Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 016322/001.

Names and composition

"VALISONE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of BETAMETHASONE VALERATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016322/001 VALISONE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
016322/002 VALISONE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.01% BASE
016740/001 VALISONE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
016932/001 VALISONE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE LOTION/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016322/001 VALISONE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
016322/002 VALISONE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.01% BASE
016740/001 VALISONE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
016932/001 VALISONE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE LOTION/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
018642/001 BETA-VAL BETAMETHASONE VALERATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
018839/001 BETADERM BETAMETHASONE VALERATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
018860/002 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
018861/001 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
018862/001 BETATREX BETAMETHASONE VALERATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
018863/001 BETATREX BETAMETHASONE VALERATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
018864/001 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
018865/001 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
018866/001 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE LOTION/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
018867/001 BETATREX BETAMETHASONE VALERATE LOTION/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
018870/001 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE LOTION/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
020934/001 LUXIQ BETAMETHASONE VALERATE AEROSOL, FOAM/TOPICAL 0.12%
070050/001 VALNAC BETAMETHASONE VALERATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
070051/001 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
070052/001 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE LOTION/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
070053/001 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
070062/001 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
070069/001 BETA-VAL BETAMETHASONE VALERATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
070072/001 BETA-VAL BETAMETHASONE VALERATE LOTION/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
070484/001 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE LOTION/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
070485/001 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
070486/001 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
071478/001 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
071883/001 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE LOTION/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
072041/001 DERMABET BETAMETHASONE VALERATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
078337/001 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE AEROSOL, FOAM/TOPICAL 0.12%
207144/001 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE AEROSOL, FOAM/TOPICAL 0.12%
208204/001 BETAMETHASONE VALERATE BETAMETHASONE VALERATE AEROSOL, FOAM/TOPICAL 0.12%

Ask a doctor

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

I have white spots all over my legs and my questionable doctor put me on Valisone...Will this help at all?
The white spots have bumps all around them and feel rough to the touch, it seems to be more than just sun spots or tanning bed fungus... In fact i have stayed out of the sun and they have increased!! This is no fun at all, please help me out. Asked by Agueda Norris 2 years ago.

yes it will help , Answered by Maida Bagdasarian 2 years ago.

I'm not sure but a friend had some weird sun/fungus thing and used selsen blue shampoo on it to help it go away. I have no idea what it is or why it's there. Good luck and hope it gets better soon. I agree that vasoline sounds odd, I don't know why that would help but maybe there is a reason-you could try asking the doc or nurse why they told you that. Answered by Scott Mesdaq 2 years ago.

First diagnose which type of disease you have causing white spots like 1)vitiligo 2)Nevus depigmentosus 3)Pityriasis Alba and White scars 4)hypopigmentation 5)Idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis Answered by Georgine Fertik 2 years ago.


Need help translating prescription handwriting assignment?
I'm trying to translate the prescription handwriting print out but its so difficult. Its an assignment. I need help on:prescription 8 (was not sure if the name of the medication is Prednisone), prescription 9 (i know its Retin-A but i'm not sure what is the quantity written there. i'm guessing... Asked by Kenneth Kosack 2 years ago.

When a pharmacist/ technician cannot decipher a doctors handwriting they cannot dispense any drug. In this scenario the pharmacist would need to phone the doctor. (I can't read it either) Answered by Ellen Swor 2 years ago.

8 is definitely Prednisone 10mg, 3qd, #9 #9 appears to be 45 gm, but I would check to see what the package size was if I were filling it #11 the 12 refers to the refills and the squiggles at the right look like initials. But since Androgel is a controlled prescription that doesn't make sense (illegal at least in Ohio) Not much help on this one #12 looks like apply bid to affected area to me. These are tough! #13 is definitely Ciprofloxacin 500 mg, #14, 1 bid for seven days. And yes, the day supply goes in the direction, unlike in #8 where it is not included. 0 Refills #14 The first drug is FeSO4 325 mg which is ferrous sulfate, #60, 1 BID, 0 Refills. The second is Protonix 40 mg, #30, 1 qd, 0 refills #15 25 mg per Virginia (which would be the nurse's name who corrected the Rx). Sig: 1 qhs (so the Rx must be good for 2 months since it's #60), 4 refills #16 is Elidel (Eledil, not sure on the correct spelling), 30 g, AAA qd Of course, in actual practice, the pharmacist who took the phone-ins would know what he/she wrote and the techs would be used to the writing so there shouldn't be much of a problem. Answered by Nicky Hanover 2 years ago.

