Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 016012/001.

Names and composition

"VIVACTIL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of PROTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016012/001 VIVACTIL PROTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
016012/002 VIVACTIL PROTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
073644/001 VIVACTIL PROTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
073645/001 VIVACTIL PROTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016012/001 VIVACTIL PROTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
016012/002 VIVACTIL PROTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
073644/001 VIVACTIL PROTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
073645/001 VIVACTIL PROTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
078913/001 PROTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE PROTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
078913/002 PROTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE PROTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
090462/001 PROTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE PROTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
090462/002 PROTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE PROTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
202220/001 PROTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE PROTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
202220/002 PROTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE PROTRIPTYLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG

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Answered questions

None of the depression medications are working, and my therapist is driving me crazy?
Jamie im trying to find one who makes me happy and you have a good point there because the therapist person should make you happy or else why are you even going there but i dunno maybe i set my expectation too high or somethin Asked by Yong Schindele 1 year ago.

I've taken Lexapro, Prozac, Paxil, Celexa, Zoloft, Norpramin, Vivactil, Effexor, and Parnate, and am currently on Surmontil (100 mg-blue/white capsules) (3 in the morning / day), and I still feel like crap sometimes. I'm really talkative and hyper and than all of a sudden I just want to be left alone and die, like even before I started taking all the meds. My therapist also drives me crazy, she is boring and I just want to fall asleep, nothing she says is relevant and she is like my 7th one I've been too. Sometimes I just see her lips moving and I go yeh, yeh, yeh, alright..because she doesn't ever stop. What can I do, it's driving me crazy, I just want her to go away, and something to start working. Answered by Suzan Luehrs 1 year ago.

Yeh so she has a pic of her children hanging on the wall and she'll just point to em and be like oooh this is my son he is in uni trying to be a lawyer, ohhh and this is my daughter going to school to be a doctor and im so proud of my children and okay lady thats cool but talk about your children sometime else cause yeh Answered by Lashonda Tarpey 1 year ago.

Hi, If you have tried ten medications and nothing is really working, your doctor should refer you to a psychiatrist for recommendations. They are the experts on medications for depression, anxiety, etc. It doesn't sound like you have a therapeutic relationship with your therapist. It's not appropriate for the therapist to be focusing on herself and her family when she's talking to you. The focus should be on helping you to gain coping strategies for your problems. You should tell your doctor what you just told us, and ask for a referral to a different counsellor. I admire you for having this much patience with your treatment to date. Start by being very honest with your family doctor, especially tell him the part about feeling like being left alone to die. That's an indication that you are pretty depressed and discouraged. Know that you are loved, and keep on trying. Best wishes to you. Answered by Kasi Pomarico 1 year ago.

A couple years ago I saw a therapist and was diagnosed with depression. They suggested I take medication, so they prescribed me Wellbutrin. I took it for a few weeks and did notice a small change. I felt like I was getting better so quit the meds and the therapist; I don't know if any of this helps, because I wasn't on the medication that long and I don't attribute all of my feeling better to the meds, as there were outside things that helped me. The important thing to know is that a pill won't simply make you better or happy. As I understand them, they're designed to help increase certain chemicals (different for different medications) in the brain which help you be more positive (or less negative, depending on how you look at it). You have to WANT to get better--but if only seeing a therapist isn't helping, I'd definitely consider medication if I were you. However, I wouldn't recommend mixing anti-depressents with alcohol. And since alcohol is a depressant, it's only going to make your depressive state even worse. Bottom line, if you continue drinking, it's going to be almost impossible for you to get better. Think about some AA meetings. And don't be afraid to ask your doctor questions about the medication; they're there to help. Answered by Lady Petek 1 year ago.

Well in some people a higher dose of drug is needed and some people 1,2,3, different types of drugs are needed and some need a less of a dose it all depends most drugs take like a week to start to work,etc. Therapist is trying to get u to open up! I know u don't want to talk about anything But u need to start talking about what u are feeling or let off some steam. Talking is the 1st step in getting out of depression and then working on what is really the problem - eating at u is next! Remember this takes time and u going to have to make the therapy work for u! Answered by Graham Nebgen 1 year ago.

Over the last five years I had begun to have increasingly withdraw into a downward spiral of depression.. But now with the method I can fully focus my energy and thoughts into a decisive line on how to make my life better constantly. And it works like magic! I'm beginning to attract people to me once again and things have just been looking up since then. Helping you eliminate depression? Answered by Kiesha Nicholson 1 year ago.

You need to be re-evaluated for the meds that you are on. Something needs to change. Also look around, talk to people to see if they would recommend a new therapist. You have to be happy with the person that is supposed to be "helping" you through this. I'm sorry that you have to go through all this just to be happy, but good luck. Answered by Johnna Regos 1 year ago.

I know you've been to a million therapists, but you really need to find a new one. Your therapist sounds like my therapist, who I hate, so I'm getting another one. I'm often suicidal but I always stop myself before I do anything drastic by thinking about who would miss me and what I'd missing out on, even if I didn't even believe it. I hope you feel better someday. Answered by Juan Pefferkorn 1 year ago.

depression meds never really work, they're just for psychiatrists to make money, if you feel depressed take a walk while listening to some uplifting music, that always works for me, even when i'm sobbing like a maniac, just focus your attention on the music, and the neighborhood. Some bands that always make me happy are, the kooks, lily allen, and led zeppelin. Answered by Mayra Francisco 1 year ago.

i suggest you get a male counselor who is like in his 20's so he doesn't annoy the s h i t out of you depression is i hard thing last year i went through of few months when i was depressed mostly kiddie stuff tho it wasn't bad but i felt like c r ap Answered by Joya Hacher 1 year ago.

sounds like you could have adhd, which can make you depressed. i thought i was depressed because i had racing thoughts and i was sad sometimes. then i got re evaluated and i found out i had adhd. Answered by Carmel Dyche 1 year ago.


Anyway to lessen the amount of sleep needed?
Asked by Dagmar Sept 1 year ago.

Certain antidepressants do it for some people. Notably Wellbutrin and Vivactil. Answered by Theo Featheroff 1 year ago.


My doc prescribes me 20 mg ritalin.a day..i dont think its enough?
an anti depressant with a speed side effect is what im really looking for Asked by Rebecca Erps 1 year ago.

I am assuming that you have ADHD and or major depression. Welbutron which is an anti-depressant is energizing and has been approved for the treatment of ADHD. Vivactil, is another anti-depressant, and although it is a tricyclic (SP?) has an energizing quality to it - unlike the others in it's class that tend to be sedating. It is not a well known drug. I am not sure if Concerta is stronger than Ritalin, it depends upon the person and their chemistry. Ritalin, Stratera, Concerta, are all related to each other. Adderal is a combination of both Dexedrine and Ritalin. Cylert is in a class by itself. If a person started taking Ritalin in the pre-teen years, sometimes as they are nearing adulthood or are adults, it has been noted that the medication isn't being as beneficial as before. It is at that time, that the person may start taking Cylert. Sometimes when a depressed person isn't responding well to an anti-depressant, a doctor may also prescribe an amphetamine to augment it. Ampehetamines increase the level of Dopamine in the brain and can help alleviate depression. There are 2 computerized tests that can be used to assess reponse to treatment. One is called the "Continuance Performance Test" (CPT) and the other the "TOVA." Both of them are done on a computer, and administered by a psychologist. I have taken them on different occassions to see how much benefit I was receiving from the medication I was taking. You may want to check into something like that. It can take a while to find the right kind of medication and in the best dosages. It has taken me years in fact, and I am still trying to fine tune it. Stick with it though, it can be very worthwhile. Take care Answered by Delta Cluff 1 year ago.

Give your doctor and the medicine they prescribed a chance to work. Most meds like that take time to become effective. If in a month or so you still don't feel it is effective then go back to the doc and discuss it with them and give them the chance to work with you to find something that will work better for you. You also ask about anti depressants... Are you feeling depressed? If are feeling that you are a danger to yourself or others get off the computer and call your doctor, a counselor or 911. Depression is nothing to fool around with. But allow you doctors to work for you they are not out to get you. And don't hesitate to call them when you have questions they are there for that. Answered by Alysha Paulauskis 1 year ago.

well concerta is a time realeased so its a lot better than ritalin bc ritalin is fast acting and u have to take like more than one pill a day but concerta lasts for like 12 hours and its worked very good for me Answered by Randee Cannistraro 1 year ago.

ritalin is stronger than concerta Answered by Denisha Miko 1 year ago.


Taken Clomipramine for 2 days dont like how i feel can i stop?
with no problems Asked by Krystina Wiktor 1 year ago.

hope this helps to answer your? clomipramine Generic Name: clomipramine (kloe MI pra meen) Brand Names: Anafranil What is the most important information I should know about clomipramine? Do not use this medication if you have recently had a heart attack, or if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Do not use clomipramine if you are allergic to it or to similar drugs such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), amoxapine (Ascendin), desipramine (Norpramin), doxepin (Sinequan), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), protriptyline (Vivactil), or trimipramine (Surmontil). You may have suicidal thoughts or behavior when you start taking an antidepressant, especially if you are under 18 years old. You will need to be monitored for worsening symptoms of depression or suicidal thoughts. Your doctor should check you at regular visits during the first 12 weeks of treatment, or whenever your dose is changed. Contact your doctor promptly if you have any of the following side effects, especially if they are new symptoms or if they get worse: mood changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, irritability, agitation, aggressiveness, severe restlessness, mania (mental and/or physical hyperactivity), thoughts of suicide or hurting yourself. What is clomipramine? Clomipramine is a tricyclic antidepressant. It affects chemicals in the brain that may become unbalanced. Clomipramine is used to treat symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) such as recurrent thoughts or feelings and repetitive actions. Clomipramine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking clomipramine? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to clomipramine or to similar drugs such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), amoxapine (Ascendin), desipramine (Norpramin), doxepin (Sinequan), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), protriptyline (Vivactil), or trimipramine (Surmontil). Do not use clomipramine if you have recently had a heart attack, or if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take clomipramine before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body. Before taking clomipramine, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have: heart disease or a history of heart attack, stroke, or seizures; bipolar disorder (manic-depression), schizophrenia or other mental illness; kidney or liver disease; overactive thyroid or adrenal gland tumor (pheochromocytoma); glaucoma; or problems with urination. If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use clomipramine, or you may need a dosage adjustment or special tests during treatment. You may have suicidal thoughts or behavior when you first start taking an antidepressant, especially if you are under 18 years old. Watch for worsening symptoms of depression or suicidal thoughts. Your doctor should check you at regular visits during the first 12 weeks of treatment, or whenever your dose is changed. In addition to you watching for changes in your own symptoms, your family or caregivers should be alert to changes in your mood or symptoms. Contact your doctor promptly if you have any of the following side effects, especially if they are new symptoms or if they get worse: mood changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, irritability, agitation, aggressiveness, severe restlessness, mania (mental and/or physical hyperactivity), thoughts of suicide or hurting yourself. FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Clomipramine can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take clomipramine? Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from this medication. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Take clomipramine with food to reduce stomach upset. If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are taking clomipramine. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time. Do not stop using clomipramine without first talking to your doctor. You may need to use less and less before you stop the medication completely. It may take up to 4 weeks of using this medicine before your symptoms improve. For best results, keep using the medication as directed. Talk with your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 4 weeks of treatment. Store clomipramine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose? Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose. What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of clomipramine can be fatal. Symptoms may include fast or uneven heart rate, extreme drowsiness, confusion, agitation, vomiting, blurred vision, sweating, muscle stiffness, increased or decreased urination, swelling, shortness of breath, blue lips or fingernails, feeling light-headed, fainting, seizure (convulsions), or coma. What should I avoid while taking clomipramine? Avoid drinking alcohol. It can cause dangerous side effects when taken together with clomipramine. Avoid using other medicines that make you sleepy (such as cold medicine, pain medication, muscle relaxers, medicine for seizures, or other antidepressants). They can add to sleepiness caused by clomipramine. Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with clomipramine. Discuss the use of grapefruit products with your doctor before increasing or decreasing the amount of grapefruit products in your diet. Clomipramine can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Avoid exposure to sunlight or artificial UV rays (sunlamps or tanning beds). Clomipramine can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight and sunburn may result. Use a sunscreen (minimum SPF 15) and wear protective clothing if you must be out in the sun. What are the possible side effects of clomipramine? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling; sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body; sudden headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance; feeling light-headed, fainting; fever, confusion, muscle stiffness, sweating, fast or uneven heartbeats; pale skin, easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness; o urinating more than usual. Less serious side effects may be more likely to occur, such as: nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, loss of appetite, constipation or diarrhea; dry mouth, unpleasant taste; increased appetite, weight changes; feeling anxious, restless, dizzy, drowsy, or tired; blurred vision, trouble concentrating; sleep problems (insomnia), nightmares; blurred vision; increased sweating; or decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect clomipramine? Before taking clomipramine, tell your doctor if you have used an "SSRI" antidepressant in the past 5 weeks, such as citalopram (Celexa), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem), fluvoxamine (Luvox), paroxetine (Paxil), or sertraline (Zoloft). Before taking clomipramine, tell your doctor if you are currently using any of the following drugs: cimetidine (Tagamet); guanethidine (Ismelin); methylphenidate (Concerta, Ritalin, Daytrana); phenytoin (Dilantin); warfarin (Coumadin); heart or blood pressure medication such as clonidine (Catapres) or digoxin (Lanoxin); heart rhythm medications such as flecainide (Tambocor), propafenone (Rhythmol), or quinidine (Cardioquin, Quinidex, Quinaglute); or anti-psychotic medications such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), haloperidol (Haldol), thioridazine (Mellaril), clozapine (Clozaril), olanzapine (Zyprexa, Zydis), quetiapine (Seroquel), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon). If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use clomipramine, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment. There are many other medicines that can interact with clomipramine. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list with you of all the medicines you use and show this list to any doctor or other healthcare provider who treats you. Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has information about clomipramine written for health professionals that you may read. What does my medication look like? Clomipramine is available with a prescription under the brand name Anafranil. Other brand or generic forms may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you. Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Copyright 1996-2006 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 7.02. Revision Date: 10/11/06 12:16:21 PM. Answered by Marissa Reddy 1 year ago.

