Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 019614/001.

Names and composition

"VERELAN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019614/001 VERELAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
019614/002 VERELAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
019614/003 VERELAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
019614/004 VERELAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018485/001 ISOPTIN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
018593/001 ISOPTIN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
018593/002 ISOPTIN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
018593/003 ISOPTIN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
018817/001 CALAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
018817/002 CALAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
018817/003 CALAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
018817/004 CALAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 160MG
018925/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INTRAVENOUS 5MG per 2ML (2.5MG per ML)
019038/001 CALAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
019152/001 CALAN SR VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
019152/002 CALAN SR VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019152/003 CALAN SR VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
019614/001 VERELAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
019614/002 VERELAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
019614/003 VERELAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
019614/004 VERELAN VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
020552/001 COVERA-HS VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
020552/002 COVERA-HS VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
020943/001 VERELAN PM VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
020943/002 VERELAN PM VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
020943/003 VERELAN PM VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
070225/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070340/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
070341/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
070348/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070451/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070468/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
070482/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
070483/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
070577/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070617/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070672/001 VERAPAMIL HCL VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE Injectable/ Injection 2.5MG per ML
070695/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070696/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070697/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070737/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INTRAVENOUS 5MG per 2ML (2.5MG per ML)
070737/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INTRAVENOUS 10MG per 4ML (2.5MG per ML)
070738/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INTRAVENOUS 10MG per 4ML (2.5MG per ML)
070739/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070740/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070855/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
070856/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
070994/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
070995/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
071019/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
071366/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
071367/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
071423/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
071424/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
071483/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
071483/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
071489/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
071489/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
071880/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
071881/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
071881/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
072124/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 80MG
072125/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
072233/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
072751/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
072799/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
072888/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
072922/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
072923/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
072924/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
073168/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
073485/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
073568/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
073568/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
074330/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
074587/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
074587/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
074587/003 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
075072/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
075072/003 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
075136/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INTRAVENOUS 5MG per 2ML (2.5MG per ML)
075138/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
075138/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
075138/003 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
078306/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
078306/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
078306/003 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
078906/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
090529/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
090529/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
090529/003 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
090700/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
090700/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
200878/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
200878/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
200878/003 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
206173/001 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
206173/002 VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG

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Answered questions

What are the side affects of verapamil (verelan pm)?
Asked by Roma Broddy 1 year ago.

VERAPAMIL Generic Name: verapamil (oral) (ver AH pa mill) Brand Names: Calan, Calan SR, Covera-HS, Isoptin, Isoptin SR, Verelan, Verelan PM What is the most important information I should know about verapamil? • Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. If you stop taking the medication, your condition could become worse. • Do not crush, chew, or break extended-release forms of verapamil such as generic Covera-HS and Verelan PM. Swallow them whole. Generic verapamil SR, Isoptin SR, and Calan SR may be divided in half but should not be crushed or chewed. What is verapamil? • Verapamil is in a class of drugs called calcium channel blockers. Verapamil relaxes (widens) blood vessels (veins and arteries), which makes it easier for the heart to pump and reduces its workload. • Verapamil is used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure), to treat angina (chest pain), and to control some types of irregular heartbeats. • Verapamil may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking verapamil? • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have · kidney or liver disease; · other diseases of the heart or blood vessels such as sick sinus syndrome, aortic stenosis, heart failure, heart block, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, coronary artery disease, or low blood pressure; or · muscular dystrophy. • You may not be able to take verapamil, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above. • Verapamil is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether verapamil will be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take verapamil without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. • Verapamil passes into breast milk and may harm a nursing infant. Do not take verapamil without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take verapamil? • Take verapamil exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you. • Take each dose with a full glass of water. • Verelan, Verelan PM, Calan, Isoptin, Covera-HS, and generic forms of regular-release verapamil can be taken with or without food. Taking the medication with food may reduce stomach upset if it occurs. • Calan SR, Isoptin SR, and generic sustained-release verapamil (verapamil SR) may be more likely to cause stomach upset and should be taken with food to reduce this side effect. • Take Covera-HS and Verelan PM at bedtime. • If you have trouble swallowing the Verelan pellet-filled capsules, they can be opened and the contents can be sprinkled onto cold, soft food such as applesauce. This mixture must be swallowed without chewing. Use the mixture immediately. Do not save it for later use. (Do not use this procedure for the Verelan PM capsules.) • Do not crush, chew, or break extended-release forms of verapamil such as Covera-HS and Verelan PM. Swallow them whole. Generic verapamil SR, Isoptin SR, and Calan SR may be divided in half if the tablets are scored, but should not be crushed or chewed. • If you are taking Covera-HS, do not be concerned if you find what looks like an undissolved tablet in your stool. This medication is formulated with an outer shell that does not dissolve. This shell allows the medicine to be released slowly into your body before it is passed out in the stool. • It is important to take verapamil regularly to get the most benefit. • Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. If you stop taking the medication, your condition could become worse. • Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with verapamil. The interaction could lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. • Your doctor may want you to have blood tests, blood pressure monitoring, or other medical evaluations during treatment with verapamil to monitor progress and side effects. • Store verapamil at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose? • Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication. What happens if I overdose? • Seek emergency medical attention. • Symptoms of a verapamil overdose include dizziness, weakness, chest pain, shortness of breath, fainting, an unusually fast or slow heartbeat, coma, slurred speech, and confusion. What should I avoid while taking verapamil? • Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with verapamil. The interaction could lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. • Avoid the use alcohol. Alcohol may further lower blood pressure and increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking verapamil. • Follow any recommendations your doctor makes about diet or exercise. What are the possible side effects of verapamil? • If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking verapamil and contact your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical treatment: · an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); · an unusually fast or slow heartbeat; · shortness of breath (heart failure); · fainting; · abnormal behavior or psychosis; · jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or · swelling of the legs or ankles. • Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take verapamil and talk to your doctor if you experience · unusual headache, fatigue, or tiredness; · insomnia or trouble sleeping; · vivid dreams; · hair loss; · nausea or diarrhea; or · increased urination. • Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect verapamil? • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following drugs: · cyclosporine (Sandimmune, Neoral); · cimetidine (Tagamet, Tagamet HB); · carbamazepine (Tegretol, Carbatrol); · lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith, others); · theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theochron, Theolair, Theobid, Elixophyllin, Slo-Phyllin, others); · rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane); · phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton); · an HMG CoA reductase inhibitor such as atorvastatin (Lipitor), lovastatin (Mevacor), simvastatin (Zocor), and others; or · another heart medication such as propranolol (Inderal), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), atenolol (Tenormin), digoxin (Lanoxin), quinidine (Quinora, Quinidex, Quinaglute), flecainide (Tambocor), disopyramide (Norpace), captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), and others. • You may not be able to take verapamil, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring if you are taking any of the medicines listed above. • Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with verapamil or affect your condition. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. Where can I get more information? • Your pharmacist has additional information about verapamil written for health professionals that you may read. --------------------------------------... • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. • Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/ or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Answered by Lurline Reitan 1 year ago.


29 wks pregnant- should i go to the EMERGENCY ROOM even though i feel fine now ?
Symptoms : light headed,head ache, hig blood pressure & heart beating fast.. this is my first pregnancy and i've been fine until last Thur & friday.. On thursday at work my back ached and i was fatigued , and friday afternoon i started feeling lightheaded, w/ a headache and and the need for air . Over the... Asked by Leonia Whittenberg 1 year ago.

Symptoms : light headed,head ache, hig blood pressure & heart beating fast.. this is my first pregnancy and i've been fine until last Thur & friday.. On thursday at work my back ached and i was fatigued , and friday afternoon i started feeling lightheaded, w/ a headache and and the need for air . Over the weekind i was fine (my days off) this monday again like from 1:30-3:00 i had the same symptoms but this time i took my blood pressure since i felt my hear beating fast and it was 140/68. I called the dr's office but they didnt call back . by 3:00 my symtoms were gone. i bet if i would of taking my blood pressure on friday it would of been high ( i also see little streaks in my vision some times. I dont know what is going on, but now i'm completely fine I called the dr's office and told them my symptoms but i forgot to mention that i felt my heart beating fast and that was also befopre i took my blood pressure , so they had no idea about those details ..they didnt call me back till 2hrs later and they left a message saying that it's probably normal and if i was concerned to go to the ER.. By the time i called back there office was closed. ~ not anemic nor do i have diabetes -i have an office job work 40hrs a week Answered by Rudy Kubick 1 year ago.

Rapid heartbeat. Lightheadedness or dizziness. Headache. Ringing in the ears (tinnitus). Irritability and other mood disturbances. Full article >>> Side Effects Include:Calan (calan SR, isoptin, isoptin SR, verelan)Constipation, dizziness, fatigue, headache, fluid retention, low blood pressure, nauseaCardene (nicardipine hydrochloride)Dizziness, headache, indigestion, nausea, rapid heartbeat, ... Full article >>> Tremors, agitation, a rapid heartbeat, and hypertension are all common side effects of Ritalin misuse. Full article >>> The severe form of the disease commences with fever, chills, bleeding into the skin, rapid heartbeat, headache, back pains, and extreme prostration. Nausea, vomiting, and constipation are common. Jaundice usually appears on the second or third day. Full article >>> These symptoms include confusion, sweating, weakness, paleness, and a rapid heartbeat. In severe cases, hypoglycemia can progress to seizures and coma. You develop symptoms of ketoacidosis (a dangerous chemical imbalance in the body). Full article >>> A physical examination may reveal either an irregular or a rapid heartbeat. There may be distended neck veins, enlarged liver, peripheral edema (swelling of the limbs), and signs of pleural effusion (fluid around the lungs). Full article >>> In extreme cases there may be heart palpitations and a rapid heartbeat, high blood pressure, anxiety, confusion, seizures and paralysis. An acute attack of porphyria can be fatal (although this is very rare these days). Full article >>> Supraventricular tachyarrhythmias - This diverse family of cardiac arrhythmias causes rapid heartbeats (tachycardias) that start in parts of the heart above the ventricles. Full article >>> For example, patients with panic disorder may experience panic attacks that include rapid heartbeat, heavy sweating and shortness of breath. Full article >>> The symptoms and signs of social phobia include blushing, sweating, trembling, rapid heartbeat, muscle tension, nausea or other stomach discomfort, lightheadedness, and other symptoms of anxiety. Full article >>> Supraventricular tachycardia, then, is a rapid heartbeat originating in the atria. Full article >>> SYMPTOMS"Depression, tension, melancholia, breast tenderness, cramps, fainting, water retention, rapid heartbeat, and backache may occur. Full article >>> history of exposure in an area where Chagas disease is known to occur swollen red area at site of previous insect bite enlarged lymph nodes swelling of one eye fever irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) rapid heartbeat (tachycardia) ... Full article >>> Too much thyroid hormone can cause rapid heartbeat, weight loss, and other symptoms. Thyroid hormone-producing tumors may be large and may spread. They sometimes also make growth hormone and/or prolactin. Answered by Zella Casumpang 1 year ago.

I would make a list of all the symptoms that you mentioned here and go see your physician as soon as possible, preferably tomorrow (unless of course anything gets worse tonight). High blood pressure will happen during pregnancy, but you want to keep it under wraps. The backache, fatigue, and lightheadedness can also be common at your stage--the need for air can be explained by your diaphragm being limited in space, so you have to take deeper breaths, etc... The thing that stands out to me is the streaks in your vision and the fact that all of these symptoms are happening together & just now starting. Make an appointment and get some bloodwork/urine sample (fundus measurement & baby's heartbeat), etc done just to make sure everything is going okay--you certainly won't regret either figuring it out, or getting some advice on what's going on. Better safe than sorry :) Answered by Samuel Yerian 1 year ago.

Follow your gut instinct. Like when I fell and hit my ribs on a chair, everyone on here freaked over me not going to the ER. He was moving a ton, I felt fine except a little scared. Me personally, I wouldn't go. I've been 4 times so far, and they couldn't do crap any of the 4 times anyway except 2 RhoGam shots. Is baby still moving? Answered by Josephine Boody 1 year ago.

hey hun, Definitely go to the doctors or hospital to get checked, My midwife told me last week that if i every had hot flashes, dizziness or fainiting. Or if i say little things visually to give her a call and to come past if they continued. You blood pressure was very high darling. they will do a urine test to determine if protein or something is low.. God bless , see how you go, drink plenty of fluids. If it comes back go the e.r better to be safe darling,.. Answered by Lorenzo Nanke 1 year ago.


Someone with Mitral Valve Prolapse please help?
Sarah - I was also diagnosed with Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome but a second opinion said no. U should check it out u sound like me! Asked by Breana Rowlette 1 year ago.

I have Mitral Valve Prolapse and am 28. I am finding it impossible to do any cardio related exercise anymore. I just carried some groceries up the stairs and I was fine until about 3 minutes into it I can't catch my breath. The breathing just doesn't keep up. I try breathing normally but find myself having to stop whatever I am doing and just sit. Talking is also impossible. Am I going to get worse with age? I don't smoke. I can't even workout anymore. Help Answered by Socorro Fearing 1 year ago.

I have this and asthma as well and i started getting out of breath just getting in and out of the tub/shower and was getting severe chest and arm pains. I thought I was having a heart attack. The doctor put me on a medicine to improve my circulation called verapamil PM(verelan pm is the generic) they did all kinds of tests on me and they couldn't find anything until they did a ultrasound of my heart a few years ago that's when I found out I had MVP(Im 35 now). they told me there isn't much you can do and they wont do surgery unless you mainly go into some kind of cardiac arrest.. they told me to do a LOT of walking to strengthen up my heart and the muscles. I don't know why that one person said you have stuff around your heart that isn't fat. MVP is a heart valve that doesn't close properly when the blood is being pumped to and from the heart so the extra blood that is being spilled is going elsewhere MVP isn't from being overweight it can be a birth defect or be caused from scarlet fever and a few other childhood diseases.the only thing I can tell you is maybe see a dr or specialist and make sure you don't have something else on top of your condition you shouldn't be struggling for air unless something else is wrong(like maybe you have fluid building up in your lungs from your heart not working properly(my mom in law had this and had to take lasix-a heart med) . MVP can also cause panic attacks in some people.it will most likely get worse with age and I have never smoked either so I know its not caused by smoking. see your doctor and tell him the problems so they can run more tests and go from there. Answered by Maurice Bilis 1 year ago.

costly Madam, i'm a heart expert sending this text for you. desire it helps you. Mitral valve prolapse, oftentimes spoke of as MVP, is a elementary heart valve ailment. The mitral valve is between the left atrium and the left ventricle of the middle. It has 2 leaflets (flaps) that administration the blood pass. MVP happens whilst one or the two between the leaflets are enlarged or have greater tissue. MVP is frequently innocuous. whether, substantial problems can ensue, inclusive of a blood clot interior the innovations and an infection spoke of as infective endocarditis related to the mitral valve besides as different valves. MVP looks two times as oftentimes in women human beings as in men. it is maximum generally a hereditary ailment. some those with MVP have not got any indicators. whether, maximum sufferers adventure a speedy or odd heartbeat, shortness of breath, mild-headedness, and protracted fatigue. Many sufferers additionally be afflicted by migraines, ingesting and sound asleep themes, an overactive or contaminated thyroid gland, diarrhea, and chilly palms and feet. Emotional rigidity oftentimes magnifies the indicators. docs oftentimes prescribe widely used tests and cardio workout for those that've MVP. sufferers are additionally recommended to limit their intake or use of severe-carbohydrate ingredients, caffeine, and decongestants. some sufferers could choose beta-blockers and particular antiarrhythmic drugs. greater severe situations could require surgical treatment to repair or replace the valve or to insert an digital regulator, alongside with a pacemaker or defibrillator. Answered by Linda Terres 1 year ago.

I have it too, i was born with it although i am only 18. Since i was a kid i was never able to go on roller coasters or air planes because they were worried it would affect me. Ive had episodes where my heart starts to hurt and I run out of breath doing absolutly nothing. When it comes to working out i find it harder than the average person because it feels like asthma attacks when im running. All you gotta do is take it easy, if your feeling dizzy or liek somethings wrong immediatly sit down, if it doesnt go away call the hospital. Ive been there pleantly of times because of it. Never once had anything really bad happen to me but I sure was in a lot of pain. Its better to be safe than sorry . Hope i helped :) Answered by Karoline Tavorn 1 year ago.

You may want to ask your physician if the MitraClip is an option to explore. The procedure does not involve traditional opening of the chest cavity and recovery time is almost instantaneous. best wishes to you. Answered by Fredric Potocnik 1 year ago.

MVP is a serious disease. Its getting bad for you since you cant go up stairs. You might need surgery Answered by Julius Condino 1 year ago.


Bipolar and meds combo?
What other meds combos are apart from old stand by lithium? Asked by Season Wardlaw 1 year ago.

you don't need combos for bipolar disorder because if you have one...it doesn't work, the dosage can be upped and it'll end up working. Lithium is pretty dangerous considering most medications can affect you and make the lithium not work... * acetazolamide (Diamox); * aminophylline (Truphylline) or theophylline (Elixophyllin, Respbid, Theo-Bid, Theo-Dur, Uniphyl); * sodium bicarbonate (Alka-Seltzer, Bicitra, Polycitra, or baking soda home remedy antacid); * carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); * fluoxetine (Prozac); * metronidazole (Flagyl); * potassium iodide thyroid medication (Pima); * an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik); * a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Tiazac, Cartia, Cardizem) or verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan); * a diuretic (water pill) such as amiloride (Midamor, Moduretic), bumetanide (Bumex), chlorthalidone (Hygroton, Thalitone), ethacrynic acid (Edecrin), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Hyzaar, Vasoretic,Zestoretic), indapamide (Lozol), metolazone (Mykrox, Zaroxolyn), spironolactone (Aldactazide, Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium, Maxzide, Dyazide), torsemide (Demadex), and others; * medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, such as haloperidol (Haldol), aripiprazole (Abilify), chlorpromazine (Thorazine), clozapine (Clozaril, Fazaclo), olanzapine (Zyprexa), quetiapine (Seroquel), pimozide (Orap), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon); or * celecoxib (Celebrex) or an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), diflunisal (Dolobid), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), ketorolac (Toradol), mefenamic acid (Ponstel), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. that's all that you couldn't take with Lithium. plus, it's recommended to have your blood drawn every so often while on it. and it causes weight gain....yeah, not good. BUT. Lamictal is probably the newest drug on the market for BP. i take it and have been for 2 years now since i was diagnosed with type II bipolar disorder....it's a 5 week process, but it's worth the wait. i think it's a miracle drug and doesn't cause all the side effects other drugs have. in rare cases a body rash can happen, to some people. but even with that, it's not even life threatening. i've only had to up my dosage from 100mg [stayed at that for a year and a half] to 150mg. and now...after my struggles with BP for all of high school...i'm a senior and happy 85% of the time. to the point where people wouldn't even figure somethings wrong with me. so my advice...talk to your doc about switching Lamictal. it doesn't cause weight gain. in my experience, along with my adderall i lost the 30 pounds i gained when i was depressed. back at 160 at 6'2'. research the drug...really it's probably the best. i asked my psych why he didn't put me on lithium, and told me that even though lithium is the most popular drug, he's found in that nearly 2/3 of his bipolar patients of his patients [who was put on that at first or other mood stabilizers didn't work] since the drug came out has worked very well for them. Answered by Wallace Gevara 1 year ago.

Lithium, is by far the best for True Bipolar. You must get your blood tests regular to check your lithium levels, but it is known to work the best. My son took this for many years and he did the best on it. He now refuses and his life is a mess because of it. Answered by Anton Naito 1 year ago.

For mood stabilizers, there is Depakote, Topamax, Lamitcal, Abilify... There are more, can't think of them all. Anti-depressants, Prozac, Zoloft, Effexor, Wellbutrin, Cymbalta, Lexapro, etc etc. There are also mixes like Symbyax, which is Prozac with and antipsychotic. There are a whole bunch of things... Answered by Elijah Gunnells 1 year ago.

