Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 020943/001.

Names and composition

"VERELAN PM" is the commercial name of a drug composed of VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020943/001 VERELAN PM VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
020943/002 VERELAN PM VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
020943/003 VERELAN PM VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018485/001 ISOPTIN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
018593/001 ISOPTIN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
018593/002 ISOPTIN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
018593/003 ISOPTIN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
018817/001 CALAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
018817/002 CALAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
018817/003 CALAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
018817/004 CALAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 160MG
018925/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INTRAVENOUS 5MG per 2ML (2.5MG per ML)
019038/001 CALAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
019152/001 CALAN SR VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
019152/002 CALAN SR VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019152/003 CALAN SR VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
019614/001 VERELAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
019614/002 VERELAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
019614/003 VERELAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
019614/004 VERELAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
020552/001 COVERA-HS VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
020552/002 COVERA-HS VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
020943/001 VERELAN PM VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
020943/002 VERELAN PM VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
020943/003 VERELAN PM VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
070225/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070340/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
070341/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
070348/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070451/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070468/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
070482/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
070483/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
070577/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070617/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070672/001 VERAPAMIL HCL VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE Injectable/ Injection 2.5MG per ML
070695/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070696/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070697/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070737/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INTRAVENOUS 5MG per 2ML (2.5MG per ML)
070737/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INTRAVENOUS 10MG per 4ML (2.5MG per ML)
070738/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INTRAVENOUS 10MG per 4ML (2.5MG per ML)
070739/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070740/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070855/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
070856/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
070994/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
070995/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
071019/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
071366/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
071367/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
071423/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
071424/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
071483/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
071483/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
071489/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
071489/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
071880/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
071881/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
071881/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
072124/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
072125/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
072233/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
072751/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
072799/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
072888/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
072922/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
072923/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
072924/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
073168/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
073485/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
073568/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
073568/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
074330/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
074587/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
074587/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
074587/003 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
075072/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
075072/003 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
075136/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INTRAVENOUS 5MG per 2ML (2.5MG per ML)
075138/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
075138/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
075138/003 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
078306/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
078306/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
078306/003 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
078906/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
090529/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
090529/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
090529/003 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
090700/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
090700/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
200878/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
200878/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
200878/003 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
206173/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
206173/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG

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Answered questions

What are the side affects of verapamil (verelan pm)?
Asked by Arianna Planas 1 year ago.

VERAPAMIL Generic Name: verapamil (oral) (ver AH pa mill) Brand Names: Calan, Calan SR, Covera-HS, Isoptin, Isoptin SR, Verelan, Verelan PM What is the most important information I should know about verapamil? • Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. If you stop taking the medication, your condition could become worse. • Do not crush, chew, or break extended-release forms of verapamil such as generic Covera-HS and Verelan PM. Swallow them whole. Generic verapamil SR, Isoptin SR, and Calan SR may be divided in half but should not be crushed or chewed. What is verapamil? • Verapamil is in a class of drugs called calcium channel blockers. Verapamil relaxes (widens) blood vessels (veins and arteries), which makes it easier for the heart to pump and reduces its workload. • Verapamil is used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure), to treat angina (chest pain), and to control some types of irregular heartbeats. • Verapamil may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking verapamil? • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have · kidney or liver disease; · other diseases of the heart or blood vessels such as sick sinus syndrome, aortic stenosis, heart failure, heart block, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, coronary artery disease, or low blood pressure; or · muscular dystrophy. • You may not be able to take verapamil, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above. • Verapamil is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether verapamil will be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take verapamil without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. • Verapamil passes into breast milk and may harm a nursing infant. Do not take verapamil without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take verapamil? • Take verapamil exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you. • Take each dose with a full glass of water. • Verelan, Verelan PM, Calan, Isoptin, Covera-HS, and generic forms of regular-release verapamil can be taken with or without food. Taking the medication with food may reduce stomach upset if it occurs. • Calan SR, Isoptin SR, and generic sustained-release verapamil (verapamil SR) may be more likely to cause stomach upset and should be taken with food to reduce this side effect. • Take Covera-HS and Verelan PM at bedtime. • If you have trouble swallowing the Verelan pellet-filled capsules, they can be opened and the contents can be sprinkled onto cold, soft food such as applesauce. This mixture must be swallowed without chewing. Use the mixture immediately. Do not save it for later use. (Do not use this procedure for the Verelan PM capsules.) • Do not crush, chew, or break extended-release forms of verapamil such as Covera-HS and Verelan PM. Swallow them whole. Generic verapamil SR, Isoptin SR, and Calan SR may be divided in half if the tablets are scored, but should not be crushed or chewed. • If you are taking Covera-HS, do not be concerned if you find what looks like an undissolved tablet in your stool. This medication is formulated with an outer shell that does not dissolve. This shell allows the medicine to be released slowly into your body before it is passed out in the stool. • It is important to take verapamil regularly to get the most benefit. • Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. If you stop taking the medication, your condition could become worse. • Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with verapamil. The interaction could lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. • Your doctor may want you to have blood tests, blood pressure monitoring, or other medical evaluations during treatment with verapamil to monitor progress and side effects. • Store verapamil at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose? • Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication. What happens if I overdose? • Seek emergency medical attention. • Symptoms of a verapamil overdose include dizziness, weakness, chest pain, shortness of breath, fainting, an unusually fast or slow heartbeat, coma, slurred speech, and confusion. What should I avoid while taking verapamil? • Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with verapamil. The interaction could lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. • Avoid the use alcohol. Alcohol may further lower blood pressure and increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking verapamil. • Follow any recommendations your doctor makes about diet or exercise. What are the possible side effects of verapamil? • If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking verapamil and contact your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical treatment: · an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); · an unusually fast or slow heartbeat; · shortness of breath (heart failure); · fainting; · abnormal behavior or psychosis; · jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or · swelling of the legs or ankles. • Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take verapamil and talk to your doctor if you experience · unusual headache, fatigue, or tiredness; · insomnia or trouble sleeping; · vivid dreams; · hair loss; · nausea or diarrhea; or · increased urination. • Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect verapamil? • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following drugs: · cyclosporine (Sandimmune, Neoral); · cimetidine (Tagamet, Tagamet HB); · carbamazepine (Tegretol, Carbatrol); · lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith, others); · theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theochron, Theolair, Theobid, Elixophyllin, Slo-Phyllin, others); · rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane); · phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton); · an HMG CoA reductase inhibitor such as atorvastatin (Lipitor), lovastatin (Mevacor), simvastatin (Zocor), and others; or · another heart medication such as propranolol (Inderal), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), atenolol (Tenormin), digoxin (Lanoxin), quinidine (Quinora, Quinidex, Quinaglute), flecainide (Tambocor), disopyramide (Norpace), captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), and others. • You may not be able to take verapamil, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring if you are taking any of the medicines listed above. • Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with verapamil or affect your condition. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. Where can I get more information? • Your pharmacist has additional information about verapamil written for health professionals that you may read. --------------------------------------... • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. • Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/ or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Answered by Beverlee Driedric 1 year ago.


