VISKEN Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 018285/001.

Names and composition

"VISKEN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of PINDOLOL.
It belongs to the class Beta-blockers and is used in Hypertension (Cardiovascular System)

Answered questions

What are the effects of 10 5mg Viskens?
Liang-really? i was expecting to hear something bad. im glad though! at least i dont have to be AS worried now. Asked by Barrie Marinucci 6 months ago.

Those are used to treat hypertension. Sudden withdrawal of the medicine may result in cardiac failure, so that should be taken into consideration when the person stops taking it. recommended dosage is 60 mg a day. Answered by Paul Hauskins 6 months ago.

Don't worry.It's nothing. Answered by Wiley Ernstrom 6 months ago.


About a medicine called THIRIDAZINE HCL?
MY husband is a psychic and he was prescribed a medicine called thiridazine 100mg. in the past day he took 4 of it at once and got a deep sleep for 18 hours and i snatched the medicine and put aside. But he feels very hungry and refuses to take the medicine. Then i decide to give all the rest 13 tablets after i... Asked by Beverley Flenner 6 months ago.

MY husband is a psychic and he was prescribed a medicine called thiridazine 100mg. in the past day he took 4 of it at once and got a deep sleep for 18 hours and i snatched the medicine and put aside. But he feels very hungry and refuses to take the medicine. Then i decide to give all the rest 13 tablets after i get information what side effect the medicine has. Answered by Brigitte Minyard 6 months ago.