There are more choice's in bi-polar meds now, like, depecote, seroquel, limictal, closeril and a host of others, only your health care provider can accurately know which combinations are safe and effective for you, the best to you, Mercee. Answered by Tracey Dinovo 1 year ago.

Oh damn, please ask a doctor or pharmacist on this one. Do not trust Yahoo Answers, or anyone online for that matter, on this question. It's a really bad idea to mix similar medications, usually. Answered by Fransisca Teplica 1 year ago.

i take a whole bevy of medication- lithium, lamictal, paxil and wellbutrin........some sleepers if needed.....usually trazadone....... Answered by Shanae Kleen 1 year ago.


What all medications cannot be taken with bystolic?
it is a beta blocker. i want to know the names of other medications that cannot be taken with this medicine. Asked by Bobbi Rosebure 1 year ago.

seems like a lot. Before taking Bystolic, tell your doctor if you are using: digitalis (digoxin, Lanoxin); clonidine (Catapres); reserpine; guanethidine (Ismelin); a heart medication such as nifedipine (Procardia, Adalat), reserpine (Serpasil), verapamil (Calan, Verelan, Isoptin), diltiazem (Cartia, Cardizem); heart rhythm medicine such as amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone), disopyramide (Norpace), procainamide (Procan, Pronestyl), propafenone (Rythmol), quinidine (Quinidex, Quin-Release Quin-G), and others; an antidepressant such as fluoxetine (Prozac), paroxetine (Paxil), and others; or another beta-blocker such as atenolol (Tenormin), bisoprolol (Zebeta), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), sotalol (Betapace), or timolol (Blocadren), and others. This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with Bystolic. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Answered by Wava Ferringer 1 year ago.


Is a heartbeat of 43 beats per min too slow?
and not athlete thanks Asked by Florrie Clapper 1 year ago.

Yes it is too slow. Normal Heart Beat for adult ranges from 60-100 beats per min. It is called bradycardia. Bradycardia is an abnormally slow heart rate of less than 60 beats per minute. A normal heartbeat is between 60 and 100 beats per minute. Here's what happens during a normal heartbeat: The electrical signal that starts a heartbeat comes from the heart's sinus node, the natural pacemaker located in the upper portion of the right atrium. From the sinus node, the heartbeat signal travels to the atrioventricular (A-V) node, located between the atria, and then through the bundle of His (pronounced "hiss") — a series of modified heart-muscle fibers located between the ventricles to the muscles of the ventricles. This triggers a contraction of the ventricles and produces a heartbeat. Bradycardia, even as low as 50 beats per minute, can be normal in athletes and other people who are physically active. In these people, regular exercise improves the heart's ability to pump blood efficiently, so fewer heart contractions are required to supply the body's needs. In other cases, bradycardia can be a form of cardiac arrhythmia, a heart-rate abnormality. Cardiac arrhythmia can be caused by a problem in the sinus node, or it can be related to some disturbance in the passage of heartbeat signals through the A-V node and bundle of His. Also, bradycardia sometimes is a side effect of certain medications, including propranolol (Inderal), atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Toprol-XL), sotalol (Betapace), verapamil (Calan, Isoptin, Verelan) and diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor-XR). Bradycardia also occurs in some people who have certain medical illnesses not related to the heart, such as: Abnormally low level of thyroid hormones (hypothyroidism) Severe liver disease An abnormally low body temperature (hypothermia) Typhoid fever Brucellosis, an infectious disease marked by fever, sweating and weakness that is transmitted to humans by direct contact with diseased animals or through ingestion of contaminated meat, milk or cheese Symptoms Bradycardia can cause dizziness, weakness, lack of energy, or fainting spells. If bradycardia is caused by a medical illness, there will be additional symptoms that are specific to that illness. For example, people whose bradycardia is due to severe hypothyroidism also can have constipation, muscle cramps, weight gain (often despite poor appetite), very dry skin, hair that is thin and dry, an abnormal sensitivity to cold temperatures and other symptoms related to low levels of thyroid hormones. Diagnosis Your doctor will ask about your family history of heart disease, cardiac arrhythmias and fainting spells. He or she also will review your current symptoms and your personal medical history, including your use of medications that may cause bradycardia. During the physical examination, your doctor will check your heart rate and rhythm, and your pulse. You may be asked to do some sit-ups or other exercise so that your doctor can see if your heart rate rises normally when your heart is asked to do more work. Your doctor also will check for physical signs of thyroid abnormalities, including an enlarged thyroid gland, very dry skin, and hair that is thin and dry. To further evaluate your bradycardia, your doctor will order an electrocardiogram (EKG). However, because some forms of bradycardia come and go, a one-time office EKG may be normal. If this is the case, a test called ambulatory electrocardiography may be done. During this test, the patient wears a portable EKG machine called a Holter monitor, usually for 24 hours. If your symptoms are infrequent, you may wear a monitor for longer. You will be taught to press a button to record your EKG reading when your symptoms occur. Depending on the results of your physical examination, other tests may be necessary to check for medical illnesses that produce bradycardia. For example, if you have symptoms and physical signs of hypothyroidism, your doctor may order blood tests to measure levels of thyroid hormones and TSH, a pituitary gland hormone that stimulates the thyroid. Your doctor also may order blood tests for cholesterol and certain liver enzymes, which often are elevated in people with hypothyroidism. Expected Duration How long bradycardia lasts depends on its cause. For example, normal bradycardia in a well-trained athlete will last as long as the athlete maintains his or her usual level of exercise. When bradycardia occurs as a side effect of medication, it usually will go away as soon as the drug that triggered the bradycardia is used by the body or excreted in the urine. Bradycardia caused by hypothyroidism will go away quickly after treatment with thyroid hormones. Certain forms of bradycardia resulting from cardiac arrhythmias can be cured with a permanent pacemaker. Prevention There are no general guidelines to prevent all forms of bradycardia. When bradycardia occurs as a side effect of medication, the problem can be prevented by either switching the drug or reducing its dose. Treatment In most cases, bradycardia in healthy, well-trained athletes does not need to be treated. In fact, in most people, bradycardia does not require treatment unless patients have symptoms that are clearly due to a slow heartbeat. The following are conditions that produce bradycardia that requires treatment: Cardiac arrhythmias resulting from sinus-node dysfunction — In people with frequent, severe symptoms of sinus-node dysfunction, the main treatment is usually a permanent pacemaker, an implanted device that generates electrical impulses to regulate the heartbeat. Cardiac arrhythmias resulting from A-V node problems — In people with A-V node problems, the passage of heartbeat signals may be blocked to different degrees. Some patients with less severe degrees of A-V block do not need treatment. Others may simply be monitored with frequent EKGs, especially if they don't have any symptoms and have a heart rate that is adequate for their daily activities. People with the most severe form of A-V block (called third-degree A-V block) can be treated with a special dual-chambered permanent pacemaker, a pacemaker with one electrode in the atrium and one in the ventricle. Hypothyroidism — Hypothyroidism is treated with replacement doses of thyroid hormones. Synthetic forms of these hormones are available — llevothyroxine (Synthroid, Levothroid and others), liothyronine (Cytomel, Triostat) or liotrix (Thyrolar) — as well as thyroid extract. When To Call A Professional Call your doctor if your pulse is less than 60 beats per minute. This is especially important if you have had dizziness, weakness, lack of energy or fainting spells. Prognosis In well-trained athletes with normal bradycardia, the slow heartbeat is often a sign of overall good health. In other people with bradycardia, the outlook depends on the underlying disorder. For example, the prognosis is usually good in people with hypothyroidism, since treatment with thyroid hormones can relieve bradycardia and other symptoms related to low hormone levels. In some elderly patients, hormone dosages may need to be increased very slowly over several weeks to prevent straining the heart. At one time, the prognosis for people with third-degree A-V block was poor, with 50% of patients dying within one year of diagnosis. Now, however, the availability of permanent pacemakers has improved the prognosis for many people with cardiac arrhythmias. Answered by Yesenia Tarasuik 1 year ago.

That is a pretty slow heartbeat, but evidently you are still conscious. If you were passing out frequently then of course you would be very concerned. How long has it been since you have seen a doctor? You should see one if you see black when you rise suddenly from a chair. I would exercise, like run up the stairs and down again and take the pulse again. It should then be more than 43 beats per minute. Like maybe 80 or 100. Is it just 43 first thing in the morning before you get out of bed? You might want to take it during the middle of the day or when you are moderately active. Answered by Kala Chrzanowski 1 year ago.

Yes, definitley. Only well trained athletes have low hear rates, and I'm not sure if that low is even normal for them. You should be experienciing some fatigue with walking, or strenuous excerise. If you are taking meds, then something needs to be adjusted. It's important to have your doctor give you a thorough exam.asap! You can also experience dizziness, so don't delay getting a doctor's appt. Take Care! Answered by Marjorie Borromeo 1 year ago.

Very, very few healthy, normal people will have a resting HR in the 40's (usually in a deep sleep). I work in an ICU and all of our patients are monitored so I see I wide range of heart rates but, this definitely falls out of "normal range" (60-100bpm). As previous posters have mentioned the cause could be a medication (this is the most frequent cause that I personally see). If you suspect it is medication related, do not stop your medication suddenly as this could cause severe side effects. Discuss this with your physician. Answered by Bernie Isenbarger 1 year ago.

yes this is considerably low and should be evaluated quickly. normal heartrate is a healthy adult is 60-80. some people (mostly athletes) run low naturally and some run high (like me-my norm is about 110). if you're currently on medication for blood pressure-this could lower your heartrate. dehydration could lower it as well (it's the body's way of preserving energy and trying to keep itself alive) make sure to have this checked out asap (24-48 hours max). it could be an indication of a serious problem. Answered by Lynn Encalade 1 year ago.

No, the more in shape you are, the slower your resting heart rate will be. There are some athletes that have resting heart rates as slow as 16 Beats per minute. Answered by Alexandra Borowiec 1 year ago.

It depends! when you are resting for example sleeping a heart beat rate of 43per minute might not be too slow. but if it is while you are active it might be seen as low. the average is about 70per minute. Answered by Felicita Berbes 1 year ago.


Hypertension problem?
I'm 23 years old anyways. Asked by Susy Rough 1 year ago.

Well it's been like this, I have been treated for hypertension for like 4-5 months with sotalol 40mg morning, diuretic in mid day, and 40mg at night sotalol (2 x half tablet). It helped me to take off some symtpoms, I had chest pain, was feeling faint, and etc. My blood pressure even with medicine never got down under 140, mostly 150 and so. But recently I woke up one morning and my heart was pounding so much, and i measured 190/110. And later again i started to feel faint somehow, and out of streght, this all preceded 3-4 day headache, which i still have to some bit. Now what I'm wondering. Even I drink medicine. Why doesn't my blood pressure go to normal count? I will tomorrow settle appointment with my cardilogist. Should my blood pressure be under 140/95, considering i had surgery (tetralogiae fallot) and have mild regurgitation which isn't making problem. Could it be that I'm not taking enough medicine for my condition? Any experiences or answers are welcome! Thanks Answered by Kennith Kressierer 1 year ago.

Hypertension can be classified either essential (primary) or secondary. Essential hypertension indicates that no specific medical cause can be found to explain a patient's condition. Secondary hypertension indicates that the high blood pressure is a result of (i.e., secondary to) another condition, such as kidney disease or tumours (pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma). Persistent hypertension is one of the risk factors for strokes, heart attacks, heart failure and arterial aneurysm, and is a leading cause of chronic renal failure. In terms of medications for this medical condition; there are several types: - Diuretics (water pills) helps your body to get rid of extra sodium (salt) and water so your blood vessels don't have to hold too much fluid. Some examples of diuretics include chlorthalidone (brand name: Thalitone), furosemide (brand name: Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (brand name: Esidrix) and indapamide (brand name: Lozol). Your doctor may also prescribe a combination of diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide combined with triamterene (brand names: Dyazide, Maxzide). - Beta-blockers makes the heart beat slower so that blood passes through your blood vessels with less force. Some examples of beta-blockers include acebutolol (brand name: Sectral), atenolol (brand name: Tenormin), carvedilol (brand name: Coreg), metoprolol (brand names: Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (brand name: Corgard), propranolol (brand name: Inderal) and timolol (brand name: Blocadren). - Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also called ACE inhibitors) keeps your body from making angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ACE inhibitors include benazepril (brand name: Lotensin), enalapril (brand name: Vasotec), lisinopril (brand names: Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (brand name: Accupril), ramipril (brand name: Altace) and trandolapril (brand name: Mavik). - Angiotensin II receptor blockers (also called ARBs) protects your blood vessels from the effects of angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ARBs include candesartan (brand name: Atacand), irbesartan (brand name: Avapro), losartan (brand name: Cozaar), olmesartan (brand name: Benicar), telmisartan (brand name: Micardis) and valsartan (brand name: Diovan). - Calcium channel blockers (also called CCBs) helps to keep your blood vessels from constricting (becoming narrow) by blocking calcium from entering your cells. Some examples of CCBs include amlodipine (brand name: Norvasc), diltiazem (brand names: Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, Tiazac), felodipine (brand name: Plendil), nicardipine (brand name: Cardene), nifedipine (brand names: Adalat, Procardia) and verapamil (some brand names: Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan). - Alpha-blockers helps to relax your blood vessels by reducing nerve impulses. This allows your blood to pass through more easily. Some examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin (brand name: Cardura), prazosin (brand name: Minipress) and terazosin (brand name: Hytrin). - Centrally acting drugs may affect your brain and central nervous system to reduce the nerve impulses that can cause your blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of centrally acting drugs include clonidine (brand name: Catapres) and methyldopa. - Direct vasodilators relaxes the muscles in the blood vessel walls. This causes the blood vessels to widen. Some examples of vasodilators include hydralazine (brand name: Apresoline) and minoxidil (brand name: Loniten). I will personally suggest that You get an Echocardiogram scan done. You must also get your cholesterol, fat and sugar levels of your body tested. A good result will reflect the following normal results: - The Total Cholesterol level should remain below 200 mg/dL all the time; HDL's typical normal level is considered to be at 40 mg/dL and above. However, the higher your HDL level be the better it is for your health. Some natural ways to maintain and raise your HDL level are by aerobic exercising and excluding trans fatty acids from your diet; The normal ratio of Total Cholesterol to HDL is considered at 5:1 or below; a desirable LDL-cholesterol level must always be below 140 mg/dL to be considered normal. - Triglycerides level is also important and must remain below 150 mg/dL. - Glucose level. Normal is about 90mg/100ml, or 5mM/L. Overall, You should be getting regular check-ups, following a healthy diet, taking your medications as prescript, rest and other instructions from your specialist/s and general physician. Good Health To You ! Answered by Joaquin Obermiller 1 year ago.

sorry but you should never just cease your medication like this. you should go back to your health professional and see where you go from here. depending on your age and many other factors of your life you need to keep your BP under control and often you it can take some time to find the right medication to keep you in a stable condition. never never never muck about with hypertension. Answered by Nilda Newens 1 year ago.

Eat less animal fat & lose weight. Answered by Marcelene Budlong 1 year ago.


23, married, mom, bipolar?
I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until... Asked by Georgann Mullinax 1 year ago.

I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until week after next. Never have been consistent with meds so i was also curious of how i was supposed to feel? Answered by Hildred Staffeld 1 year ago.

Lithium drug interactions: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), [for example, ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen Naprosyn, Aleve), indomethacin (Indocin), nabumetone (Relafen), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, Arthrotec), ketorolac (Toradol)], reduce the kidney's ability to eliminate lithium and lead to elevated levels of lithium in the blood and lithium side effects. Blood concentrations of lithium may need to be measured for 4 to 7 days after an NSAID is either added or stopped during lithium therapy. Aspirin and sulindac (Clinoril) do not appear to affect lithium concentrations in the blood. Diuretics (water pills) should be used cautiously in patients receiving lithium. Diuretics that act at the distal renal tubule, [for example, hydrochlorothiazide (Hydrodiuril), spironolactone (Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium; Dyazide, Maxzide)], can increase blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics that act at the proximal tubule, [for example, acetazolamide (Diamox)], are more likely to reduce blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics such as furosemide (Lasix) and bumetanide (Bumex) may have no affect on lithium concentrations in blood. ACE inhibitors, [for example, enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Zestril, Prinivil), benazepril (Lotensin), quinapril (Accupril), moexipril (Univasc), captopril (Capoten), ramipril (Altace)], may increase the risk of developing lithium toxicity, by increasing the amount of lithium that is reabsorbed in the tubules of the kidney and thereby reducing the excretion of lithium. When carbamazepine (Tegretol) and lithium are used together, some patients may experience side effects, including dizziness, lethargy, and tremor. Central nervous system side effects also may occur when lithium is used with antidepressants, [for example, fluoxetine (Prozac) sertraline (Zoloft), and paroxetine (Paxil), fluvoxamine (Luvox), amitriptyline (Elavil), imipramine (Tofranil), desipramine (Norpramin)]. Medications which cause the urine to become alkaline (the opposite of acidic) can increase the amount of lithium that is lost into the urine. This results in lower blood concentrations of lithium and reduces the effects of lithium. Such drugs include potassium acetate, potassium citrate (Urocit-K), sodium bicarbonate, and sodium citrate (Bicitra, Cytra-2, Liqui-Citra, Oracit, Shohl's). Caffeine appears to reduce serum lithium concentrations, and side effects of lithium have increased in frequency when caffeine is consumed. Both diltiazem (Cardizem-CD, Tiazac, Dilacor-XR) and verapamil (Calan-SR, Isoptin-SR, Verelan, Covera-HS) have been reported to have variable effects on lithium levels in blood. In some patients there may be decreased lithium blood levels and in others lithium toxicity. Methyldopa (Aldomet) may increase the likelihood of lithium toxicity. Various reactions have resulted when lithium is administered with phenothiazines, [for example, chlorpromazine (Thorazine), thioridazine (Mellaril), trifluoperazine (Stelazine) or with haloperidol (Haldol)]. Such reactions have included delirium, seizures, encephalopathy, high fever or certain neurologic reactions that affect movement of muscles, called extrapyramidal symptoms. Lithium can cause goiter or hypothyroidism. The use of lithium with potassium iodide can increase the likelihood of this adverse reaction. The use of the beta blocker, propranolol (Inderal), with lithium can lead to a slow heart rate and dizziness. Other beta blockers, [for example, metoprolol (Lopressor), atenolol (Tenormin)] also may interact with lithium and be associated with a slow heart rate. Seroquel interations: Your healthcare professionals (e.g., doctor or pharmacist) may already be aware of any possible drug interactions and may be monitoring you for it. Do not start, stop or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with them first. This drug should not be used with the following medication because very serious interactions may occur: sibutramine. If you are currently using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist before starting quetiapine. Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all prescription and nonprescription/herbal products you may use, especially of: anticholinergics (e.g., belladonna alkaloids, benztropine, scopolamine), dopamine-like drugs (e.g., bromocriptine, cabergoline), levodopa, rifabutin, drugs for treating high blood pressure (e.g., alpha blockers such as prazosin, calcium channel blockers such as diltiazem, "water pills"/diuretics such as hydrochlorothiazide), drugs affecting liver enzymes that remove quetiapine from your body (e.g., azole antifungals such as fluconazole/ketoconazole/itraconazole, barbiturates such as phenobarbital, glucocorticoids such as dexamethasone, macrolide antibiotics such as erythromycin, rifampin, certain anti-seizure drugs such as carbamazepine/phenytoin, thioridazine), thyroid medicine (e.g., thyroxine). Al Answered by Rachele Kieler 1 year ago.