Although many folks wont agree, you have to get off the meds. It is in all likelihood that every one of those meds are inflicting a extreme hormonal and neurological chemical imbalance for your mind. Consult your medical professional earlier than nevertheless. You are NOT possessed! God and the Devil don't seem to be truly. Religion is only a hypnotizer and some way to provide an explanation for matters we dont realise. As a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine, my recommendation could be get off the juice. It could also be very feasible that you're conveniently having night time terrors. I have had many sufferers experiencing them and I think that's a developing contributor to intellectual instability. DO NOT act on any irregular ideas you've got. DO NOT attempt to kill your self. If you do think that you're having unusual emotions and many others. then please name 911 as quickly as feasible. It is critical that you just obtain on the spot aid in a suicidal concern. There is desire for you but and the reply isn't God, its your possess frame. Answered by Berniece Stottlar 1 year ago.

Medications are to make you better and to fix whatever chemical imbalance you have. They are optional. If you don't feel good then quit taking them. I was given Prozac for depression and ended up with heart palpitations. so I quit. Now I feel better.You are your own best doctor and if they aren't helping you then don't do it!!! Answered by Avril Stcroix 1 year ago.

How to stop taking desipramine? Answered by Ursula Rysavy 1 year ago.


Has anyone tried stimulants to help with depression?
How do these compare with Effexor or Mirtazapine? Anyone know? Asked by Hazel Rehrig 1 year ago.

I've been on meds for depression for 3 years now and I feel tired all the time. I mean tired down to my bones and no amount sleep helps. I can sleep all day and drink tons of water and still feel the same. And I have had this exhaustion since my teens I am now 25. I've had blood tests and gone for a sleep study all to no avail. I drink like 3 diet cokes at work to stay somewhat awake. I've read that someitmes they use stimulants like Ritalin, Dexedrine or Adderall to help treat certain types of depression as well as ADD. Is this true? Has anyone tried this? I have researched it a bit and I even seem to have some characteristics of ADD. I've tried telling my "shrink" but he doesnt believe me and is always reluctant to listen when I tell him my meds arent working. Also how do you go about requesting a cat scan or different tests. Right now I see a shrink at the hospital because its covered by ohip so i'd have to go through him if i want to see someone else. Any help please? Answered by Robbie Daisy 1 year ago.

I have a very treatment resistant major depression and have been under a doctor's care for over 12 years. I also have ADHD, PTSD and a Nonverbal learning disability, all of which can contribute to fatigue. I have been on a variety of anti-depressants - Prozac, Zoloft, Effexor and now Vivactil and Wellbutron. Of all of them, I have responded best to the Vivactil and Wellbutron as they are the more energizing anti-depressants. To augment my treatment, I also take Synthroid as I have a borderline functioning thyroid. That tends to give me more energy. In my case, I have also been on a variety of stimulants and that has helped alleviate some of my depression and give me alertness and better concentration. Since going on the stimulants, I haven't needed to have as much caffine as I used to need to wake up. It was common for me to need between 6 and 9 cups of strong coffee in the morning to start feeling alert. This was even before I became depressed. If you are unhappy with your doctor you have the legal and ethical right to a referral or second opinion. You may want to have your primary care doctor involved to at least talk with your "shrink" as that may help things along. Your "shrink" may be hesitant to prescribe stimulant medication if you have a history of chemical abuse, because of the danger of becoming addicted. You can be tested for ADHD by filling out some questionaires, and participating in computerized testing that looks at attention/concentration/reaaction time. There is the Continuous Performance Test and the TOVA. Both of them can help in the diagnostic process. You don't mention whether you have had a traumatic head injury, or have a learning disability. Those are some things that can be checked out as well, depending upon any work/school/life issues. Do you have "Chronic Fatigue Syndrome" or Fibromyalgia? Just some thoughts, hope they are helpful for you. Take care. Answered by Modesto Dinuzzo 1 year ago.

Do NOT use stimulants to deactivate depression. I self prescribed myself ritalin about 2 years ago and after about a month and a half of abusing it, I started having panic attacks. It seriously screwed me up. Try Cymbalta. I was recently on it and it's worked the BEST for me (I've also been on Lexapro, Prozac and Celexa for depression-- they all made me suicidal.... I was on neurontin and then lithium for mood stabilising--- they made me feel nonexistant... and I've been on Xanax for anxiety-- and that **** didn't work). Anyway, srsly, try Cymbalta. It's highly effective. Answered by Dewitt Zumstein 1 year ago.

tell him again that ur meds aint right if he doesn't listen ask him for a referral to another covered p-doc and all i can think of is maybe a little more sugar Answered by Krishna Diruzzo 1 year ago.

Check out Provigil- a stimulating antidepressant. havent tried it myself but I'm going to ask for it. good luck. Answered by Karie Agnor 1 year ago.

Have you ever had your blood checked for iron deficiency? That will make you tired, depressed, lethargic. Answered by Patrice Northrup 1 year ago.


Whats the best medication for Narcolepsy?
i have been diagnosed with narcolepsy! so i need personal opinions on what type of meds. i should try. I ve already been prescribed one and it didnt work at all. any opinions will help!! thankyou Asked by Lauryn Ruddell 1 year ago.

There is not any "best medicine," everyone is different some people do well on one drug and other people do well on a different drug. What did you try that did not work? There are several groups of medications used to treat narcolepsy depending on the specific symptoms and the severity. Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS): stimulant medications: modafinil/armodafanil, methylphenidate, and amphetamines. Also Xyrem (sodium oxybate). Cataplexy, hallucinations and sleep paralysis: Tricyclic antidepressants: Anafranil (clomipramine), Tofranil (imipramine), Vivactil (protriptyline), Norpramin (desipramine). Also the SNRI class antidepressant Effexor (venlafaxine) and Xyrem. Poor sleep: benzodiazepine receptor agonists (BzRAs) primarily zolpidem, zopiclone, eszopiclone, and temazepam and also Xyrem. Some times other drugs have been used or have shown some potential efficacy in a few tests including lithium, codeine, morphine, selegiline, Namenda, and others. EDS occurs in all people with narcolepsy however several other symptoms commonly occur: cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations, sleep paralysis, and automatic behaviours. A person may have any combination of problems, some have all five symptoms and some may only have EDS. Xyrem has become a significant part of treatment. It is the only medication that can treat all symptoms of narcolepsy. Although not commonly used some people respond well to hypnotic medication. However it is very important to only use BzRAs that are APPROVED as hypnotics. So drugs like Valium (diazepam), Xanax (alprazolam), and Ativan (lorazepam) should NOT be given for sleep especially for narcolepsy. Almost all people with narcolepsy take stimulant medication. Of the people treated with Xyrem about 80% continued stimulant treatment but often a lower dose was used and up to 25% of narcoleptics are treatment resistant to stimulants and are only able to function well with several medications. Typically modafinil is the first stimulant used because it has fewer side effects and a much lower abuse potential compared to traditional stimulants. Methylphenidate, best know under the band name Ritalin, is more "powerful" (for lack of a better word) however amphetamines are the most powerful and potent stimulants. The United States has several amphetamine medications: Adderall, Dexedrine, Vyvanse, and Desoxyn. Adderall is most commonly used however Dexedrine and especially Desoxyn are more potent. Vyvanse is rarely used for narcolepsy. When it is used it is often used with another stimulant. I would recommend you talk to your doctor and try modafinil or armodafanil first. Armodafanil is available in The US however most countries do not yet have it available. Since both of these medications are often sufficient, have a lower abuse potential, and typically fewer side effects than traditional amphetamine stimulants it is worth trying them first. However amphetamines or methylphenidate can be used as first line treatments and patients with severe EDS typically require significant amounts of stimulants. It is hard to recommend treatments for you because what worked for another person is actually often not a good indicator of what you will do best on. Some people take 100-200 mg of modafinil a day and others may require up to 60 mg of Desoxyn and potentially other medication for other symptoms. And if a person has several symptoms he may require a cocktail of several drugs to function well. It may take you some time to find the best medication(s) for you. Some people who do not respond well initially do best on two stimulants, typically one short acting and one long acting. It is best to see a board certified sleep specialist if that is possible. Both psychiatrists and neurologists are trained to treat sleeping disorders, actually narcolepsy is one of only a few conditions specifically listed as psychiatric and neurologic. Most neuropsychiatric conditions were (often arbitrarily) separated between the two. In some severe cases consultation with a neurologist and psychiatrist may be necessary. Most sleep specialists are neurologists or psychiatrists however many cities don't have any board certified sleep specialists even if you can find one it commonly takes several months to get an initial appointment. A neurologists is typically going to be better trained for cataplexy, sleep paralysis, and automatic behaviours. A psychiatrist is typically better trained for hypnagogic hallucinations (they are not really hallucinations like most people would think of. Nor does it have anything to do with psychosis), EDS, and poor sleep. Answered by Dora Shadoan 1 year ago.

Meds For Narcolepsy Answered by Thresa Romanson 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Whats the best medication for Narcolepsy? i have been diagnosed with narcolepsy! so i need personal opinions on what type of meds. i should try. I ve already been prescribed one and it didnt work at all. any opinions will help!! thankyou Answered by Signe Feenstra 1 year ago.

Try to get Xyrem mfg by Orphan Drugs, it is GHB as an Rx. Answered by Manuel Bess 1 year ago.


Is taking multiple anti-depressants at once common?
A friend of mine is currently taking three different anti-depressants at one time. He's taking Cymbalta, Effexor, and a third that I'm not sure of. I'm just wondering if this is common. He and I are both a little bit concerned about this, and the potential health/mental risks. Asked by Blythe Gladney 1 year ago.

Any other antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil), amoxapine (Ascendin), citalopram (Celexa), clomipramine (Anafranil), desipramine (Norpramin), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac), fluvoxamine (Luvox), imipramine (Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), paroxetine (Paxil), protriptyline (Vivactil), sertraline (Zoloft), or trimipramine (Surmontil) can cause serious health issues and even death if taken in combination with Effexor. Some medications are used in combination like one in the morning and one for bedtime( one to help with sleep).Cymbalta should be fine, this drug is used as a sleep aid and an antidepressant. The best thing to do is to talk to your physician about the combination of these medications. If you dont get the suppport you need from your physician its time to find another one! Good luck and take care! Answered by Dennise Afan 1 year ago.

Im not sure, but I dont think thats safe at all. Ive never heard of anyone taking 3 at a time. They could react with each other negatively in his body, and since they have some different side effects, they could all affect his body in different ways. He should go to a different doctor and get a second opinion, and based on that he should decide on what to do next. However, until he can get an appointment, he should see his doctor, and ask why it is needed to take all 3 medications at the same time, and why the dose of one isnt just raised a little bit instead of adding two. good luck! Answered by Sharan Robinzine 1 year ago.

I worked as a school counselor. I've seen kids on as many as 5 different psych meds at one time. It's common, but you are right on to be concerned about his health. The reality of mental health is not what you'd expect. Secular mental health treatment really doesn't work very well. So clients are told that they have a "chemical imbalance" and put on drugs. There is only one good option for dealing with depression: The Bible. Check out this website: mentalhealthsolutions.info Answered by Corie Burtschi 1 year ago.

It isnt that common, but at the same time it is not un-heard of. Usually you take one or two anti-depressants when switching from one kind to another. But to be active on both? Im not sure, but if you are concerend you could always get a second opinion from another doctor Answered by Ira Harwell 1 year ago.

I take Wellbutrin SR (150 mg) in the morning, and Lexapro (10 mg) in the evening, for depression and anxiety. I've been taking that for over a year and a half, and it's working very well for me. The Wellbutrin SR seems to help me to be more alert and active - and wanting to do things - while the Lexapro makes me more mellow, and it helps me sleep better, too. Answered by Jonell Foltz 1 year ago.

It's common when they run out of options. I was in the hospital for the 5th time for suicide when they put me on two at once. There is a small chance you can get serotonin syndrome when you take this combo of drugs and it is fatal, but if you get to the emergency room they can fix you up. Answered by Enola Ciesco 1 year ago.

Multiple Antidepressants Answered by Blanch Scardino 1 year ago.


Does anyone know of any anti depressants that doesn't have weigh gain as a side effect?
I know that Wellbutrin can have a weight loss effect but are there any other anti depressants that don't have that weight gain effect? Asked by Alexis Minchew 1 year ago.

In a side by side comparison based on a scale of 0 (least likely) to 4+(very likely). Tricyclics: Of the 10 drugs within this class, those that ranked the lowest (1+) were: Desipramine (Norpramin); Nortriptyline (Aventyl, Pamelor); and Protriptyline (Vivactil) Selective Serotonin Re-uptake Inhibitors (SSRI's): Of the 6 drugs within this class (ie: Celexa, Zoloft, Prozac, ect), all rate a 1+ except Paroxetine (Paxil)- this rated a 2+ Dopamine-Reuptake Blocking compounds: Bupropion (Wellbutrin, Zyban) rated a 0 Serotonin/Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors: Venlafaxine (Effexor) rated a 0 5HT2 Receptor Antagonists: Nefazodone (Serzone) rated a 0 while Trazodone (Desyrel) rated a 2+ There are two other classes; MAOI's- too many nasty side effects- 3 drugs within this class rated 2+/3+; and finally, Noradrenergic Antagonist- Mirtazapine (Remeron) which rated a 3+. Not surprisingly the majority of those that scored best (lowest) on weight gain also showed less prevalence of drowsiness- even amoung the snooze inducing tricyclics- with Protriptyline rated the best (lowest) for drowsiness within this class (1+). Answered by Francisco Kronk 1 year ago.