Do not take thioridazine if you have any of the following conditions or a history of these conditions: heart disease; an irregular heartbeat or a history of irregular heartbeats; a history of prolonged QT intervals; a family history of congenital long QT syndrome; or other heartbeat disturbances. These conditions may increase the risk of irregular heartbeats, heart attack, and death while taking thioridazine. Do not take thioridazine with any of the following drugs: psychiatric medications such as fluoxetine (Prozac), paroxetine (Paxil, Paxil CR), and fluvoxamine (Luvox); or blood pressure medications such as pindolol (Visken) or propranolol (Inderal, Inderal LA, others). Taken with any of these drugs, thioridazine may cause irregular heartbeats that could lead to death. This is not a complete list of drugs that may interact with thioridazine and cause heart problems. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist before taking any other prescription or over-the-counter medications. Thioridazine may interact with other drugs that cause drowsiness, including alcohol, antidepressants, antihistamines, pain relievers, anxiety medicines, seizure medicines, and muscle relaxants. Dangerous sedation, dizziness, or drowsiness may occur if thioridazine is taken with alcohol or any of these medications. Talk to your doctor before taking thioridazine in combination with alcohol or any other medicines. Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Thioridazine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Dizziness may be more likely to occur when you rise from a sitting or lying position. Rise slowly to prevent dizziness and a possible fall. Call your doctor immediately if you have uncontrollable movements of the mouth, tongue, cheeks, jaw, arms, or legs; fever; muscle rigidity; sweating; irregular pulse; or fast or irregular heartbeats. What is thioridazine? Thioridazine is in a class of drugs called phenothiazines. It works by changing the actions of chemicals in the brain. Thioridazine is used to treat psychotic disorders, such as schizophrenia. Thioridazine is generally reserved for people who do not respond to other drugs or who cannot take other drugs due to side effects. Thioridazine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking thioridazine? Do not take thioridazine if you have any of the following conditions or a history of these conditions: heart disease; an irregular heartbeat or a history of irregular heartbeats; a history of prolonged QT intervals; a family history of congenital long QT syndrome; or other heartbeat disturbances. These conditions may increase the risk of irregular heartbeats, heart attack, and death while taking thioridazine. Do not take thioridazine with any of the following drugs: psychiatric medications such as fluoxetine (Prozac), paroxetine (Paxil, Paxil CR), and fluvoxamine (Luvox); or blood pressure medications such as pindolol (Visken) or propranolol (Inderal, Inderal LA, others). Taken with any of these drugs, thioridazine may cause irregular heartbeats that could lead to death. This is not a complete list of drugs that may interact with thioridazine and cause heart problems. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist before taking any other prescription or over-the-counter medications. Before taking thioridazine, tell your doctor if you have a bone marrow disease, glaucoma, seizures, Parkinson's disease, an enlarged prostate or difficulty urinating, liver disease, or kidney disease. You may not be able to take thioridazine, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above. It is not known whether thioridazine will harm an unborn baby. Do not take thioridazine without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether thioridazine passes into breast milk. Do not take thioridazine without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. If you are over 60 years of age, you may be more likely to experience side effects from thioridazine. Your doctor may prescribe a lower dose of this medication or you may require special monitoring during treatment. How should I take thioridazine? Take thioridazine exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these instructions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you. Your doctor may want to monitor your heartbeats and obtain a blood sample before starting and periodically during treatment with thioridazine. Take each dose with a full glass of water. Thioridazine can be taken with or without food. Shake the suspension (Mellaril-S) well before using it. To ensure that you get a correct dose, measure the liquid forms of thioridazine with a dropper or a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist where you can get one. The liquid concentrate can be mixed with 2 to 4 ounces of water or a suitable juice. Each dose should be mixed just prior to taking. Do not let the liquid concentrate touch your skin or clothes. Throw away any discolored liquid. Do not stop taking thioridazine without first talking to your doctor. It may be several weeks before you begin to feel better, and you may require continuous treatment for quite some time. Store thioridazine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Store the liquid in a light-resistant container. What happens if I miss a dose? Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication. What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention. Symptoms of a thioridazine overdose include uncontrollable movements, agitation, seizures, severe dizziness or fainting, coma, very deep sleep, irregular heartbeats, and high or low body temperature. What should I avoid while taking thioridazine? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Thioridazine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Dizziness may be more likely to occur when you rise from a sitting or lying position. Rise slowly to prevent dizziness and a possible fall. Thioridazine may interact with other drugs that cause drowsiness, including alcohol, antidepressants, antihistamines, pain relievers, anxiety medicines, seizure medicines, and muscle relaxants. Dangerous sedation, dizziness, or drowsiness may occur if thioridazine is taken with alcohol or any of these medications. Talk to your doctor before taking thioridazine in combination with alcohol or any other medicines. Avoid prolonged exposure to sunlight. Thioridazine may increase the sensitivity of the skin to sunlight. Use a sunscreen and wear protective clothing when sun exposure is unavoidable. What are the possible side effects of thioridazine? If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking thioridazine and seek emergency medical treatment or contact your doctor immediately: an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); uncontrollable movements of the mouth, tongue, cheeks, jaw, arms, or legs; fever; muscle rigidity; muscle spasms of the face or neck; sweating; irregular pulse; fast or irregular heartbeats. severe restlessness or tremor; severe drowsiness; blurred vision; dizziness or fainting; or a rash. Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take thioridazine and talk to your doctor if you experience dry mouth, stuffy nose; constipation; mild restlessness, drowsiness, or tremor; decreased sex drive; increased appetite; difficult urination or dark urine; or menstrual irregularities or swollen breasts. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect thioridazine? Do not take thioridazine with any of the following drugs: psychiatric medications such as fluoxetine (Prozac), paroxetine (Paxil, Paxil CR), and fluvoxamine (Luvox); or blood pressure medications such as pindolol (Visken) or propranolol (Inderal, Inderal LA, others). Taken with any of these drugs, thioridazine may cause irregular heartbeats that could lead to death. This is not a complete list of drugs that may interact with thioridazine and cause heart problems. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist before taking any other prescription or over-the-counter medications. Thioridazine may interact with other drugs that cause drowsiness, including alcohol, antidepressants, antihistamines, pain relievers, anxiety medicines, seizure medicines, and muscle relaxants. Dangerous sedation, dizziness, or drowsiness may occur if thioridazine is taken with alcohol or any of these medications. Talk to your doctor before taking thioridazine in combination with alcohol or any other medicines. Thioridazine also interacts with many medications other than the ones listed here. Before taking thioridazine, tell your doctor about all other medicines you are taking. During treatment, do not start taking any new drug or herbal product without first talking to your doctor. Answered by Vida Price 6 months ago.

So far, no one has mentioned the smarts involved. How are you doing in school right now? Do you like biology, chemistry, math and physics? AND do you like people? Do you have enough physical stamina, and can you function on 4-5 hours of sleep a night for a week at a time? It's one of those professions that can give you all the satisfaction in the world, but all the same it's one of the hardest in terms of time schedules, making rounds at 7 am and again at 6 pm and all the office hours or time in surgery in between. Then you go home and get called by your answering service, hospital nurses, etc. You may have to get out of bed in the middle of the night to check on a patient at the hospital. Some doctors seem to hate it. Other doctors are dedicated, gifted and a blessing to mankind. I liked one of the other respondent's suggestion--volunteer this summer at your local hospital or nursing home. See if working with sick people gives you a warm feeling--if it does you can get past the blood and gore. Find out whether you've got a true calling or are just a Grey's Anatomy fan. Answered by Steve Zaucha 6 months ago.

do you mean Thioridazine HCl ? Answered by Barrett Hopfensperger 6 months ago.

