VINCRISTINE SULFATE Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 070411/001.

Names and composition

"VINCRISTINE SULFATE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of VINCRISTINE SULFATE.

Answered questions

Why does the drug vincristine have side effects such as loss of dividing cells an nerve problems?
Asked by Marylou Mainland 5 months ago.

Vincristine Trade Names: Oncovin ®, Vincasar Pfs ® Other Names: Vincristine Sulfate, LCR, VCR Drug Type: Vincristine is an anti-cancer ("antineoplastic" or "cytotoxic") chemotherapy drug. Vincristine is classified as a plant alkaloid. What Vincristine Is Used For: Cancers treated with Vincristine include: acute leukemia, Hodgkin's and non- Hodgkin's lymphoma, neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma, Wilms' tumor, multiple myeloma, chronic leukemias, thyroid cancer, brain tumors. It is also used to treat some blood disorders. Side effects may include: Taste changes Peripheral neuropathy: Although uncommon, a serious side effect of decreased sensation and paresthesia (numbness and tingling of the hands and feet) may be noted. Sensory loss, numbness and tingling, and difficulty in walking may last for at least as long as therapy is continued How Vincristine Works: Cancerous tumors are characterized by cell division, which is no longer controlled as it is in normal tissue. "Normal" cells stop dividing when they come into contact with like cells, a mechanism known as contact inhibition. Cancerous cells lose this ability. Cancer cells no longer have the normal checks and balances in place that control and limit cell division. The process of cell division, whether normal or cancerous cells, is through the cell cycle. The cell cycle goes from the resting phase, through active growing phases, and then to mitosis (division). The ability of chemotherapy to kill cancer cells depends on its ability to halt cell division. Usually, the drugs work by damaging the RNA or DNA that tells the cell how to copy itself in division. If the cells are unable to divide, they die. The faster the cells are dividing, the more likely it is that chemotherapy will kill the cells, causing the tumor to shrink. They also induce cell suicide (self-death or apoptosis). Chemotherapy drugs that affect cells only when they are dividing are called cell-cycle specific. Chemotherapy drugs that affect cells when they are at rest are called cell-cycle non-specific. The scheduling of chemotherapy is set based on the type of cells, rate at which they divide, and the time at which a given drug is likely to be effective. This is why chemotherapy is typically given in cycles. Chemotherapy is most effective at killing cells that are rapidly dividing. Unfortunately, chemotherapy does not know the difference between the cancerous cells and the normal cells. The "normal" cells will grow back and be healthy but in the meantime, side effects occur. The "normal" cells most commonly affected by chemotherapy are the blood cells, the cells in the mouth, stomach and bowel, and the hair follicles; resulting in low blood counts, mouth sores, nausea, diarrhea, and/or hair loss. Different drugs may affect different parts of the body. Vincristine belongs to a class of chemotherapy drugs called plant alkaloids. Plant alkaloids are made from plants. The vinca alkaloids are made from the periwinkle plant (catharanthus rosea). The taxanes are made from the bark of the Pacific Yew tree (taxus). The vinca alkaloids and taxanes are also known as antimicrotubule agents. The podophyllotoxins are derived from the May Apple plant. Camptothecan analogs are derived from the Asian "Happy Tree" (Camptotheca acuminata). Podophyllotoxins and camptothecan analogs are also known as topoisomerase inhibitors. The plant alkaloids are cell-cycle specific. This means they attack the cells during various phases of division. Answered by Hugh Higaneda 5 months ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: why does the drug vincristine have side effects such as loss of dividing cells an nerve problems? Answered by Dion Crum 5 months ago.

Monitor your blood glucose levels. If you have diabetes, monitoring your blood glucose levels will help keep your blood glucose under control and may help improve your neuropathy. Answered by Lashawna Lutton 5 months ago.


What is the drug vincristine made from?
chemotherapy Asked by Magaret Schreurs 5 months ago.

Vincristine Sulfate Injection, USP is the salt of an alkaloid obtained from a common flowering herb, the periwinkle plant (Vinca rosea Linn). Originally known as leurocristine, it has also been referred to as LCR and VCR. The molecular formula for Vincristine sulfate is C46H56N4010•H2SO4. It has a molecular weight of 923.04. Answered by Gabrielle Hobart 5 months ago.

Catharanthus roseus, a plant used for medical purposes... Answered by Kimberlee Blankinship 5 months ago.


Which is more prefered vincristine or vinblastin sulfate as anticancer drug? and why?
Asked by Eustolia Mervine 5 months ago.

there are more alternatives then those too: there are versions with and without albumin (albumin is a proteing that may cause severe side effects in some people). Answered by Katharina Lenharr 5 months ago.