Someone with Mitral Valve Prolapse please help?
Sarah - I was also diagnosed with Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome but a second opinion said no. U should check it out u sound like me! Asked by Yung Tinney 1 year ago.

I have Mitral Valve Prolapse and am 28. I am finding it impossible to do any cardio related exercise anymore. I just carried some groceries up the stairs and I was fine until about 3 minutes into it I can't catch my breath. The breathing just doesn't keep up. I try breathing normally but find myself having to stop whatever I am doing and just sit. Talking is also impossible. Am I going to get worse with age? I don't smoke. I can't even workout anymore. Help Answered by Paige Needle 1 year ago.

I have this and asthma as well and i started getting out of breath just getting in and out of the tub/shower and was getting severe chest and arm pains. I thought I was having a heart attack. The doctor put me on a medicine to improve my circulation called verapamil PM(verelan pm is the generic) they did all kinds of tests on me and they couldn't find anything until they did a ultrasound of my heart a few years ago that's when I found out I had MVP(Im 35 now). they told me there isn't much you can do and they wont do surgery unless you mainly go into some kind of cardiac arrest.. they told me to do a LOT of walking to strengthen up my heart and the muscles. I don't know why that one person said you have stuff around your heart that isn't fat. MVP is a heart valve that doesn't close properly when the blood is being pumped to and from the heart so the extra blood that is being spilled is going elsewhere MVP isn't from being overweight it can be a birth defect or be caused from scarlet fever and a few other childhood diseases.the only thing I can tell you is maybe see a dr or specialist and make sure you don't have something else on top of your condition you shouldn't be struggling for air unless something else is wrong(like maybe you have fluid building up in your lungs from your heart not working properly(my mom in law had this and had to take lasix-a heart med) . MVP can also cause panic attacks in some people.it will most likely get worse with age and I have never smoked either so I know its not caused by smoking. see your doctor and tell him the problems so they can run more tests and go from there. Answered by Reena Huxhold 1 year ago.

costly Madam, i'm a heart expert sending this text for you. desire it helps you. Mitral valve prolapse, oftentimes spoke of as MVP, is a elementary heart valve ailment. The mitral valve is between the left atrium and the left ventricle of the middle. It has 2 leaflets (flaps) that administration the blood pass. MVP happens whilst one or the two between the leaflets are enlarged or have greater tissue. MVP is frequently innocuous. whether, substantial problems can ensue, inclusive of a blood clot interior the innovations and an infection spoke of as infective endocarditis related to the mitral valve besides as different valves. MVP looks two times as oftentimes in women human beings as in men. it is maximum generally a hereditary ailment. some those with MVP have not got any indicators. whether, maximum sufferers adventure a speedy or odd heartbeat, shortness of breath, mild-headedness, and protracted fatigue. Many sufferers additionally be afflicted by migraines, ingesting and sound asleep themes, an overactive or contaminated thyroid gland, diarrhea, and chilly palms and feet. Emotional rigidity oftentimes magnifies the indicators. docs oftentimes prescribe widely used tests and cardio workout for those that've MVP. sufferers are additionally recommended to limit their intake or use of severe-carbohydrate ingredients, caffeine, and decongestants. some sufferers could choose beta-blockers and particular antiarrhythmic drugs. greater severe situations could require surgical treatment to repair or replace the valve or to insert an digital regulator, alongside with a pacemaker or defibrillator. Answered by Ciara Cassarino 1 year ago.

I have it too, i was born with it although i am only 18. Since i was a kid i was never able to go on roller coasters or air planes because they were worried it would affect me. Ive had episodes where my heart starts to hurt and I run out of breath doing absolutly nothing. When it comes to working out i find it harder than the average person because it feels like asthma attacks when im running. All you gotta do is take it easy, if your feeling dizzy or liek somethings wrong immediatly sit down, if it doesnt go away call the hospital. Ive been there pleantly of times because of it. Never once had anything really bad happen to me but I sure was in a lot of pain. Its better to be safe than sorry . Hope i helped :) Answered by Danial Gressman 1 year ago.

You may want to ask your physician if the MitraClip is an option to explore. The procedure does not involve traditional opening of the chest cavity and recovery time is almost instantaneous. best wishes to you. Answered by Ebony Kulkarni 1 year ago.

MVP is a serious disease. Its getting bad for you since you cant go up stairs. You might need surgery Answered by Adella Veneable 1 year ago.


PAT paroxysmal atrial tachycardia. does anyone have it? how rare is it?
my dr. said i could have PAT and i got to see a cardiologist this week and do a echocardiogram.( i dont know what an echo is) my "attacks" only happen when i am doing something physical, my symptoms are a rapid pounding heartbeat, shortness of breath, lightheadedness, when that happens i lie down and it... Asked by Rosanna Roane 1 year ago.

my dr. said i could have PAT and i got to see a cardiologist this week and do a echocardiogram.( i dont know what an echo is) my "attacks" only happen when i am doing something physical, my symptoms are a rapid pounding heartbeat, shortness of breath, lightheadedness, when that happens i lie down and it goes away quickly. i have read where some people say it happens to them while doing nothing at all. i am in my early 20's and i have been dealing with it for five years now and it only has happened about 10 to 15 times. i know its not a dangerous condition but im just curious if anyone knows anything about it. Answered by Vicente Mesquita 1 year ago.

Paroxysmal Atrial Tachycardia (PAT) originates in the atrium (upper chamber) of the heart. PAT usually manifests as infrequently occurring periods of very rapid heart beats that begin and end suddenly. During episodes of PAT, the heart rate typically speeds up to 160-200 beats per minute, which can potentially be very dangerous; particularly when large amounts of stimulants (illicit or otherwise) have been recently ingested. PAT occurs due to abnormalities in the AV node "relay point" that lead to rapid firing of electrical impulses from the atrium which bypass the AV node under the influence of conditions provoked by such activities as excess alcohol consumption, the intake of the presence of hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid) and excessive thyroid hormone intake, or other things which involve high stress on the body. Some drugs are also believed to trigger PAT. PAT is an example of an arrhythmia where the abnormality is in the electrical system of the heart, while the heart muscle and valves may be entirely normal. The following is a list of the 5 most frequently prescribed drugs used in the treatment of the symptoms of your condition: Atenolol, Tenormin Digoxin, Lanoxin Metoprolol, Lopressor, Toprol XL Propranolol, Inderal, Inderal LA Verapamil, Calan, Verelan, Verelan PM, Isoptin, Covera-HS The rarity of this condition is not listed in any statistical reports conclusively, though there is a 20 year study of this condition currently underway. Hope this helped-Anton P.S. An echocardiogram is a test in which ultrasound is used to examine the heart. Echocardiography is used to provide a doctor with important information about the size of the chambers of the heart, including the dimension or volume of the cavity and the thickness of the walls and the pumping function of the heart. This measure is called an ejection fraction or EF. typically a normal EF is around 55-65%. Numbers below 45% usually suggest a decrease in the pumping ability of the heart, while numbers below 30-35% are usually considered a potential problem. Answered by Darrick Phearsdorf 1 year ago.