Thioridazine can be used as an anti-psychotic medication or also just for anxiety. Taking the right dose should make him more calm and relaxed. It sounds like he took too many at once. Make sure you read the label on the bottle carefully and he only takes them as the doctor prescribed (usually that means one at a time). If that still makes him too sleepy, go back to your doctor and have him adjust the dose. Answered by Frederick Gaffney 6 months ago.


I want info about non prescription blood pressue control products?
Asked by Mavis Clauss 6 months ago.

Trying Googling the following: * atenolol (Tenormin), * propranolol (Inderal), * metoprolol (Toprol), * nadolol (Corgard), * betaxolol (Kerlone), * acebutolol (Sectral), * pindolol (Visken), and * bisoprolol (Zebeta). Most BP meds are categorized as: ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, Beta–blockers, Diuretics, Calcium channel blockers (CCBs), or Alpha–blockers Go to www.rxlist.com and search those or you can also try Googling "PDR Online". A PDR is what docs use to narrow down a prescription for a given ailment. Hope that helps. Answered by Rosy Kacprowski 6 months ago.

Keep weight in normal range, exercise as your doctor allows, get enough sleep, and limit sodium intake - can all make a big difference. The drugs the next person lists all require a prescription. The only non-prescription medications I'm aware of are the over-the-counter diuretics, which dehydrate you and may temporarily lower blood pressure. Don't overdo, you can really hurt yourself. Answered by Nickole Croes 6 months ago.


Should I take this medication?
Also, instead of 15mg, I'd be taking 2mg. Asked by Esther Dai 6 months ago.

I am 15 and depressed. I take an antidepressant for it (Lexapro 20mg) and I have been on it for 2 months. I have no side effects, which I liked. The thing is my psychiatrist wants me to take Abilify with the Lexapro but he gave me and my mom until my next appointment (August 8) to decide though so he didn't go ahead and write the prescription and force it on me. He just knows my problems. I have tried so many antidepressants. I have been on Prozac, Effexor, and Zoloft, 2 months each but those were with a regular doctor, not a psychiatrist. The Lexapro hasn't done anything which I know the medicine isn't a happy pill and won't do everything for me, obviously. But it isn't doing ANYTHING. Well I mean I can get through the day with a fake smile basically. That is all the Lexapro as done for me. I don't wanna just stop the Lexapro. I also have issues with my stepdad. He knows I don't have a father figure in my life yet he continues to ignore me. It'd be one thing if he JUST ignored me be he always points out my flaws, as if I don't already see them, and never anything good about me. He never does anything with me. But he always plays with my nephew who is 17 months old. Whenever my stepdad and nephew are together, it bothers me to the point where I stay in my room and will either beat up a pillow, or just stay in my room and NEVER come out, not even to eat, drink, or even use the bathroom. Everyone says "Why don't you, mom, and him play with the baby together?" But that is not the point. The point is I'm angry at him because he is never there for me. He never does anything with JUST me. I took Abilify when I was 8 for bipolar disorder, which went away when I was about 9 or 10. I was on 15mg of the Abilify and it relieved my symptoms as far as anger, but I gained 40 lbs on it. I am overweight as it is and now I'm suffering by not eating foods I like and killing myself at the gym. Also Abilify has a lot of side effects and some are serious, but I never had them when I was 8. And this time I'm taking it as an adjunct treatment with my antidepressant. What should I do? I'm afraid about weight gain too, though it may not happen again. Answered by Cordia Dublin 6 months ago.

