WESTCORT Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 017950/001.

Names and composition

"WESTCORT" is the commercial name of a drug composed of HYDROCORTISONE VALERATE.

Answered questions

I need help with my exzema and im a teenager!! help plz!!!?
Ive tried practically everything!!! Asked by Kemberly Kopecky 5 months ago.

I would go to the Dr. and ask for a cream called Westcort. It cleared mine up in a matter of days and my neighbor who has psoriasis used it and hers cleared up in about a week! As far as over the counter stuff, I haven't found anything that helps! Answered by Debrah Arthun 5 months ago.

Oh my...all three of my kids have eczema and it is rough....I was prescribed Elidel for mild and Protopic for severe eczema. I also use Dove soap, but recently I switched to St. Ives (vanilla scent) bodywash...it is wonderful and moisturizes better than any soap we've tried...Also, try washing your clothes in dye free detergent...it works better than regular detergent....Keep some lotion such as Aveeno with oatmeal or get you some of that thick moisturine lotion from your doctor it works really good... Answered by Audria Worton 5 months ago.

tea tree oil soap, buy it at a natural food store. tea tree oil is good for many skin problems including exzema. good luck. Answered by Cassaundra Jarver 5 months ago.


I Think My Doctor Screwed Me Over?
Hello. a couple months ago I had an infection in my face, and it left me with a red mark where it started. It was fading slowly, to the point where it was barely visible with makeup, but I hated seeing it everyday in the mirror (plus i hate wearing makeup). When I was at the doctors, I asked him if there was... Asked by Aliza Stadden 5 months ago.

Hello. a couple months ago I had an infection in my face, and it left me with a red mark where it started. It was fading slowly, to the point where it was barely visible with makeup, but I hated seeing it everyday in the mirror (plus i hate wearing makeup). When I was at the doctors, I asked him if there was anything he could do for it, and he gave me Westcort cream (hydrocortisone valerate). Ive applied it 3 times so far and its now BRIGHT red..I cant even cover it up with makeup. I'm so disappointed, because Ive been trying to get it to go away before next semester, which starts in less than a week. My mom said it might make it worse before it gets better, but it didnt even look this bad to begin with. Help? Answered by Queenie Armada 5 months ago.

well in all my years of nursing and pharmacy work i was always led to believe hydro-cortisone cream should not be used on face,stop using it now ,as it burns and irritates Answered by Reyes Wical 5 months ago.


Any non-prescription ideas for rosacea treatment?
I was recently diagnosed w/ rosacea,would love some help w/ finding non-prescription products to help relieve my symptoms. I am currently using metrogel and westcort,but like to get off these. Thanks. Asked by Vince Crummie 5 months ago.

I have found great success with seabuckthorn oil soap by Face Doctor, this has reduced my redness by a ton! Seriously! My eye doctor told me about Face Doctor...he was concerned as Rosacea can cause blindness if left untreated... I also use Laroche-Posay products which have a moisturizer called Rosaliac with a slight green tint that reduces the look of the redness...these are gentle to the skin...Good luck! I try to stay out of the cold, the heat, the sun, away from alcohol and all the other things that can aggravate the redness Answered by Antoine Brandy 5 months ago.

I Cured Rosacea Naturally? Answered by Wilda Teach 5 months ago.

Rosacea can't be cleared up or cured by anything over-the-counter. You can minimize the appearance by washing your face with a very mild non-soap cleanser like Cetaphil and moisturize with the lotion also. The best thing you can do for rosacea is treat it like a rash, not acne. Don't use any cleansers for acne and try to stay out of the sun or wear sunblock, even in the wintertime. You can get a tinted moisturizer with sunblock all in one bottle...there are many different kinds just look for one that that doesn't clog pores. Aveno products are also soothing to skin disorders. Answered by Samantha Troncoso 5 months ago.

Niacinamide face cleansing pads are effective and simple way to keep acne away. Just place a pad on the pimple and watch it fade away. Lavender Oil helps prevent skin drying. Works for rosacea too. Niacinamide pads are also known as Nicotinamide pads or Vit B3 pads. Give them a try and you will be pleasantly surprised. Answered by Clelia Morrisroe 5 months ago.