8 - Yes, this appears to be Prednisone 10mg, 3 daily x3 days, Disp #9. But I will say that I think Prednisone 30mg for 3 days is a weird prescription. #9 - This appears to be Retin A 1% Cream, Apply at bedtime, Disp 45g tube. Six refills. #11 - AndroGel 5gm, 2 packets every day, Disp #60. I believe this physcian wanted there to be 12 refills and he signed and circled his initials after the "12" #12 - Valisone Ointment 0.1%, Disp 45g, Sig: Apply BID to affected area?, Refill 1. #13 - Ciprofloxacin 500mg, One twice daily for 7 day, Disp #14, Refill 0. #14 - FeSO4 (Ferrous Sulfate) 325mg, one by mouth twice daily, Disp #60, Refill 0. Protonix 40mg, one by mouth daily, Disp #30, Refill 0 #15 - Seroquel 25mg po at each bedtime, Disp #60, Refill 4. It appears as if the dose was corrected to 25mg "per Virginia" (Virginia must have been the one correcting the Rx). #16 - Most likely Elidel, Sig: Apply BID to affected area, Disp 30g, Refill 2. This is the best I could come up with for this one, but this is obviously the same writer as Rx#12. Wow, these are some poorly written prescriptions. I agree with the above suggestions, that these should be confirmed with the physician. This is why I always write my prescriptions clearly. Answered by Rebecka Parkey 2 years ago.

I suspect the test here is not whether you can read the Rx, but when you would call to clarify the prescription in question. I think your instructors would be more impressed if you said you found the following prescriptions illegible and in the interest of patient safety, you would contact the MD to clarify what is being prescribed. I can read some of these that you cite, but the honest truth is, if I am not 100% certain of what is being prescribed, I call the doc. If they don't get feedback about their crappy handwriting, they don't tend to correct it. Answered by Cinthia Battistini 2 years ago.


I have white spots all over my legs and my questionable doctor put me on Valisone...Will this help at all?
The white spots have bumps all around them and feel rough to the touch, it seems to be more than just sun spots or tanning bed fungus... In fact i have stayed out of the sun and they have increased!! This is no fun at all, please help me out. Asked by Merri Anliker 2 years ago.

yes it will help , Answered by Alina Dehaan 2 years ago.

I'm not sure but a friend had some weird sun/fungus thing and used selsen blue shampoo on it to help it go away. I have no idea what it is or why it's there. Good luck and hope it gets better soon. I agree that vasoline sounds odd, I don't know why that would help but maybe there is a reason-you could try asking the doc or nurse why they told you that. Answered by Narcisa Gallemore 2 years ago.

First diagnose which type of disease you have causing white spots like 1)vitiligo 2)Nevus depigmentosus 3)Pityriasis Alba and White scars 4)hypopigmentation 5)Idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis Answered by Katheryn Rzepecki 2 years ago.


Need help translating prescription handwriting assignment?
I'm trying to translate the prescription handwriting print out but its so difficult. Its an assignment. I need help on:prescription 8 (was not sure if the name of the medication is Prednisone), prescription 9 (i know its Retin-A but i'm not sure what is the quantity written there. i'm guessing... Asked by Octavio Enos 2 years ago.

When a pharmacist/ technician cannot decipher a doctors handwriting they cannot dispense any drug. In this scenario the pharmacist would need to phone the doctor. (I can't read it either) Answered by Zula Condie 2 years ago.