It's impossible for me to say if Abilify (aripiprazole) is a good option for you but I can tell you that 2 mg of Abilify is a low dose and it is unlikely you would have significant side effects. Another advantage is that you have taken Abilify before so it is not a total unknown. If you do take it it might be good to try to exercise a bit more or change your diet a little to help prevent you from gaining weight. About 6% of people who took Abilify as adjunctive treatment discontinued it due to side effects. The commonly observed adverse reactions associated with the use of adjunctive aripiprazole in patients with major depressive disorder (incidence of 5% or greater and aripiprazole incidence at least twice that for placebo) were: akathisia, restlessness, insomnia, constipation, fatigue, and blurred vision. Typically, in the real world, about 50-60% of people who take Abilify as adjunctive treatment find it to be effective. You can also ask your psychiatrist about other medications that can be added to help reduce your depression. Here is a list of augmentation agents (drugs typically used as adjunctive treatment to a primary antidepressant like Lexapro): Lithium carbonate- a mood stabilizer used mostly for bipolar BuSpar (buspirone)- an anti-anxiety medication for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) Visken (pindolol)- a beta-blocker used primarily to treat hypertension (high blood pressure) Cytomel (liothyronine) (T3)- thyroid hormone used primarily to treat hypothyroidism Ritalin (methylphenidate)- non-amphetamine stimulant used primarily for ADHD and narcolepsy Dexedrine (dextroamphetamine)- amphetamine stimulant used primarily for ADHD and narcolepsy Adderall (mixed amphetamine salts)- amphetamine stimulant used primarily for ADHD and narcolepsy Lamictal (lamotrigine)- anticonvulsant used to treat epilepsy and for bipolar disorder Xanax (alprazolam)- benzodiazepine used to treat anxiety disorders including anxiety with depression Some of the augmentation agents may be completely inappropriate for you, I don't know your medical history, but those are some of the best known, most used, and most studied. Technically lithium followed by Cytomel (T3) are the most studied medications for use as augmentation agents. Often augmentation agents can have multiple benefits so for you taking a small dose of a stimulant or Cytomel may help your depression and help you lose weight. However if you have anger issues that may not be a good idea. Just a thought- bipolar disorder is not really something that "goes away." A lot of doctors now believe some people may suffer from depression alone (without mania or hypomania) but the treatment they need is the same as the treatment for bipolar disorder. So adding lithium or Lamictal might be good. And adding Abilify might be good in that respect. It is also common to take two antidepressants at a time. Often when one antidepressant is not providing enough benefit a second antidepressant (from a different class of antidepressants) is often effective when added. Like the other medications depending on your symptoms certain drugs would be better. Wellbutrin is very popular and is good if you have low energy and want to lose weight. Desyrel and Remeron can really help people with anxiety and insomnia although Remeron often causes weight gain. Examples include: Desyrel (trazodone) Aventyl, Pamelor (nortriptyline) Remeron (mirtazapine) Wellbutrin (bupropion hydrochloride) Lastly I am sure you know this but no medication or medications will fix the problems you have with your step-dad (although if you are feeling better you will probably be better able to deal with things). If you want to have a better relationship you and him probably need to talk in therapy and say what you wrote. So talk to your psychiatrist about the Abilify, ask about alternatives to Abilify, you can mention some of the medications I listed, you can even ask about alternatives that might also help with other things (like medication that cause weight loss). You can always try Abilify and if it does not work or it has side effects you don't want to deal with you won't have to take it forever. Answered by Fritz Gronquist 6 months ago.

I was prescribed lexapro too, and it did nothing for me. So then my dr. gave me citalopram, which is working much better. Do you tell the dr. all this about your fear of weight gain? Ask him if you can try citalopram? Never ever just stop these meds, they are needed to balance the seratonin levels in our body/brain. I get mad and sad when i forget my doses for a couple of days, and also when i think i just dont need them today. But we do.....good luck! :) Answered by Griselda Garabedian 6 months ago.


Can high blood pressure medication cause nervous system side effects?
I am taking a high blood pressure medication, and it seems/appears that since I have been taking the medication I have had headaches all over, dizziness/light headedness, numbness in parts my face, as well as a stiff neck. These symptoms arent consisently there, maybe 1-2 times a day for an hour or so. Can a high... Asked by Ardith Ledonne 6 months ago.

I am taking a high blood pressure medication, and it seems/appears that since I have been taking the medication I have had headaches all over, dizziness/light headedness, numbness in parts my face, as well as a stiff neck. These symptoms arent consisently there, maybe 1-2 times a day for an hour or so. Can a high blood pressure medication cause such or is this some unrelated condition that I should seek out? Answered by Samara Farkus 6 months ago.

