VALPROATE SODIUM Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 076295/001.

Names and composition

"VALPROATE SODIUM" is the commercial name of a drug composed of VALPROATE SODIUM.

Answered questions

Risperdal consta & Valproate sodium?
risperdal consta & Valproate Sodium1) side effect2) withdraw effect3) how long increate risperdal consta fm 25mg->37.5mg->50mg4) how long increate Valproate sodium up to 1,200mg??5) any bad effect about take both together?any good webside about this (for court using)Risperdal consta 25mg... Asked by Syreeta Range 4 months ago.

risperdal consta & Valproate Sodium 1) side effect 2) withdraw effect 3) how long increate risperdal consta fm 25mg->37.5mg->50mg 4) how long increate Valproate sodium up to 1,200mg?? 5) any bad effect about take both together? any good webside about this (for court using) Risperdal consta 25mg + Valproate Sodium Cr Table 1,200 mg Risperdal consta 37.5mg + Valproate Sodium Cr Table 1,200 mg Risperdal consta 50mg + Valproate Sodium Cr Table 1,200 mg Because the Doctor gave risperdal consta 25mg (2 weeks)->37.5mg(2 weeks)->50mg only 2 weeks+2weeks, total 4 weeks fm 25mg->50mg but one of my friend told me this must be 4weeks to 6 weeks increate fm 25mg -> 37.5mg , again 4weeks to 6 weeks increate fm 37.5mg -> 50mg total 8weeks to 12 weeks fm 25mg->50mg Thank so much fm your help Answered by Cassaundra Hammans 4 months ago.