How do drugs halt mitosis?
Maligant tumors are sometimes treated with drugs that halt mitosis, and thus stop the production of new cancer cells. two such drugs, vincristine sulfate and vinblastine sulfate, interfere with the formation of spindle fibers. how could this action halt mitosis?Some drugs can also interfere with DNA... Asked by Marie Hayden 5 months ago.

Maligant tumors are sometimes treated with drugs that halt mitosis, and thus stop the production of new cancer cells. two such drugs, vincristine sulfate and vinblastine sulfate, interfere with the formation of spindle fibers. how could this action halt mitosis? Some drugs can also interfere with DNA synthesis in treated cells. How could this action halt mitosis? Answered by Denyse Gogan 5 months ago.

Catagories of Chemotherapy Drugs: In general, chemotherapy agents can be divided into three main categories based on their mechanism of action. Stop the synthesis of pre DNA molecule building blocks: These agents work in a number of different ways. DNA building blocks are folic acid, heterocyclic bases, and nucleotides, which are made naturally within cells. All of these agents work to block some step in the formation of nucleotides or deoxyribonucleotides (necessary for making DNA). When these steps are blocked, the nucleotides, which arethe building blocks of DNA and RNA, can not be synthesized. Thus the cells can not replicate because they cannot make DNA without the nucleotides. Examples of drugs in this class include 1) methotrexate (Abitrexate®),2) fluorouracil (Adrucil®), 3) hydroxyurea (Hydrea®), and 4) mercaptopurine (Purinethol®). Directly damage the DNA in the nucleus of the cell: These agents chemically damage DNA and RNA. They disrupt replication of the DNA and either totally halt replication or cause the manufacture of nonsense DNA or RNA (i.e. the new DNA or RNA does not code for anything useful). Examples of drugs in this class include cisplatin (Platinol®) and 7) antibiotics - daunorubicin (Cerubidine®), doxorubicin (Adriamycin®), and etoposide (VePesid®). Effect the synthesis or breakdown of the mitotic spindles: Mitotic spindles serve as molecular railroads with "North and South Poles" in the cell when a cell starts to divide itself into two new cells. These spindles are very important because they help to split the newly copied DNA such that a copy goes to each of the two new cells during cell division. These drugs disrupt the formation of these spindles and therefore interrupt cell division. Examples of drugs in this class of 8) miotic disrupters include: Vinblastine (Velban®), Vincristine (Oncovin®) and Pacitaxel (Taxol®). Answered by Joel Sweeley 5 months ago.

Drugs that interfere with the normal progression of mitosis belong to the most successful chemotherapeutic compounds currently used for anti-cancer treatment. Classically, these drugs are represented by microtubule binding drugs that inhibit the function of the mitotic spindle in order to halt the cell cycle in mitosis and to induce apoptosis in tumor cells. However, these compounds act not only on proliferating tumor cells, but exhibit significant side effects on non-proliferating cells including neurons that are highly dependent on intracellular transport processes mediated by microtubules. Therefore, there is a particular interest in developing novel anti-mitotic drugs that target non-microtubule structures. In fact, recently several novel drugs that target mitotic kinesins or the Aurora and polo-like kinases have been developed and are currently tested in clinical trials. In addition, approaches of cell cycle checkpoint abrogation during mitosis and at the G2/M transition inducing mitosis-associated tumor cell death are promising new strategies for anti-cancer therapy. It is expected that this "next generation" of anti-mitotic drugs will be as successful as the classical anti-microtubule drugs, while avoiding some of the adverse side effect Answered by Rozanne Lofte 5 months ago.

spindle fibers are used to move the chromosome and orgenelles to opposite sides if you cant dupliccate DNA then you cannot spilt a chromosome for the daughter cells Answered by Velda Stritzinger 5 months ago.


What are the benefits and limitations of the extractions of drugs from plants?
Am willing to award 15 points for the best answer, Describe and evaluate the benefits and limitations of extractions of drugs from plants and extractions of drugs from plants applications as well as their effect on life and society.How extractions of drugs from plants and it's... Asked by Carroll Schmierer 5 months ago.

Am willing to award 15 points for the best answer, Describe and evaluate the benefits and limitations of extractions of drugs from plants and extractions of drugs from plants applications as well as their effect on life and society. How extractions of drugs from plants and it's applications interact with social, economical, political environment and cultural factors. Answered by Kam Zerkle 5 months ago.

I will try my best to give you some information on the subject. economical, sociological, political ramifications would require hundreds of pages and months of study and fact finding. Many pharmaceuticals are so complex that it is not economically feasible to synthesise it in a laboratory. e.g. the anti-cancer drugs vincristine sulfate and vinblastine sulfate are so complex that plant extraction is the only economical production method. ( form the mediterranean periwinkel plant). Some chemicals, like antibiotics are used long before their chemical structure is discovered, and they are are extracted from bacterial or fungal fermentation). . A good example is penecillin. The exact molecular structure was determined decades after its first use. And laboratory synthesis was effected 50 years after Alexander Fleming's first discovery. It is still cheaper to extract the basic beta lactam molecule and modify it chemically in order to make newer semi sybthetic derivatives. (like ampicillin, cloxacillin, methicillin etc.). There are problems with natural plant exctracts. The source plant can be rare and in danger of going extinct if heavily exploited. A good example is the anticancer drugs taxol and paclitaxel. The source pacific yew tree is an uncommon plant and in danger. A bacterial alternate source has recently been discovered.. Hope that helps. Doc. Dan. Answered by Emmie Kuang 5 months ago.


