 80 xenon compounds have been made with xenon chemically bonded to fluorine and oxygen. Some xenon compounds are colored. Metallic xenon has been produced, using several hundred kilobars of pressure. Xenon in a vacuum tube produces a beautiful blue glow when excited by an electrical discharge. The gas is used in making electron tubes, stroboscopic lamps, bactericidal lamps, and lamps used to excite ruby lasers for generating coherent light. Xenon is used in the nuclear energy field in bubble chambers, probes, and other applications where a high molecular weight is of value. The perxenates are used in analytical chemistry as oxidizing agents. 133Xe and 135Xe are produced by neutron irradiation in air cooled nuclear reactors. 133Xe has useful applications as a radioisotope. The element is available in sealed glass containers of gas at standard pressure. Xenon is not toxic, but its compounds are highly toxic because of their strong oxidizing characteristics. Answered by Ervin Zurin 1 year ago.


How are isotopes used in biology?
emergency bio homework! please help! Asked by Nadia Ortmeyer 1 year ago.

Iodine-125 (I-125) and Palladium-103 (Pd-103) for treating prostate cancer Iodine-131(I-131) to image the thyroid. Xenon-133 (Xe-133) to image the lung. Carbon-14 (C-14) to date recent fossils Answered by Cecila Velky 1 year ago.

Isotopes Used In Smoke Alarms Answered by Dara Wright 1 year ago.

they are used in carbon dating. For instance, the carbon 14 is a radioactive isotope of carbon which is used in determining the age of the fossils, and the age of other things. Other isotopes such as Iodine-131 are used in detecting throat disorders. Isotopes such as Americium 245 are used in home smoke alarms. Isotopes of other elements are used in X-ray machines..... Answered by Lillian Manzanarez 1 year ago.


How can a radioisotope can have decay products of 99.3% beta radiation and 36.5% gamma radiation?
http://www.drugs.com/pro/xenon-xe-133-ga… it is a table displaying the decay of Xenon133. It shows 99.3% beta radiation and 36.5% gamma radiation. how can this be? it adds up to more than 100%? Asked by Ezekiel Audie 1 year ago.

The link I saw also lists some K-alpha and K-beta x-rays to the extent of another 47%. That is because the gamma and x-rays are energy that accompany some decay when the nuclide is produced in a metastable state (that is what that little -m following the isotope means) and has to dump energy. Not all of them have to. Answered by Lashawn Peals 1 year ago.

Apples and oranges. Answered by Mercedes Sikat 1 year ago.


Why is there more Xenon than any other atomic element coming from Fukushima?
http://transport.nilu.no/browser/fpv_fuku?fpp=conccol_Xe-133_;region=Japan Look at the map and click Xenon compared to Iridium throughout the world and answer me why there is so much Xenon in the world. Asked by Shaunda Scivally 1 year ago.

Iridium? I guess you mean Iodine. Xenon is a byproduct of nuclear fission. I expect that we you see in the maps is due to Xenon being a gas. All other radioactive elements shown in the map are heavier than air. After they fall down into the ocean after a while they do not show up on the map anymore. Xenon is a gas lighter than air and slowly rises up into space. Thats why it stays in the atmosphere longer. Answered by Jen Glovier 1 year ago.


I need information on the element Xenon?
Asked by Debrah Congress 1 year ago.