Can I take Benadryl while taking Toprol XL?
Asked by Minna Topi 1 year ago.

No, you should not a drug interaction may occur. You should ask you local pharmacist what would be acceptable to take without having any type of drug interaction. Here are a list of medications (prescription & OTC) that should not be taken with Toprol XL... (Partial List) There are a number of medicines that may interact with Toprol-XL® (metoprolol succinate). Some Toprol-XL drug interactions can involve medications such as: Reserpine Clonidine (Catapres®, Duraclon®) Amiodarone (Cordarone®) Cimetidine (Tagamet®) Fluoxetine (Prozac®) Paroxetine (Paxil®, Paxil CR®, Pexeva®) Bupropion (Wellbutrin®) Thioridazine (Mellaril®) Quinidine Propafenone (Rythmol®) Ritonavir (Norvir®) Diphenhydramine (Banophen®, Benadryl®) ************** Hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil®) Terbinafine (Lamisil®) Calcium channel blockers, such as: o Amlodipine (Norvasc®) o Verapamil (Calan®, Isoptin®) o Verapamil Extended-Release (Calan® SR, Covera-HS®, Isoptin® SR, Verelan®, Verelan® PM) o Diltiazem (Cardizem®) o Diltiazem ER (Cardizem® CD, Cardizem® LA, Cardizem® SR, Dilacor XR®, Diltia XT™, Tiazac®) o Nifedipine (Adalat®, Procardia®) o Nifedipine ER (Adalat® CC, Procardia XL®) o Felodipine (Plendil®) o Nisoldipine (Sular®) o Isradipine (DynaCirc®) o Nicardipine (Cardene®) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®), naproxen (Naprosyn®), naproxen sodium (Aleve®, Anaprox®, Naprelan®), diclofenac (Cataflam®, Voltaren®), indomethacin (Indocin®), nabumetone (Relafen®), oxaprozin (Daypro®), celecoxib (Celebrex®), meloxicam (Mobic®), etodolac (Lodine®), ketoprofen, ketorolac (Toradol®), and others Certain diabetes medicines, such as glyburide (DiaBeta®, Glynase®, Micronase®) Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), such as isocarboxazid (Marplan®), phenelzine (Nardil®), selegiline (Eldepryl®, EMSAM®), and tranylcypromine (Parnate®). Answered by Janay Ladieu 1 year ago.

Toprol Xl Interactions Answered by Sherilyn Esplain 1 year ago.

I looked at the list of meds that you shouldn't take with Toprol. My daughter is on Toprol and she was recently given ibuprofen for an injury per the advise of her doctor. She took it for several days without complications. Why aren't you supposed to take it? Just wondering for future use. Answered by Lisha Jowett 1 year ago.

And I take Norvasc with Toprol XL per doc? Answered by Ernestina Nickolich 1 year ago.

I wouldn't mess with anything till you know how you will react to the medication. Although if you are thinking of maybe a glass of wine once in a while you should be fine, but I would ask my doctor to make sure. Answered by Latanya Touhey 1 year ago.

Benadryl may raise your blood pressure. I would check with your Dr. first. Answered by Tajuana Trimnell 1 year ago.


What kind of serious illnesses that has palpitations as one of its symtoms?
Asked by Wendell Reine 1 year ago.

Palpitations Symptoms & Signs Index Terms Related to Palpitations: Heart Palpitations; Heartbeat Sensations Palpitations are the unpleasant sensations of irregular and/or forceful beating of the heart in the chest. This symptom can be caused by a change in the rate or rhythm, or by an increase in the force of the contraction of the heart muscle. In some patients with palpitations, no heart disease or abnormal heart rhythms can be found. In others, palpitations result from abnormal heart rhythms called arrhythmias. Arrhythmias are heartbeats that are too slow, too rapid, irregular, or too early. MedicineNet Main Article on Palpitations Palpitations Causes of Palpitations Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Aortic Stenosis Atrial Fibrillation Depression Hyperthyroidism Hypoglycemia Mitral Valve Prolapse (MVP) Paroxysmal Atrial Tachycardia Premature Ventricular Contractions Smoking and How to Quit Smoking Stress Other Causes of Palpitations Arrhythmia of Ventricle of Heart Bradycardia (very slow heartbeat) Fever Hypoxemia Medications (both Prescription and Non-prescription) Premature Atrial Contractions Examples of Medications for Palpitations amiodarone, Cordarone atenolol, Tenormin Calcium Channel Blockers metoprolol, Lopressor, Toprol XL nifedipine, Adalat, Procardia procainamide, Pronestyl; Procan-SR; Procanbid propranolol, Inderal, Inderal LA quinidine, Quinaglute, Quinidex verapamil, Calan, Verelan, Verelan PM, Isoptin, Covera-HS Answered by Ali Stoutenburg 1 year ago.

Sounds like the flu. But just to be safe I would either take a trip to your ER, or make an appt with your doctor first thing in the morning. You dont want to take chances when it comes to your health. And there are so many things going around these days that have flu-like symptoms, its better to see an MD and be safe then to assume what it is and take the chance that it will go away or try to treat it yourself. Answered by Arie Binns 1 year ago.

palpitations are rather common... you can be dehydrated, had to much caffine, adverse reaction to medication, and if your heart rate is over 160 BPM that is Severe Ventricular Tachycardia and you should call 911 ASAP! Oh that is if you are sitting down and not working out. Answered by Gaston Tagaban 1 year ago.

Maybe your inlove, hekhek! Answered by Fern Foyer 1 year ago.

high cholesterol thyroid problem Answered by Trent Chhum 1 year ago.


What are the side affects of verapamil (verelan pm)?
Asked by Rob Rechel 1 year ago.