Well, its kinda hard if you arent consistent with your medications. The meds aren't miracle workers, you can't really expect them to really do their job if you don't take them regularly. Those do sound like somewhat higher doses, at least the seroquel does. Generally most doctors will start you rather low, and gradually work your dosage up to what you need, that way side effects are minimized. If you don't take them for awhile, then all of a sudden decide to start up again, you can expect to feel worse for the first week. I would see your doc as soon as you can, let them know how you're feeling and what you've been doing with the meds, and once they prescribe you more, stick to it and you'll feel better. Answered by Madelyn Kotecki 1 year ago.

It sounds to me like both of you are the problem. Whether you like it or not, she does have the right to tell you what to do. She is the adult and you are the child in the household. Grow up and get over it. The crap of "Of course I went over budget" Shows a complete disregard for others. She has no business screaming at you but I think there is more to the story and a lot of history in your relationship. The best thing to do would be to seek counseling with a professional. Neither of you is completely right or wrong but there are some serious issues to deal with. Be ready to compromise. Just for the record, I raised my step daughter from the time she was two years old. There were lots of issues because she thought the same way you do and in my house I am the undisputed boss. Had she screamed at me, even at 15, she would have been over my knee and spanked before she could get half a sentence out of her mouth. But then, I tried to always be fair and reasonable, even taking her side against my own daughter several times because I felt the stepdaughter was right. In the end, you are fighting a losing battle and making matters worse with your attitude. Try working together! Answered by Jalisa Schopp 1 year ago.

In order for the meds. to work correctly you need to take them regularly. Your doctor has you on these dosages because he thinks they will work the best in this combination. Keep taking them every day on time until you have your appointment. If things haven't cleared up then have a talk with him and he can recommend any changes you may need. Answered by Keesha Buhl 1 year ago.


What are the side affects of verapamil (verelan pm)?
Asked by Jacelyn Letang 1 year ago.

VERAPAMIL Generic Name: verapamil (oral) (ver AH pa mill) Brand Names: Calan, Calan SR, Covera-HS, Isoptin, Isoptin SR, Verelan, Verelan PM What is the most important information I should know about verapamil? • Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. If you stop taking the medication, your condition could become worse. • Do not crush, chew, or break extended-release forms of verapamil such as generic Covera-HS and Verelan PM. Swallow them whole. Generic verapamil SR, Isoptin SR, and Calan SR may be divided in half but should not be crushed or chewed. What is verapamil? • Verapamil is in a class of drugs called calcium channel blockers. Verapamil relaxes (widens) blood vessels (veins and arteries), which makes it easier for the heart to pump and reduces its workload. • Verapamil is used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure), to treat angina (chest pain), and to control some types of irregular heartbeats. • Verapamil may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking verapamil? • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have · kidney or liver disease; · other diseases of the heart or blood vessels such as sick sinus syndrome, aortic stenosis, heart failure, heart block, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, coronary artery disease, or low blood pressure; or · muscular dystrophy. • You may not be able to take verapamil, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above. • Verapamil is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether verapamil will be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take verapamil without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. • Verapamil passes into breast milk and may harm a nursing infant. Do not take verapamil without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take verapamil? • Take verapamil exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you. • Take each dose with a full glass of water. • Verelan, Verelan PM, Calan, Isoptin, Covera-HS, and generic forms of regular-release verapamil can be taken with or without food. Taking the medication with food may reduce stomach upset if it occurs. • Calan SR, Isoptin SR, and generic sustained-release verapamil (verapamil SR) may be more likely to cause stomach upset and should be taken with food to reduce this side effect. • Take Covera-HS and Verelan PM at bedtime. • If you have trouble swallowing the Verelan pellet-filled capsules, they can be opened and the contents can be sprinkled onto cold, soft food such as applesauce. This mixture must be swallowed without chewing. Use the mixture immediately. Do not save it for later use. (Do not use this procedure for the Verelan PM capsules.) • Do not crush, chew, or break extended-release forms of verapamil such as Covera-HS and Verelan PM. Swallow them whole. Generic verapamil SR, Isoptin SR, and Calan SR may be divided in half if the tablets are scored, but should not be crushed or chewed. • If you are taking Covera-HS, do not be concerned if you find what looks like an undissolved tablet in your stool. This medication is formulated with an outer shell that does not dissolve. This shell allows the medicine to be released slowly into your body before it is passed out in the stool. • It is important to take verapamil regularly to get the most benefit. • Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. If you stop taking the medication, your condition could become worse. • Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with verapamil. The interaction could lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. • Your doctor may want you to have blood tests, blood pressure monitoring, or other medical evaluations during treatment with verapamil to monitor progress and side effects. • Store verapamil at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose? • Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication. What happens if I overdose? • Seek emergency medical attention. • Symptoms of a verapamil overdose include dizziness, weakness, chest pain, shortness of breath, fainting, an unusually fast or slow heartbeat, coma, slurred speech, and confusion. What should I avoid while taking verapamil? • Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with verapamil. The interaction could lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. • Avoid the use alcohol. Alcohol may further lower blood pressure and increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking verapamil. • Follow any recommendations your doctor makes about diet or exercise. What are the possible side effects of verapamil? • If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking verapamil and contact your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical treatment: · an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); · an unusually fast or slow heartbeat; · shortness of breath (heart failure); · fainting; · abnormal behavior or psychosis; · jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or · swelling of the legs or ankles. • Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take verapamil and talk to your doctor if you experience · unusual headache, fatigue, or tiredness; · insomnia or trouble sleeping; · vivid dreams; · hair loss; · nausea or diarrhea; or · increased urination. • Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect verapamil? • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following drugs: · cyclosporine (Sandimmune, Neoral); · cimetidine (Tagamet, Tagamet HB); · carbamazepine (Tegretol, Carbatrol); · lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith, others); · theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theochron, Theolair, Theobid, Elixophyllin, Slo-Phyllin, others); · rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane); · phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton); · an HMG CoA reductase inhibitor such as atorvastatin (Lipitor), lovastatin (Mevacor), simvastatin (Zocor), and others; or · another heart medication such as propranolol (Inderal), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), atenolol (Tenormin), digoxin (Lanoxin), quinidine (Quinora, Quinidex, Quinaglute), flecainide (Tambocor), disopyramide (Norpace), captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), and others. • You may not be able to take verapamil, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring if you are taking any of the medicines listed above. • Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with verapamil or affect your condition. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. Where can I get more information? • Your pharmacist has additional information about verapamil written for health professionals that you may read. --------------------------------------... • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. • Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/ or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Answered by Kaley Kiddy 1 year ago.


29 wks pregnant- should i go to the EMERGENCY ROOM even though i feel fine now ?
Symptoms : light headed,head ache, hig blood pressure & heart beating fast.. this is my first pregnancy and i've been fine until last Thur & friday.. On thursday at work my back ached and i was fatigued , and friday afternoon i started feeling lightheaded, w/ a headache and and the need for air . Over the... Asked by Maragret Lenberg 1 year ago.

Symptoms : light headed,head ache, hig blood pressure & heart beating fast.. this is my first pregnancy and i've been fine until last Thur & friday.. On thursday at work my back ached and i was fatigued , and friday afternoon i started feeling lightheaded, w/ a headache and and the need for air . Over the weekind i was fine (my days off) this monday again like from 1:30-3:00 i had the same symptoms but this time i took my blood pressure since i felt my hear beating fast and it was 140/68. I called the dr's office but they didnt call back . by 3:00 my symtoms were gone. i bet if i would of taking my blood pressure on friday it would of been high ( i also see little streaks in my vision some times. I dont know what is going on, but now i'm completely fine I called the dr's office and told them my symptoms but i forgot to mention that i felt my heart beating fast and that was also befopre i took my blood pressure , so they had no idea about those details ..they didnt call me back till 2hrs later and they left a message saying that it's probably normal and if i was concerned to go to the ER.. By the time i called back there office was closed. ~ not anemic nor do i have diabetes -i have an office job work 40hrs a week Answered by Claudia Pennell 1 year ago.

Rapid heartbeat. Lightheadedness or dizziness. Headache. Ringing in the ears (tinnitus). Irritability and other mood disturbances. Full article >>> Side Effects Include:Calan (calan SR, isoptin, isoptin SR, verelan)Constipation, dizziness, fatigue, headache, fluid retention, low blood pressure, nauseaCardene (nicardipine hydrochloride)Dizziness, headache, indigestion, nausea, rapid heartbeat, ... Full article >>> Tremors, agitation, a rapid heartbeat, and hypertension are all common side effects of Ritalin misuse. Full article >>> The severe form of the disease commences with fever, chills, bleeding into the skin, rapid heartbeat, headache, back pains, and extreme prostration. Nausea, vomiting, and constipation are common. Jaundice usually appears on the second or third day. Full article >>> These symptoms include confusion, sweating, weakness, paleness, and a rapid heartbeat. In severe cases, hypoglycemia can progress to seizures and coma. You develop symptoms of ketoacidosis (a dangerous chemical imbalance in the body). Full article >>> A physical examination may reveal either an irregular or a rapid heartbeat. There may be distended neck veins, enlarged liver, peripheral edema (swelling of the limbs), and signs of pleural effusion (fluid around the lungs). Full article >>> In extreme cases there may be heart palpitations and a rapid heartbeat, high blood pressure, anxiety, confusion, seizures and paralysis. An acute attack of porphyria can be fatal (although this is very rare these days). Full article >>> Supraventricular tachyarrhythmias - This diverse family of cardiac arrhythmias causes rapid heartbeats (tachycardias) that start in parts of the heart above the ventricles. Full article >>> For example, patients with panic disorder may experience panic attacks that include rapid heartbeat, heavy sweating and shortness of breath. Full article >>> The symptoms and signs of social phobia include blushing, sweating, trembling, rapid heartbeat, muscle tension, nausea or other stomach discomfort, lightheadedness, and other symptoms of anxiety. Full article >>> Supraventricular tachycardia, then, is a rapid heartbeat originating in the atria. Full article >>> SYMPTOMS"Depression, tension, melancholia, breast tenderness, cramps, fainting, water retention, rapid heartbeat, and backache may occur. Full article >>> history of exposure in an area where Chagas disease is known to occur swollen red area at site of previous insect bite enlarged lymph nodes swelling of one eye fever irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) rapid heartbeat (tachycardia) ... Full article >>> Too much thyroid hormone can cause rapid heartbeat, weight loss, and other symptoms. Thyroid hormone-producing tumors may be large and may spread. They sometimes also make growth hormone and/or prolactin. Answered by Greg Strazza 1 year ago.

I would make a list of all the symptoms that you mentioned here and go see your physician as soon as possible, preferably tomorrow (unless of course anything gets worse tonight). High blood pressure will happen during pregnancy, but you want to keep it under wraps. The backache, fatigue, and lightheadedness can also be common at your stage--the need for air can be explained by your diaphragm being limited in space, so you have to take deeper breaths, etc... The thing that stands out to me is the streaks in your vision and the fact that all of these symptoms are happening together & just now starting. Make an appointment and get some bloodwork/urine sample (fundus measurement & baby's heartbeat), etc done just to make sure everything is going okay--you certainly won't regret either figuring it out, or getting some advice on what's going on. Better safe than sorry :) Answered by Dung Mcquay 1 year ago.

Follow your gut instinct. Like when I fell and hit my ribs on a chair, everyone on here freaked over me not going to the ER. He was moving a ton, I felt fine except a little scared. Me personally, I wouldn't go. I've been 4 times so far, and they couldn't do crap any of the 4 times anyway except 2 RhoGam shots. Is baby still moving? Answered by Marion Shearier 1 year ago.

hey hun, Definitely go to the doctors or hospital to get checked, My midwife told me last week that if i every had hot flashes, dizziness or fainiting. Or if i say little things visually to give her a call and to come past if they continued. You blood pressure was very high darling. they will do a urine test to determine if protein or something is low.. God bless , see how you go, drink plenty of fluids. If it comes back go the e.r better to be safe darling,.. Answered by Marquis Digesare 1 year ago.


Someone with Mitral Valve Prolapse please help?
Sarah - I was also diagnosed with Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome but a second opinion said no. U should check it out u sound like me! Asked by Charles Holcomb 1 year ago.

I have Mitral Valve Prolapse and am 28. I am finding it impossible to do any cardio related exercise anymore. I just carried some groceries up the stairs and I was fine until about 3 minutes into it I can't catch my breath. The breathing just doesn't keep up. I try breathing normally but find myself having to stop whatever I am doing and just sit. Talking is also impossible. Am I going to get worse with age? I don't smoke. I can't even workout anymore. Help Answered by Bobby Try 1 year ago.

I have this and asthma as well and i started getting out of breath just getting in and out of the tub/shower and was getting severe chest and arm pains. I thought I was having a heart attack. The doctor put me on a medicine to improve my circulation called verapamil PM(verelan pm is the generic) they did all kinds of tests on me and they couldn't find anything until they did a ultrasound of my heart a few years ago that's when I found out I had MVP(Im 35 now). they told me there isn't much you can do and they wont do surgery unless you mainly go into some kind of cardiac arrest.. they told me to do a LOT of walking to strengthen up my heart and the muscles. I don't know why that one person said you have stuff around your heart that isn't fat. MVP is a heart valve that doesn't close properly when the blood is being pumped to and from the heart so the extra blood that is being spilled is going elsewhere MVP isn't from being overweight it can be a birth defect or be caused from scarlet fever and a few other childhood diseases.the only thing I can tell you is maybe see a dr or specialist and make sure you don't have something else on top of your condition you shouldn't be struggling for air unless something else is wrong(like maybe you have fluid building up in your lungs from your heart not working properly(my mom in law had this and had to take lasix-a heart med) . MVP can also cause panic attacks in some people.it will most likely get worse with age and I have never smoked either so I know its not caused by smoking. see your doctor and tell him the problems so they can run more tests and go from there. Answered by Dena Gaumont 1 year ago.

costly Madam, i'm a heart expert sending this text for you. desire it helps you. Mitral valve prolapse, oftentimes spoke of as MVP, is a elementary heart valve ailment. The mitral valve is between the left atrium and the left ventricle of the middle. It has 2 leaflets (flaps) that administration the blood pass. MVP happens whilst one or the two between the leaflets are enlarged or have greater tissue. MVP is frequently innocuous. whether, substantial problems can ensue, inclusive of a blood clot interior the innovations and an infection spoke of as infective endocarditis related to the mitral valve besides as different valves. MVP looks two times as oftentimes in women human beings as in men. it is maximum generally a hereditary ailment. some those with MVP have not got any indicators. whether, maximum sufferers adventure a speedy or odd heartbeat, shortness of breath, mild-headedness, and protracted fatigue. Many sufferers additionally be afflicted by migraines, ingesting and sound asleep themes, an overactive or contaminated thyroid gland, diarrhea, and chilly palms and feet. Emotional rigidity oftentimes magnifies the indicators. docs oftentimes prescribe widely used tests and cardio workout for those that've MVP. sufferers are additionally recommended to limit their intake or use of severe-carbohydrate ingredients, caffeine, and decongestants. some sufferers could choose beta-blockers and particular antiarrhythmic drugs. greater severe situations could require surgical treatment to repair or replace the valve or to insert an digital regulator, alongside with a pacemaker or defibrillator. Answered by Estela Lagassie 1 year ago.

I have it too, i was born with it although i am only 18. Since i was a kid i was never able to go on roller coasters or air planes because they were worried it would affect me. Ive had episodes where my heart starts to hurt and I run out of breath doing absolutly nothing. When it comes to working out i find it harder than the average person because it feels like asthma attacks when im running. All you gotta do is take it easy, if your feeling dizzy or liek somethings wrong immediatly sit down, if it doesnt go away call the hospital. Ive been there pleantly of times because of it. Never once had anything really bad happen to me but I sure was in a lot of pain. Its better to be safe than sorry . Hope i helped :) Answered by Soo Stehle 1 year ago.

You may want to ask your physician if the MitraClip is an option to explore. The procedure does not involve traditional opening of the chest cavity and recovery time is almost instantaneous. best wishes to you. Answered by Nigel Bruegger 1 year ago.

MVP is a serious disease. Its getting bad for you since you cant go up stairs. You might need surgery Answered by Grisel Rojos 1 year ago.


Bipolar and meds combo?
What other meds combos are apart from old stand by lithium? Asked by Kirk Roskelley 1 year ago.

you don't need combos for bipolar disorder because if you have one...it doesn't work, the dosage can be upped and it'll end up working. Lithium is pretty dangerous considering most medications can affect you and make the lithium not work... * acetazolamide (Diamox); * aminophylline (Truphylline) or theophylline (Elixophyllin, Respbid, Theo-Bid, Theo-Dur, Uniphyl); * sodium bicarbonate (Alka-Seltzer, Bicitra, Polycitra, or baking soda home remedy antacid); * carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); * fluoxetine (Prozac); * metronidazole (Flagyl); * potassium iodide thyroid medication (Pima); * an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik); * a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Tiazac, Cartia, Cardizem) or verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan); * a diuretic (water pill) such as amiloride (Midamor, Moduretic), bumetanide (Bumex), chlorthalidone (Hygroton, Thalitone), ethacrynic acid (Edecrin), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Hyzaar, Vasoretic,Zestoretic), indapamide (Lozol), metolazone (Mykrox, Zaroxolyn), spironolactone (Aldactazide, Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium, Maxzide, Dyazide), torsemide (Demadex), and others; * medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, such as haloperidol (Haldol), aripiprazole (Abilify), chlorpromazine (Thorazine), clozapine (Clozaril, Fazaclo), olanzapine (Zyprexa), quetiapine (Seroquel), pimozide (Orap), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon); or * celecoxib (Celebrex) or an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), diflunisal (Dolobid), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), ketorolac (Toradol), mefenamic acid (Ponstel), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. that's all that you couldn't take with Lithium. plus, it's recommended to have your blood drawn every so often while on it. and it causes weight gain....yeah, not good. BUT. Lamictal is probably the newest drug on the market for BP. i take it and have been for 2 years now since i was diagnosed with type II bipolar disorder....it's a 5 week process, but it's worth the wait. i think it's a miracle drug and doesn't cause all the side effects other drugs have. in rare cases a body rash can happen, to some people. but even with that, it's not even life threatening. i've only had to up my dosage from 100mg [stayed at that for a year and a half] to 150mg. and now...after my struggles with BP for all of high school...i'm a senior and happy 85% of the time. to the point where people wouldn't even figure somethings wrong with me. so my advice...talk to your doc about switching Lamictal. it doesn't cause weight gain. in my experience, along with my adderall i lost the 30 pounds i gained when i was depressed. back at 160 at 6'2'. research the drug...really it's probably the best. i asked my psych why he didn't put me on lithium, and told me that even though lithium is the most popular drug, he's found in that nearly 2/3 of his bipolar patients of his patients [who was put on that at first or other mood stabilizers didn't work] since the drug came out has worked very well for them. Answered by Lala Aroche 1 year ago.

Lithium, is by far the best for True Bipolar. You must get your blood tests regular to check your lithium levels, but it is known to work the best. My son took this for many years and he did the best on it. He now refuses and his life is a mess because of it. Answered by Phillip Claycamp 1 year ago.

For mood stabilizers, there is Depakote, Topamax, Lamitcal, Abilify... There are more, can't think of them all. Anti-depressants, Prozac, Zoloft, Effexor, Wellbutrin, Cymbalta, Lexapro, etc etc. There are also mixes like Symbyax, which is Prozac with and antipsychotic. There are a whole bunch of things... Answered by Talitha Eddens 1 year ago.

There are more choice's in bi-polar meds now, like, depecote, seroquel, limictal, closeril and a host of others, only your health care provider can accurately know which combinations are safe and effective for you, the best to you, Mercee. Answered by Eli Grossmann 1 year ago.