My boss took Effexor and lost 30 lbs. The description of the drug does claim weight gain as a side effect though. Answered by Lela Harney 1 year ago.


None of the depression medications are working, and my therapist is driving me crazy?
Jamie im trying to find one who makes me happy and you have a good point there because the therapist person should make you happy or else why are you even going there but i dunno maybe i set my expectation too high or somethin Asked by Nicol Luzinski 1 year ago.

I've taken Lexapro, Prozac, Paxil, Celexa, Zoloft, Norpramin, Vivactil, Effexor, and Parnate, and am currently on Surmontil (100 mg-blue/white capsules) (3 in the morning / day), and I still feel like crap sometimes. I'm really talkative and hyper and than all of a sudden I just want to be left alone and die, like even before I started taking all the meds. My therapist also drives me crazy, she is boring and I just want to fall asleep, nothing she says is relevant and she is like my 7th one I've been too. Sometimes I just see her lips moving and I go yeh, yeh, yeh, alright..because she doesn't ever stop. What can I do, it's driving me crazy, I just want her to go away, and something to start working. Answered by Shemika Tapia 1 year ago.

Yeh so she has a pic of her children hanging on the wall and she'll just point to em and be like oooh this is my son he is in uni trying to be a lawyer, ohhh and this is my daughter going to school to be a doctor and im so proud of my children and okay lady thats cool but talk about your children sometime else cause yeh Answered by Xavier Pratt 1 year ago.

Hi, If you have tried ten medications and nothing is really working, your doctor should refer you to a psychiatrist for recommendations. They are the experts on medications for depression, anxiety, etc. It doesn't sound like you have a therapeutic relationship with your therapist. It's not appropriate for the therapist to be focusing on herself and her family when she's talking to you. The focus should be on helping you to gain coping strategies for your problems. You should tell your doctor what you just told us, and ask for a referral to a different counsellor. I admire you for having this much patience with your treatment to date. Start by being very honest with your family doctor, especially tell him the part about feeling like being left alone to die. That's an indication that you are pretty depressed and discouraged. Know that you are loved, and keep on trying. Best wishes to you. Answered by Andrea Somani 1 year ago.

A couple years ago I saw a therapist and was diagnosed with depression. They suggested I take medication, so they prescribed me Wellbutrin. I took it for a few weeks and did notice a small change. I felt like I was getting better so quit the meds and the therapist; I don't know if any of this helps, because I wasn't on the medication that long and I don't attribute all of my feeling better to the meds, as there were outside things that helped me. The important thing to know is that a pill won't simply make you better or happy. As I understand them, they're designed to help increase certain chemicals (different for different medications) in the brain which help you be more positive (or less negative, depending on how you look at it). You have to WANT to get better--but if only seeing a therapist isn't helping, I'd definitely consider medication if I were you. However, I wouldn't recommend mixing anti-depressents with alcohol. And since alcohol is a depressant, it's only going to make your depressive state even worse. Bottom line, if you continue drinking, it's going to be almost impossible for you to get better. Think about some AA meetings. And don't be afraid to ask your doctor questions about the medication; they're there to help. Answered by Franklyn Stremming 1 year ago.

Well in some people a higher dose of drug is needed and some people 1,2,3, different types of drugs are needed and some need a less of a dose it all depends most drugs take like a week to start to work,etc. Therapist is trying to get u to open up! I know u don't want to talk about anything But u need to start talking about what u are feeling or let off some steam. Talking is the 1st step in getting out of depression and then working on what is really the problem - eating at u is next! Remember this takes time and u going to have to make the therapy work for u! Answered by Marjorie Fiorello 1 year ago.

Over the last five years I had begun to have increasingly withdraw into a downward spiral of depression.. But now with the method I can fully focus my energy and thoughts into a decisive line on how to make my life better constantly. And it works like magic! I'm beginning to attract people to me once again and things have just been looking up since then. Helping you eliminate depression? Answered by Renna Vidra 1 year ago.

You need to be re-evaluated for the meds that you are on. Something needs to change. Also look around, talk to people to see if they would recommend a new therapist. You have to be happy with the person that is supposed to be "helping" you through this. I'm sorry that you have to go through all this just to be happy, but good luck. Answered by Ojanen 1 year ago.

I know you've been to a million therapists, but you really need to find a new one. Your therapist sounds like my therapist, who I hate, so I'm getting another one. I'm often suicidal but I always stop myself before I do anything drastic by thinking about who would miss me and what I'd missing out on, even if I didn't even believe it. I hope you feel better someday. Answered by Nakisha Kazeck 1 year ago.

depression meds never really work, they're just for psychiatrists to make money, if you feel depressed take a walk while listening to some uplifting music, that always works for me, even when i'm sobbing like a maniac, just focus your attention on the music, and the neighborhood. Some bands that always make me happy are, the kooks, lily allen, and led zeppelin. Answered by Sibyl Janke 1 year ago.

i suggest you get a male counselor who is like in his 20's so he doesn't annoy the s h i t out of you depression is i hard thing last year i went through of few months when i was depressed mostly kiddie stuff tho it wasn't bad but i felt like c r ap Answered by Athena Poehler 1 year ago.

sounds like you could have adhd, which can make you depressed. i thought i was depressed because i had racing thoughts and i was sad sometimes. then i got re evaluated and i found out i had adhd. Answered by Syreeta Mantia 1 year ago.


Anyway to lessen the amount of sleep needed?
Asked by Tim Truax 1 year ago.

Certain antidepressants do it for some people. Notably Wellbutrin and Vivactil. Answered by Mitsue Mcgarrigle 1 year ago.


My doc prescribes me 20 mg ritalin.a day..i dont think its enough?
an anti depressant with a speed side effect is what im really looking for Asked by Millard Tredennick 1 year ago.

I am assuming that you have ADHD and or major depression. Welbutron which is an anti-depressant is energizing and has been approved for the treatment of ADHD. Vivactil, is another anti-depressant, and although it is a tricyclic (SP?) has an energizing quality to it - unlike the others in it's class that tend to be sedating. It is not a well known drug. I am not sure if Concerta is stronger than Ritalin, it depends upon the person and their chemistry. Ritalin, Stratera, Concerta, are all related to each other. Adderal is a combination of both Dexedrine and Ritalin. Cylert is in a class by itself. If a person started taking Ritalin in the pre-teen years, sometimes as they are nearing adulthood or are adults, it has been noted that the medication isn't being as beneficial as before. It is at that time, that the person may start taking Cylert. Sometimes when a depressed person isn't responding well to an anti-depressant, a doctor may also prescribe an amphetamine to augment it. Ampehetamines increase the level of Dopamine in the brain and can help alleviate depression. There are 2 computerized tests that can be used to assess reponse to treatment. One is called the "Continuance Performance Test" (CPT) and the other the "TOVA." Both of them are done on a computer, and administered by a psychologist. I have taken them on different occassions to see how much benefit I was receiving from the medication I was taking. You may want to check into something like that. It can take a while to find the right kind of medication and in the best dosages. It has taken me years in fact, and I am still trying to fine tune it. Stick with it though, it can be very worthwhile. Take care Answered by Lakia Malson 1 year ago.

Give your doctor and the medicine they prescribed a chance to work. Most meds like that take time to become effective. If in a month or so you still don't feel it is effective then go back to the doc and discuss it with them and give them the chance to work with you to find something that will work better for you. You also ask about anti depressants... Are you feeling depressed? If are feeling that you are a danger to yourself or others get off the computer and call your doctor, a counselor or 911. Depression is nothing to fool around with. But allow you doctors to work for you they are not out to get you. And don't hesitate to call them when you have questions they are there for that. Answered by Danille Goetz 1 year ago.

well concerta is a time realeased so its a lot better than ritalin bc ritalin is fast acting and u have to take like more than one pill a day but concerta lasts for like 12 hours and its worked very good for me Answered by Garnett Goettl 1 year ago.

ritalin is stronger than concerta Answered by Lazaro Balbuena 1 year ago.


Taken Clomipramine for 2 days dont like how i feel can i stop?
with no problems Asked by Cami Dastoli 1 year ago.

hope this helps to answer your? clomipramine Generic Name: clomipramine (kloe MI pra meen) Brand Names: Anafranil What is the most important information I should know about clomipramine? Do not use this medication if you have recently had a heart attack, or if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Do not use clomipramine if you are allergic to it or to similar drugs such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), amoxapine (Ascendin), desipramine (Norpramin), doxepin (Sinequan), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), protriptyline (Vivactil), or trimipramine (Surmontil). You may have suicidal thoughts or behavior when you start taking an antidepressant, especially if you are under 18 years old. You will need to be monitored for worsening symptoms of depression or suicidal thoughts. Your doctor should check you at regular visits during the first 12 weeks of treatment, or whenever your dose is changed. Contact your doctor promptly if you have any of the following side effects, especially if they are new symptoms or if they get worse: mood changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, irritability, agitation, aggressiveness, severe restlessness, mania (mental and/or physical hyperactivity), thoughts of suicide or hurting yourself. What is clomipramine? Clomipramine is a tricyclic antidepressant. It affects chemicals in the brain that may become unbalanced. Clomipramine is used to treat symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) such as recurrent thoughts or feelings and repetitive actions. Clomipramine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking clomipramine? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to clomipramine or to similar drugs such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), amoxapine (Ascendin), desipramine (Norpramin), doxepin (Sinequan), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), protriptyline (Vivactil), or trimipramine (Surmontil). Do not use clomipramine if you have recently had a heart attack, or if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take clomipramine before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body. Before taking clomipramine, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have: heart disease or a history of heart attack, stroke, or seizures; bipolar disorder (manic-depression), schizophrenia or other mental illness; kidney or liver disease; overactive thyroid or adrenal gland tumor (pheochromocytoma); glaucoma; or problems with urination. If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use clomipramine, or you may need a dosage adjustment or special tests during treatment. You may have suicidal thoughts or behavior when you first start taking an antidepressant, especially if you are under 18 years old. Watch for worsening symptoms of depression or suicidal thoughts. Your doctor should check you at regular visits during the first 12 weeks of treatment, or whenever your dose is changed. In addition to you watching for changes in your own symptoms, your family or caregivers should be alert to changes in your mood or symptoms. Contact your doctor promptly if you have any of the following side effects, especially if they are new symptoms or if they get worse: mood changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, irritability, agitation, aggressiveness, severe restlessness, mania (mental and/or physical hyperactivity), thoughts of suicide or hurting yourself. FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Clomipramine can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take clomipramine? Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from this medication. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Take clomipramine with food to reduce stomach upset. If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are taking clomipramine. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time. Do not stop using clomipramine without first talking to your doctor. You may need to use less and less before you stop the medication completely. It may take up to 4 weeks of using this medicine before your symptoms improve. For best results, keep using the medication as directed. Talk with your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 4 weeks of treatment. Store clomipramine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose? Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose. What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of clomipramine can be fatal. Symptoms may include fast or uneven heart rate, extreme drowsiness, confusion, agitation, vomiting, blurred vision, sweating, muscle stiffness, increased or decreased urination, swelling, shortness of breath, blue lips or fingernails, feeling light-headed, fainting, seizure (convulsions), or coma. What should I avoid while taking clomipramine? Avoid drinking alcohol. It can cause dangerous side effects when taken together with clomipramine. Avoid using other medicines that make you sleepy (such as cold medicine, pain medication, muscle relaxers, medicine for seizures, or other antidepressants). They can add to sleepiness caused by clomipramine. Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with clomipramine. Discuss the use of grapefruit products with your doctor before increasing or decreasing the amount of grapefruit products in your diet. Clomipramine can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Avoid exposure to sunlight or artificial UV rays (sunlamps or tanning beds). Clomipramine can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight and sunburn may result. Use a sunscreen (minimum SPF 15) and wear protective clothing if you must be out in the sun. What are the possible side effects of clomipramine? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling; sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body; sudden headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance; feeling light-headed, fainting; fever, confusion, muscle stiffness, sweating, fast or uneven heartbeats; pale skin, easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness; o urinating more than usual. Less serious side effects may be more likely to occur, such as: nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, loss of appetite, constipation or diarrhea; dry mouth, unpleasant taste; increased appetite, weight changes; feeling anxious, restless, dizzy, drowsy, or tired; blurred vision, trouble concentrating; sleep problems (insomnia), nightmares; blurred vision; increased sweating; or decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect clomipramine? Before taking clomipramine, tell your doctor if you have used an "SSRI" antidepressant in the past 5 weeks, such as citalopram (Celexa), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem), fluvoxamine (Luvox), paroxetine (Paxil), or sertraline (Zoloft). Before taking clomipramine, tell your doctor if you are currently using any of the following drugs: cimetidine (Tagamet); guanethidine (Ismelin); methylphenidate (Concerta, Ritalin, Daytrana); phenytoin (Dilantin); warfarin (Coumadin); heart or blood pressure medication such as clonidine (Catapres) or digoxin (Lanoxin); heart rhythm medications such as flecainide (Tambocor), propafenone (Rhythmol), or quinidine (Cardioquin, Quinidex, Quinaglute); or anti-psychotic medications such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), haloperidol (Haldol), thioridazine (Mellaril), clozapine (Clozaril), olanzapine (Zyprexa, Zydis), quetiapine (Seroquel), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon). If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use clomipramine, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment. There are many other medicines that can interact with clomipramine. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list with you of all the medicines you use and show this list to any doctor or other healthcare provider who treats you. Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has information about clomipramine written for health professionals that you may read. What does my medication look like? Clomipramine is available with a prescription under the brand name Anafranil. Other brand or generic forms may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you. Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Copyright 1996-2006 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 7.02. Revision Date: 10/11/06 12:16:21 PM. Answered by Sandy Wolak 1 year ago.