VERAPAMIL Generic Name: verapamil (oral) (ver AH pa mill) Brand Names: Calan, Calan SR, Covera-HS, Isoptin, Isoptin SR, Verelan, Verelan PM What is the most important information I should know about verapamil? • Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. If you stop taking the medication, your condition could become worse. • Do not crush, chew, or break extended-release forms of verapamil such as generic Covera-HS and Verelan PM. Swallow them whole. Generic verapamil SR, Isoptin SR, and Calan SR may be divided in half but should not be crushed or chewed. What is verapamil? • Verapamil is in a class of drugs called calcium channel blockers. Verapamil relaxes (widens) blood vessels (veins and arteries), which makes it easier for the heart to pump and reduces its workload. • Verapamil is used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure), to treat angina (chest pain), and to control some types of irregular heartbeats. • Verapamil may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking verapamil? • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have · kidney or liver disease; · other diseases of the heart or blood vessels such as sick sinus syndrome, aortic stenosis, heart failure, heart block, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, coronary artery disease, or low blood pressure; or · muscular dystrophy. • You may not be able to take verapamil, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above. • Verapamil is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether verapamil will be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take verapamil without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. • Verapamil passes into breast milk and may harm a nursing infant. Do not take verapamil without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take verapamil? • Take verapamil exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you. • Take each dose with a full glass of water. • Verelan, Verelan PM, Calan, Isoptin, Covera-HS, and generic forms of regular-release verapamil can be taken with or without food. Taking the medication with food may reduce stomach upset if it occurs. • Calan SR, Isoptin SR, and generic sustained-release verapamil (verapamil SR) may be more likely to cause stomach upset and should be taken with food to reduce this side effect. • Take Covera-HS and Verelan PM at bedtime. • If you have trouble swallowing the Verelan pellet-filled capsules, they can be opened and the contents can be sprinkled onto cold, soft food such as applesauce. This mixture must be swallowed without chewing. Use the mixture immediately. Do not save it for later use. (Do not use this procedure for the Verelan PM capsules.) • Do not crush, chew, or break extended-release forms of verapamil such as Covera-HS and Verelan PM. Swallow them whole. Generic verapamil SR, Isoptin SR, and Calan SR may be divided in half if the tablets are scored, but should not be crushed or chewed. • If you are taking Covera-HS, do not be concerned if you find what looks like an undissolved tablet in your stool. This medication is formulated with an outer shell that does not dissolve. This shell allows the medicine to be released slowly into your body before it is passed out in the stool. • It is important to take verapamil regularly to get the most benefit. • Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. If you stop taking the medication, your condition could become worse. • Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with verapamil. The interaction could lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. • Your doctor may want you to have blood tests, blood pressure monitoring, or other medical evaluations during treatment with verapamil to monitor progress and side effects. • Store verapamil at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose? • Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication. What happens if I overdose? • Seek emergency medical attention. • Symptoms of a verapamil overdose include dizziness, weakness, chest pain, shortness of breath, fainting, an unusually fast or slow heartbeat, coma, slurred speech, and confusion. What should I avoid while taking verapamil? • Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with verapamil. The interaction could lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. • Avoid the use alcohol. Alcohol may further lower blood pressure and increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking verapamil. • Follow any recommendations your doctor makes about diet or exercise. What are the possible side effects of verapamil? • If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking verapamil and contact your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical treatment: · an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); · an unusually fast or slow heartbeat; · shortness of breath (heart failure); · fainting; · abnormal behavior or psychosis; · jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or · swelling of the legs or ankles. • Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take verapamil and talk to your doctor if you experience · unusual headache, fatigue, or tiredness; · insomnia or trouble sleeping; · vivid dreams; · hair loss; · nausea or diarrhea; or · increased urination. • Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect verapamil? • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following drugs: · cyclosporine (Sandimmune, Neoral); · cimetidine (Tagamet, Tagamet HB); · carbamazepine (Tegretol, Carbatrol); · lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith, others); · theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theochron, Theolair, Theobid, Elixophyllin, Slo-Phyllin, others); · rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane); · phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton); · an HMG CoA reductase inhibitor such as atorvastatin (Lipitor), lovastatin (Mevacor), simvastatin (Zocor), and others; or · another heart medication such as propranolol (Inderal), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), atenolol (Tenormin), digoxin (Lanoxin), quinidine (Quinora, Quinidex, Quinaglute), flecainide (Tambocor), disopyramide (Norpace), captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), and others. • You may not be able to take verapamil, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring if you are taking any of the medicines listed above. • Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with verapamil or affect your condition. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. Where can I get more information? • Your pharmacist has additional information about verapamil written for health professionals that you may read. --------------------------------------... • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. • Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/ or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Answered by Winnie Fosler 1 year ago.


Someone with Mitral Valve Prolapse please help?
Sarah - I was also diagnosed with Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome but a second opinion said no. U should check it out u sound like me! Asked by Johnny Clutts 1 year ago.

I have Mitral Valve Prolapse and am 28. I am finding it impossible to do any cardio related exercise anymore. I just carried some groceries up the stairs and I was fine until about 3 minutes into it I can't catch my breath. The breathing just doesn't keep up. I try breathing normally but find myself having to stop whatever I am doing and just sit. Talking is also impossible. Am I going to get worse with age? I don't smoke. I can't even workout anymore. Help Answered by Joslyn Liff 1 year ago.

I have this and asthma as well and i started getting out of breath just getting in and out of the tub/shower and was getting severe chest and arm pains. I thought I was having a heart attack. The doctor put me on a medicine to improve my circulation called verapamil PM(verelan pm is the generic) they did all kinds of tests on me and they couldn't find anything until they did a ultrasound of my heart a few years ago that's when I found out I had MVP(Im 35 now). they told me there isn't much you can do and they wont do surgery unless you mainly go into some kind of cardiac arrest.. they told me to do a LOT of walking to strengthen up my heart and the muscles. I don't know why that one person said you have stuff around your heart that isn't fat. MVP is a heart valve that doesn't close properly when the blood is being pumped to and from the heart so the extra blood that is being spilled is going elsewhere MVP isn't from being overweight it can be a birth defect or be caused from scarlet fever and a few other childhood diseases.the only thing I can tell you is maybe see a dr or specialist and make sure you don't have something else on top of your condition you shouldn't be struggling for air unless something else is wrong(like maybe you have fluid building up in your lungs from your heart not working properly(my mom in law had this and had to take lasix-a heart med) . MVP can also cause panic attacks in some people.it will most likely get worse with age and I have never smoked either so I know its not caused by smoking. see your doctor and tell him the problems so they can run more tests and go from there. Answered by Sal Vigneault 1 year ago.

costly Madam, i'm a heart expert sending this text for you. desire it helps you. Mitral valve prolapse, oftentimes spoke of as MVP, is a elementary heart valve ailment. The mitral valve is between the left atrium and the left ventricle of the middle. It has 2 leaflets (flaps) that administration the blood pass. MVP happens whilst one or the two between the leaflets are enlarged or have greater tissue. MVP is frequently innocuous. whether, substantial problems can ensue, inclusive of a blood clot interior the innovations and an infection spoke of as infective endocarditis related to the mitral valve besides as different valves. MVP looks two times as oftentimes in women human beings as in men. it is maximum generally a hereditary ailment. some those with MVP have not got any indicators. whether, maximum sufferers adventure a speedy or odd heartbeat, shortness of breath, mild-headedness, and protracted fatigue. Many sufferers additionally be afflicted by migraines, ingesting and sound asleep themes, an overactive or contaminated thyroid gland, diarrhea, and chilly palms and feet. Emotional rigidity oftentimes magnifies the indicators. docs oftentimes prescribe widely used tests and cardio workout for those that've MVP. sufferers are additionally recommended to limit their intake or use of severe-carbohydrate ingredients, caffeine, and decongestants. some sufferers could choose beta-blockers and particular antiarrhythmic drugs. greater severe situations could require surgical treatment to repair or replace the valve or to insert an digital regulator, alongside with a pacemaker or defibrillator. Answered by Tajuana Nani 1 year ago.