Treating rosacea varies from patient to patient depending on severity and subtypes. Dermatologists are recommended to take a subtype-directed approach to treating rosacea patients.[5] Trigger avoidance can help reduce the onset of rosacea but alone will not normally cause remission for all but mild cases. The National Rosacea Society recommends that a diary be kept to help identify and reduce triggers. It is important to have a gentle skin cleansing regimen using non-irritating cleansers. Protection from the sun is important and daily use of a sunscreen of at least SPF 15 containing a physical blocker such as zinc oxide or titanium dioxide is advised. Oral tetracycline antibiotics (tetracycline, doxycycline, minocycline) and topical antibiotics such as metronidazole are usually the first line of defence prescribed by doctors to relieve papules, pustules, inflammation and some redness.[6] Oral antibiotics may also help to relieve symptoms of ocular rosacea. If papules and pustules persist, then sometimes isotretinoin can be prescribed.[7] Isotretinoin has many side effects and is normally used to treat severe acne but in low dosages is proven to be effective against papulopustular and phymatous rosacea. The treatment of flushing and blushing has been attempted by means of the centrally-acting α-2 agonist clonidine, but there is no evidence whatsoever that this is of any benefit. The same is true of the beta-blockers nadolol and propanolol. If flushing occurs with red wine consumption, then complete avoidance helps. There is no evidence at all that antihistamines are of any benefit in rosacea. People who develop infections of the eyelids must practice frequent eyelid hygiene. Daily scrubbing the eyelids gently with diluted baby shampoo or an over-the-counter eyelid cleaner and applying warm (but not hot) compresses several times a day is recommended. Dermatological vascular laser (single wavelength) or Intense Pulsed Light (broad spectrum) machines offer one of the best treatments for rosacea, in particular the erythema (redness) of the skin.[8] They use light to penetrate the epidermis to target the capillaries in the dermis layer of the skin. The light is absorbed by oxy-hemoglobin which heat up causing the capillary walls to heat up to 70ºC, damaging them, causing them to be absorbed by the body's natural defense mechanism. CO2 lasers can be used to remove excess tissue caused by phymatous rosacea. CO2 lasers emit a wavelength that is absorbed directly by the skin. The laser beam can be focused into a thin beam and used as a scalpel or defocused and used to vaporise tissue. Answered by Marquitta Goodnough 5 months ago.


What is a good cream to use on eczema?
I have eczema and i want to know how to get rid of it!!!! Asked by Reba Crout 5 months ago.

Hi, I am a dcotor.. Lubricants To help with dryness, these creams, such as Eucerin, Nivea, Cethaphil Moisturizing Cream, or Lubriderm, should be used every day, even when the eczema isn't flaring-up! Apply right after baths within 3 minutes (and after the steroid creams) to help trap in moisture and throughout the day as needed. For severely dry skin, try using an ointment, such as Aquaphor. Alternative lubricants that some parents find useful include Hydrolatum and Vanicream. Many experts recommend avoiding moisturizing lotions, as they often don't work as well as a cream or ointment. Steroid Creams These are the main treatments for atopic dermatitis when it flares up, and should be applied right after baths (and before a lubricant) and again during the day as directed. When the rash improves, cut back on how often you are using it and then stop until the rash flares up again. Common steroid creams include Cutivate, Westcort, Lociod Lipocream, Artistocort, and Elocon. Avoid using prescription steroid creams on the face or in the diaper area, unless specifically instructed to do so. An over the counter 1% Hydrocortisone cream is safer in these areas. For severe cases of eczema, a steroid ointment may be more effective than a cream. If your eczema improves when he is on a steroid and then quickly flares up again when you stop, it may help to use a 'step down' strategy where you taper the use of the steroid and use it less often, for example every other day and then 2-3 times a week, before finally stopping it. Or use a less potent steroid, like over the counter hydrocortizone after using a prescription strength steroid like Cutivate or Elocon. You might also ask your doctor about one of the newer non-steroidal medications, like Protopic or Elidel. Feel free to write to me or visit www.medicguide.org This is a site done by me and my doctor friends to answer all your health queries for free... Answered by Johnathan Rumer 5 months ago.