8 is definitely Prednisone 10mg, 3qd, #9 #9 appears to be 45 gm, but I would check to see what the package size was if I were filling it #11 the 12 refers to the refills and the squiggles at the right look like initials. But since Androgel is a controlled prescription that doesn't make sense (illegal at least in Ohio) Not much help on this one #12 looks like apply bid to affected area to me. These are tough! #13 is definitely Ciprofloxacin 500 mg, #14, 1 bid for seven days. And yes, the day supply goes in the direction, unlike in #8 where it is not included. 0 Refills #14 The first drug is FeSO4 325 mg which is ferrous sulfate, #60, 1 BID, 0 Refills. The second is Protonix 40 mg, #30, 1 qd, 0 refills #15 25 mg per Virginia (which would be the nurse's name who corrected the Rx). Sig: 1 qhs (so the Rx must be good for 2 months since it's #60), 4 refills #16 is Elidel (Eledil, not sure on the correct spelling), 30 g, AAA qd Of course, in actual practice, the pharmacist who took the phone-ins would know what he/she wrote and the techs would be used to the writing so there shouldn't be much of a problem. Answered by Jamar Moitoso 2 years ago.

8 - Yes, this appears to be Prednisone 10mg, 3 daily x3 days, Disp #9. But I will say that I think Prednisone 30mg for 3 days is a weird prescription. #9 - This appears to be Retin A 1% Cream, Apply at bedtime, Disp 45g tube. Six refills. #11 - AndroGel 5gm, 2 packets every day, Disp #60. I believe this physcian wanted there to be 12 refills and he signed and circled his initials after the "12" #12 - Valisone Ointment 0.1%, Disp 45g, Sig: Apply BID to affected area?, Refill 1. #13 - Ciprofloxacin 500mg, One twice daily for 7 day, Disp #14, Refill 0. #14 - FeSO4 (Ferrous Sulfate) 325mg, one by mouth twice daily, Disp #60, Refill 0. Protonix 40mg, one by mouth daily, Disp #30, Refill 0 #15 - Seroquel 25mg po at each bedtime, Disp #60, Refill 4. It appears as if the dose was corrected to 25mg "per Virginia" (Virginia must have been the one correcting the Rx). #16 - Most likely Elidel, Sig: Apply BID to affected area, Disp 30g, Refill 2. This is the best I could come up with for this one, but this is obviously the same writer as Rx#12. Wow, these are some poorly written prescriptions. I agree with the above suggestions, that these should be confirmed with the physician. This is why I always write my prescriptions clearly. Answered by Chrystal Prom 2 years ago.

I suspect the test here is not whether you can read the Rx, but when you would call to clarify the prescription in question. I think your instructors would be more impressed if you said you found the following prescriptions illegible and in the interest of patient safety, you would contact the MD to clarify what is being prescribed. I can read some of these that you cite, but the honest truth is, if I am not 100% certain of what is being prescribed, I call the doc. If they don't get feedback about their crappy handwriting, they don't tend to correct it. Answered by Jame Schmeer 2 years ago.


I have white spots all over my legs and my questionable doctor put me on Valisone...Will this help at all?
The white spots have bumps all around them and feel rough to the touch, it seems to be more than just sun spots or tanning bed fungus... In fact i have stayed out of the sun and they have increased!! This is no fun at all, please help me out. Asked by Julianne Loth 2 years ago.

yes it will help , Answered by Andres Bargmann 2 years ago.

I'm not sure but a friend had some weird sun/fungus thing and used selsen blue shampoo on it to help it go away. I have no idea what it is or why it's there. Good luck and hope it gets better soon. I agree that vasoline sounds odd, I don't know why that would help but maybe there is a reason-you could try asking the doc or nurse why they told you that. Answered by Orville Kellum 2 years ago.

First diagnose which type of disease you have causing white spots like 1)vitiligo 2)Nevus depigmentosus 3)Pityriasis Alba and White scars 4)hypopigmentation 5)Idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis Answered by Cassie Arender 2 years ago.