Although many folks wont agree, you have to get off the meds. It is in all likelihood that every one of those meds are inflicting a extreme hormonal and neurological chemical imbalance for your mind. Consult your medical professional earlier than nevertheless. You are NOT possessed! God and the Devil don't seem to be truly. Religion is only a hypnotizer and some way to provide an explanation for matters we dont realise. As a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine, my recommendation could be get off the juice. It could also be very feasible that you're conveniently having night time terrors. I have had many sufferers experiencing them and I think that's a developing contributor to intellectual instability. DO NOT act on any irregular ideas you've got. DO NOT attempt to kill your self. If you do think that you're having unusual emotions and many others. then please name 911 as quickly as feasible. It is critical that you just obtain on the spot aid in a suicidal concern. There is desire for you but and the reply isn't God, its your possess frame. Answered by Janelle Stuffle 1 year ago.

Medications are to make you better and to fix whatever chemical imbalance you have. They are optional. If you don't feel good then quit taking them. I was given Prozac for depression and ended up with heart palpitations. so I quit. Now I feel better.You are your own best doctor and if they aren't helping you then don't do it!!! Answered by Tammy Mcmilliam 1 year ago.

How to stop taking desipramine? Answered by Bertha Fecto 1 year ago.


Has anyone tried stimulants to help with depression?
How do these compare with Effexor or Mirtazapine? Anyone know? Asked by Graig Rorrer 1 year ago.

I've been on meds for depression for 3 years now and I feel tired all the time. I mean tired down to my bones and no amount sleep helps. I can sleep all day and drink tons of water and still feel the same. And I have had this exhaustion since my teens I am now 25. I've had blood tests and gone for a sleep study all to no avail. I drink like 3 diet cokes at work to stay somewhat awake. I've read that someitmes they use stimulants like Ritalin, Dexedrine or Adderall to help treat certain types of depression as well as ADD. Is this true? Has anyone tried this? I have researched it a bit and I even seem to have some characteristics of ADD. I've tried telling my "shrink" but he doesnt believe me and is always reluctant to listen when I tell him my meds arent working. Also how do you go about requesting a cat scan or different tests. Right now I see a shrink at the hospital because its covered by ohip so i'd have to go through him if i want to see someone else. Any help please? Answered by Alec Reath 1 year ago.

I have a very treatment resistant major depression and have been under a doctor's care for over 12 years. I also have ADHD, PTSD and a Nonverbal learning disability, all of which can contribute to fatigue. I have been on a variety of anti-depressants - Prozac, Zoloft, Effexor and now Vivactil and Wellbutron. Of all of them, I have responded best to the Vivactil and Wellbutron as they are the more energizing anti-depressants. To augment my treatment, I also take Synthroid as I have a borderline functioning thyroid. That tends to give me more energy. In my case, I have also been on a variety of stimulants and that has helped alleviate some of my depression and give me alertness and better concentration. Since going on the stimulants, I haven't needed to have as much caffine as I used to need to wake up. It was common for me to need between 6 and 9 cups of strong coffee in the morning to start feeling alert. This was even before I became depressed. If you are unhappy with your doctor you have the legal and ethical right to a referral or second opinion. You may want to have your primary care doctor involved to at least talk with your "shrink" as that may help things along. Your "shrink" may be hesitant to prescribe stimulant medication if you have a history of chemical abuse, because of the danger of becoming addicted. You can be tested for ADHD by filling out some questionaires, and participating in computerized testing that looks at attention/concentration/reaaction time. There is the Continuous Performance Test and the TOVA. Both of them can help in the diagnostic process. You don't mention whether you have had a traumatic head injury, or have a learning disability. Those are some things that can be checked out as well, depending upon any work/school/life issues. Do you have "Chronic Fatigue Syndrome" or Fibromyalgia? Just some thoughts, hope they are helpful for you. Take care. Answered by Dallas Vijil 1 year ago.

Do NOT use stimulants to deactivate depression. I self prescribed myself ritalin about 2 years ago and after about a month and a half of abusing it, I started having panic attacks. It seriously screwed me up. Try Cymbalta. I was recently on it and it's worked the BEST for me (I've also been on Lexapro, Prozac and Celexa for depression-- they all made me suicidal.... I was on neurontin and then lithium for mood stabilising--- they made me feel nonexistant... and I've been on Xanax for anxiety-- and that **** didn't work). Anyway, srsly, try Cymbalta. It's highly effective. Answered by Forrest Farmer 1 year ago.

tell him again that ur meds aint right if he doesn't listen ask him for a referral to another covered p-doc and all i can think of is maybe a little more sugar Answered by Brett Siwek 1 year ago.

Check out Provigil- a stimulating antidepressant. havent tried it myself but I'm going to ask for it. good luck. Answered by Galina Leist 1 year ago.

Have you ever had your blood checked for iron deficiency? That will make you tired, depressed, lethargic. Answered by Zelma Golida 1 year ago.


Whats the best medication for Narcolepsy?
i have been diagnosed with narcolepsy! so i need personal opinions on what type of meds. i should try. I ve already been prescribed one and it didnt work at all. any opinions will help!! thankyou Asked by Elizabeth Blesofsky 1 year ago.

There is not any "best medicine," everyone is different some people do well on one drug and other people do well on a different drug. What did you try that did not work? There are several groups of medications used to treat narcolepsy depending on the specific symptoms and the severity. Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS): stimulant medications: modafinil/armodafanil, methylphenidate, and amphetamines. Also Xyrem (sodium oxybate). Cataplexy, hallucinations and sleep paralysis: Tricyclic antidepressants: Anafranil (clomipramine), Tofranil (imipramine), Vivactil (protriptyline), Norpramin (desipramine). Also the SNRI class antidepressant Effexor (venlafaxine) and Xyrem. Poor sleep: benzodiazepine receptor agonists (BzRAs) primarily zolpidem, zopiclone, eszopiclone, and temazepam and also Xyrem. Some times other drugs have been used or have shown some potential efficacy in a few tests including lithium, codeine, morphine, selegiline, Namenda, and others. EDS occurs in all people with narcolepsy however several other symptoms commonly occur: cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations, sleep paralysis, and automatic behaviours. A person may have any combination of problems, some have all five symptoms and some may only have EDS. Xyrem has become a significant part of treatment. It is the only medication that can treat all symptoms of narcolepsy. Although not commonly used some people respond well to hypnotic medication. However it is very important to only use BzRAs that are APPROVED as hypnotics. So drugs like Valium (diazepam), Xanax (alprazolam), and Ativan (lorazepam) should NOT be given for sleep especially for narcolepsy. Almost all people with narcolepsy take stimulant medication. Of the people treated with Xyrem about 80% continued stimulant treatment but often a lower dose was used and up to 25% of narcoleptics are treatment resistant to stimulants and are only able to function well with several medications. Typically modafinil is the first stimulant used because it has fewer side effects and a much lower abuse potential compared to traditional stimulants. Methylphenidate, best know under the band name Ritalin, is more "powerful" (for lack of a better word) however amphetamines are the most powerful and potent stimulants. The United States has several amphetamine medications: Adderall, Dexedrine, Vyvanse, and Desoxyn. Adderall is most commonly used however Dexedrine and especially Desoxyn are more potent. Vyvanse is rarely used for narcolepsy. When it is used it is often used with another stimulant. I would recommend you talk to your doctor and try modafinil or armodafanil first. Armodafanil is available in The US however most countries do not yet have it available. Since both of these medications are often sufficient, have a lower abuse potential, and typically fewer side effects than traditional amphetamine stimulants it is worth trying them first. However amphetamines or methylphenidate can be used as first line treatments and patients with severe EDS typically require significant amounts of stimulants. It is hard to recommend treatments for you because what worked for another person is actually often not a good indicator of what you will do best on. Some people take 100-200 mg of modafinil a day and others may require up to 60 mg of Desoxyn and potentially other medication for other symptoms. And if a person has several symptoms he may require a cocktail of several drugs to function well. It may take you some time to find the best medication(s) for you. Some people who do not respond well initially do best on two stimulants, typically one short acting and one long acting. It is best to see a board certified sleep specialist if that is possible. Both psychiatrists and neurologists are trained to treat sleeping disorders, actually narcolepsy is one of only a few conditions specifically listed as psychiatric and neurologic. Most neuropsychiatric conditions were (often arbitrarily) separated between the two. In some severe cases consultation with a neurologist and psychiatrist may be necessary. Most sleep specialists are neurologists or psychiatrists however many cities don't have any board certified sleep specialists even if you can find one it commonly takes several months to get an initial appointment. A neurologists is typically going to be better trained for cataplexy, sleep paralysis, and automatic behaviours. A psychiatrist is typically better trained for hypnagogic hallucinations (they are not really hallucinations like most people would think of. Nor does it have anything to do with psychosis), EDS, and poor sleep. Answered by Elmo Oleksiak 1 year ago.

Meds For Narcolepsy Answered by Pearl Rife 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Whats the best medication for Narcolepsy? i have been diagnosed with narcolepsy! so i need personal opinions on what type of meds. i should try. I ve already been prescribed one and it didnt work at all. any opinions will help!! thankyou Answered by Ronny Strejan 1 year ago.

Try to get Xyrem mfg by Orphan Drugs, it is GHB as an Rx. Answered by Qiana Taketa 1 year ago.


Is taking multiple anti-depressants at once common?
A friend of mine is currently taking three different anti-depressants at one time. He's taking Cymbalta, Effexor, and a third that I'm not sure of. I'm just wondering if this is common. He and I are both a little bit concerned about this, and the potential health/mental risks. Asked by Blair Blenden 1 year ago.

Any other antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil), amoxapine (Ascendin), citalopram (Celexa), clomipramine (Anafranil), desipramine (Norpramin), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac), fluvoxamine (Luvox), imipramine (Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), paroxetine (Paxil), protriptyline (Vivactil), sertraline (Zoloft), or trimipramine (Surmontil) can cause serious health issues and even death if taken in combination with Effexor. Some medications are used in combination like one in the morning and one for bedtime( one to help with sleep).Cymbalta should be fine, this drug is used as a sleep aid and an antidepressant. The best thing to do is to talk to your physician about the combination of these medications. If you dont get the suppport you need from your physician its time to find another one! Good luck and take care! Answered by Lenny Standage 1 year ago.

Im not sure, but I dont think thats safe at all. Ive never heard of anyone taking 3 at a time. They could react with each other negatively in his body, and since they have some different side effects, they could all affect his body in different ways. He should go to a different doctor and get a second opinion, and based on that he should decide on what to do next. However, until he can get an appointment, he should see his doctor, and ask why it is needed to take all 3 medications at the same time, and why the dose of one isnt just raised a little bit instead of adding two. good luck! Answered by Nadene Spreng 1 year ago.

I worked as a school counselor. I've seen kids on as many as 5 different psych meds at one time. It's common, but you are right on to be concerned about his health. The reality of mental health is not what you'd expect. Secular mental health treatment really doesn't work very well. So clients are told that they have a "chemical imbalance" and put on drugs. There is only one good option for dealing with depression: The Bible. Check out this website: mentalhealthsolutions.info Answered by Samual Dedon 1 year ago.

It isnt that common, but at the same time it is not un-heard of. Usually you take one or two anti-depressants when switching from one kind to another. But to be active on both? Im not sure, but if you are concerend you could always get a second opinion from another doctor Answered by Royal Labarba 1 year ago.

I take Wellbutrin SR (150 mg) in the morning, and Lexapro (10 mg) in the evening, for depression and anxiety. I've been taking that for over a year and a half, and it's working very well for me. The Wellbutrin SR seems to help me to be more alert and active - and wanting to do things - while the Lexapro makes me more mellow, and it helps me sleep better, too. Answered by Huey Drehs 1 year ago.

It's common when they run out of options. I was in the hospital for the 5th time for suicide when they put me on two at once. There is a small chance you can get serotonin syndrome when you take this combo of drugs and it is fatal, but if you get to the emergency room they can fix you up. Answered by Dollie Balbuena 1 year ago.

Multiple Antidepressants Answered by Ethel Seegert 1 year ago.


Does anyone know of any anti depressants that doesn't have weigh gain as a side effect?
I know that Wellbutrin can have a weight loss effect but are there any other anti depressants that don't have that weight gain effect? Asked by Micha Brazil 1 year ago.

In a side by side comparison based on a scale of 0 (least likely) to 4+(very likely). Tricyclics: Of the 10 drugs within this class, those that ranked the lowest (1+) were: Desipramine (Norpramin); Nortriptyline (Aventyl, Pamelor); and Protriptyline (Vivactil) Selective Serotonin Re-uptake Inhibitors (SSRI's): Of the 6 drugs within this class (ie: Celexa, Zoloft, Prozac, ect), all rate a 1+ except Paroxetine (Paxil)- this rated a 2+ Dopamine-Reuptake Blocking compounds: Bupropion (Wellbutrin, Zyban) rated a 0 Serotonin/Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors: Venlafaxine (Effexor) rated a 0 5HT2 Receptor Antagonists: Nefazodone (Serzone) rated a 0 while Trazodone (Desyrel) rated a 2+ There are two other classes; MAOI's- too many nasty side effects- 3 drugs within this class rated 2+/3+; and finally, Noradrenergic Antagonist- Mirtazapine (Remeron) which rated a 3+. Not surprisingly the majority of those that scored best (lowest) on weight gain also showed less prevalence of drowsiness- even amoung the snooze inducing tricyclics- with Protriptyline rated the best (lowest) for drowsiness within this class (1+). Answered by Saturnina Denis 1 year ago.