Oh damn, please ask a doctor or pharmacist on this one. Do not trust Yahoo Answers, or anyone online for that matter, on this question. It's a really bad idea to mix similar medications, usually. Answered by Buck Mcgwier 1 year ago.

i take a whole bevy of medication- lithium, lamictal, paxil and wellbutrin........some sleepers if needed.....usually trazadone....... Answered by Julie Taube 1 year ago.


What all medications cannot be taken with bystolic?
it is a beta blocker. i want to know the names of other medications that cannot be taken with this medicine. Asked by Tilda Spasiano 1 year ago.

seems like a lot. Before taking Bystolic, tell your doctor if you are using: digitalis (digoxin, Lanoxin); clonidine (Catapres); reserpine; guanethidine (Ismelin); a heart medication such as nifedipine (Procardia, Adalat), reserpine (Serpasil), verapamil (Calan, Verelan, Isoptin), diltiazem (Cartia, Cardizem); heart rhythm medicine such as amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone), disopyramide (Norpace), procainamide (Procan, Pronestyl), propafenone (Rythmol), quinidine (Quinidex, Quin-Release Quin-G), and others; an antidepressant such as fluoxetine (Prozac), paroxetine (Paxil), and others; or another beta-blocker such as atenolol (Tenormin), bisoprolol (Zebeta), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), sotalol (Betapace), or timolol (Blocadren), and others. This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with Bystolic. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Answered by Jared Kratochwil 1 year ago.


Is a heartbeat of 43 beats per min too slow?
and not athlete thanks Asked by Willetta Tonne 1 year ago.

Yes it is too slow. Normal Heart Beat for adult ranges from 60-100 beats per min. It is called bradycardia. Bradycardia is an abnormally slow heart rate of less than 60 beats per minute. A normal heartbeat is between 60 and 100 beats per minute. Here's what happens during a normal heartbeat: The electrical signal that starts a heartbeat comes from the heart's sinus node, the natural pacemaker located in the upper portion of the right atrium. From the sinus node, the heartbeat signal travels to the atrioventricular (A-V) node, located between the atria, and then through the bundle of His (pronounced "hiss") — a series of modified heart-muscle fibers located between the ventricles to the muscles of the ventricles. This triggers a contraction of the ventricles and produces a heartbeat. Bradycardia, even as low as 50 beats per minute, can be normal in athletes and other people who are physically active. In these people, regular exercise improves the heart's ability to pump blood efficiently, so fewer heart contractions are required to supply the body's needs. In other cases, bradycardia can be a form of cardiac arrhythmia, a heart-rate abnormality. Cardiac arrhythmia can be caused by a problem in the sinus node, or it can be related to some disturbance in the passage of heartbeat signals through the A-V node and bundle of His. Also, bradycardia sometimes is a side effect of certain medications, including propranolol (Inderal), atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Toprol-XL), sotalol (Betapace), verapamil (Calan, Isoptin, Verelan) and diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor-XR). Bradycardia also occurs in some people who have certain medical illnesses not related to the heart, such as: Abnormally low level of thyroid hormones (hypothyroidism) Severe liver disease An abnormally low body temperature (hypothermia) Typhoid fever Brucellosis, an infectious disease marked by fever, sweating and weakness that is transmitted to humans by direct contact with diseased animals or through ingestion of contaminated meat, milk or cheese Symptoms Bradycardia can cause dizziness, weakness, lack of energy, or fainting spells. If bradycardia is caused by a medical illness, there will be additional symptoms that are specific to that illness. For example, people whose bradycardia is due to severe hypothyroidism also can have constipation, muscle cramps, weight gain (often despite poor appetite), very dry skin, hair that is thin and dry, an abnormal sensitivity to cold temperatures and other symptoms related to low levels of thyroid hormones. Diagnosis Your doctor will ask about your family history of heart disease, cardiac arrhythmias and fainting spells. He or she also will review your current symptoms and your personal medical history, including your use of medications that may cause bradycardia. During the physical examination, your doctor will check your heart rate and rhythm, and your pulse. You may be asked to do some sit-ups or other exercise so that your doctor can see if your heart rate rises normally when your heart is asked to do more work. Your doctor also will check for physical signs of thyroid abnormalities, including an enlarged thyroid gland, very dry skin, and hair that is thin and dry. To further evaluate your bradycardia, your doctor will order an electrocardiogram (EKG). However, because some forms of bradycardia come and go, a one-time office EKG may be normal. If this is the case, a test called ambulatory electrocardiography may be done. During this test, the patient wears a portable EKG machine called a Holter monitor, usually for 24 hours. If your symptoms are infrequent, you may wear a monitor for longer. You will be taught to press a button to record your EKG reading when your symptoms occur. Depending on the results of your physical examination, other tests may be necessary to check for medical illnesses that produce bradycardia. For example, if you have symptoms and physical signs of hypothyroidism, your doctor may order blood tests to measure levels of thyroid hormones and TSH, a pituitary gland hormone that stimulates the thyroid. Your doctor also may order blood tests for cholesterol and certain liver enzymes, which often are elevated in people with hypothyroidism. Expected Duration How long bradycardia lasts depends on its cause. For example, normal bradycardia in a well-trained athlete will last as long as the athlete maintains his or her usual level of exercise. When bradycardia occurs as a side effect of medication, it usually will go away as soon as the drug that triggered the bradycardia is used by the body or excreted in the urine. Bradycardia caused by hypothyroidism will go away quickly after treatment with thyroid hormones. Certain forms of bradycardia resulting from cardiac arrhythmias can be cured with a permanent pacemaker. Prevention There are no general guidelines to prevent all forms of bradycardia. When bradycardia occurs as a side effect of medication, the problem can be prevented by either switching the drug or reducing its dose. Treatment In most cases, bradycardia in healthy, well-trained athletes does not need to be treated. In fact, in most people, bradycardia does not require treatment unless patients have symptoms that are clearly due to a slow heartbeat. The following are conditions that produce bradycardia that requires treatment: Cardiac arrhythmias resulting from sinus-node dysfunction — In people with frequent, severe symptoms of sinus-node dysfunction, the main treatment is usually a permanent pacemaker, an implanted device that generates electrical impulses to regulate the heartbeat. Cardiac arrhythmias resulting from A-V node problems — In people with A-V node problems, the passage of heartbeat signals may be blocked to different degrees. Some patients with less severe degrees of A-V block do not need treatment. Others may simply be monitored with frequent EKGs, especially if they don't have any symptoms and have a heart rate that is adequate for their daily activities. People with the most severe form of A-V block (called third-degree A-V block) can be treated with a special dual-chambered permanent pacemaker, a pacemaker with one electrode in the atrium and one in the ventricle. Hypothyroidism — Hypothyroidism is treated with replacement doses of thyroid hormones. Synthetic forms of these hormones are available — llevothyroxine (Synthroid, Levothroid and others), liothyronine (Cytomel, Triostat) or liotrix (Thyrolar) — as well as thyroid extract. When To Call A Professional Call your doctor if your pulse is less than 60 beats per minute. This is especially important if you have had dizziness, weakness, lack of energy or fainting spells. Prognosis In well-trained athletes with normal bradycardia, the slow heartbeat is often a sign of overall good health. In other people with bradycardia, the outlook depends on the underlying disorder. For example, the prognosis is usually good in people with hypothyroidism, since treatment with thyroid hormones can relieve bradycardia and other symptoms related to low hormone levels. In some elderly patients, hormone dosages may need to be increased very slowly over several weeks to prevent straining the heart. At one time, the prognosis for people with third-degree A-V block was poor, with 50% of patients dying within one year of diagnosis. Now, however, the availability of permanent pacemakers has improved the prognosis for many people with cardiac arrhythmias. Answered by Scott Fenton 1 year ago.

That is a pretty slow heartbeat, but evidently you are still conscious. If you were passing out frequently then of course you would be very concerned. How long has it been since you have seen a doctor? You should see one if you see black when you rise suddenly from a chair. I would exercise, like run up the stairs and down again and take the pulse again. It should then be more than 43 beats per minute. Like maybe 80 or 100. Is it just 43 first thing in the morning before you get out of bed? You might want to take it during the middle of the day or when you are moderately active. Answered by Almeda Copland 1 year ago.

Yes, definitley. Only well trained athletes have low hear rates, and I'm not sure if that low is even normal for them. You should be experienciing some fatigue with walking, or strenuous excerise. If you are taking meds, then something needs to be adjusted. It's important to have your doctor give you a thorough exam.asap! You can also experience dizziness, so don't delay getting a doctor's appt. Take Care! Answered by Mauro Kemerling 1 year ago.

Very, very few healthy, normal people will have a resting HR in the 40's (usually in a deep sleep). I work in an ICU and all of our patients are monitored so I see I wide range of heart rates but, this definitely falls out of "normal range" (60-100bpm). As previous posters have mentioned the cause could be a medication (this is the most frequent cause that I personally see). If you suspect it is medication related, do not stop your medication suddenly as this could cause severe side effects. Discuss this with your physician. Answered by Danika Mascroft 1 year ago.

yes this is considerably low and should be evaluated quickly. normal heartrate is a healthy adult is 60-80. some people (mostly athletes) run low naturally and some run high (like me-my norm is about 110). if you're currently on medication for blood pressure-this could lower your heartrate. dehydration could lower it as well (it's the body's way of preserving energy and trying to keep itself alive) make sure to have this checked out asap (24-48 hours max). it could be an indication of a serious problem. Answered by Augustine Bahls 1 year ago.

No, the more in shape you are, the slower your resting heart rate will be. There are some athletes that have resting heart rates as slow as 16 Beats per minute. Answered by Jeannette Maltese 1 year ago.

It depends! when you are resting for example sleeping a heart beat rate of 43per minute might not be too slow. but if it is while you are active it might be seen as low. the average is about 70per minute. Answered by Marquetta Worlie 1 year ago.


23, married, mom, bipolar?
I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until... Asked by Yu Nebred 1 year ago.

I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until week after next. Never have been consistent with meds so i was also curious of how i was supposed to feel? Answered by Arthur Caplener 1 year ago.

Lithium drug interactions: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), [for example, ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen Naprosyn, Aleve), indomethacin (Indocin), nabumetone (Relafen), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, Arthrotec), ketorolac (Toradol)], reduce the kidney's ability to eliminate lithium and lead to elevated levels of lithium in the blood and lithium side effects. Blood concentrations of lithium may need to be measured for 4 to 7 days after an NSAID is either added or stopped during lithium therapy. Aspirin and sulindac (Clinoril) do not appear to affect lithium concentrations in the blood. Diuretics (water pills) should be used cautiously in patients receiving lithium. Diuretics that act at the distal renal tubule, [for example, hydrochlorothiazide (Hydrodiuril), spironolactone (Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium; Dyazide, Maxzide)], can increase blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics that act at the proximal tubule, [for example, acetazolamide (Diamox)], are more likely to reduce blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics such as furosemide (Lasix) and bumetanide (Bumex) may have no affect on lithium concentrations in blood. ACE inhibitors, [for example, enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Zestril, Prinivil), benazepril (Lotensin), quinapril (Accupril), moexipril (Univasc), captopril (Capoten), ramipril (Altace)], may increase the risk of developing lithium toxicity, by increasing the amount of lithium that is reabsorbed in the tubules of the kidney and thereby reducing the excretion of lithium. When carbamazepine (Tegretol) and lithium are used together, some patients may experience side effects, including dizziness, lethargy, and tremor. Central nervous system side effects also may occur when lithium is used with antidepressants, [for example, fluoxetine (Prozac) sertraline (Zoloft), and paroxetine (Paxil), fluvoxamine (Luvox), amitriptyline (Elavil), imipramine (Tofranil), desipramine (Norpramin)]. Medications which cause the urine to become alkaline (the opposite of acidic) can increase the amount of lithium that is lost into the urine. This results in lower blood concentrations of lithium and reduces the effects of lithium. Such drugs include potassium acetate, potassium citrate (Urocit-K), sodium bicarbonate, and sodium citrate (Bicitra, Cytra-2, Liqui-Citra, Oracit, Shohl's). Caffeine appears to reduce serum lithium concentrations, and side effects of lithium have increased in frequency when caffeine is consumed. Both diltiazem (Cardizem-CD, Tiazac, Dilacor-XR) and verapamil (Calan-SR, Isoptin-SR, Verelan, Covera-HS) have been reported to have variable effects on lithium levels in blood. In some patients there may be decreased lithium blood levels and in others lithium toxicity. Methyldopa (Aldomet) may increase the likelihood of lithium toxicity. Various reactions have resulted when lithium is administered with phenothiazines, [for example, chlorpromazine (Thorazine), thioridazine (Mellaril), trifluoperazine (Stelazine) or with haloperidol (Haldol)]. Such reactions have included delirium, seizures, encephalopathy, high fever or certain neurologic reactions that affect movement of muscles, called extrapyramidal symptoms. Lithium can cause goiter or hypothyroidism. The use of lithium with potassium iodide can increase the likelihood of this adverse reaction. The use of the beta blocker, propranolol (Inderal), with lithium can lead to a slow heart rate and dizziness. Other beta blockers, [for example, metoprolol (Lopressor), atenolol (Tenormin)] also may interact with lithium and be associated with a slow heart rate. Seroquel interations: Your healthcare professionals (e.g., doctor or pharmacist) may already be aware of any possible drug interactions and may be monitoring you for it. Do not start, stop or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with them first. This drug should not be used with the following medication because very serious interactions may occur: sibutramine. If you are currently using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist before starting quetiapine. Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all prescription and nonprescription/herbal products you may use, especially of: anticholinergics (e.g., belladonna alkaloids, benztropine, scopolamine), dopamine-like drugs (e.g., bromocriptine, cabergoline), levodopa, rifabutin, drugs for treating high blood pressure (e.g., alpha blockers such as prazosin, calcium channel blockers such as diltiazem, "water pills"/diuretics such as hydrochlorothiazide), drugs affecting liver enzymes that remove quetiapine from your body (e.g., azole antifungals such as fluconazole/ketoconazole/itraconazole, barbiturates such as phenobarbital, glucocorticoids such as dexamethasone, macrolide antibiotics such as erythromycin, rifampin, certain anti-seizure drugs such as carbamazepine/phenytoin, thioridazine), thyroid medicine (e.g., thyroxine). Al Answered by Leda Trosclair 1 year ago.

Well, its kinda hard if you arent consistent with your medications. The meds aren't miracle workers, you can't really expect them to really do their job if you don't take them regularly. Those do sound like somewhat higher doses, at least the seroquel does. Generally most doctors will start you rather low, and gradually work your dosage up to what you need, that way side effects are minimized. If you don't take them for awhile, then all of a sudden decide to start up again, you can expect to feel worse for the first week. I would see your doc as soon as you can, let them know how you're feeling and what you've been doing with the meds, and once they prescribe you more, stick to it and you'll feel better. Answered by Avery Reveles 1 year ago.

It sounds to me like both of you are the problem. Whether you like it or not, she does have the right to tell you what to do. She is the adult and you are the child in the household. Grow up and get over it. The crap of "Of course I went over budget" Shows a complete disregard for others. She has no business screaming at you but I think there is more to the story and a lot of history in your relationship. The best thing to do would be to seek counseling with a professional. Neither of you is completely right or wrong but there are some serious issues to deal with. Be ready to compromise. Just for the record, I raised my step daughter from the time she was two years old. There were lots of issues because she thought the same way you do and in my house I am the undisputed boss. Had she screamed at me, even at 15, she would have been over my knee and spanked before she could get half a sentence out of her mouth. But then, I tried to always be fair and reasonable, even taking her side against my own daughter several times because I felt the stepdaughter was right. In the end, you are fighting a losing battle and making matters worse with your attitude. Try working together! Answered by Polly Ryley 1 year ago.

In order for the meds. to work correctly you need to take them regularly. Your doctor has you on these dosages because he thinks they will work the best in this combination. Keep taking them every day on time until you have your appointment. If things haven't cleared up then have a talk with him and he can recommend any changes you may need. Answered by Moses January 1 year ago.


Hypertension problem?
I'm 23 years old anyways. Asked by Aida Skalka 1 year ago.

Well it's been like this, I have been treated for hypertension for like 4-5 months with sotalol 40mg morning, diuretic in mid day, and 40mg at night sotalol (2 x half tablet). It helped me to take off some symtpoms, I had chest pain, was feeling faint, and etc. My blood pressure even with medicine never got down under 140, mostly 150 and so. But recently I woke up one morning and my heart was pounding so much, and i measured 190/110. And later again i started to feel faint somehow, and out of streght, this all preceded 3-4 day headache, which i still have to some bit. Now what I'm wondering. Even I drink medicine. Why doesn't my blood pressure go to normal count? I will tomorrow settle appointment with my cardilogist. Should my blood pressure be under 140/95, considering i had surgery (tetralogiae fallot) and have mild regurgitation which isn't making problem. Could it be that I'm not taking enough medicine for my condition? Any experiences or answers are welcome! Thanks Answered by Simonne Popovich 1 year ago.

Hypertension can be classified either essential (primary) or secondary. Essential hypertension indicates that no specific medical cause can be found to explain a patient's condition. Secondary hypertension indicates that the high blood pressure is a result of (i.e., secondary to) another condition, such as kidney disease or tumours (pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma). Persistent hypertension is one of the risk factors for strokes, heart attacks, heart failure and arterial aneurysm, and is a leading cause of chronic renal failure. In terms of medications for this medical condition; there are several types: - Diuretics (water pills) helps your body to get rid of extra sodium (salt) and water so your blood vessels don't have to hold too much fluid. Some examples of diuretics include chlorthalidone (brand name: Thalitone), furosemide (brand name: Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (brand name: Esidrix) and indapamide (brand name: Lozol). Your doctor may also prescribe a combination of diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide combined with triamterene (brand names: Dyazide, Maxzide). - Beta-blockers makes the heart beat slower so that blood passes through your blood vessels with less force. Some examples of beta-blockers include acebutolol (brand name: Sectral), atenolol (brand name: Tenormin), carvedilol (brand name: Coreg), metoprolol (brand names: Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (brand name: Corgard), propranolol (brand name: Inderal) and timolol (brand name: Blocadren). - Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also called ACE inhibitors) keeps your body from making angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ACE inhibitors include benazepril (brand name: Lotensin), enalapril (brand name: Vasotec), lisinopril (brand names: Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (brand name: Accupril), ramipril (brand name: Altace) and trandolapril (brand name: Mavik). - Angiotensin II receptor blockers (also called ARBs) protects your blood vessels from the effects of angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ARBs include candesartan (brand name: Atacand), irbesartan (brand name: Avapro), losartan (brand name: Cozaar), olmesartan (brand name: Benicar), telmisartan (brand name: Micardis) and valsartan (brand name: Diovan). - Calcium channel blockers (also called CCBs) helps to keep your blood vessels from constricting (becoming narrow) by blocking calcium from entering your cells. Some examples of CCBs include amlodipine (brand name: Norvasc), diltiazem (brand names: Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, Tiazac), felodipine (brand name: Plendil), nicardipine (brand name: Cardene), nifedipine (brand names: Adalat, Procardia) and verapamil (some brand names: Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan). - Alpha-blockers helps to relax your blood vessels by reducing nerve impulses. This allows your blood to pass through more easily. Some examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin (brand name: Cardura), prazosin (brand name: Minipress) and terazosin (brand name: Hytrin). - Centrally acting drugs may affect your brain and central nervous system to reduce the nerve impulses that can cause your blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of centrally acting drugs include clonidine (brand name: Catapres) and methyldopa. - Direct vasodilators relaxes the muscles in the blood vessel walls. This causes the blood vessels to widen. Some examples of vasodilators include hydralazine (brand name: Apresoline) and minoxidil (brand name: Loniten). I will personally suggest that You get an Echocardiogram scan done. You must also get your cholesterol, fat and sugar levels of your body tested. A good result will reflect the following normal results: - The Total Cholesterol level should remain below 200 mg/dL all the time; HDL's typical normal level is considered to be at 40 mg/dL and above. However, the higher your HDL level be the better it is for your health. Some natural ways to maintain and raise your HDL level are by aerobic exercising and excluding trans fatty acids from your diet; The normal ratio of Total Cholesterol to HDL is considered at 5:1 or below; a desirable LDL-cholesterol level must always be below 140 mg/dL to be considered normal. - Triglycerides level is also important and must remain below 150 mg/dL. - Glucose level. Normal is about 90mg/100ml, or 5mM/L. Overall, You should be getting regular check-ups, following a healthy diet, taking your medications as prescript, rest and other instructions from your specialist/s and general physician. Good Health To You ! Answered by Margie Cardoso 1 year ago.

sorry but you should never just cease your medication like this. you should go back to your health professional and see where you go from here. depending on your age and many other factors of your life you need to keep your BP under control and often you it can take some time to find the right medication to keep you in a stable condition. never never never muck about with hypertension. Answered by Chaya Schad 1 year ago.