Need help translating prescription handwriting assignment?
I'm trying to translate the prescription handwriting print out but its so difficult. Its an assignment. I need help on:prescription 8 (was not sure if the name of the medication is Prednisone), prescription 9 (i know its Retin-A but i'm not sure what is the quantity written there. i'm guessing... Asked by Nedra Boes 2 years ago.

When a pharmacist/ technician cannot decipher a doctors handwriting they cannot dispense any drug. In this scenario the pharmacist would need to phone the doctor. (I can't read it either) Answered by Shana Hime 2 years ago.

8 is definitely Prednisone 10mg, 3qd, #9 #9 appears to be 45 gm, but I would check to see what the package size was if I were filling it #11 the 12 refers to the refills and the squiggles at the right look like initials. But since Androgel is a controlled prescription that doesn't make sense (illegal at least in Ohio) Not much help on this one #12 looks like apply bid to affected area to me. These are tough! #13 is definitely Ciprofloxacin 500 mg, #14, 1 bid for seven days. And yes, the day supply goes in the direction, unlike in #8 where it is not included. 0 Refills #14 The first drug is FeSO4 325 mg which is ferrous sulfate, #60, 1 BID, 0 Refills. The second is Protonix 40 mg, #30, 1 qd, 0 refills #15 25 mg per Virginia (which would be the nurse's name who corrected the Rx). Sig: 1 qhs (so the Rx must be good for 2 months since it's #60), 4 refills #16 is Elidel (Eledil, not sure on the correct spelling), 30 g, AAA qd Of course, in actual practice, the pharmacist who took the phone-ins would know what he/she wrote and the techs would be used to the writing so there shouldn't be much of a problem. Answered by Klara Gallinaro 2 years ago.

8 - Yes, this appears to be Prednisone 10mg, 3 daily x3 days, Disp #9. But I will say that I think Prednisone 30mg for 3 days is a weird prescription. #9 - This appears to be Retin A 1% Cream, Apply at bedtime, Disp 45g tube. Six refills. #11 - AndroGel 5gm, 2 packets every day, Disp #60. I believe this physcian wanted there to be 12 refills and he signed and circled his initials after the "12" #12 - Valisone Ointment 0.1%, Disp 45g, Sig: Apply BID to affected area?, Refill 1. #13 - Ciprofloxacin 500mg, One twice daily for 7 day, Disp #14, Refill 0. #14 - FeSO4 (Ferrous Sulfate) 325mg, one by mouth twice daily, Disp #60, Refill 0. Protonix 40mg, one by mouth daily, Disp #30, Refill 0 #15 - Seroquel 25mg po at each bedtime, Disp #60, Refill 4. It appears as if the dose was corrected to 25mg "per Virginia" (Virginia must have been the one correcting the Rx). #16 - Most likely Elidel, Sig: Apply BID to affected area, Disp 30g, Refill 2. This is the best I could come up with for this one, but this is obviously the same writer as Rx#12. Wow, these are some poorly written prescriptions. I agree with the above suggestions, that these should be confirmed with the physician. This is why I always write my prescriptions clearly. Answered by Ronald Ashcraft 2 years ago.

I suspect the test here is not whether you can read the Rx, but when you would call to clarify the prescription in question. I think your instructors would be more impressed if you said you found the following prescriptions illegible and in the interest of patient safety, you would contact the MD to clarify what is being prescribed. I can read some of these that you cite, but the honest truth is, if I am not 100% certain of what is being prescribed, I call the doc. If they don't get feedback about their crappy handwriting, they don't tend to correct it. Answered by Paul Perrigan 2 years ago.


I have white spots all over my legs and my questionable doctor put me on Valisone...Will this help at all?
The white spots have bumps all around them and feel rough to the touch, it seems to be more than just sun spots or tanning bed fungus... In fact i have stayed out of the sun and they have increased!! This is no fun at all, please help me out. Asked by Antione Bensen 2 years ago.

yes it will help , Answered by Devon Kincannon 2 years ago.