Xenon is a chemical element in the periodic table that has the symbol Xe and atomic number 54. A colorless, heavy, odorless noble gas, xenon occurs in the earth's atmosphere in trace amounts and was part of the first noble gas compound synthesized. Xenon is a member of the zero-valence elements that are called noble or inert gases, however, "inert" is not a completely accurate description of this chemical series since some noble gas compounds have been synthesized. In a gas filled tube, xenon emits a blue glow when the gas is excited by electrical discharge. Using tens of gigapascals of pressure, xenon has been forced into a metallic phase.[3] Xenon can also form clathrates with water when atoms of it are trapped in a lattice of the water molecules This gas is most widely and most famously used in light-emitting devices called Xenon flash lamps, which are used in photographic flashes, stroboscopic lamps, to excite the active medium in lasers which then generate coherent light, in bactericidal lamps (rarely), and in certain dermatological uses. Continuous, short-arc, high pressure Xenon arc lamps have a color temperature closely approximating noon sunlight and are used in solar simulators, some projection systems, automotive HID headlights and other specialized uses. They are an excellent source of short wavelength ultraviolet light and they have intense emissions in the near infrared, which are used in some night vision systems. Other uses of Xenon: * Has been used as a general anaesthetic, though the cost is prohibitive. * In nuclear energy applications it is used in bubble chambers, probes, and in other areas where a high molecular weight and inert nature is a desirable quality. * Perxenates are used as oxidizing agents in analytical chemistry. * The isotope Xe-133 is useful as a radioisotope. Xenon is a trace gas in Earth's atmosphere, occurring in one part in twenty million. The element is obtained commercially through extraction from the residues of liquefied air. This noble gas is naturally found in gases emitted from some mineral springs. Xe-133 and Xe-135 are synthesized by neutron irradiation within air-cooled nuclear reactors. Answered by Earline Whitehall 1 year ago.

(i think what tammi gave is more tha n enough but still read the history of xenon......... Gr. xenon, stranger) Discovered by Ramsay and Travers in 1898 in the residue left after evaporating liquid air components. Xenon is a member of the so-called noble or "inert" gases. It is present in the atmosphere to the extent of about one part in twenty million. Xenon is present in the Martian atmosphere to the extent of 0.08 ppm. the element is found in the gases evolved from certain mineral springs, and is commercially obtained by extraction from liquid air. Natural xenon is composed of nine stable isotopes. In addition to these, 20 unstable isotopes have been characterized. Before 1962, it had generally been assumed that xenon and other noble gases were unable to form compounds. Evidence has been mounting in the past few years that xenon, as well as other members of zero valance elements, do form compounds. Among the "compounds" of xenon now reported are sodium perxenate, xenon deuterate, xenon hydrate, difluoride, tetrafluoride, and hexafluoride. Xenon trioxide, which is highly explosive, has been prepared. More than 80 xenon compounds have been made with xenon chemically bonded to fluorine and oxygen. Some xenon compounds are colored. Metallic xenon has been produced, using several hundred kilobars of pressure. Xenon in a vacuum tube produces a beautiful blue glow when excited by an electrical discharge. The gas is used in making electron tubes, stroboscopic lamps, bactericidal lamps, and lamps used to excite ruby lasers for generating coherent light. Xenon is used in the nuclear energy field in bubble chambers, probes, and other applications where a high molecular weight is of value. The perxenates are used in analytical chemistry as oxidizing agents. 133Xe and 135Xe are produced by neutron irradiation in air cooled nuclear reactors. 133Xe has useful applications as a radioisotope. The element is available in sealed glass containers of gas at standard pressure. Xenon is not toxic, but its compounds are highly toxic because of their strong oxidizing characteristics. Answered by Kenyatta Larr 1 year ago.


How are isotopes used in biology?
emergency bio homework! please help! Asked by Noe Boarman 1 year ago.

Iodine-125 (I-125) and Palladium-103 (Pd-103) for treating prostate cancer Iodine-131(I-131) to image the thyroid. Xenon-133 (Xe-133) to image the lung. Carbon-14 (C-14) to date recent fossils Answered by Keila Fukano 1 year ago.

Isotopes Used In Smoke Alarms Answered by Mirella Chikko 1 year ago.

they are used in carbon dating. For instance, the carbon 14 is a radioactive isotope of carbon which is used in determining the age of the fossils, and the age of other things. Other isotopes such as Iodine-131 are used in detecting throat disorders. Isotopes such as Americium 245 are used in home smoke alarms. Isotopes of other elements are used in X-ray machines..... Answered by Latonya Nakanishi 1 year ago.