Eat less animal fat & lose weight. Answered by Chi Rudoy 1 year ago.


What are the side affects of verapamil (verelan pm)?
Asked by Delora Killingsworth 1 year ago.

VERAPAMIL Generic Name: verapamil (oral) (ver AH pa mill) Brand Names: Calan, Calan SR, Covera-HS, Isoptin, Isoptin SR, Verelan, Verelan PM What is the most important information I should know about verapamil? • Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. If you stop taking the medication, your condition could become worse. • Do not crush, chew, or break extended-release forms of verapamil such as generic Covera-HS and Verelan PM. Swallow them whole. Generic verapamil SR, Isoptin SR, and Calan SR may be divided in half but should not be crushed or chewed. What is verapamil? • Verapamil is in a class of drugs called calcium channel blockers. Verapamil relaxes (widens) blood vessels (veins and arteries), which makes it easier for the heart to pump and reduces its workload. • Verapamil is used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure), to treat angina (chest pain), and to control some types of irregular heartbeats. • Verapamil may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking verapamil? • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have · kidney or liver disease; · other diseases of the heart or blood vessels such as sick sinus syndrome, aortic stenosis, heart failure, heart block, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, coronary artery disease, or low blood pressure; or · muscular dystrophy. • You may not be able to take verapamil, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above. • Verapamil is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether verapamil will be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take verapamil without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. • Verapamil passes into breast milk and may harm a nursing infant. Do not take verapamil without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take verapamil? • Take verapamil exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you. • Take each dose with a full glass of water. • Verelan, Verelan PM, Calan, Isoptin, Covera-HS, and generic forms of regular-release verapamil can be taken with or without food. Taking the medication with food may reduce stomach upset if it occurs. • Calan SR, Isoptin SR, and generic sustained-release verapamil (verapamil SR) may be more likely to cause stomach upset and should be taken with food to reduce this side effect. • Take Covera-HS and Verelan PM at bedtime. • If you have trouble swallowing the Verelan pellet-filled capsules, they can be opened and the contents can be sprinkled onto cold, soft food such as applesauce. This mixture must be swallowed without chewing. Use the mixture immediately. Do not save it for later use. (Do not use this procedure for the Verelan PM capsules.) • Do not crush, chew, or break extended-release forms of verapamil such as Covera-HS and Verelan PM. Swallow them whole. Generic verapamil SR, Isoptin SR, and Calan SR may be divided in half if the tablets are scored, but should not be crushed or chewed. • If you are taking Covera-HS, do not be concerned if you find what looks like an undissolved tablet in your stool. This medication is formulated with an outer shell that does not dissolve. This shell allows the medicine to be released slowly into your body before it is passed out in the stool. • It is important to take verapamil regularly to get the most benefit. • Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. If you stop taking the medication, your condition could become worse. • Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with verapamil. The interaction could lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. • Your doctor may want you to have blood tests, blood pressure monitoring, or other medical evaluations during treatment with verapamil to monitor progress and side effects. • Store verapamil at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose? • Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication. What happens if I overdose? • Seek emergency medical attention. • Symptoms of a verapamil overdose include dizziness, weakness, chest pain, shortness of breath, fainting, an unusually fast or slow heartbeat, coma, slurred speech, and confusion. What should I avoid while taking verapamil? • Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with verapamil. The interaction could lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. • Avoid the use alcohol. Alcohol may further lower blood pressure and increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking verapamil. • Follow any recommendations your doctor makes about diet or exercise. What are the possible side effects of verapamil? • If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking verapamil and contact your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical treatment: · an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); · an unusually fast or slow heartbeat; · shortness of breath (heart failure); · fainting; · abnormal behavior or psychosis; · jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or · swelling of the legs or ankles. • Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take verapamil and talk to your doctor if you experience · unusual headache, fatigue, or tiredness; · insomnia or trouble sleeping; · vivid dreams; · hair loss; · nausea or diarrhea; or · increased urination. • Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect verapamil? • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following drugs: · cyclosporine (Sandimmune, Neoral); · cimetidine (Tagamet, Tagamet HB); · carbamazepine (Tegretol, Carbatrol); · lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith, others); · theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theochron, Theolair, Theobid, Elixophyllin, Slo-Phyllin, others); · rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane); · phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton); · an HMG CoA reductase inhibitor such as atorvastatin (Lipitor), lovastatin (Mevacor), simvastatin (Zocor), and others; or · another heart medication such as propranolol (Inderal), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), atenolol (Tenormin), digoxin (Lanoxin), quinidine (Quinora, Quinidex, Quinaglute), flecainide (Tambocor), disopyramide (Norpace), captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), and others. • You may not be able to take verapamil, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring if you are taking any of the medicines listed above. • Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with verapamil or affect your condition. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. Where can I get more information? • Your pharmacist has additional information about verapamil written for health professionals that you may read. --------------------------------------... • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. • Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/ or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Answered by Shelly Heitzman 1 year ago.


29 wks pregnant- should i go to the EMERGENCY ROOM even though i feel fine now ?
Symptoms : light headed,head ache, hig blood pressure & heart beating fast.. this is my first pregnancy and i've been fine until last Thur & friday.. On thursday at work my back ached and i was fatigued , and friday afternoon i started feeling lightheaded, w/ a headache and and the need for air . Over the... Asked by Damion Martnez 1 year ago.

Symptoms : light headed,head ache, hig blood pressure & heart beating fast.. this is my first pregnancy and i've been fine until last Thur & friday.. On thursday at work my back ached and i was fatigued , and friday afternoon i started feeling lightheaded, w/ a headache and and the need for air . Over the weekind i was fine (my days off) this monday again like from 1:30-3:00 i had the same symptoms but this time i took my blood pressure since i felt my hear beating fast and it was 140/68. I called the dr's office but they didnt call back . by 3:00 my symtoms were gone. i bet if i would of taking my blood pressure on friday it would of been high ( i also see little streaks in my vision some times. I dont know what is going on, but now i'm completely fine I called the dr's office and told them my symptoms but i forgot to mention that i felt my heart beating fast and that was also befopre i took my blood pressure , so they had no idea about those details ..they didnt call me back till 2hrs later and they left a message saying that it's probably normal and if i was concerned to go to the ER.. By the time i called back there office was closed. ~ not anemic nor do i have diabetes -i have an office job work 40hrs a week Answered by Stewart Depolito 1 year ago.

Rapid heartbeat. Lightheadedness or dizziness. Headache. Ringing in the ears (tinnitus). Irritability and other mood disturbances. Full article >>> Side Effects Include:Calan (calan SR, isoptin, isoptin SR, verelan)Constipation, dizziness, fatigue, headache, fluid retention, low blood pressure, nauseaCardene (nicardipine hydrochloride)Dizziness, headache, indigestion, nausea, rapid heartbeat, ... Full article >>> Tremors, agitation, a rapid heartbeat, and hypertension are all common side effects of Ritalin misuse. Full article >>> The severe form of the disease commences with fever, chills, bleeding into the skin, rapid heartbeat, headache, back pains, and extreme prostration. Nausea, vomiting, and constipation are common. Jaundice usually appears on the second or third day. Full article >>> These symptoms include confusion, sweating, weakness, paleness, and a rapid heartbeat. In severe cases, hypoglycemia can progress to seizures and coma. You develop symptoms of ketoacidosis (a dangerous chemical imbalance in the body). Full article >>> A physical examination may reveal either an irregular or a rapid heartbeat. There may be distended neck veins, enlarged liver, peripheral edema (swelling of the limbs), and signs of pleural effusion (fluid around the lungs). Full article >>> In extreme cases there may be heart palpitations and a rapid heartbeat, high blood pressure, anxiety, confusion, seizures and paralysis. An acute attack of porphyria can be fatal (although this is very rare these days). Full article >>> Supraventricular tachyarrhythmias - This diverse family of cardiac arrhythmias causes rapid heartbeats (tachycardias) that start in parts of the heart above the ventricles. Full article >>> For example, patients with panic disorder may experience panic attacks that include rapid heartbeat, heavy sweating and shortness of breath. Full article >>> The symptoms and signs of social phobia include blushing, sweating, trembling, rapid heartbeat, muscle tension, nausea or other stomach discomfort, lightheadedness, and other symptoms of anxiety. Full article >>> Supraventricular tachycardia, then, is a rapid heartbeat originating in the atria. Full article >>> SYMPTOMS"Depression, tension, melancholia, breast tenderness, cramps, fainting, water retention, rapid heartbeat, and backache may occur. Full article >>> history of exposure in an area where Chagas disease is known to occur swollen red area at site of previous insect bite enlarged lymph nodes swelling of one eye fever irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) rapid heartbeat (tachycardia) ... Full article >>> Too much thyroid hormone can cause rapid heartbeat, weight loss, and other symptoms. Thyroid hormone-producing tumors may be large and may spread. They sometimes also make growth hormone and/or prolactin. Answered by Nichole Tuschhoff 1 year ago.

I would make a list of all the symptoms that you mentioned here and go see your physician as soon as possible, preferably tomorrow (unless of course anything gets worse tonight). High blood pressure will happen during pregnancy, but you want to keep it under wraps. The backache, fatigue, and lightheadedness can also be common at your stage--the need for air can be explained by your diaphragm being limited in space, so you have to take deeper breaths, etc... The thing that stands out to me is the streaks in your vision and the fact that all of these symptoms are happening together & just now starting. Make an appointment and get some bloodwork/urine sample (fundus measurement & baby's heartbeat), etc done just to make sure everything is going okay--you certainly won't regret either figuring it out, or getting some advice on what's going on. Better safe than sorry :) Answered by Adelaida Tremel 1 year ago.

Follow your gut instinct. Like when I fell and hit my ribs on a chair, everyone on here freaked over me not going to the ER. He was moving a ton, I felt fine except a little scared. Me personally, I wouldn't go. I've been 4 times so far, and they couldn't do crap any of the 4 times anyway except 2 RhoGam shots. Is baby still moving? Answered by Sherika Sandburg 1 year ago.

hey hun, Definitely go to the doctors or hospital to get checked, My midwife told me last week that if i every had hot flashes, dizziness or fainiting. Or if i say little things visually to give her a call and to come past if they continued. You blood pressure was very high darling. they will do a urine test to determine if protein or something is low.. God bless , see how you go, drink plenty of fluids. If it comes back go the e.r better to be safe darling,.. Answered by Peggy Hoshino 1 year ago.


Someone with Mitral Valve Prolapse please help?
Sarah - I was also diagnosed with Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome but a second opinion said no. U should check it out u sound like me! Asked by Robby Auslander 1 year ago.

I have Mitral Valve Prolapse and am 28. I am finding it impossible to do any cardio related exercise anymore. I just carried some groceries up the stairs and I was fine until about 3 minutes into it I can't catch my breath. The breathing just doesn't keep up. I try breathing normally but find myself having to stop whatever I am doing and just sit. Talking is also impossible. Am I going to get worse with age? I don't smoke. I can't even workout anymore. Help Answered by Jenice Meeuwsen 1 year ago.

I have this and asthma as well and i started getting out of breath just getting in and out of the tub/shower and was getting severe chest and arm pains. I thought I was having a heart attack. The doctor put me on a medicine to improve my circulation called verapamil PM(verelan pm is the generic) they did all kinds of tests on me and they couldn't find anything until they did a ultrasound of my heart a few years ago that's when I found out I had MVP(Im 35 now). they told me there isn't much you can do and they wont do surgery unless you mainly go into some kind of cardiac arrest.. they told me to do a LOT of walking to strengthen up my heart and the muscles. I don't know why that one person said you have stuff around your heart that isn't fat. MVP is a heart valve that doesn't close properly when the blood is being pumped to and from the heart so the extra blood that is being spilled is going elsewhere MVP isn't from being overweight it can be a birth defect or be caused from scarlet fever and a few other childhood diseases.the only thing I can tell you is maybe see a dr or specialist and make sure you don't have something else on top of your condition you shouldn't be struggling for air unless something else is wrong(like maybe you have fluid building up in your lungs from your heart not working properly(my mom in law had this and had to take lasix-a heart med) . MVP can also cause panic attacks in some people.it will most likely get worse with age and I have never smoked either so I know its not caused by smoking. see your doctor and tell him the problems so they can run more tests and go from there. Answered by Sabrina Shrake 1 year ago.

costly Madam, i'm a heart expert sending this text for you. desire it helps you. Mitral valve prolapse, oftentimes spoke of as MVP, is a elementary heart valve ailment. The mitral valve is between the left atrium and the left ventricle of the middle. It has 2 leaflets (flaps) that administration the blood pass. MVP happens whilst one or the two between the leaflets are enlarged or have greater tissue. MVP is frequently innocuous. whether, substantial problems can ensue, inclusive of a blood clot interior the innovations and an infection spoke of as infective endocarditis related to the mitral valve besides as different valves. MVP looks two times as oftentimes in women human beings as in men. it is maximum generally a hereditary ailment. some those with MVP have not got any indicators. whether, maximum sufferers adventure a speedy or odd heartbeat, shortness of breath, mild-headedness, and protracted fatigue. Many sufferers additionally be afflicted by migraines, ingesting and sound asleep themes, an overactive or contaminated thyroid gland, diarrhea, and chilly palms and feet. Emotional rigidity oftentimes magnifies the indicators. docs oftentimes prescribe widely used tests and cardio workout for those that've MVP. sufferers are additionally recommended to limit their intake or use of severe-carbohydrate ingredients, caffeine, and decongestants. some sufferers could choose beta-blockers and particular antiarrhythmic drugs. greater severe situations could require surgical treatment to repair or replace the valve or to insert an digital regulator, alongside with a pacemaker or defibrillator. Answered by Twila Podraza 1 year ago.

I have it too, i was born with it although i am only 18. Since i was a kid i was never able to go on roller coasters or air planes because they were worried it would affect me. Ive had episodes where my heart starts to hurt and I run out of breath doing absolutly nothing. When it comes to working out i find it harder than the average person because it feels like asthma attacks when im running. All you gotta do is take it easy, if your feeling dizzy or liek somethings wrong immediatly sit down, if it doesnt go away call the hospital. Ive been there pleantly of times because of it. Never once had anything really bad happen to me but I sure was in a lot of pain. Its better to be safe than sorry . Hope i helped :) Answered by Shalon Icard 1 year ago.

You may want to ask your physician if the MitraClip is an option to explore. The procedure does not involve traditional opening of the chest cavity and recovery time is almost instantaneous. best wishes to you. Answered by Chieko Iqbal 1 year ago.

MVP is a serious disease. Its getting bad for you since you cant go up stairs. You might need surgery Answered by Candyce Feltus 1 year ago.


Bipolar and meds combo?
What other meds combos are apart from old stand by lithium? Asked by Lynelle Strothmann 1 year ago.

you don't need combos for bipolar disorder because if you have one...it doesn't work, the dosage can be upped and it'll end up working. Lithium is pretty dangerous considering most medications can affect you and make the lithium not work... * acetazolamide (Diamox); * aminophylline (Truphylline) or theophylline (Elixophyllin, Respbid, Theo-Bid, Theo-Dur, Uniphyl); * sodium bicarbonate (Alka-Seltzer, Bicitra, Polycitra, or baking soda home remedy antacid); * carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); * fluoxetine (Prozac); * metronidazole (Flagyl); * potassium iodide thyroid medication (Pima); * an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik); * a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Tiazac, Cartia, Cardizem) or verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan); * a diuretic (water pill) such as amiloride (Midamor, Moduretic), bumetanide (Bumex), chlorthalidone (Hygroton, Thalitone), ethacrynic acid (Edecrin), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Hyzaar, Vasoretic,Zestoretic), indapamide (Lozol), metolazone (Mykrox, Zaroxolyn), spironolactone (Aldactazide, Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium, Maxzide, Dyazide), torsemide (Demadex), and others; * medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, such as haloperidol (Haldol), aripiprazole (Abilify), chlorpromazine (Thorazine), clozapine (Clozaril, Fazaclo), olanzapine (Zyprexa), quetiapine (Seroquel), pimozide (Orap), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon); or * celecoxib (Celebrex) or an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), diflunisal (Dolobid), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), ketorolac (Toradol), mefenamic acid (Ponstel), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. that's all that you couldn't take with Lithium. plus, it's recommended to have your blood drawn every so often while on it. and it causes weight gain....yeah, not good. BUT. Lamictal is probably the newest drug on the market for BP. i take it and have been for 2 years now since i was diagnosed with type II bipolar disorder....it's a 5 week process, but it's worth the wait. i think it's a miracle drug and doesn't cause all the side effects other drugs have. in rare cases a body rash can happen, to some people. but even with that, it's not even life threatening. i've only had to up my dosage from 100mg [stayed at that for a year and a half] to 150mg. and now...after my struggles with BP for all of high school...i'm a senior and happy 85% of the time. to the point where people wouldn't even figure somethings wrong with me. so my advice...talk to your doc about switching Lamictal. it doesn't cause weight gain. in my experience, along with my adderall i lost the 30 pounds i gained when i was depressed. back at 160 at 6'2'. research the drug...really it's probably the best. i asked my psych why he didn't put me on lithium, and told me that even though lithium is the most popular drug, he's found in that nearly 2/3 of his bipolar patients of his patients [who was put on that at first or other mood stabilizers didn't work] since the drug came out has worked very well for them. Answered by Luciana Donley 1 year ago.

Lithium, is by far the best for True Bipolar. You must get your blood tests regular to check your lithium levels, but it is known to work the best. My son took this for many years and he did the best on it. He now refuses and his life is a mess because of it. Answered by Crista Stults 1 year ago.

For mood stabilizers, there is Depakote, Topamax, Lamitcal, Abilify... There are more, can't think of them all. Anti-depressants, Prozac, Zoloft, Effexor, Wellbutrin, Cymbalta, Lexapro, etc etc. There are also mixes like Symbyax, which is Prozac with and antipsychotic. There are a whole bunch of things... Answered by Leandra Smeenk 1 year ago.

There are more choice's in bi-polar meds now, like, depecote, seroquel, limictal, closeril and a host of others, only your health care provider can accurately know which combinations are safe and effective for you, the best to you, Mercee. Answered by Pamila Etchells 1 year ago.

Oh damn, please ask a doctor or pharmacist on this one. Do not trust Yahoo Answers, or anyone online for that matter, on this question. It's a really bad idea to mix similar medications, usually. Answered by Fermina Boggiano 1 year ago.

i take a whole bevy of medication- lithium, lamictal, paxil and wellbutrin........some sleepers if needed.....usually trazadone....... Answered by Gisele Aschoff 1 year ago.