I'm not sure but a friend had some weird sun/fungus thing and used selsen blue shampoo on it to help it go away. I have no idea what it is or why it's there. Good luck and hope it gets better soon. I agree that vasoline sounds odd, I don't know why that would help but maybe there is a reason-you could try asking the doc or nurse why they told you that. Answered by Keenan Biffer 2 years ago.

First diagnose which type of disease you have causing white spots like 1)vitiligo 2)Nevus depigmentosus 3)Pityriasis Alba and White scars 4)hypopigmentation 5)Idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis Answered by Arlena Seiders 2 years ago.


Need help translating prescription handwriting assignment?
I'm trying to translate the prescription handwriting print out but its so difficult. Its an assignment. I need help on:prescription 8 (was not sure if the name of the medication is Prednisone), prescription 9 (i know its Retin-A but i'm not sure what is the quantity written there. i'm guessing... Asked by Dacia Bittinger 2 years ago.

When a pharmacist/ technician cannot decipher a doctors handwriting they cannot dispense any drug. In this scenario the pharmacist would need to phone the doctor. (I can't read it either) Answered by Latonya Gitting 2 years ago.

8 is definitely Prednisone 10mg, 3qd, #9 #9 appears to be 45 gm, but I would check to see what the package size was if I were filling it #11 the 12 refers to the refills and the squiggles at the right look like initials. But since Androgel is a controlled prescription that doesn't make sense (illegal at least in Ohio) Not much help on this one #12 looks like apply bid to affected area to me. These are tough! #13 is definitely Ciprofloxacin 500 mg, #14, 1 bid for seven days. And yes, the day supply goes in the direction, unlike in #8 where it is not included. 0 Refills #14 The first drug is FeSO4 325 mg which is ferrous sulfate, #60, 1 BID, 0 Refills. The second is Protonix 40 mg, #30, 1 qd, 0 refills #15 25 mg per Virginia (which would be the nurse's name who corrected the Rx). Sig: 1 qhs (so the Rx must be good for 2 months since it's #60), 4 refills #16 is Elidel (Eledil, not sure on the correct spelling), 30 g, AAA qd Of course, in actual practice, the pharmacist who took the phone-ins would know what he/she wrote and the techs would be used to the writing so there shouldn't be much of a problem. Answered by Chuck Bellin 2 years ago.

8 - Yes, this appears to be Prednisone 10mg, 3 daily x3 days, Disp #9. But I will say that I think Prednisone 30mg for 3 days is a weird prescription. #9 - This appears to be Retin A 1% Cream, Apply at bedtime, Disp 45g tube. Six refills. #11 - AndroGel 5gm, 2 packets every day, Disp #60. I believe this physcian wanted there to be 12 refills and he signed and circled his initials after the "12" #12 - Valisone Ointment 0.1%, Disp 45g, Sig: Apply BID to affected area?, Refill 1. #13 - Ciprofloxacin 500mg, One twice daily for 7 day, Disp #14, Refill 0. #14 - FeSO4 (Ferrous Sulfate) 325mg, one by mouth twice daily, Disp #60, Refill 0. Protonix 40mg, one by mouth daily, Disp #30, Refill 0 #15 - Seroquel 25mg po at each bedtime, Disp #60, Refill 4. It appears as if the dose was corrected to 25mg "per Virginia" (Virginia must have been the one correcting the Rx). #16 - Most likely Elidel, Sig: Apply BID to affected area, Disp 30g, Refill 2. This is the best I could come up with for this one, but this is obviously the same writer as Rx#12. Wow, these are some poorly written prescriptions. I agree with the above suggestions, that these should be confirmed with the physician. This is why I always write my prescriptions clearly. Answered by Robbi Monios 2 years ago.

I suspect the test here is not whether you can read the Rx, but when you would call to clarify the prescription in question. I think your instructors would be more impressed if you said you found the following prescriptions illegible and in the interest of patient safety, you would contact the MD to clarify what is being prescribed. I can read some of these that you cite, but the honest truth is, if I am not 100% certain of what is being prescribed, I call the doc. If they don't get feedback about their crappy handwriting, they don't tend to correct it. Answered by Milton Mclarty 2 years ago.


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