How can a radioisotope can have decay products of 99.3% beta radiation and 36.5% gamma radiation?
http://www.drugs.com/pro/xenon-xe-133-ga… it is a table displaying the decay of Xenon133. It shows 99.3% beta radiation and 36.5% gamma radiation. how can this be? it adds up to more than 100%? Asked by Olin Krotzer 1 year ago.

The link I saw also lists some K-alpha and K-beta x-rays to the extent of another 47%. That is because the gamma and x-rays are energy that accompany some decay when the nuclide is produced in a metastable state (that is what that little -m following the isotope means) and has to dump energy. Not all of them have to. Answered by Trey Ugolini 1 year ago.

Apples and oranges. Answered by Edward Cederstrom 1 year ago.


Why is there more Xenon than any other atomic element coming from Fukushima?
http://transport.nilu.no/browser/fpv_fuku?fpp=conccol_Xe-133_;region=Japan Look at the map and click Xenon compared to Iridium throughout the world and answer me why there is so much Xenon in the world. Asked by Carissa Yanchik 1 year ago.

Iridium? I guess you mean Iodine. Xenon is a byproduct of nuclear fission. I expect that we you see in the maps is due to Xenon being a gas. All other radioactive elements shown in the map are heavier than air. After they fall down into the ocean after a while they do not show up on the map anymore. Xenon is a gas lighter than air and slowly rises up into space. Thats why it stays in the atmosphere longer. Answered by Marcos Marolf 1 year ago.


I need information on the element Xenon?
Asked by Luci Cabreja 1 year ago.

Xenon is a chemical element in the periodic table that has the symbol Xe and atomic number 54. A colorless, heavy, odorless noble gas, xenon occurs in the earth's atmosphere in trace amounts and was part of the first noble gas compound synthesized. Xenon is a member of the zero-valence elements that are called noble or inert gases, however, "inert" is not a completely accurate description of this chemical series since some noble gas compounds have been synthesized. In a gas filled tube, xenon emits a blue glow when the gas is excited by electrical discharge. Using tens of gigapascals of pressure, xenon has been forced into a metallic phase.[3] Xenon can also form clathrates with water when atoms of it are trapped in a lattice of the water molecules This gas is most widely and most famously used in light-emitting devices called Xenon flash lamps, which are used in photographic flashes, stroboscopic lamps, to excite the active medium in lasers which then generate coherent light, in bactericidal lamps (rarely), and in certain dermatological uses. Continuous, short-arc, high pressure Xenon arc lamps have a color temperature closely approximating noon sunlight and are used in solar simulators, some projection systems, automotive HID headlights and other specialized uses. They are an excellent source of short wavelength ultraviolet light and they have intense emissions in the near infrared, which are used in some night vision systems. Other uses of Xenon: * Has been used as a general anaesthetic, though the cost is prohibitive. * In nuclear energy applications it is used in bubble chambers, probes, and in other areas where a high molecular weight and inert nature is a desirable quality. * Perxenates are used as oxidizing agents in analytical chemistry. * The isotope Xe-133 is useful as a radioisotope. Xenon is a trace gas in Earth's atmosphere, occurring in one part in twenty million. The element is obtained commercially through extraction from the residues of liquefied air. This noble gas is naturally found in gases emitted from some mineral springs. Xe-133 and Xe-135 are synthesized by neutron irradiation within air-cooled nuclear reactors. Answered by Etha Valazquez 1 year ago.