Possible Side Effects of Drugs That Lower Blood Pressure Some of the drugs listed below can affect certain functions of the body, resulting in bad side effects. However, drugs that lower blood pressure have proven effective over the years. The benefits of using them far outweigh the risk of side effects. Most people who’ve taken these drugs haven’t had any problems. Diuretics — Some of these drugs may decrease your body's supply of a mineral called potassium. Symptoms such as weakness, leg cramps or being tired may result. Eating foods containing potassium may help prevent significant potassium loss. You can prevent potassium loss by taking a liquid or tablet that has potassium along with the diuretic, if your doctor recommends it. Diuretics such as amiloride (Midamar), spironolactone (Aldactone) or triamterene (Dyrenium) are called "potassium sparing" agents. They don’t cause the body to lose potassium. They might be prescribed alone but are usually used with another diuretic. Some of these combinations are Aldactazide, Dyazide, Maxzide or Moduretic. Some people suffer from attacks of gout after prolonged treatment with diuretics. This side effect isn't common and can be managed by other treatment. In people with diabetes, diuretic drugs may increase the blood sugar level. A change in drug, diet, insulin or oral antidiabetic dosage corrects this in most cases. Your doctor can change your treatment. Most of the time the degree of increase in blood sugar isn't much. Impotence may also occur in a small percentage of people. Beta-blockers — Acebutolol (Sectral), atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Lopressor), nadolol (Corgard), pindolol (Visken), propranolol (Inderal) or timolol (Blocadren) may cause insomnia, cold hands and feet, tiredness or depression, a slow heartbeat or symptoms of asthma. Impotence may occur. If you have diabetes and you’re taking insulin, have your responses to therapy monitored closely. ACE inhibitors — These drugs, such as captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Zestril or Prinivil), may cause a skin rash; loss of taste; a chronic dry, hacking cough; and in rare instances, kidney damage. Angiotensin II receptor blockers — These drugs may cause occasional dizziness. Calcium channel blockers — Diltiazem (Cardizem), nicardipine (Cardene), Nifedipine (Procardia) and verapamil (Calan or Isoptin) may cause palpitations, swollen ankles, constipation, headache or dizziness. Side effects with each of these drugs differ a great deal. Alpha blockers — These drugs may cause fast heart rate, dizziness or a drop in blood pressure when you stand up. Combined alpha and beta blockers — People taking these drugs may experience a drop in blood pressure when they stand up. Central agonists — Alpha methyldopa (Aldomet) may produce a greater drop in blood pressure when you're in an upright position (standing or walking) and may make you feel weak or faint if the pressure has been lowered too far. This drug may also cause drowsiness or sluggishness, dryness of the mouth, fever or anemia. Male patients may experience impotence. If this side effect persists, your doctor may have to change the drug dosage or use another medication. Clonidine (Catapres), guanabenz (Wytensin) or guanfacine (Tenex) may produce severe dryness of the mouth, constipation or drowsiness. If you're taking any of these drugs, don’t stop suddenly, because your blood pressure may rise quickly to dangerously high levels. Peripheral adrenergic inhibitors — Reserpine may cause a stuffy nose, diarrhea or heartburn. These effects aren't severe and no treatment is required other than to change the amount of drugs taken. If you have nightmares or insomnia or get depressed, tell your doctor. You should stop using the drugs. Guanadrel (Hylorel) or guanethidine (Ismelin) may cause some diarrhea, which may persist in some people. This side effect usually becomes less of a problem if you continue treatment. These drugs reduce blood pressure more when you stand. Consequently, you may get dizzy and lightheaded and feel weak when you get out of bed in the morning or stand up suddenly. If you notice any of these reactions — and if they persist for more than a minute or two — sit or lie down and either reduce or omit the next dose of the drug. If symptoms continue, contact your doctor. When you're taking guanethidine, don't keep standing in the hot sun or at a social gathering if you begin to feel faint or weak. These activities cause low blood pressure. Male patients may experience impotence. Contact your doctor if this occurs. These drugs are rarely used unless other medications don’t help. Blood vessel dilators — Hydralzine (Apresoline) may cause headaches, swelling around the eyes, heart palpitations or aches and pains in the joints. Usually none of these symptoms are severe, and most will go away after a few weeks of treatment. This drug isn't usually used by itself. Minoxidil (Loniten) is a potent drug that's usually used only in resistant cases of severe high blood pressure. It may cause fluid retention (marked weight gain) or excessive hair growth. Answered by Jana Miras 6 months ago.

You really should speak to your doctor, while yes, high blood pressure meds do have "Side Effects" to some of those effects, you really should make doubly sure that you can take them, and they will not harm you. So speak to your doctor. I take blood pressure meds and the least I get is light headiness, when my blood pressure drops to "Normal" from being too high. Answered by Maryland Plett 6 months ago.