My boss took Effexor and lost 30 lbs. The description of the drug does claim weight gain as a side effect though. Answered by Shandi Lyerla 1 year ago.


None of the depression medications are working, and my therapist is driving me crazy?
Jamie im trying to find one who makes me happy and you have a good point there because the therapist person should make you happy or else why are you even going there but i dunno maybe i set my expectation too high or somethin Asked by Asha Urquidez 1 year ago.

I've taken Lexapro, Prozac, Paxil, Celexa, Zoloft, Norpramin, Vivactil, Effexor, and Parnate, and am currently on Surmontil (100 mg-blue/white capsules) (3 in the morning / day), and I still feel like crap sometimes. I'm really talkative and hyper and than all of a sudden I just want to be left alone and die, like even before I started taking all the meds. My therapist also drives me crazy, she is boring and I just want to fall asleep, nothing she says is relevant and she is like my 7th one I've been too. Sometimes I just see her lips moving and I go yeh, yeh, yeh, alright..because she doesn't ever stop. What can I do, it's driving me crazy, I just want her to go away, and something to start working. Answered by Torie Castanado 1 year ago.

Yeh so she has a pic of her children hanging on the wall and she'll just point to em and be like oooh this is my son he is in uni trying to be a lawyer, ohhh and this is my daughter going to school to be a doctor and im so proud of my children and okay lady thats cool but talk about your children sometime else cause yeh Answered by Tracey Bery 1 year ago.

Hi, If you have tried ten medications and nothing is really working, your doctor should refer you to a psychiatrist for recommendations. They are the experts on medications for depression, anxiety, etc. It doesn't sound like you have a therapeutic relationship with your therapist. It's not appropriate for the therapist to be focusing on herself and her family when she's talking to you. The focus should be on helping you to gain coping strategies for your problems. You should tell your doctor what you just told us, and ask for a referral to a different counsellor. I admire you for having this much patience with your treatment to date. Start by being very honest with your family doctor, especially tell him the part about feeling like being left alone to die. That's an indication that you are pretty depressed and discouraged. Know that you are loved, and keep on trying. Best wishes to you. Answered by Barry Mccarrol 1 year ago.

A couple years ago I saw a therapist and was diagnosed with depression. They suggested I take medication, so they prescribed me Wellbutrin. I took it for a few weeks and did notice a small change. I felt like I was getting better so quit the meds and the therapist; I don't know if any of this helps, because I wasn't on the medication that long and I don't attribute all of my feeling better to the meds, as there were outside things that helped me. The important thing to know is that a pill won't simply make you better or happy. As I understand them, they're designed to help increase certain chemicals (different for different medications) in the brain which help you be more positive (or less negative, depending on how you look at it). You have to WANT to get better--but if only seeing a therapist isn't helping, I'd definitely consider medication if I were you. However, I wouldn't recommend mixing anti-depressents with alcohol. And since alcohol is a depressant, it's only going to make your depressive state even worse. Bottom line, if you continue drinking, it's going to be almost impossible for you to get better. Think about some AA meetings. And don't be afraid to ask your doctor questions about the medication; they're there to help. Answered by Rashida Allmon 1 year ago.

Well in some people a higher dose of drug is needed and some people 1,2,3, different types of drugs are needed and some need a less of a dose it all depends most drugs take like a week to start to work,etc. Therapist is trying to get u to open up! I know u don't want to talk about anything But u need to start talking about what u are feeling or let off some steam. Talking is the 1st step in getting out of depression and then working on what is really the problem - eating at u is next! Remember this takes time and u going to have to make the therapy work for u! Answered by Glynis Hoston 1 year ago.

Over the last five years I had begun to have increasingly withdraw into a downward spiral of depression.. But now with the method I can fully focus my energy and thoughts into a decisive line on how to make my life better constantly. And it works like magic! I'm beginning to attract people to me once again and things have just been looking up since then. Helping you eliminate depression? Answered by Justin Fiorino 1 year ago.

You need to be re-evaluated for the meds that you are on. Something needs to change. Also look around, talk to people to see if they would recommend a new therapist. You have to be happy with the person that is supposed to be "helping" you through this. I'm sorry that you have to go through all this just to be happy, but good luck. Answered by Lane Repine 1 year ago.

I know you've been to a million therapists, but you really need to find a new one. Your therapist sounds like my therapist, who I hate, so I'm getting another one. I'm often suicidal but I always stop myself before I do anything drastic by thinking about who would miss me and what I'd missing out on, even if I didn't even believe it. I hope you feel better someday. Answered by Petrina Marland 1 year ago.

depression meds never really work, they're just for psychiatrists to make money, if you feel depressed take a walk while listening to some uplifting music, that always works for me, even when i'm sobbing like a maniac, just focus your attention on the music, and the neighborhood. Some bands that always make me happy are, the kooks, lily allen, and led zeppelin. Answered by Brady Kruzewski 1 year ago.

i suggest you get a male counselor who is like in his 20's so he doesn't annoy the s h i t out of you depression is i hard thing last year i went through of few months when i was depressed mostly kiddie stuff tho it wasn't bad but i felt like c r ap Answered by Duncan Beady 1 year ago.

sounds like you could have adhd, which can make you depressed. i thought i was depressed because i had racing thoughts and i was sad sometimes. then i got re evaluated and i found out i had adhd. Answered by Grayce Younglove 1 year ago.


Anyway to lessen the amount of sleep needed?
Asked by Stanley Saffo 1 year ago.

Certain antidepressants do it for some people. Notably Wellbutrin and Vivactil. Answered by Antonio Abide 1 year ago.


My doc prescribes me 20 mg ritalin.a day..i dont think its enough?
an anti depressant with a speed side effect is what im really looking for Asked by Drew Zielesch 1 year ago.

I am assuming that you have ADHD and or major depression. Welbutron which is an anti-depressant is energizing and has been approved for the treatment of ADHD. Vivactil, is another anti-depressant, and although it is a tricyclic (SP?) has an energizing quality to it - unlike the others in it's class that tend to be sedating. It is not a well known drug. I am not sure if Concerta is stronger than Ritalin, it depends upon the person and their chemistry. Ritalin, Stratera, Concerta, are all related to each other. Adderal is a combination of both Dexedrine and Ritalin. Cylert is in a class by itself. If a person started taking Ritalin in the pre-teen years, sometimes as they are nearing adulthood or are adults, it has been noted that the medication isn't being as beneficial as before. It is at that time, that the person may start taking Cylert. Sometimes when a depressed person isn't responding well to an anti-depressant, a doctor may also prescribe an amphetamine to augment it. Ampehetamines increase the level of Dopamine in the brain and can help alleviate depression. There are 2 computerized tests that can be used to assess reponse to treatment. One is called the "Continuance Performance Test" (CPT) and the other the "TOVA." Both of them are done on a computer, and administered by a psychologist. I have taken them on different occassions to see how much benefit I was receiving from the medication I was taking. You may want to check into something like that. It can take a while to find the right kind of medication and in the best dosages. It has taken me years in fact, and I am still trying to fine tune it. Stick with it though, it can be very worthwhile. Take care Answered by Isela Cahela 1 year ago.

Give your doctor and the medicine they prescribed a chance to work. Most meds like that take time to become effective. If in a month or so you still don't feel it is effective then go back to the doc and discuss it with them and give them the chance to work with you to find something that will work better for you. You also ask about anti depressants... Are you feeling depressed? If are feeling that you are a danger to yourself or others get off the computer and call your doctor, a counselor or 911. Depression is nothing to fool around with. But allow you doctors to work for you they are not out to get you. And don't hesitate to call them when you have questions they are there for that. Answered by Mike Milstein 1 year ago.

well concerta is a time realeased so its a lot better than ritalin bc ritalin is fast acting and u have to take like more than one pill a day but concerta lasts for like 12 hours and its worked very good for me Answered by Bernita Cardinale 1 year ago.

ritalin is stronger than concerta Answered by Takisha Thombs 1 year ago.


Taken Clomipramine for 2 days dont like how i feel can i stop?
with no problems Asked by Darin Mogg 1 year ago.

hope this helps to answer your? clomipramine Generic Name: clomipramine (kloe MI pra meen) Brand Names: Anafranil What is the most important information I should know about clomipramine? Do not use this medication if you have recently had a heart attack, or if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Do not use clomipramine if you are allergic to it or to similar drugs such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), amoxapine (Ascendin), desipramine (Norpramin), doxepin (Sinequan), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), protriptyline (Vivactil), or trimipramine (Surmontil). You may have suicidal thoughts or behavior when you start taking an antidepressant, especially if you are under 18 years old. You will need to be monitored for worsening symptoms of depression or suicidal thoughts. Your doctor should check you at regular visits during the first 12 weeks of treatment, or whenever your dose is changed. Contact your doctor promptly if you have any of the following side effects, especially if they are new symptoms or if they get worse: mood changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, irritability, agitation, aggressiveness, severe restlessness, mania (mental and/or physical hyperactivity), thoughts of suicide or hurting yourself. What is clomipramine? Clomipramine is a tricyclic antidepressant. It affects chemicals in the brain that may become unbalanced. Clomipramine is used to treat symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) such as recurrent thoughts or feelings and repetitive actions. Clomipramine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking clomipramine? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to clomipramine or to similar drugs such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), amoxapine (Ascendin), desipramine (Norpramin), doxepin (Sinequan), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), protriptyline (Vivactil), or trimipramine (Surmontil). Do not use clomipramine if you have recently had a heart attack, or if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take clomipramine before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body. Before taking clomipramine, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have: heart disease or a history of heart attack, stroke, or seizures; bipolar disorder (manic-depression), schizophrenia or other mental illness; kidney or liver disease; overactive thyroid or adrenal gland tumor (pheochromocytoma); glaucoma; or problems with urination. If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use clomipramine, or you may need a dosage adjustment or special tests during treatment. You may have suicidal thoughts or behavior when you first start taking an antidepressant, especially if you are under 18 years old. Watch for worsening symptoms of depression or suicidal thoughts. Your doctor should check you at regular visits during the first 12 weeks of treatment, or whenever your dose is changed. In addition to you watching for changes in your own symptoms, your family or caregivers should be alert to changes in your mood or symptoms. Contact your doctor promptly if you have any of the following side effects, especially if they are new symptoms or if they get worse: mood changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, irritability, agitation, aggressiveness, severe restlessness, mania (mental and/or physical hyperactivity), thoughts of suicide or hurting yourself. FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Clomipramine can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take clomipramine? Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from this medication. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Take clomipramine with food to reduce stomach upset. If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are taking clomipramine. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time. Do not stop using clomipramine without first talking to your doctor. You may need to use less and less before you stop the medication completely. It may take up to 4 weeks of using this medicine before your symptoms improve. For best results, keep using the medication as directed. Talk with your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 4 weeks of treatment. Store clomipramine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose? Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose. What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of clomipramine can be fatal. Symptoms may include fast or uneven heart rate, extreme drowsiness, confusion, agitation, vomiting, blurred vision, sweating, muscle stiffness, increased or decreased urination, swelling, shortness of breath, blue lips or fingernails, feeling light-headed, fainting, seizure (convulsions), or coma. What should I avoid while taking clomipramine? Avoid drinking alcohol. It can cause dangerous side effects when taken together with clomipramine. Avoid using other medicines that make you sleepy (such as cold medicine, pain medication, muscle relaxers, medicine for seizures, or other antidepressants). They can add to sleepiness caused by clomipramine. Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with clomipramine. Discuss the use of grapefruit products with your doctor before increasing or decreasing the amount of grapefruit products in your diet. Clomipramine can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Avoid exposure to sunlight or artificial UV rays (sunlamps or tanning beds). Clomipramine can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight and sunburn may result. Use a sunscreen (minimum SPF 15) and wear protective clothing if you must be out in the sun. What are the possible side effects of clomipramine? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling; sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body; sudden headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance; feeling light-headed, fainting; fever, confusion, muscle stiffness, sweating, fast or uneven heartbeats; pale skin, easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness; o urinating more than usual. Less serious side effects may be more likely to occur, such as: nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, loss of appetite, constipation or diarrhea; dry mouth, unpleasant taste; increased appetite, weight changes; feeling anxious, restless, dizzy, drowsy, or tired; blurred vision, trouble concentrating; sleep problems (insomnia), nightmares; blurred vision; increased sweating; or decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect clomipramine? Before taking clomipramine, tell your doctor if you have used an "SSRI" antidepressant in the past 5 weeks, such as citalopram (Celexa), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem), fluvoxamine (Luvox), paroxetine (Paxil), or sertraline (Zoloft). Before taking clomipramine, tell your doctor if you are currently using any of the following drugs: cimetidine (Tagamet); guanethidine (Ismelin); methylphenidate (Concerta, Ritalin, Daytrana); phenytoin (Dilantin); warfarin (Coumadin); heart or blood pressure medication such as clonidine (Catapres) or digoxin (Lanoxin); heart rhythm medications such as flecainide (Tambocor), propafenone (Rhythmol), or quinidine (Cardioquin, Quinidex, Quinaglute); or anti-psychotic medications such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), haloperidol (Haldol), thioridazine (Mellaril), clozapine (Clozaril), olanzapine (Zyprexa, Zydis), quetiapine (Seroquel), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon). If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use clomipramine, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment. There are many other medicines that can interact with clomipramine. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list with you of all the medicines you use and show this list to any doctor or other healthcare provider who treats you. Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has information about clomipramine written for health professionals that you may read. What does my medication look like? Clomipramine is available with a prescription under the brand name Anafranil. Other brand or generic forms may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you. Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Copyright 1996-2006 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 7.02. Revision Date: 10/11/06 12:16:21 PM. Answered by Wonda Eckmeyer 1 year ago.