(i think what tammi gave is more tha n enough but still read the history of xenon......... Gr. xenon, stranger) Discovered by Ramsay and Travers in 1898 in the residue left after evaporating liquid air components. Xenon is a member of the so-called noble or "inert" gases. It is present in the atmosphere to the extent of about one part in twenty million. Xenon is present in the Martian atmosphere to the extent of 0.08 ppm. the element is found in the gases evolved from certain mineral springs, and is commercially obtained by extraction from liquid air. Natural xenon is composed of nine stable isotopes. In addition to these, 20 unstable isotopes have been characterized. Before 1962, it had generally been assumed that xenon and other noble gases were unable to form compounds. Evidence has been mounting in the past few years that xenon, as well as other members of zero valance elements, do form compounds. Among the "compounds" of xenon now reported are sodium perxenate, xenon deuterate, xenon hydrate, difluoride, tetrafluoride, and hexafluoride. Xenon trioxide, which is highly explosive, has been prepared. More than 80 xenon compounds have been made with xenon chemically bonded to fluorine and oxygen. Some xenon compounds are colored. Metallic xenon has been produced, using several hundred kilobars of pressure. Xenon in a vacuum tube produces a beautiful blue glow when excited by an electrical discharge. The gas is used in making electron tubes, stroboscopic lamps, bactericidal lamps, and lamps used to excite ruby lasers for generating coherent light. Xenon is used in the nuclear energy field in bubble chambers, probes, and other applications where a high molecular weight is of value. The perxenates are used in analytical chemistry as oxidizing agents. 133Xe and 135Xe are produced by neutron irradiation in air cooled nuclear reactors. 133Xe has useful applications as a radioisotope. The element is available in sealed glass containers of gas at standard pressure. Xenon is not toxic, but its compounds are highly toxic because of their strong oxidizing characteristics. Answered by Inga Stoessel 1 year ago.


How are isotopes used in biology?
emergency bio homework! please help! Asked by Quiana Swineford 1 year ago.

Iodine-125 (I-125) and Palladium-103 (Pd-103) for treating prostate cancer Iodine-131(I-131) to image the thyroid. Xenon-133 (Xe-133) to image the lung. Carbon-14 (C-14) to date recent fossils Answered by Vannesa Ebinger 1 year ago.

Isotopes Used In Smoke Alarms Answered by Shawanna Ripplinger 1 year ago.

they are used in carbon dating. For instance, the carbon 14 is a radioactive isotope of carbon which is used in determining the age of the fossils, and the age of other things. Other isotopes such as Iodine-131 are used in detecting throat disorders. Isotopes such as Americium 245 are used in home smoke alarms. Isotopes of other elements are used in X-ray machines..... Answered by Earleen Siebenaler 1 year ago.


How can a radioisotope can have decay products of 99.3% beta radiation and 36.5% gamma radiation?
http://www.drugs.com/pro/xenon-xe-133-ga… it is a table displaying the decay of Xenon133. It shows 99.3% beta radiation and 36.5% gamma radiation. how can this be? it adds up to more than 100%? Asked by Berenice Thaller 1 year ago.

The link I saw also lists some K-alpha and K-beta x-rays to the extent of another 47%. That is because the gamma and x-rays are energy that accompany some decay when the nuclide is produced in a metastable state (that is what that little -m following the isotope means) and has to dump energy. Not all of them have to. Answered by Angel Bolk 1 year ago.

Apples and oranges. Answered by Jack Balcomb 1 year ago.


Why is there more Xenon than any other atomic element coming from Fukushima?
http://transport.nilu.no/browser/fpv_fuku?fpp=conccol_Xe-133_;region=Japan Look at the map and click Xenon compared to Iridium throughout the world and answer me why there is so much Xenon in the world. Asked by Nella Jann 1 year ago.

Iridium? I guess you mean Iodine. Xenon is a byproduct of nuclear fission. I expect that we you see in the maps is due to Xenon being a gas. All other radioactive elements shown in the map are heavier than air. After they fall down into the ocean after a while they do not show up on the map anymore. Xenon is a gas lighter than air and slowly rises up into space. Thats why it stays in the atmosphere longer. Answered by Tarra Adib 1 year ago.


I need information on the element Xenon?
Asked by Shaunta Avis 1 year ago.