I have it too, i was born with it although i am only 18. Since i was a kid i was never able to go on roller coasters or air planes because they were worried it would affect me. Ive had episodes where my heart starts to hurt and I run out of breath doing absolutly nothing. When it comes to working out i find it harder than the average person because it feels like asthma attacks when im running. All you gotta do is take it easy, if your feeling dizzy or liek somethings wrong immediatly sit down, if it doesnt go away call the hospital. Ive been there pleantly of times because of it. Never once had anything really bad happen to me but I sure was in a lot of pain. Its better to be safe than sorry . Hope i helped :) Answered by Javier Cromack 1 year ago.

You may want to ask your physician if the MitraClip is an option to explore. The procedure does not involve traditional opening of the chest cavity and recovery time is almost instantaneous. best wishes to you. Answered by Caprice Cardinas 1 year ago.

MVP is a serious disease. Its getting bad for you since you cant go up stairs. You might need surgery Answered by Neida Balent 1 year ago.


PAT paroxysmal atrial tachycardia. does anyone have it? how rare is it?
my dr. said i could have PAT and i got to see a cardiologist this week and do a echocardiogram.( i dont know what an echo is) my "attacks" only happen when i am doing something physical, my symptoms are a rapid pounding heartbeat, shortness of breath, lightheadedness, when that happens i lie down and it... Asked by Adena France 1 year ago.

my dr. said i could have PAT and i got to see a cardiologist this week and do a echocardiogram.( i dont know what an echo is) my "attacks" only happen when i am doing something physical, my symptoms are a rapid pounding heartbeat, shortness of breath, lightheadedness, when that happens i lie down and it goes away quickly. i have read where some people say it happens to them while doing nothing at all. i am in my early 20's and i have been dealing with it for five years now and it only has happened about 10 to 15 times. i know its not a dangerous condition but im just curious if anyone knows anything about it. Answered by Amalia Lisboa 1 year ago.

Paroxysmal Atrial Tachycardia (PAT) originates in the atrium (upper chamber) of the heart. PAT usually manifests as infrequently occurring periods of very rapid heart beats that begin and end suddenly. During episodes of PAT, the heart rate typically speeds up to 160-200 beats per minute, which can potentially be very dangerous; particularly when large amounts of stimulants (illicit or otherwise) have been recently ingested. PAT occurs due to abnormalities in the AV node "relay point" that lead to rapid firing of electrical impulses from the atrium which bypass the AV node under the influence of conditions provoked by such activities as excess alcohol consumption, the intake of the presence of hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid) and excessive thyroid hormone intake, or other things which involve high stress on the body. Some drugs are also believed to trigger PAT. PAT is an example of an arrhythmia where the abnormality is in the electrical system of the heart, while the heart muscle and valves may be entirely normal. The following is a list of the 5 most frequently prescribed drugs used in the treatment of the symptoms of your condition: Atenolol, Tenormin Digoxin, Lanoxin Metoprolol, Lopressor, Toprol XL Propranolol, Inderal, Inderal LA Verapamil, Calan, Verelan, Verelan PM, Isoptin, Covera-HS The rarity of this condition is not listed in any statistical reports conclusively, though there is a 20 year study of this condition currently underway. Hope this helped-Anton P.S. An echocardiogram is a test in which ultrasound is used to examine the heart. Echocardiography is used to provide a doctor with important information about the size of the chambers of the heart, including the dimension or volume of the cavity and the thickness of the walls and the pumping function of the heart. This measure is called an ejection fraction or EF. typically a normal EF is around 55-65%. Numbers below 45% usually suggest a decrease in the pumping ability of the heart, while numbers below 30-35% are usually considered a potential problem. Answered by Kathrine Learman 1 year ago.


Can I take Benadryl while taking Toprol XL?
Asked by Madelaine Cypher 1 year ago.

No, you should not a drug interaction may occur. You should ask you local pharmacist what would be acceptable to take without having any type of drug interaction. Here are a list of medications (prescription & OTC) that should not be taken with Toprol XL... (Partial List) There are a number of medicines that may interact with Toprol-XL® (metoprolol succinate). Some Toprol-XL drug interactions can involve medications such as: Reserpine Clonidine (Catapres®, Duraclon®) Amiodarone (Cordarone®) Cimetidine (Tagamet®) Fluoxetine (Prozac®) Paroxetine (Paxil®, Paxil CR®, Pexeva®) Bupropion (Wellbutrin®) Thioridazine (Mellaril®) Quinidine Propafenone (Rythmol®) Ritonavir (Norvir®) Diphenhydramine (Banophen®, Benadryl®) ************** Hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil®) Terbinafine (Lamisil®) Calcium channel blockers, such as: o Amlodipine (Norvasc®) o Verapamil (Calan®, Isoptin®) o Verapamil Extended-Release (Calan® SR, Covera-HS®, Isoptin® SR, Verelan®, Verelan® PM) o Diltiazem (Cardizem®) o Diltiazem ER (Cardizem® CD, Cardizem® LA, Cardizem® SR, Dilacor XR®, Diltia XT™, Tiazac®) o Nifedipine (Adalat®, Procardia®) o Nifedipine ER (Adalat® CC, Procardia XL®) o Felodipine (Plendil®) o Nisoldipine (Sular®) o Isradipine (DynaCirc®) o Nicardipine (Cardene®) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®), naproxen (Naprosyn®), naproxen sodium (Aleve®, Anaprox®, Naprelan®), diclofenac (Cataflam®, Voltaren®), indomethacin (Indocin®), nabumetone (Relafen®), oxaprozin (Daypro®), celecoxib (Celebrex®), meloxicam (Mobic®), etodolac (Lodine®), ketoprofen, ketorolac (Toradol®), and others Certain diabetes medicines, such as glyburide (DiaBeta®, Glynase®, Micronase®) Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), such as isocarboxazid (Marplan®), phenelzine (Nardil®), selegiline (Eldepryl®, EMSAM®), and tranylcypromine (Parnate®). Answered by Chi Ruffo 1 year ago.

Toprol Xl Interactions Answered by Noah Mcjunkins 1 year ago.