I use purebodyscent facial moisturizers which are absolutely awesome, affordable, oil-free, all natural and long-lasting. They don't contain ANY toxic ingredients at all. The best part is this... I have the most sensitive skin ever, like I cannot use anything without breaking out. I tried purebodyscent for the first time and never broke out. The moisturizer seems oily but it is completely oil free. I applied some in the morning and that evening at 11pm, I swear this stuff was still on my face as if I just applied it. The products are amazing ... no hydrogenated oils either BTW ~ oh yeah and they have natural deodorants that smell awesome and work extremely well. I know several people with eczema and rosecea and they swear by this product. Answered by Donella Lafleur 5 months ago.

My little boy had eczema on his cheeks. I was not sure what method to use but I didn't want to make my boy go through any surgery treatments at this young age. Some suggested a plastic surgeon since it was in a very visible location but our family doctor recommend this natural guide. Best Eczema Treatment? Answered by Hilaria Defrance 5 months ago.

Naftin Cream Uses Answered by Mahalia Vicknair 5 months ago.

When my daughter was a baby, she had eczema. Her skin looked like alligator skin. She was sensitive to every cream I tried until a friend told me about Eucerin Cream. It has worked wonders for her. She is 29 now and when she has a flair up, she puts that on and within a few days it's cleared up. Answered by Otelia Nouri 5 months ago.


What is eczema?
How to prevent eczema?? Asked by Christene Courter 5 months ago.