Here is a bunch of info for you-D Valproic acid, valproate sodium, and divalproex belong to the group of medicines called anticonvulsants. They are used to control certain types of seizures in the treatment of epilepsy. Valproic acid, valproate sodium, and divalproex may be used alone or with other seizure medicine. Divalproex is also used to treat the manic phase of bipolar disorder (manic-depressive illness), and to help prevent migraine headaches. Divalproex and valproate sodium form valproic acid in the body. Therefore, the following information applies to all of these medicines. These medicines are available only with your doctor's prescription, in the following dosage forms: Oral Divalproex Delayed-release capsules (U.S.) Delayed-release tablets (U.S. and Canada) Valproic Acid Capsules (U.S. and Canada) Syrup (U.S. and Canada) Parenteral Valproate Sodium Injection (U.S.) Before Using This MedicineReturn to top In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For valproic acid, valproate sodium, and divalproex, the following should be considered: Allergies—Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to valproic acid, valproate sodium, or divalproex. Also tell your health care professional if you are allergic to any other substances, such as foods, preservatives, or dyes. Pregnancy—Valproic acid, valproate sodium, and divalproex have been reported to cause birth defects when taken by the mother during the first 3 months of pregnancy. Also, animal studies have shown that valproic acid, valproate sodium, and divalproex cause birth defects when taken in doses several times greater than doses used in humans. However, these medicines may be necessary to control seizures in some pregnant patients. Be sure you have discussed this with your doctor. Breast-feeding—Valproic acid, valproate sodium, and divalproex pass into the breast milk, but their effect on the nursing baby is not known. It may be necessary for you to take another medicine or to stop breast-feeding during treatment with valproic acid, valproate sodium, or divalproex. Be sure you have discussed the risks and benefits of this medicine with your doctor. Children—Abdominal or stomach cramps, nausea or vomiting, tiredness or weakness, and yellow eyes or skin may be especially likely to occur in children, who are usually more sensitive to the effects of these medicines. Children up to 2 years of age, those taking more than one medicine for seizure control, and children with certain other medical problems may be more likely to develop serious side effects. Older adults—Elderly people are especially sensitive to the effects of these medicines. This may increase the chance of side effects during treatment. The dose of this medicine may be lower for older adults. Other medicines—Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking valproic acid, valproate sodium, or divalproex, it is especially important that your health care professional knows if you are taking any of the following: Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Amiodarone (e.g., Cordarone) or Amitriptyline and nortriptyline Anabolic steroids (nandrolone [e.g., Anabolin], oxandrolone [e.g., Anavar], oxymetholone [e.g., Anadrol], stanozolol [e.g., Winstrol]) or Androgens (male hormones) or Anticoagulants Aspirin Barbiturates or Carbamazepine (e.g., Tegretol) or Carmustine (e.g., BiCNU) or Dantrolene (e.g., Dantrium) or Daunorubicin (e.g., Cerubidine) or Disulfiram (e.g., Antabuse) or Estrogens (female hormones) or Ethosuximide Etretinate (e.g., Tegison) or Gold salts (medicine for arthritis) or Mercaptopurine (e.g., Purinethol) or Methotrexate (e.g., Mexate) or Methyldopa (e.g., Aldomet) or Naltrexone (e.g., Trexan) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Phenothiazines (acetophenazine [e.g., Tindal], chlorpromazine [e.g., Thorazine], fluphenazine [e.g., Prolixin], mesoridazine [e.g., Serentil], perphenazine [e.g., Trilafon], prochlorperazine [e.g., Compazine], promazine [e.g., Sparine], promethazine [e.g., Phenergan], thioridazine [e.g., Mellaril], trifluoperazine [e.g., Stelazine], triflupromazine [e.g., Vesprin], trimeprazine [e.g., Temaril]) or Plicamycin (e.g., Mithracin)—There is an increased risk of serious side effects to the liver Central nervous system (CNS) depressants (medicines that cause drowsiness) or Tricyclic antidepressants (medicine for depression)—There may be an increase in CNS depressant effects Carbenicillin by injection (e.g., Geopen) or Dipyridamole (e.g., Persantine) or Inflammation or pain medicine, except narcotics, or Pentoxifylline (e.g., Trental) or Sulfinpyrazone (e.g., Anturane) or Ticarcillin (e.g., Ticar)—Valproic acid, valproate sodium, or divalproex may increase the chance of bleeding because of decreased blood clotting ability; the potential of aspirin, medicine for inflammation or pain, or sulfinpyrazone to cause stomach ulcer and bleeding may also increase the chance of bleeding in patients taking valproic acid, valproate sodium, or divalproex Heparin—There is an increased risk of side effects that may cause bleeding Mefloquine—The amount of valproic acid, valproate sodium, or divalproex that you need to take may change Other anticonvulsants (medicine for seizures)—There is an increased risk of seizures or other unwanted effects Other medical problems—The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of these medicines. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially: Blood disease or Brain disease or Kidney disease—There is an increased risk of serious side effects Liver disease—Valproic acid, valproate sodium, or divalproex may make the condition worse Pancreatitis—may be life threatening, stop using valproate if you have this condition Urea cycle disorders—my lead to serious side effects or death Proper Use of This MedicineReturn to top For patients taking the capsule form of valproic acid: Swallow the capsule whole without chewing, crushing, or breaking. This is to prevent irritation of the mouth or throat. For patients taking the delayed-release capsule form of divalproex: Swallow the capsule whole, or sprinkle the contents on a small amount of soft food, such as applesauce or pudding, and swallow without chewing. For patients taking the delayed-release tablet form of divalproex: Swallow the tablet whole without chewing, breaking, or crushing. This is to prevent damage to the special coating that helps lessen irritation of the stomach. For patients taking the syrup form of valproic acid: The syrup may be mixed with any liquid or added to food for a better taste. For patients taking the oral dosage forms of valproic acid and divalproex: These medicines may be taken with meals or snacks to reduce stomach upset. This medicine must be taken exactly as directed by your doctor to prevent seizures and lessen the possibility of side effects. Dosing— The dose of valproic acid, valproate sodium, or divalproex will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of valproic acid, valproate sodium, or divalproex. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so. The number of capsules or tablets or teaspoonfuls of syrup that you take or the number of injections you receive depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using valproic acid, valproate sodium, or divalproex. If valproic acid or divalproex is the only medicine you are taking for seizures: Adults and adolescents: Dose is based on body weight. The usual dose is 5 to 15 milligrams (mg) per kilogram (kg) (2.3 to 6.9 mg per pound) of body weight to start. Your doctor may increase your dose gradually every week by 5 to 10 mg per kg of body weight if needed. However, the dose is usually not more than 60 mg per kg of body weight a day. If the total dose a day is greater than 250 mg, it is usually divided into smaller doses and taken two or more times during the day. Children 1 to 12 years of age: Dose is based on body weight. The usual dose is 15 to 45 mg per kg (6.9 to 20.7 mg per pound) of body weight to start. The doctor may increase the dose gradually every week by 5 to 10 mg per kg of body weight if needed. If you are taking more than one medicine for seizures: Adults and adolescents: Dose is based on body weight. The usual dose is 10 to 30 mg per kg (4.6 to 13.8 mg per pound) of body weight to start. Your doctor may increase your dose gradually every week by 5 to 10 mg per kg of body weight if needed. If the total dose a day is greater than 250 mg, it is usually divided into smaller doses and taken two or more times during the day. Children 1 to 12 years of age: Dose is based on body weight. The usual dose is 30 to 100 mg per kg (13.8 to 45.5 mg per pound) of body weight. If you are using valproate sodium for seizures because you temporarily cannot take oral medication: Adults, adolescents, and children: Dose is based on body weight, and will be determined by your doctor. The dose is injected into a vein. If you are taking divalproex for treatment of mania: Adults: At first, 750 mg a day, usually divided into smaller doses and taken two or more times during the day. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed. Children: Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. If you are taking divalproex for prevention of migraine headaches: Adults: At first, 250 mg two times a day. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed. However, the dose is usually not more than 1000 mg a day. Children: Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. Missed dose— If you miss a dose of this medicine, and your dosing schedule is: One dose a day—Take the missed dose as soon as possible. However, if you do not remember until the next day, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses. Two or more doses a day—If you remember within 6 hours of the missed dose, take it right away. Then take the rest of the doses for that day at equally spaced times. Do not double doses. If you have any questions about this, check with your doctor. Storage— To store this medicine: Keep out of the reach of children. Store away from heat and direct light. Do not store the capsule or tablet form of this medicine in the bathroom, near the kitchen sink, or in other damp places. Heat or moisture may cause the medicine to break down. Keep the syrup form of this medicine from freezing. Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed. Be sure that any discarded medicine is out of the reach of children. Precautions While Using This MedicineReturn to top Your doctor should check your progress at regular visits, especially for the first few months that you take this medicine. This is necessary to allow dose adjustments and to reduce any unwanted effects. Do not stop taking this medicine without first checking with your doctor. Your doctor may want you to gradually reduce the amount you are taking before stopping completely. Before you have any medical tests, tell the doctor in charge that you are taking this medicine. The results of the metyrapone and thyroid function tests may be affected by this medicine. Before having any kind of surgery, dental treatment, or emergency treatment, tell the medical doctor or dentist in charge that you are taking this medicine. Valproic acid, valproate sodium, or divalproex may change the time it takes your blood to clot, which may increase the chance of bleeding. Also, taking valproic acid, valproate sodium, or divalproex together with medicines that are used during surgery or dental or emergency treatments may increase the CNS depressant effects. Valproic acid, valproate sodium, and divalproex will add to the effects of alcohol and other CNS depressants (medicines that make you drowsy or less alert). Some examples of CNS depressants are antihistamines or medicine for hay fever, other allergies, or colds; sedatives, tranquilizers, or sleeping medicine; prescription pain medicine or narcotics; barbiturates; medicine for seizures; muscle relaxants; or anesthetics, including some dental anesthetics. Check with your doctor before taking any of the above while you are using this medicine. For diabetic patients: This medicine may interfere with urine tests for ketones and give false-positive results. Your doctor may want you to carry a medical identification card or bracelet stating that