I looked at the list of meds that you shouldn't take with Toprol. My daughter is on Toprol and she was recently given ibuprofen for an injury per the advise of her doctor. She took it for several days without complications. Why aren't you supposed to take it? Just wondering for future use. Answered by Keely Kottenstette 1 year ago.

And I take Norvasc with Toprol XL per doc? Answered by Beatris Tostado 1 year ago.

I wouldn't mess with anything till you know how you will react to the medication. Although if you are thinking of maybe a glass of wine once in a while you should be fine, but I would ask my doctor to make sure. Answered by Gigi Armenta 1 year ago.

Benadryl may raise your blood pressure. I would check with your Dr. first. Answered by Antione Reiswig 1 year ago.


What kind of serious illnesses that has palpitations as one of its symtoms?
Asked by Kerry Brocklehurst 1 year ago.

Palpitations Symptoms & Signs Index Terms Related to Palpitations: Heart Palpitations; Heartbeat Sensations Palpitations are the unpleasant sensations of irregular and/or forceful beating of the heart in the chest. This symptom can be caused by a change in the rate or rhythm, or by an increase in the force of the contraction of the heart muscle. In some patients with palpitations, no heart disease or abnormal heart rhythms can be found. In others, palpitations result from abnormal heart rhythms called arrhythmias. Arrhythmias are heartbeats that are too slow, too rapid, irregular, or too early. MedicineNet Main Article on Palpitations Palpitations Causes of Palpitations Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Aortic Stenosis Atrial Fibrillation Depression Hyperthyroidism Hypoglycemia Mitral Valve Prolapse (MVP) Paroxysmal Atrial Tachycardia Premature Ventricular Contractions Smoking and How to Quit Smoking Stress Other Causes of Palpitations Arrhythmia of Ventricle of Heart Bradycardia (very slow heartbeat) Fever Hypoxemia Medications (both Prescription and Non-prescription) Premature Atrial Contractions Examples of Medications for Palpitations amiodarone, Cordarone atenolol, Tenormin Calcium Channel Blockers metoprolol, Lopressor, Toprol XL nifedipine, Adalat, Procardia procainamide, Pronestyl; Procan-SR; Procanbid propranolol, Inderal, Inderal LA quinidine, Quinaglute, Quinidex verapamil, Calan, Verelan, Verelan PM, Isoptin, Covera-HS Answered by Suzi Dimmitt 1 year ago.

Sounds like the flu. But just to be safe I would either take a trip to your ER, or make an appt with your doctor first thing in the morning. You dont want to take chances when it comes to your health. And there are so many things going around these days that have flu-like symptoms, its better to see an MD and be safe then to assume what it is and take the chance that it will go away or try to treat it yourself. Answered by Treva Racer 1 year ago.

palpitations are rather common... you can be dehydrated, had to much caffine, adverse reaction to medication, and if your heart rate is over 160 BPM that is Severe Ventricular Tachycardia and you should call 911 ASAP! Oh that is if you are sitting down and not working out. Answered by Elmer Raniero 1 year ago.

Maybe your inlove, hekhek! Answered by Gricelda Terboss 1 year ago.

high cholesterol thyroid problem Answered by Virgina Mohn 1 year ago.


What are the side affects of verapamil (verelan pm)?
Asked by Annelle Lutze 1 year ago.

VERAPAMIL Generic Name: verapamil (oral) (ver AH pa mill) Brand Names: Calan, Calan SR, Covera-HS, Isoptin, Isoptin SR, Verelan, Verelan PM What is the most important information I should know about verapamil? • Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. If you stop taking the medication, your condition could become worse. • Do not crush, chew, or break extended-release forms of verapamil such as generic Covera-HS and Verelan PM. Swallow them whole. Generic verapamil SR, Isoptin SR, and Calan SR may be divided in half but should not be crushed or chewed. What is verapamil? • Verapamil is in a class of drugs called calcium channel blockers. Verapamil relaxes (widens) blood vessels (veins and arteries), which makes it easier for the heart to pump and reduces its workload. • Verapamil is used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure), to treat angina (chest pain), and to control some types of irregular heartbeats. • Verapamil may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking verapamil? • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have · kidney or liver disease; · other diseases of the heart or blood vessels such as sick sinus syndrome, aortic stenosis, heart failure, heart block, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, coronary artery disease, or low blood pressure; or · muscular dystrophy. • You may not be able to take verapamil, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above. • Verapamil is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether verapamil will be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take verapamil without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. • Verapamil passes into breast milk and may harm a nursing infant. Do not take verapamil without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take verapamil? • Take verapamil exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you. • Take each dose with a full glass of water. • Verelan, Verelan PM, Calan, Isoptin, Covera-HS, and generic forms of regular-release verapamil can be taken with or without food. Taking the medication with food may reduce stomach upset if it occurs. • Calan SR, Isoptin SR, and generic sustained-release verapamil (verapamil SR) may be more likely to cause stomach upset and should be taken with food to reduce this side effect. • Take Covera-HS and Verelan PM at bedtime. • If you have trouble swallowing the Verelan pellet-filled capsules, they can be opened and the contents can be sprinkled onto cold, soft food such as applesauce. This mixture must be swallowed without chewing. Use the mixture immediately. Do not save it for later use. (Do not use this procedure for the Verelan PM capsules.) • Do not crush, chew, or break extended-release forms of verapamil such as Covera-HS and Verelan PM. Swallow them whole. Generic verapamil SR, Isoptin SR, and Calan SR may be divided in half if the tablets are scored, but should not be crushed or chewed. • If you are taking Covera-HS, do not be concerned if you find what looks like an undissolved tablet in your stool. This medication is formulated with an outer shell that does not dissolve. This shell allows the medicine to be released slowly into your body before it is passed out in the stool. • It is important to take verapamil regularly to get the most benefit. • Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. If you stop taking the medication, your condition could become worse. • Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with verapamil. The interaction could lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. • Your doctor may want you to have blood tests, blood pressure monitoring, or other medical evaluations during treatment with verapamil to monitor progress and side effects. • Store verapamil at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose? • Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication. What happens if I overdose? • Seek emergency medical attention. • Symptoms of a verapamil overdose include dizziness, weakness, chest pain, shortness of breath, fainting, an unusually fast or slow heartbeat, coma, slurred speech, and confusion. What should I avoid while taking verapamil? • Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with verapamil. The interaction could lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. • Avoid the use alcohol. Alcohol may further lower blood pressure and increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking verapamil. • Follow any recommendations your doctor makes about diet or exercise. What are the possible side effects of verapamil? • If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking verapamil and contact your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical treatment: · an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); · an unusually fast or slow heartbeat; · shortness of breath (heart failure); · fainting; · abnormal behavior or psychosis; · jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or · swelling of the legs or ankles. • Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take verapamil and talk to your doctor if you experience · unusual headache, fatigue, or tiredness; · insomnia or trouble sleeping; · vivid dreams; · hair loss; · nausea or diarrhea; or · increased urination. • Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect verapamil? • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following drugs: · cyclosporine (Sandimmune, Neoral); · cimetidine (Tagamet, Tagamet HB); · carbamazepine (Tegretol, Carbatrol); · lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith, others); · theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theochron, Theolair, Theobid, Elixophyllin, Slo-Phyllin, others); · rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane); · phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton); · an HMG CoA reductase inhibitor such as atorvastatin (Lipitor), lovastatin (Mevacor), simvastatin (Zocor), and others; or · another heart medication such as propranolol (Inderal), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), atenolol (Tenormin), digoxin (Lanoxin), quinidine (Quinora, Quinidex, Quinaglute), flecainide (Tambocor), disopyramide (Norpace), captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), and others. • You may not be able to take verapamil, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring if you are taking any of the medicines listed above. • Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with verapamil or affect your condition. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. Where can I get more information? • Your pharmacist has additional information about verapamil written for health professionals that you may read. --------------------------------------... • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. • Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/ or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Answered by Milan Cuddington 1 year ago.