Xenon is a chemical element in the periodic table that has the symbol Xe and atomic number 54. A colorless, heavy, odorless noble gas, xenon occurs in the earth's atmosphere in trace amounts and was part of the first noble gas compound synthesized. Xenon is a member of the zero-valence elements that are called noble or inert gases, however, "inert" is not a completely accurate description of this chemical series since some noble gas compounds have been synthesized. In a gas filled tube, xenon emits a blue glow when the gas is excited by electrical discharge. Using tens of gigapascals of pressure, xenon has been forced into a metallic phase.[3] Xenon can also form clathrates with water when atoms of it are trapped in a lattice of the water molecules This gas is most widely and most famously used in light-emitting devices called Xenon flash lamps, which are used in photographic flashes, stroboscopic lamps, to excite the active medium in lasers which then generate coherent light, in bactericidal lamps (rarely), and in certain dermatological uses. Continuous, short-arc, high pressure Xenon arc lamps have a color temperature closely approximating noon sunlight and are used in solar simulators, some projection systems, automotive HID headlights and other specialized uses. They are an excellent source of short wavelength ultraviolet light and they have intense emissions in the near infrared, which are used in some night vision systems. Other uses of Xenon: * Has been used as a general anaesthetic, though the cost is prohibitive. * In nuclear energy applications it is used in bubble chambers, probes, and in other areas where a high molecular weight and inert nature is a desirable quality. * Perxenates are used as oxidizing agents in analytical chemistry. * The isotope Xe-133 is useful as a radioisotope. Xenon is a trace gas in Earth's atmosphere, occurring in one part in twenty million. The element is obtained commercially through extraction from the residues of liquefied air. This noble gas is naturally found in gases emitted from some mineral springs. Xe-133 and Xe-135 are synthesized by neutron irradiation within air-cooled nuclear reactors. Answered by Hollie Mcmulen 1 year ago.

(i think what tammi gave is more tha n enough but still read the history of xenon......... Gr. xenon, stranger) Discovered by Ramsay and Travers in 1898 in the residue left after evaporating liquid air components. Xenon is a member of the so-called noble or "inert" gases. It is present in the atmosphere to the extent of about one part in twenty million. Xenon is present in the Martian atmosphere to the extent of 0.08 ppm. the element is found in the gases evolved from certain mineral springs, and is commercially obtained by extraction from liquid air. Natural xenon is composed of nine stable isotopes. In addition to these, 20 unstable isotopes have been characterized. Before 1962, it had generally been assumed that xenon and other noble gases were unable to form compounds. Evidence has been mounting in the past few years that xenon, as well as other members of zero valance elements, do form compounds. Among the "compounds" of xenon now reported are sodium perxenate, xenon deuterate, xenon hydrate, difluoride, tetrafluoride, and hexafluoride. Xenon trioxide, which is highly explosive, has been prepared. More than 80 xenon compounds have been made with xenon chemically bonded to fluorine and oxygen. Some xenon compounds are colored. Metallic xenon has been produced, using several hundred kilobars of pressure. Xenon in a vacuum tube produces a beautiful blue glow when excited by an electrical discharge. The gas is used in making electron tubes, stroboscopic lamps, bactericidal lamps, and lamps used to excite ruby lasers for generating coherent light. Xenon is used in the nuclear energy field in bubble chambers, probes, and other applications where a high molecular weight is of value. The perxenates are used in analytical chemistry as oxidizing agents. 133Xe and 135Xe are produced by neutron irradiation in air cooled nuclear reactors. 133Xe has useful applications as a radioisotope. The element is available in sealed glass containers of gas at standard pressure. Xenon is not toxic, but its compounds are highly toxic because of their strong oxidizing characteristics. Answered by Connie Murri 1 year ago.


How are isotopes used in biology?
emergency bio homework! please help! Asked by Chris Luchetti 1 year ago.

Iodine-125 (I-125) and Palladium-103 (Pd-103) for treating prostate cancer Iodine-131(I-131) to image the thyroid. Xenon-133 (Xe-133) to image the lung. Carbon-14 (C-14) to date recent fossils Answered by Jeffie Nading 1 year ago.

Isotopes Used In Smoke Alarms Answered by Tim Hoppesch 1 year ago.

they are used in carbon dating. For instance, the carbon 14 is a radioactive isotope of carbon which is used in determining the age of the fossils, and the age of other things. Other isotopes such as Iodine-131 are used in detecting throat disorders. Isotopes such as Americium 245 are used in home smoke alarms. Isotopes of other elements are used in X-ray machines..... Answered by Emery Lieser 1 year ago.


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