you are taking this medicine. This medicine may cause some people to become drowsy or less alert than they are normally. Make sure you know how you react to this medicine before you drive, use machines, or do anything else that could be dangerous if you are drowsy or not alert. Side Effects of This MedicineReturn to top Side Effects of This Medicine Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur: More common body aches or pain ; congestion; cough; dryness or soreness of throat ; fever ; hoarseness runny nose; tender, swollen glands in neck ; trouble in swallowing; voice changes Less common Abdominal or stomach cramps (severe); behavioral, mood, or mental changes; blurred vision; ; confusion; ; continuous, uncontrolled back-and-forth and/or rolling eye movements; earache, redness or swelling in ear; dizziness, ; double vision; faintness, or light-headedness when getting up from a lying or sitting position suddenly; sweating; unusual tiredness or weakness; fast, irregular, pounding, or racing heartbeat or pulse; heavy, nonmenstrual vaginal bleeding; increase in seizures; loss of appetite; nausea or vomiting (continuing); rapid weight gain; spots before eyes; swelling of face, arms, hands, lower legs, or feet; tingling of hands or feet; tiredness and weakness; unusual bleeding or bruising; unusual weight gain or loss; vomiting of blood or material that looks like coffee grounds ; yellow eyes or skin Other side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. However, check with your doctor if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome: More common Abdominal or stomach cramps (mild); acid or sour stomach; belching; heartburn; indigestion; stomach discomfort, upset or pain; change in menstrual periods; crying paranoia; quick to react or overreact emotionally; rapidly changing moods; depersonalization; dysphoria; diarrhea; euphoria; hair loss; indigestion ; lack or loss of strength; loss of appetite; loss of bowel control; mental depression; nausea and vomiting ; paranoia; quick to react or overreact emotionally; rapidly changing moods; sleepiness or unusual drowsiness; trembling of hands and arms; unusual weight loss or gain Less common or rare Absence of or decrease in body movement; absent, missed, or irregular menstrual periods; stopping of menstrual bleeding ; anxiety; nervousness; restlessness; bloated full feeling; bloody or cloudy urine; bloody nose; bruising ; burning, crawling, itching, numbness, prickling, "pins and needles" , or tingling feelings; burning, dry or itching eyes; change in taste; chills; clumsiness or unsteadiness; coin-shaped lesions on skin; cold sweats ; confusion; constipation ; cramps; decreased awareness or responsiveness; degenerative disease of the joint ; difficult, burning, or painful urination; difficulty in moving; discharge; excessive tearing of eye; discouragement; dizziness; drowsiness; dry mouth; excess air or gas in stomach or intestines ; excessive muscle tone; muscle tension or tightness; muscle stiffness; feeling of constant movement of self or surroundings; feeling sad or empty; feeling of warmth or heat; ; flushing or redness of skin, especially on face and neck; frequent urge to urinate; headache; heavy bleeding; irregular heartbeats ; irritability; joint pain; swollen joints; lack of appetite; lip smacking ; uncontrolled chewing movements; loss of hair; loss of interest or pleasure; loss of memory; problems with memory; mimicry of speech or movements; muscle aching or cramping; muscle pains or stiffness; mutism; negativism; normal menstrual bleeding occurring earlier, possibly lasting longer than expected; pain; passing gas; peculiar postures or movements, mannerisms or grimacing; puffing of cheeks; rapid or worm-like movements of tongue; redness, swelling, or soreness of tongue; severe sleepiness ; shortness of breath; difficult or labored breathing ; small red or purple spots on skin; stuffy nose; runny nose; sneezing; redness, pain, swelling of eye, eyelid, or inner lining of eyelid; seeing, hearing, or feeling things that are not there; sensation of spinning; shaking; shortness of breath; hyperventilation; skin rash; sweating; tightness in chest; tiredness; trouble concentrating; trouble in speaking; slurred speech ; trouble sleeping; uncontrolled chewing movements; uncontrolled movements of arms and legs; unusual excitement, restlessness, or irritability ; wheezing Other side effects not listed above may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your doctor. Brand NamesReturn to top Some commonly used brand names are: In the U.S.— Depacon2 Depakene3 Depakote1 Depakote Sprinkle1 In Canada— Alti-Valproic3 Depakene3 Deproic3 Dom-Valproic3 Epival1 Med Valproic3 Novo-Valproic3 Nu-Valproic3 Penta-Valproic3 pms-Valproic Acid3 pms-Valproic Acid E.C.3 Note: For quick reference, the following medicines are numbered to match the corresponding brand names. This information applies to the following medicines: 1. Divalproex (dye-VAL-pro-ex) 2. Valproate Sodium (val-PRO-ate SO-dee-um)† 3. Valproic Acid (val-PRO-ic acid)‡ ‡ Generic name product may be available in the U.S. § Generic name product may be available in Canada * Not commercially available in the U.S. † Not commercially available in Canada CategoryReturn to top Anticonvulsant --Divalproex; Valproate Sodium; Valproic Acid Antimanic -- Divalproex Migraine headache prophylactic --Divalproex Revised: 11/11/2003 Thomson Micromedex, Inc. Disclaimer Copyright © 2006 Thomson Healthcare. All rights reserved. USP DI ® and Advice for the Patient ® are registered trademarks of USP used under license to Thomson MICROMEDEX. Information is for End User's use only and may not be sold, redistributed or otherwise used for commercial purposes. Home | Health Topics | Drugs & Supplements | Encyclopedia | Dictionary | News | Directories | Other Resources Copyright | Privacy | Accessibility | Quality Guidelines U.S. National Library of Medicine, 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894 National Institutes of Health | Department of Health & Human Services Page last updated: 13 October 2006 Answered by Pilar Louvier 4 months ago.