What all medications cannot be taken with bystolic?
it is a beta blocker. i want to know the names of other medications that cannot be taken with this medicine. Asked by Sherise Chadburn 1 year ago.

seems like a lot. Before taking Bystolic, tell your doctor if you are using: digitalis (digoxin, Lanoxin); clonidine (Catapres); reserpine; guanethidine (Ismelin); a heart medication such as nifedipine (Procardia, Adalat), reserpine (Serpasil), verapamil (Calan, Verelan, Isoptin), diltiazem (Cartia, Cardizem); heart rhythm medicine such as amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone), disopyramide (Norpace), procainamide (Procan, Pronestyl), propafenone (Rythmol), quinidine (Quinidex, Quin-Release Quin-G), and others; an antidepressant such as fluoxetine (Prozac), paroxetine (Paxil), and others; or another beta-blocker such as atenolol (Tenormin), bisoprolol (Zebeta), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), sotalol (Betapace), or timolol (Blocadren), and others. This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with Bystolic. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Answered by Rema Arrindel 1 year ago.


Is a heartbeat of 43 beats per min too slow?
and not athlete thanks Asked by Rod Walmer 1 year ago.

Yes it is too slow. Normal Heart Beat for adult ranges from 60-100 beats per min. It is called bradycardia. Bradycardia is an abnormally slow heart rate of less than 60 beats per minute. A normal heartbeat is between 60 and 100 beats per minute. Here's what happens during a normal heartbeat: The electrical signal that starts a heartbeat comes from the heart's sinus node, the natural pacemaker located in the upper portion of the right atrium. From the sinus node, the heartbeat signal travels to the atrioventricular (A-V) node, located between the atria, and then through the bundle of His (pronounced "hiss") — a series of modified heart-muscle fibers located between the ventricles to the muscles of the ventricles. This triggers a contraction of the ventricles and produces a heartbeat. Bradycardia, even as low as 50 beats per minute, can be normal in athletes and other people who are physically active. In these people, regular exercise improves the heart's ability to pump blood efficiently, so fewer heart contractions are required to supply the body's needs. In other cases, bradycardia can be a form of cardiac arrhythmia, a heart-rate abnormality. Cardiac arrhythmia can be caused by a problem in the sinus node, or it can be related to some disturbance in the passage of heartbeat signals through the A-V node and bundle of His. Also, bradycardia sometimes is a side effect of certain medications, including propranolol (Inderal), atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Toprol-XL), sotalol (Betapace), verapamil (Calan, Isoptin, Verelan) and diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor-XR). Bradycardia also occurs in some people who have certain medical illnesses not related to the heart, such as: Abnormally low level of thyroid hormones (hypothyroidism) Severe liver disease An abnormally low body temperature (hypothermia) Typhoid fever Brucellosis, an infectious disease marked by fever, sweating and weakness that is transmitted to humans by direct contact with diseased animals or through ingestion of contaminated meat, milk or cheese Symptoms Bradycardia can cause dizziness, weakness, lack of energy, or fainting spells. If bradycardia is caused by a medical illness, there will be additional symptoms that are specific to that illness. For example, people whose bradycardia is due to severe hypothyroidism also can have constipation, muscle cramps, weight gain (often despite poor appetite), very dry skin, hair that is thin and dry, an abnormal sensitivity to cold temperatures and other symptoms related to low levels of thyroid hormones. Diagnosis Your doctor will ask about your family history of heart disease, cardiac arrhythmias and fainting spells. He or she also will review your current symptoms and your personal medical history, including your use of medications that may cause bradycardia. During the physical examination, your doctor will check your heart rate and rhythm, and your pulse. You may be asked to do some sit-ups or other exercise so that your doctor can see if your heart rate rises normally when your heart is asked to do more work. Your doctor also will check for physical signs of thyroid abnormalities, including an enlarged thyroid gland, very dry skin, and hair that is thin and dry. To further evaluate your bradycardia, your doctor will order an electrocardiogram (EKG). However, because some forms of bradycardia come and go, a one-time office EKG may be normal. If this is the case, a test called ambulatory electrocardiography may be done. During this test, the patient wears a portable EKG machine called a Holter monitor, usually for 24 hours. If your symptoms are infrequent, you may wear a monitor for longer. You will be taught to press a button to record your EKG reading when your symptoms occur. Depending on the results of your physical examination, other tests may be necessary to check for medical illnesses that produce bradycardia. For example, if you have symptoms and physical signs of hypothyroidism, your doctor may order blood tests to measure levels of thyroid hormones and TSH, a pituitary gland hormone that stimulates the thyroid. Your doctor also may order blood tests for cholesterol and certain liver enzymes, which often are elevated in people with hypothyroidism. Expected Duration How long bradycardia lasts depends on its cause. For example, normal bradycardia in a well-trained athlete will last as long as the athlete maintains his or her usual level of exercise. When bradycardia occurs as a side effect of medication, it usually will go away as soon as the drug that triggered the bradycardia is used by the body or excreted in the urine. Bradycardia caused by hypothyroidism will go away quickly after treatment with thyroid hormones. Certain forms of bradycardia resulting from cardiac arrhythmias can be cured with a permanent pacemaker. Prevention There are no general guidelines to prevent all forms of bradycardia. When bradycardia occurs as a side effect of medication, the problem can be prevented by either switching the drug or reducing its dose. Treatment In most cases, bradycardia in healthy, well-trained athletes does not need to be treated. In fact, in most people, bradycardia does not require treatment unless patients have symptoms that are clearly due to a slow heartbeat. The following are conditions that produce bradycardia that requires treatment: Cardiac arrhythmias resulting from sinus-node dysfunction — In people with frequent, severe symptoms of sinus-node dysfunction, the main treatment is usually a permanent pacemaker, an implanted device that generates electrical impulses to regulate the heartbeat. Cardiac arrhythmias resulting from A-V node problems — In people with A-V node problems, the passage of heartbeat signals may be blocked to different degrees. Some patients with less severe degrees of A-V block do not need treatment. Others may simply be monitored with frequent EKGs, especially if they don't have any symptoms and have a heart rate that is adequate for their daily activities. People with the most severe form of A-V block (called third-degree A-V block) can be treated with a special dual-chambered permanent pacemaker, a pacemaker with one electrode in the atrium and one in the ventricle. Hypothyroidism — Hypothyroidism is treated with replacement doses of thyroid hormones. Synthetic forms of these hormones are available — llevothyroxine (Synthroid, Levothroid and others), liothyronine (Cytomel, Triostat) or liotrix (Thyrolar) — as well as thyroid extract. When To Call A Professional Call your doctor if your pulse is less than 60 beats per minute. This is especially important if you have had dizziness, weakness, lack of energy or fainting spells. Prognosis In well-trained athletes with normal bradycardia, the slow heartbeat is often a sign of overall good health. In other people with bradycardia, the outlook depends on the underlying disorder. For example, the prognosis is usually good in people with hypothyroidism, since treatment with thyroid hormones can relieve bradycardia and other symptoms related to low hormone levels. In some elderly patients, hormone dosages may need to be increased very slowly over several weeks to prevent straining the heart. At one time, the prognosis for people with third-degree A-V block was poor, with 50% of patients dying within one year of diagnosis. Now, however, the availability of permanent pacemakers has improved the prognosis for many people with cardiac arrhythmias. Answered by Sabina Redel 1 year ago.

That is a pretty slow heartbeat, but evidently you are still conscious. If you were passing out frequently then of course you would be very concerned. How long has it been since you have seen a doctor? You should see one if you see black when you rise suddenly from a chair. I would exercise, like run up the stairs and down again and take the pulse again. It should then be more than 43 beats per minute. Like maybe 80 or 100. Is it just 43 first thing in the morning before you get out of bed? You might want to take it during the middle of the day or when you are moderately active. Answered by Herschel Fineberg 1 year ago.

Yes, definitley. Only well trained athletes have low hear rates, and I'm not sure if that low is even normal for them. You should be experienciing some fatigue with walking, or strenuous excerise. If you are taking meds, then something needs to be adjusted. It's important to have your doctor give you a thorough exam.asap! You can also experience dizziness, so don't delay getting a doctor's appt. Take Care! Answered by Michaele Astarita 1 year ago.

Very, very few healthy, normal people will have a resting HR in the 40's (usually in a deep sleep). I work in an ICU and all of our patients are monitored so I see I wide range of heart rates but, this definitely falls out of "normal range" (60-100bpm). As previous posters have mentioned the cause could be a medication (this is the most frequent cause that I personally see). If you suspect it is medication related, do not stop your medication suddenly as this could cause severe side effects. Discuss this with your physician. Answered by Letty Grigalonis 1 year ago.

yes this is considerably low and should be evaluated quickly. normal heartrate is a healthy adult is 60-80. some people (mostly athletes) run low naturally and some run high (like me-my norm is about 110). if you're currently on medication for blood pressure-this could lower your heartrate. dehydration could lower it as well (it's the body's way of preserving energy and trying to keep itself alive) make sure to have this checked out asap (24-48 hours max). it could be an indication of a serious problem. Answered by Ellie Polidoro 1 year ago.

No, the more in shape you are, the slower your resting heart rate will be. There are some athletes that have resting heart rates as slow as 16 Beats per minute. Answered by Monty Galpin 1 year ago.

It depends! when you are resting for example sleeping a heart beat rate of 43per minute might not be too slow. but if it is while you are active it might be seen as low. the average is about 70per minute. Answered by Lanell Bonifant 1 year ago.


23, married, mom, bipolar?
I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until... Asked by Nilsa Boomershine 1 year ago.

I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until week after next. Never have been consistent with meds so i was also curious of how i was supposed to feel? Answered by Garrett Oury 1 year ago.

Lithium drug interactions: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), [for example, ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen Naprosyn, Aleve), indomethacin (Indocin), nabumetone (Relafen), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, Arthrotec), ketorolac (Toradol)], reduce the kidney's ability to eliminate lithium and lead to elevated levels of lithium in the blood and lithium side effects. Blood concentrations of lithium may need to be measured for 4 to 7 days after an NSAID is either added or stopped during lithium therapy. Aspirin and sulindac (Clinoril) do not appear to affect lithium concentrations in the blood. Diuretics (water pills) should be used cautiously in patients receiving lithium. Diuretics that act at the distal renal tubule, [for example, hydrochlorothiazide (Hydrodiuril), spironolactone (Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium; Dyazide, Maxzide)], can increase blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics that act at the proximal tubule, [for example, acetazolamide (Diamox)], are more likely to reduce blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics such as furosemide (Lasix) and bumetanide (Bumex) may have no affect on lithium concentrations in blood. ACE inhibitors, [for example, enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Zestril, Prinivil), benazepril (Lotensin), quinapril (Accupril), moexipril (Univasc), captopril (Capoten), ramipril (Altace)], may increase the risk of developing lithium toxicity, by increasing the amount of lithium that is reabsorbed in the tubules of the kidney and thereby reducing the excretion of lithium. When carbamazepine (Tegretol) and lithium are used together, some patients may experience side effects, including dizziness, lethargy, and tremor. Central nervous system side effects also may occur when lithium is used with antidepressants, [for example, fluoxetine (Prozac) sertraline (Zoloft), and paroxetine (Paxil), fluvoxamine (Luvox), amitriptyline (Elavil), imipramine (Tofranil), desipramine (Norpramin)]. Medications which cause the urine to become alkaline (the opposite of acidic) can increase the amount of lithium that is lost into the urine. This results in lower blood concentrations of lithium and reduces the effects of lithium. Such drugs include potassium acetate, potassium citrate (Urocit-K), sodium bicarbonate, and sodium citrate (Bicitra, Cytra-2, Liqui-Citra, Oracit, Shohl's). Caffeine appears to reduce serum lithium concentrations, and side effects of lithium have increased in frequency when caffeine is consumed. Both diltiazem (Cardizem-CD, Tiazac, Dilacor-XR) and verapamil (Calan-SR, Isoptin-SR, Verelan, Covera-HS) have been reported to have variable effects on lithium levels in blood. In some patients there may be decreased lithium blood levels and in others lithium toxicity. Methyldopa (Aldomet) may increase the likelihood of lithium toxicity. Various reactions have resulted when lithium is administered with phenothiazines, [for example, chlorpromazine (Thorazine), thioridazine (Mellaril), trifluoperazine (Stelazine) or with haloperidol (Haldol)]. Such reactions have included delirium, seizures, encephalopathy, high fever or certain neurologic reactions that affect movement of muscles, called extrapyramidal symptoms. Lithium can cause goiter or hypothyroidism. The use of lithium with potassium iodide can increase the likelihood of this adverse reaction. The use of the beta blocker, propranolol (Inderal), with lithium can lead to a slow heart rate and dizziness. Other beta blockers, [for example, metoprolol (Lopressor), atenolol (Tenormin)] also may interact with lithium and be associated with a slow heart rate. Seroquel interations: Your healthcare professionals (e.g., doctor or pharmacist) may already be aware of any possible drug interactions and may be monitoring you for it. Do not start, stop or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with them first. This drug should not be used with the following medication because very serious interactions may occur: sibutramine. If you are currently using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist before starting quetiapine. Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all prescription and nonprescription/herbal products you may use, especially of: anticholinergics (e.g., belladonna alkaloids, benztropine, scopolamine), dopamine-like drugs (e.g., bromocriptine, cabergoline), levodopa, rifabutin, drugs for treating high blood pressure (e.g., alpha blockers such as prazosin, calcium channel blockers such as diltiazem, "water pills"/diuretics such as hydrochlorothiazide), drugs affecting liver enzymes that remove quetiapine from your body (e.g., azole antifungals such as fluconazole/ketoconazole/itraconazole, barbiturates such as phenobarbital, glucocorticoids such as dexamethasone, macrolide antibiotics such as erythromycin, rifampin, certain anti-seizure drugs such as carbamazepine/phenytoin, thioridazine), thyroid medicine (e.g., thyroxine). Al Answered by Theo Novi 1 year ago.

Well, its kinda hard if you arent consistent with your medications. The meds aren't miracle workers, you can't really expect them to really do their job if you don't take them regularly. Those do sound like somewhat higher doses, at least the seroquel does. Generally most doctors will start you rather low, and gradually work your dosage up to what you need, that way side effects are minimized. If you don't take them for awhile, then all of a sudden decide to start up again, you can expect to feel worse for the first week. I would see your doc as soon as you can, let them know how you're feeling and what you've been doing with the meds, and once they prescribe you more, stick to it and you'll feel better. Answered by Odelia Klette 1 year ago.

It sounds to me like both of you are the problem. Whether you like it or not, she does have the right to tell you what to do. She is the adult and you are the child in the household. Grow up and get over it. The crap of "Of course I went over budget" Shows a complete disregard for others. She has no business screaming at you but I think there is more to the story and a lot of history in your relationship. The best thing to do would be to seek counseling with a professional. Neither of you is completely right or wrong but there are some serious issues to deal with. Be ready to compromise. Just for the record, I raised my step daughter from the time she was two years old. There were lots of issues because she thought the same way you do and in my house I am the undisputed boss. Had she screamed at me, even at 15, she would have been over my knee and spanked before she could get half a sentence out of her mouth. But then, I tried to always be fair and reasonable, even taking her side against my own daughter several times because I felt the stepdaughter was right. In the end, you are fighting a losing battle and making matters worse with your attitude. Try working together! Answered by Jame Spicker 1 year ago.

In order for the meds. to work correctly you need to take them regularly. Your doctor has you on these dosages because he thinks they will work the best in this combination. Keep taking them every day on time until you have your appointment. If things haven't cleared up then have a talk with him and he can recommend any changes you may need. Answered by Tova Lighty 1 year ago.


Hypertension problem?
I'm 23 years old anyways. Asked by Angila Reginaldo 1 year ago.

Well it's been like this, I have been treated for hypertension for like 4-5 months with sotalol 40mg morning, diuretic in mid day, and 40mg at night sotalol (2 x half tablet). It helped me to take off some symtpoms, I had chest pain, was feeling faint, and etc. My blood pressure even with medicine never got down under 140, mostly 150 and so. But recently I woke up one morning and my heart was pounding so much, and i measured 190/110. And later again i started to feel faint somehow, and out of streght, this all preceded 3-4 day headache, which i still have to some bit. Now what I'm wondering. Even I drink medicine. Why doesn't my blood pressure go to normal count? I will tomorrow settle appointment with my cardilogist. Should my blood pressure be under 140/95, considering i had surgery (tetralogiae fallot) and have mild regurgitation which isn't making problem. Could it be that I'm not taking enough medicine for my condition? Any experiences or answers are welcome! Thanks Answered by Lucienne Harrigton 1 year ago.

Hypertension can be classified either essential (primary) or secondary. Essential hypertension indicates that no specific medical cause can be found to explain a patient's condition. Secondary hypertension indicates that the high blood pressure is a result of (i.e., secondary to) another condition, such as kidney disease or tumours (pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma). Persistent hypertension is one of the risk factors for strokes, heart attacks, heart failure and arterial aneurysm, and is a leading cause of chronic renal failure. In terms of medications for this medical condition; there are several types: - Diuretics (water pills) helps your body to get rid of extra sodium (salt) and water so your blood vessels don't have to hold too much fluid. Some examples of diuretics include chlorthalidone (brand name: Thalitone), furosemide (brand name: Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (brand name: Esidrix) and indapamide (brand name: Lozol). Your doctor may also prescribe a combination of diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide combined with triamterene (brand names: Dyazide, Maxzide). - Beta-blockers makes the heart beat slower so that blood passes through your blood vessels with less force. Some examples of beta-blockers include acebutolol (brand name: Sectral), atenolol (brand name: Tenormin), carvedilol (brand name: Coreg), metoprolol (brand names: Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (brand name: Corgard), propranolol (brand name: Inderal) and timolol (brand name: Blocadren). - Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also called ACE inhibitors) keeps your body from making angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ACE inhibitors include benazepril (brand name: Lotensin), enalapril (brand name: Vasotec), lisinopril (brand names: Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (brand name: Accupril), ramipril (brand name: Altace) and trandolapril (brand name: Mavik). - Angiotensin II receptor blockers (also called ARBs) protects your blood vessels from the effects of angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ARBs include candesartan (brand name: Atacand), irbesartan (brand name: Avapro), losartan (brand name: Cozaar), olmesartan (brand name: Benicar), telmisartan (brand name: Micardis) and valsartan (brand name: Diovan). - Calcium channel blockers (also called CCBs) helps to keep your blood vessels from constricting (becoming narrow) by blocking calcium from entering your cells. Some examples of CCBs include amlodipine (brand name: Norvasc), diltiazem (brand names: Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, Tiazac), felodipine (brand name: Plendil), nicardipine (brand name: Cardene), nifedipine (brand names: Adalat, Procardia) and verapamil (some brand names: Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan). - Alpha-blockers helps to relax your blood vessels by reducing nerve impulses. This allows your blood to pass through more easily. Some examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin (brand name: Cardura), prazosin (brand name: Minipress) and terazosin (brand name: Hytrin). - Centrally acting drugs may affect your brain and central nervous system to reduce the nerve impulses that can cause your blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of centrally acting drugs include clonidine (brand name: Catapres) and methyldopa. - Direct vasodilators relaxes the muscles in the blood vessel walls. This causes the blood vessels to widen. Some examples of vasodilators include hydralazine (brand name: Apresoline) and minoxidil (brand name: Loniten). I will personally suggest that You get an Echocardiogram scan done. You must also get your cholesterol, fat and sugar levels of your body tested. A good result will reflect the following normal results: - The Total Cholesterol level should remain below 200 mg/dL all the time; HDL's typical normal level is considered to be at 40 mg/dL and above. However, the higher your HDL level be the better it is for your health. Some natural ways to maintain and raise your HDL level are by aerobic exercising and excluding trans fatty acids from your diet; The normal ratio of Total Cholesterol to HDL is considered at 5:1 or below; a desirable LDL-cholesterol level must always be below 140 mg/dL to be considered normal. - Triglycerides level is also important and must remain below 150 mg/dL. - Glucose level. Normal is about 90mg/100ml, or 5mM/L. Overall, You should be getting regular check-ups, following a healthy diet, taking your medications as prescript, rest and other instructions from your specialist/s and general physician. Good Health To You ! Answered by Kera Bessick 1 year ago.

sorry but you should never just cease your medication like this. you should go back to your health professional and see where you go from here. depending on your age and many other factors of your life you need to keep your BP under control and often you it can take some time to find the right medication to keep you in a stable condition. never never never muck about with hypertension. Answered by Elmer Mikuszewski 1 year ago.