Questions about Inderal (propanolol)?
A few days ago I was diagnosed with hyperthyroid disease and received my 'scripts today - one for propylthiourical (aka PTU), for my thyroid, and propanolol for my high heart rate, palpitations, acute angina, and panic attacks. Unfortunately the pharmacist didn't have time to answer all of my questions... Asked by Kieth Hourihan 6 months ago.

A few days ago I was diagnosed with hyperthyroid disease and received my 'scripts today - one for propylthiourical (aka PTU), for my thyroid, and propanolol for my high heart rate, palpitations, acute angina, and panic attacks. Unfortunately the pharmacist didn't have time to answer all of my questions (it's a charity clinic and pharmacy, they're rather busy) and I've come up with a few since taking Dose #1 of propanolol. I hope someone can help me out. (Pt is 29, 5'4", 190#, and a bit of a hypochondriac) #1 - I've started to panic, but it's as if my heart doesn't care and just returns to its happy 73 bpm routine. Does this mean that if I get excited or scared, that my heart rate won't rise? Have I become a robot? #2 - Can I continue my work out routine while taking propanolol? (By work out, I mean cardio exercise 3-5x a week.) #3 - If anyone else has taken propanolol, would you please share your experience? The pharmacist said it would take about a week before I'd be used to its effects. #4 - Would I be safe making small trips or perhaps even driving? #5 - How long am I going to be dropping weight? (My ribs are starting to show, which is pretty freaky, considering I've been overweight most of my life.) Thanks!! Answered by Shira Dineen 6 months ago.

I think you should get a second opinion about your condition. Musicians and stuff apparently take inderal to relax them. Ive taken it twice or three times... its part of a drug called beta blockers, when you take them it will feel like weight off your heart. Im very mixed about them. If you dont need them, dont take them. But if youve started taking them dont abruptly stop them or you can end up with serious problems. I personally wouldn't take any of those drugs, and if youve started taking them, talk to the doctor at once to stop taking them. They have really nasty side effects, which may or may not go away, which may or may not worsen your condition. Inderal is a OLDER type of betablocker, They are non selective, which means they block a wide band of receptors (wiki it). Psychiatrists prescribe them for anxiety.. and fairly often! Mainly to control a condition. They also use a drug called VISKEN... But if your heart rate is normal i wouldn't bother. You can deal with your anxiety on your own, i most certainly would not take the beta blocker. I dont know much about the thyroid, but you probably should take that medication. I know thyroids control allot of vital parts of your body... but still get a second opinion before you do anything. Again i dont know enough to help you, these are just my thoughts. Whats really important is 1.) IS it easy to get off? betablockers are the hardest drugs of their class to get off. If you abruptly stop them they could screw up the rate of your heart and cause massive problems. You have to very gradually weane them off. It usually takes a few days before they get into your blood, and then getting off them is troublesome. I also know inderal washes out of your system very fast, so you have to take them often, which from a psychological prospective isnt pleasing, it reminds you that theres always something wrong with you... 2.) Does it have very nasty side effects? Inderal causes nightmares, slow heart rate, a multitude of unnecessary things. Beta blockers are generally for people with tachycardia, or cardiac rhythm problems. 3.) Is it doing more harm then good? In your case, by the sounds of it, yes. The less medication u can take, the better. But you may need the thyroid meds. Answered by Anjelica Terracina 6 months ago.

I am additionally on Synthroid, my thyroid slightly works. I have spotted each weight acquire and weight reduction, it is in general a question of approximately five kilos with trouble doing some thing approximately it in phrases of vitamin and health. Though I'm no longer high-quality at retaining up with both. Still shouldn't have the vigour I must for the reason that I have got to return for healing adustment. You do not desire your thyroid to also be gradual. You're brain does not paintings the identical, problem concentrating, intolerance to bloodless, feasible middle issues if left unchecked. But the MAJOR predicament is that you simply get so worn out day-to-day, while you get up it appears like you have not slept. You attempt to make it via a piece day and discover your self falling asleep at your table by way of three:30. Friday and Saturday nights do not in general influence in some thing however falling asleep at 10:00 (previous on weekdays). Answered by Kaylee Binion 6 months ago.