What causes eczema? The exact cause of atopic eczema is unknown. People inherit a tendency to the disorder, but the symptoms themselves seem to be set off by a number of 'trigger factors', for example: Psychological factors In adults, stress, anxiety, depression and other psychological factors can all influence atopic conditions. In particular, they can make the severity and flare-ups of eczema much worse. Irritants in the home or environment If you get eczema you're more likely to react to irritants which you inhale or which have contact with your skin. These include: Dust mites The fur of dogs and cats, as well as horse hair Certain plants Low humidity - dry air caused by air conditioning, central heating or frosty weather can aggravate eczema Overheating due to central heating and woollen or synthetic clothing can trigger itching Foods Certain foods may trigger eczema, as can the following food additives: Preservatives Parabens E214 to E218 Sodium Benzoate E211 Sorbic acid E200 Antioxidants Butyl hydroxyanisole E320 Butyl Hydroxytoluene E321 Colours Tartrazine E102 Erythrosine E123 Amaranth E127 Industrial or chemical irritants Certain chemicals such as detergents, biological washing powders and chlorine in swimming pools can trigger ezcema. Climate How climate affects eczema isn't proven. However, there is evidence that the condition generally improves in mountains over 1500m high, in seashore locations and humid regions. Atopic eczema often becomes worse in Autumn, as central heating is more widely used, leading to a reduction in room humidity. Studies have shown that children who are breast-fed are less likely to get eczema. This is also true when the nursing mother has avoided cow's milk in her diet. Other dietary restrictions may include eggs, fish, peanuts, and soy. Eczema tends to run in families. Control of stress, nervousness, anxiety, and depression can be beneficial in some cases. There is no cure for it but there is relief medications Lubricants To help with dryness, these creams, such as Eucerin, Nivea, Cethaphil Moisturizing Cream, or Lubriderm, should be used every day, even when the eczema isn't flaring-up! Apply right after baths within 3 minutes (and after the steroid creams) to help trap in moisture and throughout the day as needed. For severely dry skin, try using an ointment, such as Aquaphor. Alternative lubricants that some parents find useful include Hydrolatum and Vanicream. Many experts recommend avoiding moisturizing lotions, as they often don't work as well as a cream or ointment. Steroid Creams These are the main treatments for atopic dermatitis when it flares up, and should be applied right after baths (and before a lubricant) and again during the day as directed. When the rash improves, cut back on how often you are using it and then stop until the rash flares up again. Common steroid creams include Cutivate, Westcort, Lociod Lipocream, Artistocort, and Elocon. Avoid using prescription steroid creams on the face or in the diaper area, unless specifically instructed to do so. An over the counter 1% Hydrocortisone cream is safer in these areas. For severe cases of eczema, a steroid ointment may be more effective than a cream. If your child's eczema improves when he is on a steroid and then quickly flares up again when you stop, it may help to use a 'step down' strategy where you taper the use of the steroid and use it less often, for example every other day and then 2-3 times a week, before finally stopping it. Or use a less potent steroid, like over the counter hydrocortizone after using a prescription strength steroid like Cutivate or Elocon. You might also ask your doctor about one of the newer non-steroidal medications, like Protopic or Elidel. Bathing and Eczema Bathing and eczema is a controversial topic, but many people think the practice of limiting baths is old school or old fashioned. Many experts now recommend a daily bath for kids with eczema. A daily bath for at least 15-20 minutes helps to moisturize the skin and make it less itchy. Be sure to use a mild, nondrying soap, such as Dove, Neutrogena, Tone, Caress, Dial, Basis, or Purpose, avoid vigorous scrubbing, use a soft towel to pat the skin dry and immediately (within 3 minutes) apply a lubricating cream afterwards. If your child's skin is not tolerating a daily bath, limit baths to every other day or try using a soap substitute, such as Cetaphil. Avoid using bubble baths, harsh or drying soaps and keep shampoo off the affected areas. Itching Relief Atopic dermatitis is a very itchy rash, and scratching usually makes it worse, so it is important to help control itching. You can use an oral antihistamine, such as Benadryl, especially at night to help control irritability and restlessness that the itching may cause. Always apply your steroid cream to areas that itch. Wet or damp dressings can sometimes help with severe itching. A wet-to-wet dressing can be made by having your child wear wetted pajamas after he takes a bath and then apply a dry layer over this. Also, keep your child's fingernails cut short to limit the damage caused by scratching. Eczema Prevention Help prevent flare-ups by avoiding things that are known to trigger your child's eczema. These may include certain foods (cow's milk, eggs, peanut butter, fish), wool fibers and clothes, rough or tight fitting clothing, dry air, sweating, getting too hot or too cold (avoid hot or cold water), harsh soaps or chemicals, and stress. Swimming is allowed, but immediately shower or bathe to wash off chlorine and other chemicals and apply a moisturizer to help prevent your child's skin from drying out. Important Reminders Be patient. This is a chronic disease that usually improves and then flares-up again, but one which is usually easily managed with the above therapies. Call your pediatrician if your child is not improving in 1-2 weeks with his current treatments, the itching is keeping your child awake at night, the rash is infected with pus or honey colored scabs, or if the rash becomes raw and bleeding. A secondary skin infection can often be to blame for eczema that isn't clearing up. A trial of an antibiotic or a bacterial skin culture might help to see if this is complicating your child's eczema. You sometimes have to experiment to find what works best for your child's eczema. Consider seeing an expert, such as a Pediatric Dermatologist if you and your Pediatrician are not able to get your child's eczema under good control. Answered by Jeane Merfeld 5 months ago.

What is it?: Eczema is a general term encompassing various inflamed skin conditions. One of the most common forms of eczema is atopic dermatitis (or "atopic eczema"). Approximately 10 percent to 20 percent of the world population is affected by this chronic, relapsing, and very itchy rash at some point during childhood. Fortunately, many children with eczema find that the disease clears and often disappears with age. How to prevent it: Scientists believe that eczema is inherited, so there's no way to prevent the condition. However, because specific triggers may tend to make it worse, flare-ups can be prevented or improved by avoiding possible triggers such as: * pollen * mold * dust * animal dander * dry winter air with little moisture * allowing the skin to become too dry * certain harsh soaps and detergents * certain fabrics (such as wool or coarsely woven materials) * certain skin care products, perfumes, and colognes (particularly those that contain alcohol) * tobacco smoke * some foods (Which foods may be eczema triggers depends on the person, but dairy products and acidic foods like tomatoes seem to be common culprits.) * emotional stress * excessive heat * sweating Also, curbing the tendency to scratch the rash can prevent the condition from worsening and progressing to cause more severe skin damage or secondary infection. Answered by Jasmine Deschino 5 months ago.