Eat less animal fat & lose weight. Answered by Bernice Hinton 1 year ago.


What are the side affects of verapamil (verelan pm)?
Asked by Hipolito Hedman 1 year ago.

VERAPAMIL Generic Name: verapamil (oral) (ver AH pa mill) Brand Names: Calan, Calan SR, Covera-HS, Isoptin, Isoptin SR, Verelan, Verelan PM What is the most important information I should know about verapamil? • Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. If you stop taking the medication, your condition could become worse. • Do not crush, chew, or break extended-release forms of verapamil such as generic Covera-HS and Verelan PM. Swallow them whole. Generic verapamil SR, Isoptin SR, and Calan SR may be divided in half but should not be crushed or chewed. What is verapamil? • Verapamil is in a class of drugs called calcium channel blockers. Verapamil relaxes (widens) blood vessels (veins and arteries), which makes it easier for the heart to pump and reduces its workload. • Verapamil is used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure), to treat angina (chest pain), and to control some types of irregular heartbeats. • Verapamil may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking verapamil? • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have · kidney or liver disease; · other diseases of the heart or blood vessels such as sick sinus syndrome, aortic stenosis, heart failure, heart block, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, coronary artery disease, or low blood pressure; or · muscular dystrophy. • You may not be able to take verapamil, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above. • Verapamil is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether verapamil will be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take verapamil without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. • Verapamil passes into breast milk and may harm a nursing infant. Do not take verapamil without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take verapamil? • Take verapamil exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you. • Take each dose with a full glass of water. • Verelan, Verelan PM, Calan, Isoptin, Covera-HS, and generic forms of regular-release verapamil can be taken with or without food. Taking the medication with food may reduce stomach upset if it occurs. • Calan SR, Isoptin SR, and generic sustained-release verapamil (verapamil SR) may be more likely to cause stomach upset and should be taken with food to reduce this side effect. • Take Covera-HS and Verelan PM at bedtime. • If you have trouble swallowing the Verelan pellet-filled capsules, they can be opened and the contents can be sprinkled onto cold, soft food such as applesauce. This mixture must be swallowed without chewing. Use the mixture immediately. Do not save it for later use. (Do not use this procedure for the Verelan PM capsules.) • Do not crush, chew, or break extended-release forms of verapamil such as Covera-HS and Verelan PM. Swallow them whole. Generic verapamil SR, Isoptin SR, and Calan SR may be divided in half if the tablets are scored, but should not be crushed or chewed. • If you are taking Covera-HS, do not be concerned if you find what looks like an undissolved tablet in your stool. This medication is formulated with an outer shell that does not dissolve. This shell allows the medicine to be released slowly into your body before it is passed out in the stool. • It is important to take verapamil regularly to get the most benefit. • Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. If you stop taking the medication, your condition could become worse. • Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with verapamil. The interaction could lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. • Your doctor may want you to have blood tests, blood pressure monitoring, or other medical evaluations during treatment with verapamil to monitor progress and side effects. • Store verapamil at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose? • Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication. What happens if I overdose? • Seek emergency medical attention. • Symptoms of a verapamil overdose include dizziness, weakness, chest pain, shortness of breath, fainting, an unusually fast or slow heartbeat, coma, slurred speech, and confusion. What should I avoid while taking verapamil? • Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with verapamil. The interaction could lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. • Avoid the use alcohol. Alcohol may further lower blood pressure and increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking verapamil. • Follow any recommendations your doctor makes about diet or exercise. What are the possible side effects of verapamil? • If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking verapamil and contact your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical treatment: · an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); · an unusually fast or slow heartbeat; · shortness of breath (heart failure); · fainting; · abnormal behavior or psychosis; · jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or · swelling of the legs or ankles. • Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take verapamil and talk to your doctor if you experience · unusual headache, fatigue, or tiredness; · insomnia or trouble sleeping; · vivid dreams; · hair loss; · nausea or diarrhea; or · increased urination. • Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect verapamil? • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following drugs: · cyclosporine (Sandimmune, Neoral); · cimetidine (Tagamet, Tagamet HB); · carbamazepine (Tegretol, Carbatrol); · lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith, others); · theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theochron, Theolair, Theobid, Elixophyllin, Slo-Phyllin, others); · rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane); · phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton); · an HMG CoA reductase inhibitor such as atorvastatin (Lipitor), lovastatin (Mevacor), simvastatin (Zocor), and others; or · another heart medication such as propranolol (Inderal), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), atenolol (Tenormin), digoxin (Lanoxin), quinidine (Quinora, Quinidex, Quinaglute), flecainide (Tambocor), disopyramide (Norpace), captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), and others. • You may not be able to take verapamil, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring if you are taking any of the medicines listed above. • Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with verapamil or affect your condition. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. Where can I get more information? • Your pharmacist has additional information about verapamil written for health professionals that you may read. --------------------------------------... • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. • Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/ or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Answered by Twyla Obannon 1 year ago.


29 wks pregnant- should i go to the EMERGENCY ROOM even though i feel fine now ?
Symptoms : light headed,head ache, hig blood pressure & heart beating fast.. this is my first pregnancy and i've been fine until last Thur & friday.. On thursday at work my back ached and i was fatigued , and friday afternoon i started feeling lightheaded, w/ a headache and and the need for air . Over the... Asked by Regan Southam 1 year ago.

Symptoms : light headed,head ache, hig blood pressure & heart beating fast.. this is my first pregnancy and i've been fine until last Thur & friday.. On thursday at work my back ached and i was fatigued , and friday afternoon i started feeling lightheaded, w/ a headache and and the need for air . Over the weekind i was fine (my days off) this monday again like from 1:30-3:00 i had the same symptoms but this time i took my blood pressure since i felt my hear beating fast and it was 140/68. I called the dr's office but they didnt call back . by 3:00 my symtoms were gone. i bet if i would of taking my blood pressure on friday it would of been high ( i also see little streaks in my vision some times. I dont know what is going on, but now i'm completely fine I called the dr's office and told them my symptoms but i forgot to mention that i felt my heart beating fast and that was also befopre i took my blood pressure , so they had no idea about those details ..they didnt call me back till 2hrs later and they left a message saying that it's probably normal and if i was concerned to go to the ER.. By the time i called back there office was closed. ~ not anemic nor do i have diabetes -i have an office job work 40hrs a week Answered by Leia Schuhmacher 1 year ago.

Rapid heartbeat. Lightheadedness or dizziness. Headache. Ringing in the ears (tinnitus). Irritability and other mood disturbances. Full article >>> Side Effects Include:Calan (calan SR, isoptin, isoptin SR, verelan)Constipation, dizziness, fatigue, headache, fluid retention, low blood pressure, nauseaCardene (nicardipine hydrochloride)Dizziness, headache, indigestion, nausea, rapid heartbeat, ... Full article >>> Tremors, agitation, a rapid heartbeat, and hypertension are all common side effects of Ritalin misuse. Full article >>> The severe form of the disease commences with fever, chills, bleeding into the skin, rapid heartbeat, headache, back pains, and extreme prostration. Nausea, vomiting, and constipation are common. Jaundice usually appears on the second or third day. Full article >>> These symptoms include confusion, sweating, weakness, paleness, and a rapid heartbeat. In severe cases, hypoglycemia can progress to seizures and coma. You develop symptoms of ketoacidosis (a dangerous chemical imbalance in the body). Full article >>> A physical examination may reveal either an irregular or a rapid heartbeat. There may be distended neck veins, enlarged liver, peripheral edema (swelling of the limbs), and signs of pleural effusion (fluid around the lungs). Full article >>> In extreme cases there may be heart palpitations and a rapid heartbeat, high blood pressure, anxiety, confusion, seizures and paralysis. An acute attack of porphyria can be fatal (although this is very rare these days). Full article >>> Supraventricular tachyarrhythmias - This diverse family of cardiac arrhythmias causes rapid heartbeats (tachycardias) that start in parts of the heart above the ventricles. Full article >>> For example, patients with panic disorder may experience panic attacks that include rapid heartbeat, heavy sweating and shortness of breath. Full article >>> The symptoms and signs of social phobia include blushing, sweating, trembling, rapid heartbeat, muscle tension, nausea or other stomach discomfort, lightheadedness, and other symptoms of anxiety. Full article >>> Supraventricular tachycardia, then, is a rapid heartbeat originating in the atria. Full article >>> SYMPTOMS"Depression, tension, melancholia, breast tenderness, cramps, fainting, water retention, rapid heartbeat, and backache may occur. Full article >>> history of exposure in an area where Chagas disease is known to occur swollen red area at site of previous insect bite enlarged lymph nodes swelling of one eye fever irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) rapid heartbeat (tachycardia) ... Full article >>> Too much thyroid hormone can cause rapid heartbeat, weight loss, and other symptoms. Thyroid hormone-producing tumors may be large and may spread. They sometimes also make growth hormone and/or prolactin. Answered by Alexandra Ratana 1 year ago.

I would make a list of all the symptoms that you mentioned here and go see your physician as soon as possible, preferably tomorrow (unless of course anything gets worse tonight). High blood pressure will happen during pregnancy, but you want to keep it under wraps. The backache, fatigue, and lightheadedness can also be common at your stage--the need for air can be explained by your diaphragm being limited in space, so you have to take deeper breaths, etc... The thing that stands out to me is the streaks in your vision and the fact that all of these symptoms are happening together & just now starting. Make an appointment and get some bloodwork/urine sample (fundus measurement & baby's heartbeat), etc done just to make sure everything is going okay--you certainly won't regret either figuring it out, or getting some advice on what's going on. Better safe than sorry :) Answered by Kindra Kellstrom 1 year ago.

Follow your gut instinct. Like when I fell and hit my ribs on a chair, everyone on here freaked over me not going to the ER. He was moving a ton, I felt fine except a little scared. Me personally, I wouldn't go. I've been 4 times so far, and they couldn't do crap any of the 4 times anyway except 2 RhoGam shots. Is baby still moving? Answered by Granville Baskett 1 year ago.

hey hun, Definitely go to the doctors or hospital to get checked, My midwife told me last week that if i every had hot flashes, dizziness or fainiting. Or if i say little things visually to give her a call and to come past if they continued. You blood pressure was very high darling. they will do a urine test to determine if protein or something is low.. God bless , see how you go, drink plenty of fluids. If it comes back go the e.r better to be safe darling,.. Answered by Terrell Mantilla 1 year ago.


Someone with Mitral Valve Prolapse please help?
Sarah - I was also diagnosed with Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome but a second opinion said no. U should check it out u sound like me! Asked by Ingrid Orne 1 year ago.

I have Mitral Valve Prolapse and am 28. I am finding it impossible to do any cardio related exercise anymore. I just carried some groceries up the stairs and I was fine until about 3 minutes into it I can't catch my breath. The breathing just doesn't keep up. I try breathing normally but find myself having to stop whatever I am doing and just sit. Talking is also impossible. Am I going to get worse with age? I don't smoke. I can't even workout anymore. Help Answered by Darrick Turman 1 year ago.

I have this and asthma as well and i started getting out of breath just getting in and out of the tub/shower and was getting severe chest and arm pains. I thought I was having a heart attack. The doctor put me on a medicine to improve my circulation called verapamil PM(verelan pm is the generic) they did all kinds of tests on me and they couldn't find anything until they did a ultrasound of my heart a few years ago that's when I found out I had MVP(Im 35 now). they told me there isn't much you can do and they wont do surgery unless you mainly go into some kind of cardiac arrest.. they told me to do a LOT of walking to strengthen up my heart and the muscles. I don't know why that one person said you have stuff around your heart that isn't fat. MVP is a heart valve that doesn't close properly when the blood is being pumped to and from the heart so the extra blood that is being spilled is going elsewhere MVP isn't from being overweight it can be a birth defect or be caused from scarlet fever and a few other childhood diseases.the only thing I can tell you is maybe see a dr or specialist and make sure you don't have something else on top of your condition you shouldn't be struggling for air unless something else is wrong(like maybe you have fluid building up in your lungs from your heart not working properly(my mom in law had this and had to take lasix-a heart med) . MVP can also cause panic attacks in some people.it will most likely get worse with age and I have never smoked either so I know its not caused by smoking. see your doctor and tell him the problems so they can run more tests and go from there. Answered by Jeniffer Fouty 1 year ago.

costly Madam, i'm a heart expert sending this text for you. desire it helps you. Mitral valve prolapse, oftentimes spoke of as MVP, is a elementary heart valve ailment. The mitral valve is between the left atrium and the left ventricle of the middle. It has 2 leaflets (flaps) that administration the blood pass. MVP happens whilst one or the two between the leaflets are enlarged or have greater tissue. MVP is frequently innocuous. whether, substantial problems can ensue, inclusive of a blood clot interior the innovations and an infection spoke of as infective endocarditis related to the mitral valve besides as different valves. MVP looks two times as oftentimes in women human beings as in men. it is maximum generally a hereditary ailment. some those with MVP have not got any indicators. whether, maximum sufferers adventure a speedy or odd heartbeat, shortness of breath, mild-headedness, and protracted fatigue. Many sufferers additionally be afflicted by migraines, ingesting and sound asleep themes, an overactive or contaminated thyroid gland, diarrhea, and chilly palms and feet. Emotional rigidity oftentimes magnifies the indicators. docs oftentimes prescribe widely used tests and cardio workout for those that've MVP. sufferers are additionally recommended to limit their intake or use of severe-carbohydrate ingredients, caffeine, and decongestants. some sufferers could choose beta-blockers and particular antiarrhythmic drugs. greater severe situations could require surgical treatment to repair or replace the valve or to insert an digital regulator, alongside with a pacemaker or defibrillator. Answered by Carlee Steggeman 1 year ago.

I have it too, i was born with it although i am only 18. Since i was a kid i was never able to go on roller coasters or air planes because they were worried it would affect me. Ive had episodes where my heart starts to hurt and I run out of breath doing absolutly nothing. When it comes to working out i find it harder than the average person because it feels like asthma attacks when im running. All you gotta do is take it easy, if your feeling dizzy or liek somethings wrong immediatly sit down, if it doesnt go away call the hospital. Ive been there pleantly of times because of it. Never once had anything really bad happen to me but I sure was in a lot of pain. Its better to be safe than sorry . Hope i helped :) Answered by Mavis Swaney 1 year ago.

You may want to ask your physician if the MitraClip is an option to explore. The procedure does not involve traditional opening of the chest cavity and recovery time is almost instantaneous. best wishes to you. Answered by Nicola Heppert 1 year ago.

MVP is a serious disease. Its getting bad for you since you cant go up stairs. You might need surgery Answered by So Rivard 1 year ago.


Bipolar and meds combo?
What other meds combos are apart from old stand by lithium? Asked by Maude Duncomb 1 year ago.

you don't need combos for bipolar disorder because if you have one...it doesn't work, the dosage can be upped and it'll end up working. Lithium is pretty dangerous considering most medications can affect you and make the lithium not work... * acetazolamide (Diamox); * aminophylline (Truphylline) or theophylline (Elixophyllin, Respbid, Theo-Bid, Theo-Dur, Uniphyl); * sodium bicarbonate (Alka-Seltzer, Bicitra, Polycitra, or baking soda home remedy antacid); * carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); * fluoxetine (Prozac); * metronidazole (Flagyl); * potassium iodide thyroid medication (Pima); * an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik); * a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Tiazac, Cartia, Cardizem) or verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan); * a diuretic (water pill) such as amiloride (Midamor, Moduretic), bumetanide (Bumex), chlorthalidone (Hygroton, Thalitone), ethacrynic acid (Edecrin), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Hyzaar, Vasoretic,Zestoretic), indapamide (Lozol), metolazone (Mykrox, Zaroxolyn), spironolactone (Aldactazide, Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium, Maxzide, Dyazide), torsemide (Demadex), and others; * medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, such as haloperidol (Haldol), aripiprazole (Abilify), chlorpromazine (Thorazine), clozapine (Clozaril, Fazaclo), olanzapine (Zyprexa), quetiapine (Seroquel), pimozide (Orap), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon); or * celecoxib (Celebrex) or an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), diflunisal (Dolobid), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), ketorolac (Toradol), mefenamic acid (Ponstel), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. that's all that you couldn't take with Lithium. plus, it's recommended to have your blood drawn every so often while on it. and it causes weight gain....yeah, not good. BUT. Lamictal is probably the newest drug on the market for BP. i take it and have been for 2 years now since i was diagnosed with type II bipolar disorder....it's a 5 week process, but it's worth the wait. i think it's a miracle drug and doesn't cause all the side effects other drugs have. in rare cases a body rash can happen, to some people. but even with that, it's not even life threatening. i've only had to up my dosage from 100mg [stayed at that for a year and a half] to 150mg. and now...after my struggles with BP for all of high school...i'm a senior and happy 85% of the time. to the point where people wouldn't even figure somethings wrong with me. so my advice...talk to your doc about switching Lamictal. it doesn't cause weight gain. in my experience, along with my adderall i lost the 30 pounds i gained when i was depressed. back at 160 at 6'2'. research the drug...really it's probably the best. i asked my psych why he didn't put me on lithium, and told me that even though lithium is the most popular drug, he's found in that nearly 2/3 of his bipolar patients of his patients [who was put on that at first or other mood stabilizers didn't work] since the drug came out has worked very well for them. Answered by Zachariah Julien 1 year ago.

Lithium, is by far the best for True Bipolar. You must get your blood tests regular to check your lithium levels, but it is known to work the best. My son took this for many years and he did the best on it. He now refuses and his life is a mess because of it. Answered by Crysta Collamore 1 year ago.

For mood stabilizers, there is Depakote, Topamax, Lamitcal, Abilify... There are more, can't think of them all. Anti-depressants, Prozac, Zoloft, Effexor, Wellbutrin, Cymbalta, Lexapro, etc etc. There are also mixes like Symbyax, which is Prozac with and antipsychotic. There are a whole bunch of things... Answered by Rolande Shamas 1 year ago.

There are more choice's in bi-polar meds now, like, depecote, seroquel, limictal, closeril and a host of others, only your health care provider can accurately know which combinations are safe and effective for you, the best to you, Mercee. Answered by Carolin Arden 1 year ago.

Oh damn, please ask a doctor or pharmacist on this one. Do not trust Yahoo Answers, or anyone online for that matter, on this question. It's a really bad idea to mix similar medications, usually. Answered by Cammy Kinnaman 1 year ago.

i take a whole bevy of medication- lithium, lamictal, paxil and wellbutrin........some sleepers if needed.....usually trazadone....... Answered by Katharine Mcloughlin 1 year ago.


What all medications cannot be taken with bystolic?
it is a beta blocker. i want to know the names of other medications that cannot be taken with this medicine. Asked by Tena Sobota 1 year ago.

seems like a lot. Before taking Bystolic, tell your doctor if you are using: digitalis (digoxin, Lanoxin); clonidine (Catapres); reserpine; guanethidine (Ismelin); a heart medication such as nifedipine (Procardia, Adalat), reserpine (Serpasil), verapamil (Calan, Verelan, Isoptin), diltiazem (Cartia, Cardizem); heart rhythm medicine such as amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone), disopyramide (Norpace), procainamide (Procan, Pronestyl), propafenone (Rythmol), quinidine (Quinidex, Quin-Release Quin-G), and others; an antidepressant such as fluoxetine (Prozac), paroxetine (Paxil), and others; or another beta-blocker such as atenolol (Tenormin), bisoprolol (Zebeta), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), sotalol (Betapace), or timolol (Blocadren), and others. This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with Bystolic. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Answered by Leia Wickard 1 year ago.