Although many folks wont agree, you have to get off the meds. It is in all likelihood that every one of those meds are inflicting a extreme hormonal and neurological chemical imbalance for your mind. Consult your medical professional earlier than nevertheless. You are NOT possessed! God and the Devil don't seem to be truly. Religion is only a hypnotizer and some way to provide an explanation for matters we dont realise. As a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine, my recommendation could be get off the juice. It could also be very feasible that you're conveniently having night time terrors. I have had many sufferers experiencing them and I think that's a developing contributor to intellectual instability. DO NOT act on any irregular ideas you've got. DO NOT attempt to kill your self. If you do think that you're having unusual emotions and many others. then please name 911 as quickly as feasible. It is critical that you just obtain on the spot aid in a suicidal concern. There is desire for you but and the reply isn't God, its your possess frame. Answered by Abigail Mongeau 1 year ago.

Medications are to make you better and to fix whatever chemical imbalance you have. They are optional. If you don't feel good then quit taking them. I was given Prozac for depression and ended up with heart palpitations. so I quit. Now I feel better.You are your own best doctor and if they aren't helping you then don't do it!!! Answered by Christian Peaden 1 year ago.

How to stop taking desipramine? Answered by Irwin Redden 1 year ago.


Has anyone tried stimulants to help with depression?
How do these compare with Effexor or Mirtazapine? Anyone know? Asked by Lilla Urankar 1 year ago.

I've been on meds for depression for 3 years now and I feel tired all the time. I mean tired down to my bones and no amount sleep helps. I can sleep all day and drink tons of water and still feel the same. And I have had this exhaustion since my teens I am now 25. I've had blood tests and gone for a sleep study all to no avail. I drink like 3 diet cokes at work to stay somewhat awake. I've read that someitmes they use stimulants like Ritalin, Dexedrine or Adderall to help treat certain types of depression as well as ADD. Is this true? Has anyone tried this? I have researched it a bit and I even seem to have some characteristics of ADD. I've tried telling my "shrink" but he doesnt believe me and is always reluctant to listen when I tell him my meds arent working. Also how do you go about requesting a cat scan or different tests. Right now I see a shrink at the hospital because its covered by ohip so i'd have to go through him if i want to see someone else. Any help please? Answered by Amiee Alsbrook 1 year ago.

I have a very treatment resistant major depression and have been under a doctor's care for over 12 years. I also have ADHD, PTSD and a Nonverbal learning disability, all of which can contribute to fatigue. I have been on a variety of anti-depressants - Prozac, Zoloft, Effexor and now Vivactil and Wellbutron. Of all of them, I have responded best to the Vivactil and Wellbutron as they are the more energizing anti-depressants. To augment my treatment, I also take Synthroid as I have a borderline functioning thyroid. That tends to give me more energy. In my case, I have also been on a variety of stimulants and that has helped alleviate some of my depression and give me alertness and better concentration. Since going on the stimulants, I haven't needed to have as much caffine as I used to need to wake up. It was common for me to need between 6 and 9 cups of strong coffee in the morning to start feeling alert. This was even before I became depressed. If you are unhappy with your doctor you have the legal and ethical right to a referral or second opinion. You may want to have your primary care doctor involved to at least talk with your "shrink" as that may help things along. Your "shrink" may be hesitant to prescribe stimulant medication if you have a history of chemical abuse, because of the danger of becoming addicted. You can be tested for ADHD by filling out some questionaires, and participating in computerized testing that looks at attention/concentration/reaaction time. There is the Continuous Performance Test and the TOVA. Both of them can help in the diagnostic process. You don't mention whether you have had a traumatic head injury, or have a learning disability. Those are some things that can be checked out as well, depending upon any work/school/life issues. Do you have "Chronic Fatigue Syndrome" or Fibromyalgia? Just some thoughts, hope they are helpful for you. Take care. Answered by Elaine Pilarski 1 year ago.

Do NOT use stimulants to deactivate depression. I self prescribed myself ritalin about 2 years ago and after about a month and a half of abusing it, I started having panic attacks. It seriously screwed me up. Try Cymbalta. I was recently on it and it's worked the BEST for me (I've also been on Lexapro, Prozac and Celexa for depression-- they all made me suicidal.... I was on neurontin and then lithium for mood stabilising--- they made me feel nonexistant... and I've been on Xanax for anxiety-- and that **** didn't work). Anyway, srsly, try Cymbalta. It's highly effective. Answered by Rodney Scacco 1 year ago.

tell him again that ur meds aint right if he doesn't listen ask him for a referral to another covered p-doc and all i can think of is maybe a little more sugar Answered by Arleen Patts 1 year ago.

Check out Provigil- a stimulating antidepressant. havent tried it myself but I'm going to ask for it. good luck. Answered by Suzanna Verkamp 1 year ago.

Have you ever had your blood checked for iron deficiency? That will make you tired, depressed, lethargic. Answered by Dane Ulmen 1 year ago.


Whats the best medication for Narcolepsy?
i have been diagnosed with narcolepsy! so i need personal opinions on what type of meds. i should try. I ve already been prescribed one and it didnt work at all. any opinions will help!! thankyou Asked by Ophelia Acosta 1 year ago.

There is not any "best medicine," everyone is different some people do well on one drug and other people do well on a different drug. What did you try that did not work? There are several groups of medications used to treat narcolepsy depending on the specific symptoms and the severity. Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS): stimulant medications: modafinil/armodafanil, methylphenidate, and amphetamines. Also Xyrem (sodium oxybate). Cataplexy, hallucinations and sleep paralysis: Tricyclic antidepressants: Anafranil (clomipramine), Tofranil (imipramine), Vivactil (protriptyline), Norpramin (desipramine). Also the SNRI class antidepressant Effexor (venlafaxine) and Xyrem. Poor sleep: benzodiazepine receptor agonists (BzRAs) primarily zolpidem, zopiclone, eszopiclone, and temazepam and also Xyrem. Some times other drugs have been used or have shown some potential efficacy in a few tests including lithium, codeine, morphine, selegiline, Namenda, and others. EDS occurs in all people with narcolepsy however several other symptoms commonly occur: cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations, sleep paralysis, and automatic behaviours. A person may have any combination of problems, some have all five symptoms and some may only have EDS. Xyrem has become a significant part of treatment. It is the only medication that can treat all symptoms of narcolepsy. Although not commonly used some people respond well to hypnotic medication. However it is very important to only use BzRAs that are APPROVED as hypnotics. So drugs like Valium (diazepam), Xanax (alprazolam), and Ativan (lorazepam) should NOT be given for sleep especially for narcolepsy. Almost all people with narcolepsy take stimulant medication. Of the people treated with Xyrem about 80% continued stimulant treatment but often a lower dose was used and up to 25% of narcoleptics are treatment resistant to stimulants and are only able to function well with several medications. Typically modafinil is the first stimulant used because it has fewer side effects and a much lower abuse potential compared to traditional stimulants. Methylphenidate, best know under the band name Ritalin, is more "powerful" (for lack of a better word) however amphetamines are the most powerful and potent stimulants. The United States has several amphetamine medications: Adderall, Dexedrine, Vyvanse, and Desoxyn. Adderall is most commonly used however Dexedrine and especially Desoxyn are more potent. Vyvanse is rarely used for narcolepsy. When it is used it is often used with another stimulant. I would recommend you talk to your doctor and try modafinil or armodafanil first. Armodafanil is available in The US however most countries do not yet have it available. Since both of these medications are often sufficient, have a lower abuse potential, and typically fewer side effects than traditional amphetamine stimulants it is worth trying them first. However amphetamines or methylphenidate can be used as first line treatments and patients with severe EDS typically require significant amounts of stimulants. It is hard to recommend treatments for you because what worked for another person is actually often not a good indicator of what you will do best on. Some people take 100-200 mg of modafinil a day and others may require up to 60 mg of Desoxyn and potentially other medication for other symptoms. And if a person has several symptoms he may require a cocktail of several drugs to function well. It may take you some time to find the best medication(s) for you. Some people who do not respond well initially do best on two stimulants, typically one short acting and one long acting. It is best to see a board certified sleep specialist if that is possible. Both psychiatrists and neurologists are trained to treat sleeping disorders, actually narcolepsy is one of only a few conditions specifically listed as psychiatric and neurologic. Most neuropsychiatric conditions were (often arbitrarily) separated between the two. In some severe cases consultation with a neurologist and psychiatrist may be necessary. Most sleep specialists are neurologists or psychiatrists however many cities don't have any board certified sleep specialists even if you can find one it commonly takes several months to get an initial appointment. A neurologists is typically going to be better trained for cataplexy, sleep paralysis, and automatic behaviours. A psychiatrist is typically better trained for hypnagogic hallucinations (they are not really hallucinations like most people would think of. Nor does it have anything to do with psychosis), EDS, and poor sleep. Answered by Tosha Body 1 year ago.

Meds For Narcolepsy Answered by Darron Kuennen 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Whats the best medication for Narcolepsy? i have been diagnosed with narcolepsy! so i need personal opinions on what type of meds. i should try. I ve already been prescribed one and it didnt work at all. any opinions will help!! thankyou Answered by Katy Pinedo 1 year ago.

Try to get Xyrem mfg by Orphan Drugs, it is GHB as an Rx. Answered by Lawanda Reagon 1 year ago.


Is taking multiple anti-depressants at once common?
A friend of mine is currently taking three different anti-depressants at one time. He's taking Cymbalta, Effexor, and a third that I'm not sure of. I'm just wondering if this is common. He and I are both a little bit concerned about this, and the potential health/mental risks. Asked by Rosalee Keslar 1 year ago.

Any other antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil), amoxapine (Ascendin), citalopram (Celexa), clomipramine (Anafranil), desipramine (Norpramin), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac), fluvoxamine (Luvox), imipramine (Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), paroxetine (Paxil), protriptyline (Vivactil), sertraline (Zoloft), or trimipramine (Surmontil) can cause serious health issues and even death if taken in combination with Effexor. Some medications are used in combination like one in the morning and one for bedtime( one to help with sleep).Cymbalta should be fine, this drug is used as a sleep aid and an antidepressant. The best thing to do is to talk to your physician about the combination of these medications. If you dont get the suppport you need from your physician its time to find another one! Good luck and take care! Answered by Eloise Righi 1 year ago.

Im not sure, but I dont think thats safe at all. Ive never heard of anyone taking 3 at a time. They could react with each other negatively in his body, and since they have some different side effects, they could all affect his body in different ways. He should go to a different doctor and get a second opinion, and based on that he should decide on what to do next. However, until he can get an appointment, he should see his doctor, and ask why it is needed to take all 3 medications at the same time, and why the dose of one isnt just raised a little bit instead of adding two. good luck! Answered by Brendon Walstrom 1 year ago.

I worked as a school counselor. I've seen kids on as many as 5 different psych meds at one time. It's common, but you are right on to be concerned about his health. The reality of mental health is not what you'd expect. Secular mental health treatment really doesn't work very well. So clients are told that they have a "chemical imbalance" and put on drugs. There is only one good option for dealing with depression: The Bible. Check out this website: mentalhealthsolutions.info Answered by Cody Lindabury 1 year ago.

It isnt that common, but at the same time it is not un-heard of. Usually you take one or two anti-depressants when switching from one kind to another. But to be active on both? Im not sure, but if you are concerend you could always get a second opinion from another doctor Answered by Sol Kho 1 year ago.

I take Wellbutrin SR (150 mg) in the morning, and Lexapro (10 mg) in the evening, for depression and anxiety. I've been taking that for over a year and a half, and it's working very well for me. The Wellbutrin SR seems to help me to be more alert and active - and wanting to do things - while the Lexapro makes me more mellow, and it helps me sleep better, too. Answered by Dirk Palomo 1 year ago.

It's common when they run out of options. I was in the hospital for the 5th time for suicide when they put me on two at once. There is a small chance you can get serotonin syndrome when you take this combo of drugs and it is fatal, but if you get to the emergency room they can fix you up. Answered by Gertha Cluckey 1 year ago.

Multiple Antidepressants Answered by Asia Puryear 1 year ago.


Does anyone know of any anti depressants that doesn't have weigh gain as a side effect?
I know that Wellbutrin can have a weight loss effect but are there any other anti depressants that don't have that weight gain effect? Asked by Gaylord Ranford 1 year ago.

In a side by side comparison based on a scale of 0 (least likely) to 4+(very likely). Tricyclics: Of the 10 drugs within this class, those that ranked the lowest (1+) were: Desipramine (Norpramin); Nortriptyline (Aventyl, Pamelor); and Protriptyline (Vivactil) Selective Serotonin Re-uptake Inhibitors (SSRI's): Of the 6 drugs within this class (ie: Celexa, Zoloft, Prozac, ect), all rate a 1+ except Paroxetine (Paxil)- this rated a 2+ Dopamine-Reuptake Blocking compounds: Bupropion (Wellbutrin, Zyban) rated a 0 Serotonin/Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors: Venlafaxine (Effexor) rated a 0 5HT2 Receptor Antagonists: Nefazodone (Serzone) rated a 0 while Trazodone (Desyrel) rated a 2+ There are two other classes; MAOI's- too many nasty side effects- 3 drugs within this class rated 2+/3+; and finally, Noradrenergic Antagonist- Mirtazapine (Remeron) which rated a 3+. Not surprisingly the majority of those that scored best (lowest) on weight gain also showed less prevalence of drowsiness- even amoung the snooze inducing tricyclics- with Protriptyline rated the best (lowest) for drowsiness within this class (1+). Answered by Denae Yara 1 year ago.