wow, you got a lot of detailed answers. I have eczema and so does my son. It basically is an extream case of dry skin. When my son was small he would scratch until he would bleed. I took him to dermatologist ect.They always wanted me to use benadrill (spelling?). Didn't work in our case. I also finally took him to an allergy specialist where I learned he was actually allegic to some foods which aggravated the eczama. So you may want to check that out also. There is no preventing eczema just living with it. Eucerin cream is very good. It is thicker than most lotions and has no alcohol. Don't take very hot baths or showers. The heat draws out moisture in the skin. Dove soap is a mild soap, some are very strong also don't use fabric softner when you do your laundry. Drift is a good detertant to wash your clothes in. It's mild. Another tip is to keep your room cool at night . I got a lot of mixed info when my son was little so I have tried many things.( oh zinc oxide paste is wonderful! It would clear his skin over night but you can only get it from a Doc. Of course it isn't a cure the eczama is always there) Answered by Madie Klund 5 months ago.

I had a eczema flare up on my knee, I tried several different soaps, laundry soap even went to my Doctor and he gave me some cream it helped but was not the cure. So one evening I was looking for something to put on it I had ran out of the Neutrogena Eczema cream so I tried some of my cats hydrocortisone spray I had got from Wal-Mart and it really worked NO KIDDING just a spray once a night and maybe a couple during the day within about a week it was looking better Answered by Kendall Wilhelmsen 5 months ago.

My little boy had eczema on his cheeks. I was not sure what method to use but I didn't want to make my boy go through any surgery treatments at this young age. Some suggested a plastic surgeon since it was in a very visible location but our family doctor recommend this natural guide. Best Eczema Treatment? Answered by Jan Isaman 5 months ago.

Eczema is a skin condition that can affect both young and old. It creates a dotty appearance on the skin, sometimes a scaly appearance like "shingles." Eczema is not serious , although can become very discomforting. Physicians sometimes prescribe steroidal creams if it becomes to severe. I reccommend Aveeno Lotion in Oatmeal. Any lotions that are natural and not scented or perfumy should work just fine. Answered by Arlie Pantaleo 5 months ago.

In general, you can help to prevent eczema flare-ups by avoiding exposure to extreme temperatures, dry air, harsh soaps and bubble baths. Also, try using blankets and clothing made of cotton instead of more irritating fabrics such as wool or stiff synthetics, such as polyester. After showering or bathing, pat dry so you leave a little moisture on your skin and apply a moisturizing cream or lotion to trap moisture in the skin. Use a room humidifier to add moisture to indoor air during the winter heating season. To help to prevent contact dermatitis, avoid skin contact with irritating chemicals, plants, jewelry and substances that trigger skin allergies. If you have severe varicose veins, you can help prevent stasis dermatitis by wearing compression stockings and by elevating your legs if you sit for long periods. Be alert for any reactions within 48 hours of using a medication. Antibiotics applied to the skin and taken by mouth both can trigger a skin reaction such as hives or more sensitive skin. If this happens, call your doctor to get a substitute medication. Eczema outbreaks can usually be avoided with some simple precautions. The following suggestions may help to reduce the severity and frequency of flare-ups: Use the cream or ointment which your doctor recommends on a regular basis, and as a soap substitute, to keep the skin supple and to prevent drying. Avoid scratching when you itch. If you can not stop yourself, then gently rubbing, with the flat of your hand, is less likely to do damage. Avoid exposure to chemicals and strong detergents. It is usually better to avoid using biological agents altogether. Use protective gloves when you use such things in the house or at work. If you have been found to be allergic to a specific substance, avoid contact with it, if this is feasible. Use your treatments according to the instructions from your doctor and the pharmacist. Answered by Jody Batley 5 months ago.

Eczema is a form of dermatitis, or inflammation of the upper layers of the skin. The term eczema is broadly applied to a range of persistent or recurring skin rashes characterized by redness, skin edema, itching and dryness, with possible crusting, flaking, blistering, cracking, oozing or bleeding. Areas of temporary skin discoloration sometimes characterize healed lesions, though scarring is rare. Answered by Mario Pakonen 5 months ago.

The specific cause of Eczema (atopic dermatitis) is unknown, however, it's believed that eczema is due to the overreaction of the immune system, and due to environmental and hereditary factors. Answered by Lurlene Hornor 5 months ago.