Is a heartbeat of 43 beats per min too slow?
and not athlete thanks Asked by Lavonia Boehler 1 year ago.

Yes it is too slow. Normal Heart Beat for adult ranges from 60-100 beats per min. It is called bradycardia. Bradycardia is an abnormally slow heart rate of less than 60 beats per minute. A normal heartbeat is between 60 and 100 beats per minute. Here's what happens during a normal heartbeat: The electrical signal that starts a heartbeat comes from the heart's sinus node, the natural pacemaker located in the upper portion of the right atrium. From the sinus node, the heartbeat signal travels to the atrioventricular (A-V) node, located between the atria, and then through the bundle of His (pronounced "hiss") — a series of modified heart-muscle fibers located between the ventricles to the muscles of the ventricles. This triggers a contraction of the ventricles and produces a heartbeat. Bradycardia, even as low as 50 beats per minute, can be normal in athletes and other people who are physically active. In these people, regular exercise improves the heart's ability to pump blood efficiently, so fewer heart contractions are required to supply the body's needs. In other cases, bradycardia can be a form of cardiac arrhythmia, a heart-rate abnormality. Cardiac arrhythmia can be caused by a problem in the sinus node, or it can be related to some disturbance in the passage of heartbeat signals through the A-V node and bundle of His. Also, bradycardia sometimes is a side effect of certain medications, including propranolol (Inderal), atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Toprol-XL), sotalol (Betapace), verapamil (Calan, Isoptin, Verelan) and diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor-XR). Bradycardia also occurs in some people who have certain medical illnesses not related to the heart, such as: Abnormally low level of thyroid hormones (hypothyroidism) Severe liver disease An abnormally low body temperature (hypothermia) Typhoid fever Brucellosis, an infectious disease marked by fever, sweating and weakness that is transmitted to humans by direct contact with diseased animals or through ingestion of contaminated meat, milk or cheese Symptoms Bradycardia can cause dizziness, weakness, lack of energy, or fainting spells. If bradycardia is caused by a medical illness, there will be additional symptoms that are specific to that illness. For example, people whose bradycardia is due to severe hypothyroidism also can have constipation, muscle cramps, weight gain (often despite poor appetite), very dry skin, hair that is thin and dry, an abnormal sensitivity to cold temperatures and other symptoms related to low levels of thyroid hormones. Diagnosis Your doctor will ask about your family history of heart disease, cardiac arrhythmias and fainting spells. He or she also will review your current symptoms and your personal medical history, including your use of medications that may cause bradycardia. During the physical examination, your doctor will check your heart rate and rhythm, and your pulse. You may be asked to do some sit-ups or other exercise so that your doctor can see if your heart rate rises normally when your heart is asked to do more work. Your doctor also will check for physical signs of thyroid abnormalities, including an enlarged thyroid gland, very dry skin, and hair that is thin and dry. To further evaluate your bradycardia, your doctor will order an electrocardiogram (EKG). However, because some forms of bradycardia come and go, a one-time office EKG may be normal. If this is the case, a test called ambulatory electrocardiography may be done. During this test, the patient wears a portable EKG machine called a Holter monitor, usually for 24 hours. If your symptoms are infrequent, you may wear a monitor for longer. You will be taught to press a button to record your EKG reading when your symptoms occur. Depending on the results of your physical examination, other tests may be necessary to check for medical illnesses that produce bradycardia. For example, if you have symptoms and physical signs of hypothyroidism, your doctor may order blood tests to measure levels of thyroid hormones and TSH, a pituitary gland hormone that stimulates the thyroid. Your doctor also may order blood tests for cholesterol and certain liver enzymes, which often are elevated in people with hypothyroidism. Expected Duration How long bradycardia lasts depends on its cause. For example, normal bradycardia in a well-trained athlete will last as long as the athlete maintains his or her usual level of exercise. When bradycardia occurs as a side effect of medication, it usually will go away as soon as the drug that triggered the bradycardia is used by the body or excreted in the urine. Bradycardia caused by hypothyroidism will go away quickly after treatment with thyroid hormones. Certain forms of bradycardia resulting from cardiac arrhythmias can be cured with a permanent pacemaker. Prevention There are no general guidelines to prevent all forms of bradycardia. When bradycardia occurs as a side effect of medication, the problem can be prevented by either switching the drug or reducing its dose. Treatment In most cases, bradycardia in healthy, well-trained athletes does not need to be treated. In fact, in most people, bradycardia does not require treatment unless patients have symptoms that are clearly due to a slow heartbeat. The following are conditions that produce bradycardia that requires treatment: Cardiac arrhythmias resulting from sinus-node dysfunction — In people with frequent, severe symptoms of sinus-node dysfunction, the main treatment is usually a permanent pacemaker, an implanted device that generates electrical impulses to regulate the heartbeat. Cardiac arrhythmias resulting from A-V node problems — In people with A-V node problems, the passage of heartbeat signals may be blocked to different degrees. Some patients with less severe degrees of A-V block do not need treatment. Others may simply be monitored with frequent EKGs, especially if they don't have any symptoms and have a heart rate that is adequate for their daily activities. People with the most severe form of A-V block (called third-degree A-V block) can be treated with a special dual-chambered permanent pacemaker, a pacemaker with one electrode in the atrium and one in the ventricle. Hypothyroidism — Hypothyroidism is treated with replacement doses of thyroid hormones. Synthetic forms of these hormones are available — llevothyroxine (Synthroid, Levothroid and others), liothyronine (Cytomel, Triostat) or liotrix (Thyrolar) — as well as thyroid extract. When To Call A Professional Call your doctor if your pulse is less than 60 beats per minute. This is especially important if you have had dizziness, weakness, lack of energy or fainting spells. Prognosis In well-trained athletes with normal bradycardia, the slow heartbeat is often a sign of overall good health. In other people with bradycardia, the outlook depends on the underlying disorder. For example, the prognosis is usually good in people with hypothyroidism, since treatment with thyroid hormones can relieve bradycardia and other symptoms related to low hormone levels. In some elderly patients, hormone dosages may need to be increased very slowly over several weeks to prevent straining the heart. At one time, the prognosis for people with third-degree A-V block was poor, with 50% of patients dying within one year of diagnosis. Now, however, the availability of permanent pacemakers has improved the prognosis for many people with cardiac arrhythmias. Answered by Barbra Intrieri 1 year ago.

That is a pretty slow heartbeat, but evidently you are still conscious. If you were passing out frequently then of course you would be very concerned. How long has it been since you have seen a doctor? You should see one if you see black when you rise suddenly from a chair. I would exercise, like run up the stairs and down again and take the pulse again. It should then be more than 43 beats per minute. Like maybe 80 or 100. Is it just 43 first thing in the morning before you get out of bed? You might want to take it during the middle of the day or when you are moderately active. Answered by Rubye Deruiter 1 year ago.

Yes, definitley. Only well trained athletes have low hear rates, and I'm not sure if that low is even normal for them. You should be experienciing some fatigue with walking, or strenuous excerise. If you are taking meds, then something needs to be adjusted. It's important to have your doctor give you a thorough exam.asap! You can also experience dizziness, so don't delay getting a doctor's appt. Take Care! Answered by Kristofer Grohman 1 year ago.

Very, very few healthy, normal people will have a resting HR in the 40's (usually in a deep sleep). I work in an ICU and all of our patients are monitored so I see I wide range of heart rates but, this definitely falls out of "normal range" (60-100bpm). As previous posters have mentioned the cause could be a medication (this is the most frequent cause that I personally see). If you suspect it is medication related, do not stop your medication suddenly as this could cause severe side effects. Discuss this with your physician. Answered by Chan Kolasinski 1 year ago.

yes this is considerably low and should be evaluated quickly. normal heartrate is a healthy adult is 60-80. some people (mostly athletes) run low naturally and some run high (like me-my norm is about 110). if you're currently on medication for blood pressure-this could lower your heartrate. dehydration could lower it as well (it's the body's way of preserving energy and trying to keep itself alive) make sure to have this checked out asap (24-48 hours max). it could be an indication of a serious problem. Answered by Augustina Whildin 1 year ago.

No, the more in shape you are, the slower your resting heart rate will be. There are some athletes that have resting heart rates as slow as 16 Beats per minute. Answered by Shawnee Moudry 1 year ago.

It depends! when you are resting for example sleeping a heart beat rate of 43per minute might not be too slow. but if it is while you are active it might be seen as low. the average is about 70per minute. Answered by Kenneth Cornelius 1 year ago.


23, married, mom, bipolar?
I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until... Asked by Lazaro Ditton 1 year ago.

I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until week after next. Never have been consistent with meds so i was also curious of how i was supposed to feel? Answered by Georgiann Hinely 1 year ago.

Lithium drug interactions: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), [for example, ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen Naprosyn, Aleve), indomethacin (Indocin), nabumetone (Relafen), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, Arthrotec), ketorolac (Toradol)], reduce the kidney's ability to eliminate lithium and lead to elevated levels of lithium in the blood and lithium side effects. Blood concentrations of lithium may need to be measured for 4 to 7 days after an NSAID is either added or stopped during lithium therapy. Aspirin and sulindac (Clinoril) do not appear to affect lithium concentrations in the blood. Diuretics (water pills) should be used cautiously in patients receiving lithium. Diuretics that act at the distal renal tubule, [for example, hydrochlorothiazide (Hydrodiuril), spironolactone (Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium; Dyazide, Maxzide)], can increase blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics that act at the proximal tubule, [for example, acetazolamide (Diamox)], are more likely to reduce blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics such as furosemide (Lasix) and bumetanide (Bumex) may have no affect on lithium concentrations in blood. ACE inhibitors, [for example, enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Zestril, Prinivil), benazepril (Lotensin), quinapril (Accupril), moexipril (Univasc), captopril (Capoten), ramipril (Altace)], may increase the risk of developing lithium toxicity, by increasing the amount of lithium that is reabsorbed in the tubules of the kidney and thereby reducing the excretion of lithium. When carbamazepine (Tegretol) and lithium are used together, some patients may experience side effects, including dizziness, lethargy, and tremor. Central nervous system side effects also may occur when lithium is used with antidepressants, [for example, fluoxetine (Prozac) sertraline (Zoloft), and paroxetine (Paxil), fluvoxamine (Luvox), amitriptyline (Elavil), imipramine (Tofranil), desipramine (Norpramin)]. Medications which cause the urine to become alkaline (the opposite of acidic) can increase the amount of lithium that is lost into the urine. This results in lower blood concentrations of lithium and reduces the effects of lithium. Such drugs include potassium acetate, potassium citrate (Urocit-K), sodium bicarbonate, and sodium citrate (Bicitra, Cytra-2, Liqui-Citra, Oracit, Shohl's). Caffeine appears to reduce serum lithium concentrations, and side effects of lithium have increased in frequency when caffeine is consumed. Both diltiazem (Cardizem-CD, Tiazac, Dilacor-XR) and verapamil (Calan-SR, Isoptin-SR, Verelan, Covera-HS) have been reported to have variable effects on lithium levels in blood. In some patients there may be decreased lithium blood levels and in others lithium toxicity. Methyldopa (Aldomet) may increase the likelihood of lithium toxicity. Various reactions have resulted when lithium is administered with phenothiazines, [for example, chlorpromazine (Thorazine), thioridazine (Mellaril), trifluoperazine (Stelazine) or with haloperidol (Haldol)]. Such reactions have included delirium, seizures, encephalopathy, high fever or certain neurologic reactions that affect movement of muscles, called extrapyramidal symptoms. Lithium can cause goiter or hypothyroidism. The use of lithium with potassium iodide can increase the likelihood of this adverse reaction. The use of the beta blocker, propranolol (Inderal), with lithium can lead to a slow heart rate and dizziness. Other beta blockers, [for example, metoprolol (Lopressor), atenolol (Tenormin)] also may interact with lithium and be associated with a slow heart rate. Seroquel interations: Your healthcare professionals (e.g., doctor or pharmacist) may already be aware of any possible drug interactions and may be monitoring you for it. Do not start, stop or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with them first. This drug should not be used with the following medication because very serious interactions may occur: sibutramine. If you are currently using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist before starting quetiapine. Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all prescription and nonprescription/herbal products you may use, especially of: anticholinergics (e.g., belladonna alkaloids, benztropine, scopolamine), dopamine-like drugs (e.g., bromocriptine, cabergoline), levodopa, rifabutin, drugs for treating high blood pressure (e.g., alpha blockers such as prazosin, calcium channel blockers such as diltiazem, "water pills"/diuretics such as hydrochlorothiazide), drugs affecting liver enzymes that remove quetiapine from your body (e.g., azole antifungals such as fluconazole/ketoconazole/itraconazole, barbiturates such as phenobarbital, glucocorticoids such as dexamethasone, macrolide antibiotics such as erythromycin, rifampin, certain anti-seizure drugs such as carbamazepine/phenytoin, thioridazine), thyroid medicine (e.g., thyroxine). Al Answered by Rosanna Palmour 1 year ago.

Well, its kinda hard if you arent consistent with your medications. The meds aren't miracle workers, you can't really expect them to really do their job if you don't take them regularly. Those do sound like somewhat higher doses, at least the seroquel does. Generally most doctors will start you rather low, and gradually work your dosage up to what you need, that way side effects are minimized. If you don't take them for awhile, then all of a sudden decide to start up again, you can expect to feel worse for the first week. I would see your doc as soon as you can, let them know how you're feeling and what you've been doing with the meds, and once they prescribe you more, stick to it and you'll feel better. Answered by Muoi Riskalla 1 year ago.

It sounds to me like both of you are the problem. Whether you like it or not, she does have the right to tell you what to do. She is the adult and you are the child in the household. Grow up and get over it. The crap of "Of course I went over budget" Shows a complete disregard for others. She has no business screaming at you but I think there is more to the story and a lot of history in your relationship. The best thing to do would be to seek counseling with a professional. Neither of you is completely right or wrong but there are some serious issues to deal with. Be ready to compromise. Just for the record, I raised my step daughter from the time she was two years old. There were lots of issues because she thought the same way you do and in my house I am the undisputed boss. Had she screamed at me, even at 15, she would have been over my knee and spanked before she could get half a sentence out of her mouth. But then, I tried to always be fair and reasonable, even taking her side against my own daughter several times because I felt the stepdaughter was right. In the end, you are fighting a losing battle and making matters worse with your attitude. Try working together! Answered by Ramon Marina 1 year ago.

In order for the meds. to work correctly you need to take them regularly. Your doctor has you on these dosages because he thinks they will work the best in this combination. Keep taking them every day on time until you have your appointment. If things haven't cleared up then have a talk with him and he can recommend any changes you may need. Answered by Marnie Blumhardt 1 year ago.


Hypertension problem?
I'm 23 years old anyways. Asked by Donnette Mamula 1 year ago.

Well it's been like this, I have been treated for hypertension for like 4-5 months with sotalol 40mg morning, diuretic in mid day, and 40mg at night sotalol (2 x half tablet). It helped me to take off some symtpoms, I had chest pain, was feeling faint, and etc. My blood pressure even with medicine never got down under 140, mostly 150 and so. But recently I woke up one morning and my heart was pounding so much, and i measured 190/110. And later again i started to feel faint somehow, and out of streght, this all preceded 3-4 day headache, which i still have to some bit. Now what I'm wondering. Even I drink medicine. Why doesn't my blood pressure go to normal count? I will tomorrow settle appointment with my cardilogist. Should my blood pressure be under 140/95, considering i had surgery (tetralogiae fallot) and have mild regurgitation which isn't making problem. Could it be that I'm not taking enough medicine for my condition? Any experiences or answers are welcome! Thanks Answered by Thuy Frevert 1 year ago.

Hypertension can be classified either essential (primary) or secondary. Essential hypertension indicates that no specific medical cause can be found to explain a patient's condition. Secondary hypertension indicates that the high blood pressure is a result of (i.e., secondary to) another condition, such as kidney disease or tumours (pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma). Persistent hypertension is one of the risk factors for strokes, heart attacks, heart failure and arterial aneurysm, and is a leading cause of chronic renal failure. In terms of medications for this medical condition; there are several types: - Diuretics (water pills) helps your body to get rid of extra sodium (salt) and water so your blood vessels don't have to hold too much fluid. Some examples of diuretics include chlorthalidone (brand name: Thalitone), furosemide (brand name: Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (brand name: Esidrix) and indapamide (brand name: Lozol). Your doctor may also prescribe a combination of diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide combined with triamterene (brand names: Dyazide, Maxzide). - Beta-blockers makes the heart beat slower so that blood passes through your blood vessels with less force. Some examples of beta-blockers include acebutolol (brand name: Sectral), atenolol (brand name: Tenormin), carvedilol (brand name: Coreg), metoprolol (brand names: Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (brand name: Corgard), propranolol (brand name: Inderal) and timolol (brand name: Blocadren). - Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also called ACE inhibitors) keeps your body from making angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ACE inhibitors include benazepril (brand name: Lotensin), enalapril (brand name: Vasotec), lisinopril (brand names: Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (brand name: Accupril), ramipril (brand name: Altace) and trandolapril (brand name: Mavik). - Angiotensin II receptor blockers (also called ARBs) protects your blood vessels from the effects of angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ARBs include candesartan (brand name: Atacand), irbesartan (brand name: Avapro), losartan (brand name: Cozaar), olmesartan (brand name: Benicar), telmisartan (brand name: Micardis) and valsartan (brand name: Diovan). - Calcium channel blockers (also called CCBs) helps to keep your blood vessels from constricting (becoming narrow) by blocking calcium from entering your cells. Some examples of CCBs include amlodipine (brand name: Norvasc), diltiazem (brand names: Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, Tiazac), felodipine (brand name: Plendil), nicardipine (brand name: Cardene), nifedipine (brand names: Adalat, Procardia) and verapamil (some brand names: Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan). - Alpha-blockers helps to relax your blood vessels by reducing nerve impulses. This allows your blood to pass through more easily. Some examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin (brand name: Cardura), prazosin (brand name: Minipress) and terazosin (brand name: Hytrin). - Centrally acting drugs may affect your brain and central nervous system to reduce the nerve impulses that can cause your blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of centrally acting drugs include clonidine (brand name: Catapres) and methyldopa. - Direct vasodilators relaxes the muscles in the blood vessel walls. This causes the blood vessels to widen. Some examples of vasodilators include hydralazine (brand name: Apresoline) and minoxidil (brand name: Loniten). I will personally suggest that You get an Echocardiogram scan done. You must also get your cholesterol, fat and sugar levels of your body tested. A good result will reflect the following normal results: - The Total Cholesterol level should remain below 200 mg/dL all the time; HDL's typical normal level is considered to be at 40 mg/dL and above. However, the higher your HDL level be the better it is for your health. Some natural ways to maintain and raise your HDL level are by aerobic exercising and excluding trans fatty acids from your diet; The normal ratio of Total Cholesterol to HDL is considered at 5:1 or below; a desirable LDL-cholesterol level must always be below 140 mg/dL to be considered normal. - Triglycerides level is also important and must remain below 150 mg/dL. - Glucose level. Normal is about 90mg/100ml, or 5mM/L. Overall, You should be getting regular check-ups, following a healthy diet, taking your medications as prescript, rest and other instructions from your specialist/s and general physician. Good Health To You ! Answered by Sonja Charlot 1 year ago.

sorry but you should never just cease your medication like this. you should go back to your health professional and see where you go from here. depending on your age and many other factors of your life you need to keep your BP under control and often you it can take some time to find the right medication to keep you in a stable condition. never never never muck about with hypertension. Answered by Ayesha Onnen 1 year ago.

Eat less animal fat & lose weight. Answered by Dollie Deily 1 year ago.


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