My boss took Effexor and lost 30 lbs. The description of the drug does claim weight gain as a side effect though. Answered by Jettie Kamuda 1 year ago.


None of the depression medications are working, and my therapist is driving me crazy?
Jamie im trying to find one who makes me happy and you have a good point there because the therapist person should make you happy or else why are you even going there but i dunno maybe i set my expectation too high or somethin Asked by Ileana Barthelmes 1 year ago.

I've taken Lexapro, Prozac, Paxil, Celexa, Zoloft, Norpramin, Vivactil, Effexor, and Parnate, and am currently on Surmontil (100 mg-blue/white capsules) (3 in the morning / day), and I still feel like crap sometimes. I'm really talkative and hyper and than all of a sudden I just want to be left alone and die, like even before I started taking all the meds. My therapist also drives me crazy, she is boring and I just want to fall asleep, nothing she says is relevant and she is like my 7th one I've been too. Sometimes I just see her lips moving and I go yeh, yeh, yeh, alright..because she doesn't ever stop. What can I do, it's driving me crazy, I just want her to go away, and something to start working. Answered by Tifany Altes 1 year ago.

Yeh so she has a pic of her children hanging on the wall and she'll just point to em and be like oooh this is my son he is in uni trying to be a lawyer, ohhh and this is my daughter going to school to be a doctor and im so proud of my children and okay lady thats cool but talk about your children sometime else cause yeh Answered by Louella Tavaris 1 year ago.

Hi, If you have tried ten medications and nothing is really working, your doctor should refer you to a psychiatrist for recommendations. They are the experts on medications for depression, anxiety, etc. It doesn't sound like you have a therapeutic relationship with your therapist. It's not appropriate for the therapist to be focusing on herself and her family when she's talking to you. The focus should be on helping you to gain coping strategies for your problems. You should tell your doctor what you just told us, and ask for a referral to a different counsellor. I admire you for having this much patience with your treatment to date. Start by being very honest with your family doctor, especially tell him the part about feeling like being left alone to die. That's an indication that you are pretty depressed and discouraged. Know that you are loved, and keep on trying. Best wishes to you. Answered by Gina Cacciatori 1 year ago.

A couple years ago I saw a therapist and was diagnosed with depression. They suggested I take medication, so they prescribed me Wellbutrin. I took it for a few weeks and did notice a small change. I felt like I was getting better so quit the meds and the therapist; I don't know if any of this helps, because I wasn't on the medication that long and I don't attribute all of my feeling better to the meds, as there were outside things that helped me. The important thing to know is that a pill won't simply make you better or happy. As I understand them, they're designed to help increase certain chemicals (different for different medications) in the brain which help you be more positive (or less negative, depending on how you look at it). You have to WANT to get better--but if only seeing a therapist isn't helping, I'd definitely consider medication if I were you. However, I wouldn't recommend mixing anti-depressents with alcohol. And since alcohol is a depressant, it's only going to make your depressive state even worse. Bottom line, if you continue drinking, it's going to be almost impossible for you to get better. Think about some AA meetings. And don't be afraid to ask your doctor questions about the medication; they're there to help. Answered by Luciano Kovac 1 year ago.

Well in some people a higher dose of drug is needed and some people 1,2,3, different types of drugs are needed and some need a less of a dose it all depends most drugs take like a week to start to work,etc. Therapist is trying to get u to open up! I know u don't want to talk about anything But u need to start talking about what u are feeling or let off some steam. Talking is the 1st step in getting out of depression and then working on what is really the problem - eating at u is next! Remember this takes time and u going to have to make the therapy work for u! Answered by Latoya Mackert 1 year ago.

Over the last five years I had begun to have increasingly withdraw into a downward spiral of depression.. But now with the method I can fully focus my energy and thoughts into a decisive line on how to make my life better constantly. And it works like magic! I'm beginning to attract people to me once again and things have just been looking up since then. Helping you eliminate depression? Answered by Debbie Grazioplene 1 year ago.

You need to be re-evaluated for the meds that you are on. Something needs to change. Also look around, talk to people to see if they would recommend a new therapist. You have to be happy with the person that is supposed to be "helping" you through this. I'm sorry that you have to go through all this just to be happy, but good luck. Answered by Tanesha Mccoppin 1 year ago.

I know you've been to a million therapists, but you really need to find a new one. Your therapist sounds like my therapist, who I hate, so I'm getting another one. I'm often suicidal but I always stop myself before I do anything drastic by thinking about who would miss me and what I'd missing out on, even if I didn't even believe it. I hope you feel better someday. Answered by Hermina Arcadipane 1 year ago.

depression meds never really work, they're just for psychiatrists to make money, if you feel depressed take a walk while listening to some uplifting music, that always works for me, even when i'm sobbing like a maniac, just focus your attention on the music, and the neighborhood. Some bands that always make me happy are, the kooks, lily allen, and led zeppelin. Answered by Neva Haigh 1 year ago.

i suggest you get a male counselor who is like in his 20's so he doesn't annoy the s h i t out of you depression is i hard thing last year i went through of few months when i was depressed mostly kiddie stuff tho it wasn't bad but i felt like c r ap Answered by Ronda Lose 1 year ago.

sounds like you could have adhd, which can make you depressed. i thought i was depressed because i had racing thoughts and i was sad sometimes. then i got re evaluated and i found out i had adhd. Answered by Senaida Keylon 1 year ago.


Anyway to lessen the amount of sleep needed?
Asked by Bob Abrell 1 year ago.

Certain antidepressants do it for some people. Notably Wellbutrin and Vivactil. Answered by Jacqueline Hoinacki 1 year ago.


My doc prescribes me 20 mg ritalin.a day..i dont think its enough?
an anti depressant with a speed side effect is what im really looking for Asked by Anamaria Romjue 1 year ago.

I am assuming that you have ADHD and or major depression. Welbutron which is an anti-depressant is energizing and has been approved for the treatment of ADHD. Vivactil, is another anti-depressant, and although it is a tricyclic (SP?) has an energizing quality to it - unlike the others in it's class that tend to be sedating. It is not a well known drug. I am not sure if Concerta is stronger than Ritalin, it depends upon the person and their chemistry. Ritalin, Stratera, Concerta, are all related to each other. Adderal is a combination of both Dexedrine and Ritalin. Cylert is in a class by itself. If a person started taking Ritalin in the pre-teen years, sometimes as they are nearing adulthood or are adults, it has been noted that the medication isn't being as beneficial as before. It is at that time, that the person may start taking Cylert. Sometimes when a depressed person isn't responding well to an anti-depressant, a doctor may also prescribe an amphetamine to augment it. Ampehetamines increase the level of Dopamine in the brain and can help alleviate depression. There are 2 computerized tests that can be used to assess reponse to treatment. One is called the "Continuance Performance Test" (CPT) and the other the "TOVA." Both of them are done on a computer, and administered by a psychologist. I have taken them on different occassions to see how much benefit I was receiving from the medication I was taking. You may want to check into something like that. It can take a while to find the right kind of medication and in the best dosages. It has taken me years in fact, and I am still trying to fine tune it. Stick with it though, it can be very worthwhile. Take care Answered by Venita Lysne 1 year ago.

Give your doctor and the medicine they prescribed a chance to work. Most meds like that take time to become effective. If in a month or so you still don't feel it is effective then go back to the doc and discuss it with them and give them the chance to work with you to find something that will work better for you. You also ask about anti depressants... Are you feeling depressed? If are feeling that you are a danger to yourself or others get off the computer and call your doctor, a counselor or 911. Depression is nothing to fool around with. But allow you doctors to work for you they are not out to get you. And don't hesitate to call them when you have questions they are there for that. Answered by Lakendra Ruble 1 year ago.

well concerta is a time realeased so its a lot better than ritalin bc ritalin is fast acting and u have to take like more than one pill a day but concerta lasts for like 12 hours and its worked very good for me Answered by Lenore Osofsky 1 year ago.

ritalin is stronger than concerta Answered by Lindsy Balette 1 year ago.


Taken Clomipramine for 2 days dont like how i feel can i stop?
with no problems Asked by Eboni Fitchpatrick 1 year ago.

hope this helps to answer your? clomipramine Generic Name: clomipramine (kloe MI pra meen) Brand Names: Anafranil What is the most important information I should know about clomipramine? Do not use this medication if you have recently had a heart attack, or if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Do not use clomipramine if you are allergic to it or to similar drugs such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), amoxapine (Ascendin), desipramine (Norpramin), doxepin (Sinequan), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), protriptyline (Vivactil), or trimipramine (Surmontil). You may have suicidal thoughts or behavior when you start taking an antidepressant, especially if you are under 18 years old. You will need to be monitored for worsening symptoms of depression or suicidal thoughts. Your doctor should check you at regular visits during the first 12 weeks of treatment, or whenever your dose is changed. Contact your doctor promptly if you have any of the following side effects, especially if they are new symptoms or if they get worse: mood changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, irritability, agitation, aggressiveness, severe restlessness, mania (mental and/or physical hyperactivity), thoughts of suicide or hurting yourself. What is clomipramine? Clomipramine is a tricyclic antidepressant. It affects chemicals in the brain that may become unbalanced. Clomipramine is used to treat symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) such as recurrent thoughts or feelings and repetitive actions. Clomipramine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking clomipramine? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to clomipramine or to similar drugs such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), amoxapine (Ascendin), desipramine (Norpramin), doxepin (Sinequan), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), protriptyline (Vivactil), or trimipramine (Surmontil). Do not use clomipramine if you have recently had a heart attack, or if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take clomipramine before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body. Before taking clomipramine, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have: heart disease or a history of heart attack, stroke, or seizures; bipolar disorder (manic-depression), schizophrenia or other mental illness; kidney or liver disease; overactive thyroid or adrenal gland tumor (pheochromocytoma); glaucoma; or problems with urination. If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use clomipramine, or you may need a dosage adjustment or special tests during treatment. You may have suicidal thoughts or behavior when you first start taking an antidepressant, especially if you are under 18 years old. Watch for worsening symptoms of depression or suicidal thoughts. Your doctor should check you at regular visits during the first 12 weeks of treatment, or whenever your dose is changed. In addition to you watching for changes in your own symptoms, your family or caregivers should be alert to changes in your mood or symptoms. Contact your doctor promptly if you have any of the following side effects, especially if they are new symptoms or if they get worse: mood changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, irritability, agitation, aggressiveness, severe restlessness, mania (mental and/or physical hyperactivity), thoughts of suicide or hurting yourself. FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Clomipramine can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take clomipramine? Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from this medication. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Take clomipramine with food to reduce stomach upset. If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are taking clomipramine. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time. Do not stop using clomipramine without first talking to your doctor. You may need to use less and less before you stop the medication completely. It may take up to 4 weeks of using this medicine before your symptoms improve. For best results, keep using the medication as directed. Talk with your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 4 weeks of treatment. Store clomipramine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose? Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose. What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of clomipramine can be fatal. Symptoms may include fast or uneven heart rate, extreme drowsiness, confusion, agitation, vomiting, blurred vision, sweating, muscle stiffness, increased or decreased urination, swelling, shortness of breath, blue lips or fingernails, feeling light-headed, fainting, seizure (convulsions), or coma. What should I avoid while taking clomipramine? Avoid drinking alcohol. It can cause dangerous side effects when taken together with clomipramine. Avoid using other medicines that make you sleepy (such as cold medicine, pain medication, muscle relaxers, medicine for seizures, or other antidepressants). They can add to sleepiness caused by clomipramine. Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with clomipramine. Discuss the use of grapefruit products with your doctor before increasing or decreasing the amount of grapefruit products in your diet. Clomipramine can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Avoid exposure to sunlight or artificial UV rays (sunlamps or tanning beds). Clomipramine can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight and sunburn may result. Use a sunscreen (minimum SPF 15) and wear protective clothing if you must be out in the sun. What are the possible side effects of clomipramine? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling; sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body; sudden headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance; feeling light-headed, fainting; fever, confusion, muscle stiffness, sweating, fast or uneven heartbeats; pale skin, easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness; o urinating more than usual. Less serious side effects may be more likely to occur, such as: nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, loss of appetite, constipation or diarrhea; dry mouth, unpleasant taste; increased appetite, weight changes; feeling anxious, restless, dizzy, drowsy, or tired; blurred vision, trouble concentrating; sleep problems (insomnia), nightmares; blurred vision; increased sweating; or decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect clomipramine? Before taking clomipramine, tell your doctor if you have used an "SSRI" antidepressant in the past 5 weeks, such as citalopram (Celexa), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem), fluvoxamine (Luvox), paroxetine (Paxil), or sertraline (Zoloft). Before taking clomipramine, tell your doctor if you are currently using any of the following drugs: cimetidine (Tagamet); guanethidine (Ismelin); methylphenidate (Concerta, Ritalin, Daytrana); phenytoin (Dilantin); warfarin (Coumadin); heart or blood pressure medication such as clonidine (Catapres) or digoxin (Lanoxin); heart rhythm medications such as flecainide (Tambocor), propafenone (Rhythmol), or quinidine (Cardioquin, Quinidex, Quinaglute); or anti-psychotic medications such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), haloperidol (Haldol), thioridazine (Mellaril), clozapine (Clozaril), olanzapine (Zyprexa, Zydis), quetiapine (Seroquel), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon). If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use clomipramine, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment. There are many other medicines that can interact with clomipramine. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list with you of all the medicines you use and show this list to any doctor or other healthcare provider who treats you. Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has information about clomipramine written for health professionals that you may read. What does my medication look like? Clomipramine is available with a prescription under the brand name Anafranil. Other brand or generic forms may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you. Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Copyright 1996-2006 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 7.02. Revision Date: 10/11/06 12:16:21 PM. Answered by Delinda Manby 1 year ago.