Can anyone tell me the difference between otc Hydrocortisone and prescription Hydrocortisone Valerate?
Is VALERATE and ingredient? Is that what seperates the two?Will long term use of both or either cause any side effects in small children??My twins have eczema and these creams seem to do the best job. They are 2 yrs old now and have been using the creams for almost ALL of their lives. Some days it's... Asked by Tosha Cherney 5 months ago.

Is VALERATE and ingredient? Is that what seperates the two? Will long term use of both or either cause any side effects in small children?? My twins have eczema and these creams seem to do the best job. They are 2 yrs old now and have been using the creams for almost ALL of their lives. Some days it's just spot treatment, other days we need to use it like lotion, because they are having a "whole body" reaction. Answered by Katrice Mohring 5 months ago.

I am 41 and I have used hydro cortisone for years almost 40. The difference is the strength OTC only is 0.1% and Westcort the brand name for hydrocortisone w/VALERATE is 0.2%. Your best bet is to talk to the pharmacist about the two medications. Also as a child, I under went UV treatment and used a special soap, as well as a special diet. Many times they will out grown it and it will mainly be spot treatment as they get older. Mine was worse in the winter. Answered by Dona Bacon 5 months ago.

The answer is quite simple. No one could tell the difference unless Mr. God popped out from the heavens and showed us all his omniscient omnipotence in person. Exegesis is so rampant amongst all those 'of religion' and everyone's interpretations are different. A man may commit adultery or have more than one goat and figure, hey, what he did isn't soooo bad; he'll still go to heaven if he prostrates himself before the Lord and promises not to ever, ever do it again. At least not until next week, when he will return to church to genuflect some more. Another man might be a homophobic ding-dong who steals shopping carts from Price-Rite and is having an affair with his first cousin. He too believes he will be forgiven - after all, only them homersexuals are really goin' ter Hell. In other words, religious people bend and twist their book and their god as they please. I want to say that this is not the case for some but reality tells us it's the same for all. There are many Christians I love here and they base their Biblical interpretations upon the goodness of God and as such are charitable, sweet, and empathic. Still - an interpretation of God's goodness or his glory is STILL an interpretation. The Bible is there for all to read. I have read it. You've read it. The God of the Bible isn't always nice & kind. He is more often bigoted and violent toward his creations. For those whose values are dependent upon Jesus' compassion there are 100 who believe God is a punishing tyrant. (Punishing all but themselves, I imagine). Either way, since God has never appeared nor left any proof of his existence (and no, looking at the pretty sky all around me is NOT proof of any sort of God-figure), all is subjective. It's Pascal's Wager all over again. If he exists, they are all rewarded. If he doesn't, well, they probably won't know it anyway once they're underground. The Christian God is one of the most popular gods around, and there were like a bazillion gods way back when. But this one is the right one. Of course. The Bible says so. And God says so in the Bible. There is ultimately no way whatsoever to know the difference in existence. At least not until the Rapture, when God comes, takes his 144,000 and leaves all the rest of us to sort it out in Hell. (((AZ))) Answered by Hildegard Oberdier 5 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017950/001 WESTCORT HYDROCORTISONE VALERATE CREAM/TOPICAL 0.2% **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018726/001 WESTCORT HYDROCORTISONE VALERATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL 0.2% **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017950/001 WESTCORT HYDROCORTISONE VALERATE CREAM/TOPICAL 0.2% **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018726/001 WESTCORT HYDROCORTISONE VALERATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL 0.2% **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
074489/001 HYDROCORTISONE VALERATE HYDROCORTISONE VALERATE CREAM/TOPICAL 0.2%
075042/001 HYDROCORTISONE VALERATE HYDROCORTISONE VALERATE CREAM/TOPICAL 0.2%
075043/001 HYDROCORTISONE VALERATE HYDROCORTISONE VALERATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL 0.2%
075085/001 HYDROCORTISONE VALERATE HYDROCORTISONE VALERATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL 0.2%
075666/001 HYDROCORTISONE VALERATE HYDROCORTISONE VALERATE CREAM/TOPICAL 0.2%

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