Pre-term labor question??? Twins?
I forgot to add, the On-call doctor decided not to prescribe the Terbutaline pills to me after she saw my reaction. I guess it scared them. I have asthma and they wouldnt let me use my inhaler when I was short of breath. It was scary. Asked by Tess Blackmond 6 months ago.

Hello to all :) I am 34 weeks pregnant with twins. I went into pre-term labor 2 weeks ago. I was advised to go to the hospital and did. They were advised by an on-call doctor at my dr office, to give me 2 bags of IV fluid and to give me 2 shots of Terbutalene and 1 Terbutalene pill to take. Well, I started having complications from the medicines. My heart started racing, and I couldnt breathe, I also had severe chest pain and they had to perform 2 EKG's. They later released me to the ER where I was placed on oxygen for an hour until my heart rate returned to normal. My contractions did stop that day but have been ongoing ever since. I have been having "real" contractions, not Braxton Hicks. I have no idea if I have dialated. Basically my Dr. wants me to go to the hospital and get more of the medicine that almost killed me so they can stop the contractions. I know I have the right to not take it. I feel like if its time, its time. How would you handle this with your dr? Answered by Carri Salerno 6 months ago.

This is YOUR pregnancy and you need to do what you feel is right. If this stuff nearly killed you, it may happen again. You dying is not going to help those babies! Talk to your doctor about options. If he won't be cooperative, ask if you can talk to someone else for a second opinion. Ask if they can try a different medication. If not, weigh the pros and cons of delivering now or attempting to take the medication again. It's always better if the babies are delivered full term but many babies have been delivered at 34 weeks due to preterm labor or complications with the mother, baby(s), and/or pregnancy. Although they have a higher risk of complications, it is sometimes necessary to do this and many are just fine. My own siblings (twins) were delivered at 34 weeks and spent a couple weeks in the NICU. No complications other than they were small and needed help breathing for a few days. They're now 26 years old and perfectly normal. Good luck and I hope things work out for you. Congratulations on your twins! Answered by Judy Bindas 6 months ago.

From my understanding twins ussually come early and are smaller anyways. My husband is a twin. They were born at 32 weeks and weighed about 3.5 lbs a piece and are both fine. When I first found out I was pregnant I was wondering if it was twins seeing as how it runs in both our families, and had asked him about it. Althogh 37 weeks is "full term" He also said that technology is so advance that babies are surviving at 20+ weeks. I would think bue to your reaction to the meds last time that theywould never give it to you again and putit on file that it is not for you! If your contractions are real close together and you are thinking it is time I would jsut go strait to the hospital tell them tht theycan not stop your labor with the meds because this happened 2 weeks ago with it, and they hopefully will listen! Some er docs I learned are alot better in these situations than your doc that wants you to wait. Good luk and congrats on the twins. I hope you find a way to relax and sooth yourself until that point! Answered by Rona Tintle 6 months ago.

If you are having strong, frequent contractions, there is no question about it, you need to go in and be checked. People confuse braxton hicks, thinking they are "fake", but they can feel very strong at times. It's possible you haven't dilated enough to worry about it yet. If you are in labor, and they can't give you anything else to stop contractions, maybe they can go ahead and check on the twins via ultrasound to see how they are doing. It's possible that a delivery at this point could be ok. After all 34 weeks isn't all that early for twins anyway. Answered by Lanora Garib 6 months ago.

My cousin took the same medicine & could hardly breath when she took them. 34 wks for twins is good, but the longer u go the better the chance that their lungs have matured, and they won't be in the nicu. I was 37 wks w/ a single baby and contractions & they would not deliver me either. My Dr. said 38 weeks plus for the babies lungs. If u feel u r contracting, go to the Dr. and get checked right away,don't take chances. Dr.'s don't want to do anything until they actually see you. I think they r so used to their job they forget u r the one going through this & its all new to u. Congratulations on the twins & making it to 34wks Answered by Lizabeth Willier 6 months ago.

Signs of preterm labor: Call your midwife or doctor right away if you're having any of the following symptoms in your second or third trimester (before 37 weeks): • An increase in vaginal discharge • A change in the type of discharge — if it becomes watery, mucus-like, or bloody (even if it's pink or just tinged with blood) • Any vaginal bleeding or spotting • Abdominal pain, menstrual-like cramping, or more than four contractions in one hour (even if they don't hurt) • An increase in pressure in the pelvic area (a feeling that your baby is pushing down) • Low back pain, especially if you didn't previously have back pain These symptoms can be confusing because some of them, such as pelvic pressure or low back pain, occur during normal pregnancies, too, and sporadic early contractions may just be Braxton Hicks contractions. But it's always better to be safe than sorry, so call your midwife or doctor right away if you're experiencing anything unusual. Answered by Tierra Arney 6 months ago.