When to expect hairloss?
Hi, my 5 year old who was diagnosed with Stage III B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma started treatment today. His first course of treatment is 7 days long. This course consists of Vincristine sulfate IV (Day 1), Cyclophosphamide IV (Day 1), Prednisone (Pill form, twice a day for all 7 days), and Methotrexate (IT) and... Asked by Lynnette Widera 5 months ago.

Hi, my 5 year old who was diagnosed with Stage III B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma started treatment today. His first course of treatment is 7 days long. This course consists of Vincristine sulfate IV (Day 1), Cyclophosphamide IV (Day 1), Prednisone (Pill form, twice a day for all 7 days), and Methotrexate (IT) and hydrocortisone (IT) (Day 1). Terrible, but it's all in the fight :/ Anyways, I was told we should start seeing hair around 2 weeks after the start of treatment, but I wanted to come on here and see how some of your experiences have been? What should we expect? Answered by Ferdinand Wetherington 5 months ago.

My daughter (15 when diagnosed) found she began losing her hair within 3 weeks. It started to thin at first, and then just came out in handfulls. She clipped her hair and the rest just rubbed off after a couple of days. Also on vinc, cyclo (also etop, ifos, irinitecan, doxo and dactinomycin 20 rounds in total). Your son is very brave, and my thoughts are with you. Its a tough fight, and can be done, but I know its hard to watch your baby go through all this. Tc > Answered by Kayleen Hippler 5 months ago.

my boyfriend has lymphoma as well. first round of chemo he would have to go to the outpatient clinic for his chemo which would take like 5 hours and he went 6 times with 3 weeks inbetween. im not sure the name of the drugs he got. he started to lost hair just after his second treatment. i came home from work and he was pulling chunks out of his head one day. i had to make a midnight run to wally for clippers to cut it. it was a night to remember lol. this was the ONLY side effect he had from those chemo days. so i would say it took 4 weeks? i was asking the nurses about this and they said every patient besides one they had lost hair. it seems to be a pretty common side effect. but you never know. he could be that one person who doesnt. i do remember her saying it usually starts to happen within the first couple treatments. but on a good note. it was like 3 weeks after his last chemo it started to grow back right away. Answered by Augustine Nakajima 5 months ago.

It's different for every patient. Some patients lose their hair within the first treatment while others may take a few treatments. Answered by Shala Boahn 5 months ago.

His Dr & Nurses would be able to give the best indication. THey have experience with a wide variety of patients. I was under a totally different treatment so my results are irrelevant except to say they were exactly as my Dr predicted. Answered by Celestina Tille 5 months ago.

Your boy might not experience any hair loss at all. Everyone reacts to chemotherapy differently, kids are no different - my grandpa didn't experience hair loss and neither did my cousin. Just take each day at a time. He might not lose any hair. That's always a possibility. Answered by Adina Staehler 5 months ago.

I'm sorry your son is having to go through this. I wish him the best. Hair loss varies from person to person. My hair started to fall out 13 days after my first chemo. Answered by Edmundo Kuk 5 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
070411/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
070777/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE Injectable/ Injection 1MG per ML
070778/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE Injectable/ Injection 1MG per ML
070873/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
071222/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE Injectable/ Injection 1MG per VIAL
071223/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE Injectable/ Injection 2MG per VIAL
071559/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per VIAL
071560/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2MG per VIAL
071561/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per VIAL
071937/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE Injectable/ Injection 5MG per VIAL
076296/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
076401/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
014103/001 ONCOVIN VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per VIAL
014103/002 ONCOVIN VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per VIAL
014103/003 ONCOVIN VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
070411/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
070777/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE Injectable/ Injection 1MG per ML
070778/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE Injectable/ Injection 1MG per ML
070867/001 VINCREX VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per VIAL
070873/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
071222/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE Injectable/ Injection 1MG per VIAL
071223/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE Injectable/ Injection 2MG per VIAL
071426/001 VINCASAR PFS VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
071484/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE PFS VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
071559/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per VIAL
071560/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2MG per VIAL
071561/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per VIAL
071937/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE Injectable/ Injection 5MG per VIAL
075493/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE PFS VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
076296/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
076401/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
202497/001 MARQIBO KIT VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE, LIPOSOMAL/INTRAVENOUS 5MG per 5ML (1MG per ML)

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