Someone with Mitral Valve Prolapse please help?
Sarah - I was also diagnosed with Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome but a second opinion said no. U should check it out u sound like me! Asked by Michael Noell 1 year ago.

I have Mitral Valve Prolapse and am 28. I am finding it impossible to do any cardio related exercise anymore. I just carried some groceries up the stairs and I was fine until about 3 minutes into it I can't catch my breath. The breathing just doesn't keep up. I try breathing normally but find myself having to stop whatever I am doing and just sit. Talking is also impossible. Am I going to get worse with age? I don't smoke. I can't even workout anymore. Help Answered by Le Mella 1 year ago.

I have this and asthma as well and i started getting out of breath just getting in and out of the tub/shower and was getting severe chest and arm pains. I thought I was having a heart attack. The doctor put me on a medicine to improve my circulation called verapamil PM(verelan pm is the generic) they did all kinds of tests on me and they couldn't find anything until they did a ultrasound of my heart a few years ago that's when I found out I had MVP(Im 35 now). they told me there isn't much you can do and they wont do surgery unless you mainly go into some kind of cardiac arrest.. they told me to do a LOT of walking to strengthen up my heart and the muscles. I don't know why that one person said you have stuff around your heart that isn't fat. MVP is a heart valve that doesn't close properly when the blood is being pumped to and from the heart so the extra blood that is being spilled is going elsewhere MVP isn't from being overweight it can be a birth defect or be caused from scarlet fever and a few other childhood diseases.the only thing I can tell you is maybe see a dr or specialist and make sure you don't have something else on top of your condition you shouldn't be struggling for air unless something else is wrong(like maybe you have fluid building up in your lungs from your heart not working properly(my mom in law had this and had to take lasix-a heart med) . MVP can also cause panic attacks in some people.it will most likely get worse with age and I have never smoked either so I know its not caused by smoking. see your doctor and tell him the problems so they can run more tests and go from there. Answered by Bok Decasas 1 year ago.

costly Madam, i'm a heart expert sending this text for you. desire it helps you. Mitral valve prolapse, oftentimes spoke of as MVP, is a elementary heart valve ailment. The mitral valve is between the left atrium and the left ventricle of the middle. It has 2 leaflets (flaps) that administration the blood pass. MVP happens whilst one or the two between the leaflets are enlarged or have greater tissue. MVP is frequently innocuous. whether, substantial problems can ensue, inclusive of a blood clot interior the innovations and an infection spoke of as infective endocarditis related to the mitral valve besides as different valves. MVP looks two times as oftentimes in women human beings as in men. it is maximum generally a hereditary ailment. some those with MVP have not got any indicators. whether, maximum sufferers adventure a speedy or odd heartbeat, shortness of breath, mild-headedness, and protracted fatigue. Many sufferers additionally be afflicted by migraines, ingesting and sound asleep themes, an overactive or contaminated thyroid gland, diarrhea, and chilly palms and feet. Emotional rigidity oftentimes magnifies the indicators. docs oftentimes prescribe widely used tests and cardio workout for those that've MVP. sufferers are additionally recommended to limit their intake or use of severe-carbohydrate ingredients, caffeine, and decongestants. some sufferers could choose beta-blockers and particular antiarrhythmic drugs. greater severe situations could require surgical treatment to repair or replace the valve or to insert an digital regulator, alongside with a pacemaker or defibrillator. Answered by Rueben Botello 1 year ago.

I have it too, i was born with it although i am only 18. Since i was a kid i was never able to go on roller coasters or air planes because they were worried it would affect me. Ive had episodes where my heart starts to hurt and I run out of breath doing absolutly nothing. When it comes to working out i find it harder than the average person because it feels like asthma attacks when im running. All you gotta do is take it easy, if your feeling dizzy or liek somethings wrong immediatly sit down, if it doesnt go away call the hospital. Ive been there pleantly of times because of it. Never once had anything really bad happen to me but I sure was in a lot of pain. Its better to be safe than sorry . Hope i helped :) Answered by Ardell Aukes 1 year ago.

You may want to ask your physician if the MitraClip is an option to explore. The procedure does not involve traditional opening of the chest cavity and recovery time is almost instantaneous. best wishes to you. Answered by Rosio Garraghty 1 year ago.

MVP is a serious disease. Its getting bad for you since you cant go up stairs. You might need surgery Answered by Sherrie Pavlas 1 year ago.


PAT paroxysmal atrial tachycardia. does anyone have it? how rare is it?
my dr. said i could have PAT and i got to see a cardiologist this week and do a echocardiogram.( i dont know what an echo is) my "attacks" only happen when i am doing something physical, my symptoms are a rapid pounding heartbeat, shortness of breath, lightheadedness, when that happens i lie down and it... Asked by Patricia Tebbe 1 year ago.

my dr. said i could have PAT and i got to see a cardiologist this week and do a echocardiogram.( i dont know what an echo is) my "attacks" only happen when i am doing something physical, my symptoms are a rapid pounding heartbeat, shortness of breath, lightheadedness, when that happens i lie down and it goes away quickly. i have read where some people say it happens to them while doing nothing at all. i am in my early 20's and i have been dealing with it for five years now and it only has happened about 10 to 15 times. i know its not a dangerous condition but im just curious if anyone knows anything about it. Answered by Bea Chartraw 1 year ago.