My 2nd pregnancy was twins, I also had preterm labor at 32wks, was given meds to stop it...it's common for those meds to make your heart race just not the chest pain. I went into labor again at 34wks 5days and they let me deliver that time. Twins were great weights and extremely healthy. I don't know why on earth she'd give you those meds again but if you're in labor and having real contractions that are regular you need to go in. If they are real but irregular then you should be fine, ,maybe jsut call and let them know? If I were you I wouldn't take the meds again especially not at this point. Answered by Myra Tesoriero 6 months ago.

I had twins and early contractions 30 weeks. my specialist put me on bed rest and gave me the same stuff. It made my heart race, but that's it. I was told it was OK to go into labor at 34 weeks. I did go into labor at 34 weeks and 3 days and they delivered me. Is there a reason they wont deliver you now? Or is there something else they can give you because you had such a bad reaction. Answered by Melodee Versaw 6 months ago.

I would talk to your doc and tell him your concerns. I think that it is your right not to take it. Just remember that you have two little ones inside you and the longer they stay there the better off they are. Congrats and Good Luck Answered by Rosanne Jez 6 months ago.

I'm all with betsy on this one. Have you also considered the fact that this may be due to an allergic reaction? Ask whats in that stuff and see. Answered by Coletta Vreeken 6 months ago.


Does st john wart have effect with beta blocker meds?
Asked by America Boeck 6 months ago.

Possibly. I am sensitive to St John's Wort. So it is pretty powerful. It does effect your serotonin levels. It does affect beta blockers--beta blockers such as atenolol (Tenormin), acebutolol (Sectral), pindolol (Visken), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), sotalol (Betapace), nadolol (Corgard), propranolol (Inderal), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), and carvedilol (Coreg). Answered by Sherie Klaren 6 months ago.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist, moron. Answered by Mirtha Hellner 6 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018285/001 VISKEN PINDOLOL TABLET/ORAL 5MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018285/002 VISKEN PINDOLOL TABLET/ORAL 10MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018285/001 VISKEN PINDOLOL TABLET/ORAL 5MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018285/002 VISKEN PINDOLOL TABLET/ORAL 10MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
073608/001 PINDOLOL PINDOLOL TABLET/ORAL 5MG
073609/001 PINDOLOL PINDOLOL TABLET/ORAL 10MG
073661/002 PINDOLOL PINDOLOL TABLET/ORAL 10MG
073661/001 PINDOLOL PINDOLOL TABLET/ORAL 5MG
073687/001 PINDOLOL PINDOLOL TABLET/ORAL 5MG
073687/002 PINDOLOL PINDOLOL TABLET/ORAL 10MG
074013/001 PINDOLOL PINDOLOL TABLET/ORAL 5MG
074018/001 PINDOLOL PINDOLOL TABLET/ORAL 10MG
074019/001 PINDOLOL PINDOLOL TABLET/ORAL 5MG
074019/002 PINDOLOL PINDOLOL TABLET/ORAL 10MG
074063/001 PINDOLOL PINDOLOL TABLET/ORAL 5MG
074063/002 PINDOLOL PINDOLOL TABLET/ORAL 10MG
074125/002 PINDOLOL PINDOLOL TABLET/ORAL 10MG
074123/001 PINDOLOL PINDOLOL TABLET/ORAL 5MG
074123/002 PINDOLOL PINDOLOL TABLET/ORAL 10MG
074125/001 PINDOLOL PINDOLOL TABLET/ORAL 5MG
074437/001 PINDOLOL PINDOLOL TABLET/ORAL 5MG
074437/002 PINDOLOL PINDOLOL TABLET/ORAL 10MG
074474/001 PINDOLOL PINDOLOL TABLET/ORAL 5MG
074474/002 PINDOLOL PINDOLOL TABLET/ORAL 10MG
205415/001 PINDOLOL PINDOLOL TABLET/ORAL 5MG
205415/002 PINDOLOL PINDOLOL TABLET/ORAL 10MG

Manufacturers

Manufacturer name
Concordia International

Ask a question

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question as quickly as possible.

Related

Browse by letter
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

© Medications.li 2015-2017 - Blog - All rights reserved