I've been on risperdal oral tablets for schizophrenia for almost 5 years, and contrary to islandbunny's comment, every year, I see improvement in all relevant areas of my life (symptom management, cognitive and social functioning, etc.) Not sure how it affects an anxiety disorder, but in college, I suffered from high anxiety over a period of years, and I have no problems now. Answered by Eliana Debold 4 months ago.

Very Dangerous. Answered by Jose Pilkey 4 months ago.


A qestion about Sodium Valproate...?
I have been seeing a psychiatrist for about a year now. I have been on Escitalopram (Lexapro) 60mg for 12 weeks. I have been getting results, but nowhere near what I want. I am also on other "augmentation" drugs to increase the effect of the Lexapro. They are Zyprexa, Seroquel, Clonidine, Baclofen,... Asked by Betty Zidek 4 months ago.

I have been seeing a psychiatrist for about a year now. I have been on Escitalopram (Lexapro) 60mg for 12 weeks. I have been getting results, but nowhere near what I want. I am also on other "augmentation" drugs to increase the effect of the Lexapro. They are Zyprexa, Seroquel, Clonidine, Baclofen, Propranolol, Ativan. My Psych has me down as "Refractory " treatment-resistant OCD. I left his office today with a script for Sodium Valproate. Now, this is an anticonvulsant, anti-epileptic drug. He said to me this is the last drug I can trial you on. So, my question is: How can Sodium Valproate help with OCD? Why does my psych think that severe, chronic OCD will respond to Sodium Valproate? He said the high-dose Lexapro with this new drug will be effective. What do you think? Answered by Farah Horney 4 months ago.

Valproic acid (Sodium Valproate) was indeed originally researched and developed as an anti epileptic, as an adjunct drug (ie, not a first line drug) after Phenytoin for seizure disorders. After a number of years, it was discovered it had psychiatric effects as well -- thus its use in your case. Valproate is also only an adjunct drug in OCD disorders, and in fact may not even be a second line drug, more like third. If your Dr. is trying you on Valproate, it means he is pretty much running out of options -- not to say Valproate is not a good drug, just not the first (or second) choice. So, it looks like Valproate is doomed to go through like not being the drug of choice for anything, but has made a living being a decent back up drug. Valproate as an anti-OCD drug (and related disorders) has shown promise, which is why psychiatrists continue to use it. Source: I am a pharmacist Answered by Anderson Tanious 4 months ago.


Epilim (sodium valproate ) and pregnancy?
Has anyone been pregnant and stayed on their medications how did you go and what dosage do you take. I am 6 weeks pregnant and the doctor has me on 5mg Folate a day also. Asked by Griselda Cavins 4 months ago.

Sodium valproate is not a good medication to take while you are pregnant. Your taking it for epilepsy I'm guessing. I'm not a doctor but it would be wise to find a different medication. The risk is just too great. Just think of having a baby with spina bifida? How would you live with yourself? How many different medications have you tried? Do you work outside the home? How often did you have seizures when you were not on medication? Look at some pictures on the net of babies with birth defects and ask yourself if it is worth it. Answered by Dayna Segee 4 months ago.

Don't beat yourself up too much . You are trying to restore your dying relationship but your husband respond in silence . Maybe you want to leave him alone for sometime give him sometime to think . Go and sleep .....psychiastrist are stupid. They can only give you medication and judging each and every different individuals using the standards /theories they learnt in their profession. This is the problem , that people trying to fit a single standard onto everyone which totally neglect our individuality . You know yourself better than these so called " experts " ...trust me , if you don't feel well . then no matter what others are saying your well . You are not . Because you are the only one that knows . It does sound to me that your husband is a jerk . Pushing all his responsibilities to you . But don't get up-set and start with him. Fighting isn't going to help in most cases . Perhaps you can try to talk to your husband and tell him how you feel . A marriage isn't base on the effort of one spouse alone . It requires both the male and the female to work together as a TEAM ! There's nothing more I can do if your husband isn't going to respond to your effort . Do your best and leave all else to fate . Hope life is going to work out for you . I sincerely hope there's Not Going to be another divorce . And please keep this in mind : Even your husband , everyone should know that marriage , like every other skills and profession you NEED to invest into it in order that it stays functional and success . It's such a tragedy that Schools never offer subject on more practical and important aspects of life such as marriage , etc. And now you are facing the conscequences of not preparing for you marriage beforehand. It's like before you learn how to fly an aircraft and you were put into the plane to drive the airplane . Because you are untrained you will crash utterly ...... Marriage ? Same thing ! Answered by Orval Alepin 4 months ago.