Paroxysmal Atrial Tachycardia (PAT) originates in the atrium (upper chamber) of the heart. PAT usually manifests as infrequently occurring periods of very rapid heart beats that begin and end suddenly. During episodes of PAT, the heart rate typically speeds up to 160-200 beats per minute, which can potentially be very dangerous; particularly when large amounts of stimulants (illicit or otherwise) have been recently ingested. PAT occurs due to abnormalities in the AV node "relay point" that lead to rapid firing of electrical impulses from the atrium which bypass the AV node under the influence of conditions provoked by such activities as excess alcohol consumption, the intake of the presence of hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid) and excessive thyroid hormone intake, or other things which involve high stress on the body. Some drugs are also believed to trigger PAT. PAT is an example of an arrhythmia where the abnormality is in the electrical system of the heart, while the heart muscle and valves may be entirely normal. The following is a list of the 5 most frequently prescribed drugs used in the treatment of the symptoms of your condition: Atenolol, Tenormin Digoxin, Lanoxin Metoprolol, Lopressor, Toprol XL Propranolol, Inderal, Inderal LA Verapamil, Calan, Verelan, Verelan PM, Isoptin, Covera-HS The rarity of this condition is not listed in any statistical reports conclusively, though there is a 20 year study of this condition currently underway. Hope this helped-Anton P.S. An echocardiogram is a test in which ultrasound is used to examine the heart. Echocardiography is used to provide a doctor with important information about the size of the chambers of the heart, including the dimension or volume of the cavity and the thickness of the walls and the pumping function of the heart. This measure is called an ejection fraction or EF. typically a normal EF is around 55-65%. Numbers below 45% usually suggest a decrease in the pumping ability of the heart, while numbers below 30-35% are usually considered a potential problem. Answered by Vickie Solan 1 year ago.


Can I take Benadryl while taking Toprol XL?
Asked by Ema Rohn 1 year ago.

No, you should not a drug interaction may occur. You should ask you local pharmacist what would be acceptable to take without having any type of drug interaction. Here are a list of medications (prescription & OTC) that should not be taken with Toprol XL... (Partial List) There are a number of medicines that may interact with Toprol-XL® (metoprolol succinate). Some Toprol-XL drug interactions can involve medications such as: Reserpine Clonidine (Catapres®, Duraclon®) Amiodarone (Cordarone®) Cimetidine (Tagamet®) Fluoxetine (Prozac®) Paroxetine (Paxil®, Paxil CR®, Pexeva®) Bupropion (Wellbutrin®) Thioridazine (Mellaril®) Quinidine Propafenone (Rythmol®) Ritonavir (Norvir®) Diphenhydramine (Banophen®, Benadryl®) ************** Hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil®) Terbinafine (Lamisil®) Calcium channel blockers, such as: o Amlodipine (Norvasc®) o Verapamil (Calan®, Isoptin®) o Verapamil Extended-Release (Calan® SR, Covera-HS®, Isoptin® SR, Verelan®, Verelan® PM) o Diltiazem (Cardizem®) o Diltiazem ER (Cardizem® CD, Cardizem® LA, Cardizem® SR, Dilacor XR®, Diltia XT™, Tiazac®) o Nifedipine (Adalat®, Procardia®) o Nifedipine ER (Adalat® CC, Procardia XL®) o Felodipine (Plendil®) o Nisoldipine (Sular®) o Isradipine (DynaCirc®) o Nicardipine (Cardene®) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®), naproxen (Naprosyn®), naproxen sodium (Aleve®, Anaprox®, Naprelan®), diclofenac (Cataflam®, Voltaren®), indomethacin (Indocin®), nabumetone (Relafen®), oxaprozin (Daypro®), celecoxib (Celebrex®), meloxicam (Mobic®), etodolac (Lodine®), ketoprofen, ketorolac (Toradol®), and others Certain diabetes medicines, such as glyburide (DiaBeta®, Glynase®, Micronase®) Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), such as isocarboxazid (Marplan®), phenelzine (Nardil®), selegiline (Eldepryl®, EMSAM®), and tranylcypromine (Parnate®). Answered by Lenna Juve 1 year ago.

Toprol Xl Interactions Answered by Bruce Luchenbill 1 year ago.

I looked at the list of meds that you shouldn't take with Toprol. My daughter is on Toprol and she was recently given ibuprofen for an injury per the advise of her doctor. She took it for several days without complications. Why aren't you supposed to take it? Just wondering for future use. Answered by Sherron Groshek 1 year ago.

And I take Norvasc with Toprol XL per doc? Answered by Shandi Horsely 1 year ago.

I wouldn't mess with anything till you know how you will react to the medication. Although if you are thinking of maybe a glass of wine once in a while you should be fine, but I would ask my doctor to make sure. Answered by Lashell Dentino 1 year ago.

Benadryl may raise your blood pressure. I would check with your Dr. first. Answered by Walker Birenbaum 1 year ago.


What kind of serious illnesses that has palpitations as one of its symtoms?
Asked by Derek Birley 1 year ago.

Palpitations Symptoms & Signs Index Terms Related to Palpitations: Heart Palpitations; Heartbeat Sensations Palpitations are the unpleasant sensations of irregular and/or forceful beating of the heart in the chest. This symptom can be caused by a change in the rate or rhythm, or by an increase in the force of the contraction of the heart muscle. In some patients with palpitations, no heart disease or abnormal heart rhythms can be found. In others, palpitations result from abnormal heart rhythms called arrhythmias. Arrhythmias are heartbeats that are too slow, too rapid, irregular, or too early. MedicineNet Main Article on Palpitations Palpitations Causes of Palpitations Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Aortic Stenosis Atrial Fibrillation Depression Hyperthyroidism Hypoglycemia Mitral Valve Prolapse (MVP) Paroxysmal Atrial Tachycardia Premature Ventricular Contractions Smoking and How to Quit Smoking Stress Other Causes of Palpitations Arrhythmia of Ventricle of Heart Bradycardia (very slow heartbeat) Fever Hypoxemia Medications (both Prescription and Non-prescription) Premature Atrial Contractions Examples of Medications for Palpitations amiodarone, Cordarone atenolol, Tenormin Calcium Channel Blockers metoprolol, Lopressor, Toprol XL nifedipine, Adalat, Procardia procainamide, Pronestyl; Procan-SR; Procanbid propranolol, Inderal, Inderal LA quinidine, Quinaglute, Quinidex verapamil, Calan, Verelan, Verelan PM, Isoptin, Covera-HS Answered by Debora Snearly 1 year ago.

Sounds like the flu. But just to be safe I would either take a trip to your ER, or make an appt with your doctor first thing in the morning. You dont want to take chances when it comes to your health. And there are so many things going around these days that have flu-like symptoms, its better to see an MD and be safe then to assume what it is and take the chance that it will go away or try to treat it yourself. Answered by Edda Schuffert 1 year ago.

palpitations are rather common... you can be dehydrated, had to much caffine, adverse reaction to medication, and if your heart rate is over 160 BPM that is Severe Ventricular Tachycardia and you should call 911 ASAP! Oh that is if you are sitting down and not working out. Answered by Keisha Lym 1 year ago.

Maybe your inlove, hekhek! Answered by Elizabet Braylock 1 year ago.

high cholesterol thyroid problem Answered by Marybelle Dennie 1 year ago.


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