Although many folks wont agree, you have to get off the meds. It is in all likelihood that every one of those meds are inflicting a extreme hormonal and neurological chemical imbalance for your mind. Consult your medical professional earlier than nevertheless. You are NOT possessed! God and the Devil don't seem to be truly. Religion is only a hypnotizer and some way to provide an explanation for matters we dont realise. As a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine, my recommendation could be get off the juice. It could also be very feasible that you're conveniently having night time terrors. I have had many sufferers experiencing them and I think that's a developing contributor to intellectual instability. DO NOT act on any irregular ideas you've got. DO NOT attempt to kill your self. If you do think that you're having unusual emotions and many others. then please name 911 as quickly as feasible. It is critical that you just obtain on the spot aid in a suicidal concern. There is desire for you but and the reply isn't God, its your possess frame. Answered by Donn Hepp 1 year ago.

Medications are to make you better and to fix whatever chemical imbalance you have. They are optional. If you don't feel good then quit taking them. I was given Prozac for depression and ended up with heart palpitations. so I quit. Now I feel better.You are your own best doctor and if they aren't helping you then don't do it!!! Answered by Elva Sasseen 1 year ago.

How to stop taking desipramine? Answered by Darci Cuddihee 1 year ago.


Has anyone tried stimulants to help with depression?
How do these compare with Effexor or Mirtazapine? Anyone know? Asked by Melania Irish 1 year ago.

I've been on meds for depression for 3 years now and I feel tired all the time. I mean tired down to my bones and no amount sleep helps. I can sleep all day and drink tons of water and still feel the same. And I have had this exhaustion since my teens I am now 25. I've had blood tests and gone for a sleep study all to no avail. I drink like 3 diet cokes at work to stay somewhat awake. I've read that someitmes they use stimulants like Ritalin, Dexedrine or Adderall to help treat certain types of depression as well as ADD. Is this true? Has anyone tried this? I have researched it a bit and I even seem to have some characteristics of ADD. I've tried telling my "shrink" but he doesnt believe me and is always reluctant to listen when I tell him my meds arent working. Also how do you go about requesting a cat scan or different tests. Right now I see a shrink at the hospital because its covered by ohip so i'd have to go through him if i want to see someone else. Any help please? Answered by Rodrigo Dubuc 1 year ago.

I have a very treatment resistant major depression and have been under a doctor's care for over 12 years. I also have ADHD, PTSD and a Nonverbal learning disability, all of which can contribute to fatigue. I have been on a variety of anti-depressants - Prozac, Zoloft, Effexor and now Vivactil and Wellbutron. Of all of them, I have responded best to the Vivactil and Wellbutron as they are the more energizing anti-depressants. To augment my treatment, I also take Synthroid as I have a borderline functioning thyroid. That tends to give me more energy. In my case, I have also been on a variety of stimulants and that has helped alleviate some of my depression and give me alertness and better concentration. Since going on the stimulants, I haven't needed to have as much caffine as I used to need to wake up. It was common for me to need between 6 and 9 cups of strong coffee in the morning to start feeling alert. This was even before I became depressed. If you are unhappy with your doctor you have the legal and ethical right to a referral or second opinion. You may want to have your primary care doctor involved to at least talk with your "shrink" as that may help things along. Your "shrink" may be hesitant to prescribe stimulant medication if you have a history of chemical abuse, because of the danger of becoming addicted. You can be tested for ADHD by filling out some questionaires, and participating in computerized testing that looks at attention/concentration/reaaction time. There is the Continuous Performance Test and the TOVA. Both of them can help in the diagnostic process. You don't mention whether you have had a traumatic head injury, or have a learning disability. Those are some things that can be checked out as well, depending upon any work/school/life issues. Do you have "Chronic Fatigue Syndrome" or Fibromyalgia? Just some thoughts, hope they are helpful for you. Take care. Answered by Sonya Saleeby 1 year ago.

Do NOT use stimulants to deactivate depression. I self prescribed myself ritalin about 2 years ago and after about a month and a half of abusing it, I started having panic attacks. It seriously screwed me up. Try Cymbalta. I was recently on it and it's worked the BEST for me (I've also been on Lexapro, Prozac and Celexa for depression-- they all made me suicidal.... I was on neurontin and then lithium for mood stabilising--- they made me feel nonexistant... and I've been on Xanax for anxiety-- and that **** didn't work). Anyway, srsly, try Cymbalta. It's highly effective. Answered by Estefana Glyn 1 year ago.

tell him again that ur meds aint right if he doesn't listen ask him for a referral to another covered p-doc and all i can think of is maybe a little more sugar Answered by Eva Trull 1 year ago.

Check out Provigil- a stimulating antidepressant. havent tried it myself but I'm going to ask for it. good luck. Answered by Gavin Walley 1 year ago.

Have you ever had your blood checked for iron deficiency? That will make you tired, depressed, lethargic. Answered by Ollie Conteras 1 year ago.


Whats the best medication for Narcolepsy?
i have been diagnosed with narcolepsy! so i need personal opinions on what type of meds. i should try. I ve already been prescribed one and it didnt work at all. any opinions will help!! thankyou Asked by Li Starwalt 1 year ago.

There is not any "best medicine," everyone is different some people do well on one drug and other people do well on a different drug. What did you try that did not work? There are several groups of medications used to treat narcolepsy depending on the specific symptoms and the severity. Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS): stimulant medications: modafinil/armodafanil, methylphenidate, and amphetamines. Also Xyrem (sodium oxybate). Cataplexy, hallucinations and sleep paralysis: Tricyclic antidepressants: Anafranil (clomipramine), Tofranil (imipramine), Vivactil (protriptyline), Norpramin (desipramine). Also the SNRI class antidepressant Effexor (venlafaxine) and Xyrem. Poor sleep: benzodiazepine receptor agonists (BzRAs) primarily zolpidem, zopiclone, eszopiclone, and temazepam and also Xyrem. Some times other drugs have been used or have shown some potential efficacy in a few tests including lithium, codeine, morphine, selegiline, Namenda, and others. EDS occurs in all people with narcolepsy however several other symptoms commonly occur: cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations, sleep paralysis, and automatic behaviours. A person may have any combination of problems, some have all five symptoms and some may only have EDS. Xyrem has become a significant part of treatment. It is the only medication that can treat all symptoms of narcolepsy. Although not commonly used some people respond well to hypnotic medication. However it is very important to only use BzRAs that are APPROVED as hypnotics. So drugs like Valium (diazepam), Xanax (alprazolam), and Ativan (lorazepam) should NOT be given for sleep especially for narcolepsy. Almost all people with narcolepsy take stimulant medication. Of the people treated with Xyrem about 80% continued stimulant treatment but often a lower dose was used and up to 25% of narcoleptics are treatment resistant to stimulants and are only able to function well with several medications. Typically modafinil is the first stimulant used because it has fewer side effects and a much lower abuse potential compared to traditional stimulants. Methylphenidate, best know under the band name Ritalin, is more "powerful" (for lack of a better word) however amphetamines are the most powerful and potent stimulants. The United States has several amphetamine medications: Adderall, Dexedrine, Vyvanse, and Desoxyn. Adderall is most commonly used however Dexedrine and especially Desoxyn are more potent. Vyvanse is rarely used for narcolepsy. When it is used it is often used with another stimulant. I would recommend you talk to your doctor and try modafinil or armodafanil first. Armodafanil is available in The US however most countries do not yet have it available. Since both of these medications are often sufficient, have a lower abuse potential, and typically fewer side effects than traditional amphetamine stimulants it is worth trying them first. However amphetamines or methylphenidate can be used as first line treatments and patients with severe EDS typically require significant amounts of stimulants. It is hard to recommend treatments for you because what worked for another person is actually often not a good indicator of what you will do best on. Some people take 100-200 mg of modafinil a day and others may require up to 60 mg of Desoxyn and potentially other medication for other symptoms. And if a person has several symptoms he may require a cocktail of several drugs to function well. It may take you some time to find the best medication(s) for you. Some people who do not respond well initially do best on two stimulants, typically one short acting and one long acting. It is best to see a board certified sleep specialist if that is possible. Both psychiatrists and neurologists are trained to treat sleeping disorders, actually narcolepsy is one of only a few conditions specifically listed as psychiatric and neurologic. Most neuropsychiatric conditions were (often arbitrarily) separated between the two. In some severe cases consultation with a neurologist and psychiatrist may be necessary. Most sleep specialists are neurologists or psychiatrists however many cities don't have any board certified sleep specialists even if you can find one it commonly takes several months to get an initial appointment. A neurologists is typically going to be better trained for cataplexy, sleep paralysis, and automatic behaviours. A psychiatrist is typically better trained for hypnagogic hallucinations (they are not really hallucinations like most people would think of. Nor does it have anything to do with psychosis), EDS, and poor sleep. Answered by Araceli Prall 1 year ago.

Meds For Narcolepsy Answered by Kathryn Unland 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Whats the best medication for Narcolepsy? i have been diagnosed with narcolepsy! so i need personal opinions on what type of meds. i should try. I ve already been prescribed one and it didnt work at all. any opinions will help!! thankyou Answered by Galina Covar 1 year ago.

Try to get Xyrem mfg by Orphan Drugs, it is GHB as an Rx. Answered by Colby Woodhull 1 year ago.


Is taking multiple anti-depressants at once common?
A friend of mine is currently taking three different anti-depressants at one time. He's taking Cymbalta, Effexor, and a third that I'm not sure of. I'm just wondering if this is common. He and I are both a little bit concerned about this, and the potential health/mental risks. Asked by Laurice Sondrini 1 year ago.

Any other antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil), amoxapine (Ascendin), citalopram (Celexa), clomipramine (Anafranil), desipramine (Norpramin), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac), fluvoxamine (Luvox), imipramine (Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), paroxetine (Paxil), protriptyline (Vivactil), sertraline (Zoloft), or trimipramine (Surmontil) can cause serious health issues and even death if taken in combination with Effexor. Some medications are used in combination like one in the morning and one for bedtime( one to help with sleep).Cymbalta should be fine, this drug is used as a sleep aid and an antidepressant. The best thing to do is to talk to your physician about the combination of these medications. If you dont get the suppport you need from your physician its time to find another one! Good luck and take care! Answered by Isidra Scudder 1 year ago.

Im not sure, but I dont think thats safe at all. Ive never heard of anyone taking 3 at a time. They could react with each other negatively in his body, and since they have some different side effects, they could all affect his body in different ways. He should go to a different doctor and get a second opinion, and based on that he should decide on what to do next. However, until he can get an appointment, he should see his doctor, and ask why it is needed to take all 3 medications at the same time, and why the dose of one isnt just raised a little bit instead of adding two. good luck! Answered by Alexia Lostetter 1 year ago.

I worked as a school counselor. I've seen kids on as many as 5 different psych meds at one time. It's common, but you are right on to be concerned about his health. The reality of mental health is not what you'd expect. Secular mental health treatment really doesn't work very well. So clients are told that they have a "chemical imbalance" and put on drugs. There is only one good option for dealing with depression: The Bible. Check out this website: mentalhealthsolutions.info Answered by Cristin Darrough 1 year ago.

It isnt that common, but at the same time it is not un-heard of. Usually you take one or two anti-depressants when switching from one kind to another. But to be active on both? Im not sure, but if you are concerend you could always get a second opinion from another doctor Answered by Pinkie Eibell 1 year ago.

I take Wellbutrin SR (150 mg) in the morning, and Lexapro (10 mg) in the evening, for depression and anxiety. I've been taking that for over a year and a half, and it's working very well for me. The Wellbutrin SR seems to help me to be more alert and active - and wanting to do things - while the Lexapro makes me more mellow, and it helps me sleep better, too. Answered by Brendan Robello 1 year ago.

It's common when they run out of options. I was in the hospital for the 5th time for suicide when they put me on two at once. There is a small chance you can get serotonin syndrome when you take this combo of drugs and it is fatal, but if you get to the emergency room they can fix you up. Answered by Marketta Boggio 1 year ago.

Multiple Antidepressants Answered by Julienne Esshaki 1 year ago.


Does anyone know of any anti depressants that doesn't have weigh gain as a side effect?
I know that Wellbutrin can have a weight loss effect but are there any other anti depressants that don't have that weight gain effect? Asked by Merrill Lawhead 1 year ago.

In a side by side comparison based on a scale of 0 (least likely) to 4+(very likely). Tricyclics: Of the 10 drugs within this class, those that ranked the lowest (1+) were: Desipramine (Norpramin); Nortriptyline (Aventyl, Pamelor); and Protriptyline (Vivactil) Selective Serotonin Re-uptake Inhibitors (SSRI's): Of the 6 drugs within this class (ie: Celexa, Zoloft, Prozac, ect), all rate a 1+ except Paroxetine (Paxil)- this rated a 2+ Dopamine-Reuptake Blocking compounds: Bupropion (Wellbutrin, Zyban) rated a 0 Serotonin/Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors: Venlafaxine (Effexor) rated a 0 5HT2 Receptor Antagonists: Nefazodone (Serzone) rated a 0 while Trazodone (Desyrel) rated a 2+ There are two other classes; MAOI's- too many nasty side effects- 3 drugs within this class rated 2+/3+; and finally, Noradrenergic Antagonist- Mirtazapine (Remeron) which rated a 3+. Not surprisingly the majority of those that scored best (lowest) on weight gain also showed less prevalence of drowsiness- even amoung the snooze inducing tricyclics- with Protriptyline rated the best (lowest) for drowsiness within this class (1+). Answered by Imogene Marmol 1 year ago.

My boss took Effexor and lost 30 lbs. The description of the drug does claim weight gain as a side effect though. Answered by Linnie Breen 1 year ago.


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