Is memory loss a side effect of sodium valproate medicine? memory loss? weak in maths?
after gradually decreasing the dose, will epilepsy occur again? pl explain side effects in simple lang, not in medical terms. my daughter is only 14 yrs old. can dizziness n headache be effects of dose adjustment? How long Will she have to take medicines? PLEASE HELP. Asked by Carla Lovecchio 4 months ago.

Sodium valproate (Depakene) is a drug used to treat epilepsy. It's not clear how Depakene controls epilepsy, but it increases the concentration of gamma-aminobutyric acid, a chemical neurotransmitter that carries impulses from one nerve cell to another. Depakene is almost completely metabolized or broken down in the liver and can cause toxic reactions that can lead to liver failure and death. Depakene can cause severe birth defects, including neural tube defects such as spina bifida, heart defects and bone defects. Depakene can cause inflammation of the pancreas. Pancreatitis is characterized by severe abdominal pain, as well as nausea, vomiting and loss of appetite. Depakene may cause depression that leads to suicidal thoughts and attempted suicide, so people should be monitored carefully for mood changes or signs of depression during treatment. Somnolence, a constant state of sleepiness, may occur in older adults taking Depakene. Platelets (thrombocytes) are necessary for blood clotting and to prevent hemorrhage, but Depakene can cause thrombocytopenia, a reduced number of platelets, so platelets should be monitored with increased bruising or bleeding. High levels of ammonia may occur with Depakene. Hymperammonemia may result in encephalopathy with mental changes, nausea and vomiting. Sometimes Depakene causes the normal body temperature to fall to abnormal levels below 35 degrees Celsius or 95 degrees Fahrenheit. This may affect multiple body systems as circulation slows. Hypothermia may also be a sign of hyperammonemia. Q__after gradually decreasing the dose, will epilepsy occur again? Q__can dizziness n headache be effects of dose adjustment? Q__How long Will she have to take medicines? Only qualified Medical Doctors can give you an answer to all your queations.Please consult your doctor or search the web. Take care as always!!! Answered by Kirsten Traffanstedt 4 months ago.

I've been having amazing memory problems on 1000mg of Lithium. I would think something and it would be gone within a couple of seconds, often before I'd had time to remember to write it down. It was partly amusing and partly terrifying. However, both a psychiatrist and a pharmacist say it's not the lithium. So, with you, I guess it must part of the bipolar. I think as evidence for that is the fact that my memory is better on some days than others. I assume if it was just the lithium, the memory failures would be a steady feature. Good luck working out how to cope with it. Buy a notebook, is the best I can advise. Answered by Francene Cottier 4 months ago.

yes defintely, and other side effects are: erectile dysfunction, bleeding in stool, and a gradual shrinking of genitalia. Good day to you. Answered by Jewel Noblett 4 months ago.


Low or No Sperm Count - Keppra (Levetiractam) 1000mg, Epilim Chrono (Sodium Valproate) 700mg?
Im currently taken Keppra (Levetiractam) 1000mg - Twice a day & Epilim Chrono (Sodium Valproate) 700mg - Twice a day, Can any tell me if this will effect me having children. Asked by Drusilla Franca 4 months ago.

The keppra isn't associated with any decrease in fertility, but the Sodium Valproate should not be used by women who are or may be pregnant, so you should check with your doctor if you and your wife are trying to conceive. Answered by Cletus Verhagen 4 months ago.


Is vaproate used to treat Post Traumatic Stress Disorder?
That is sodium Valproate Asked by Stephine Mcnamer 4 months ago.

Sometimes it is used as a mood stabilizer in people with PTSD or borderline to help control the wild mood swings. I'm assuming you misspelled sodium valproate/valproic acid. Answered by Nanci Shene 4 months ago.

It is FDA indicated for epilepsy and bipolar disorder. Some may use it as offlabel for many other problems. Answered by Miss Carranzo 4 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
076295/001 VALPROATE SODIUM VALPROATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per ML
076539/001 VALPROATE SODIUM VALPROATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per ML
078523/001 VALPROATE SODIUM VALPROATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020593/001 DEPACON VALPROATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per ML
076295/001 VALPROATE SODIUM VALPROATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per ML
076539/001 VALPROATE SODIUM VALPROATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per ML
078523/001 VALPROATE SODIUM VALPROATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per ML

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