UNITHROID Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 021210/001.

Names and composition

"UNITHROID" is the commercial name of a drug composed of LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
021210/001 UNITHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.025MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021210/002 UNITHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.05MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021210/003 UNITHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.075MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021210/004 UNITHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.088MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021210/005 UNITHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021210/006 UNITHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.112MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021210/007 UNITHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.125MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021210/008 UNITHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.15MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021210/009 UNITHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.175MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021210/010 UNITHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.2MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021210/011 UNITHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.3MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021210/012 UNITHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.137MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
206977/002 TIROSINT-SOL LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM SOLUTION/ORAL 25MCG per ML
206977/003 TIROSINT-SOL LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM SOLUTION/ORAL 50MCG per ML
206977/004 TIROSINT-SOL LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM SOLUTION/ORAL 75MCG per ML
206977/005 TIROSINT-SOL LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM SOLUTION/ORAL 88MCG per ML
206977/006 TIROSINT-SOL LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM SOLUTION/ORAL 100MCG per ML
206977/007 TIROSINT-SOL LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM SOLUTION/ORAL 112MCG per ML
206977/008 TIROSINT-SOL LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM SOLUTION/ORAL 125MCG per ML
206977/009 TIROSINT-SOL LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM SOLUTION/ORAL 137MCG per ML
206977/010 TIROSINT-SOL LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM SOLUTION/ORAL 150MCG per ML
206977/011 TIROSINT-SOL LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM SOLUTION/ORAL 175MCG per ML
206977/012 TIROSINT-SOL LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM SOLUTION/ORAL 200MCG per ML
021137/012 LEVOLET LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.3MG
021137/005 LEVOLET LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
021137/002 LEVOLET LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.05MG
206977/001 TIROSINT-SOL LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM SOLUTION/ORAL 13MCG per ML
021137/001 LEVOLET LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.025MG
021137/003 LEVOLET LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.075MG
021137/004 LEVOLET LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.088MG
021137/006 LEVOLET LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.112MG
021137/007 LEVOLET LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.125MG
021137/008 LEVOLET LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.137MG
021137/010 LEVOLET LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.175MG
021137/011 LEVOLET LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.2MG
021137/009 LEVOLET LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.15MG
021342/001 LEVO-T LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.025MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021116/001 LEVOTHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.025MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
076187/001 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.025MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021301/001 LEVOXYL LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.025MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021342/002 LEVO-T LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.05MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021116/002 LEVOTHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.05MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
076187/002 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.05MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021301/002 LEVOXYL LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.05MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021342/003 LEVO-T LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.075MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021116/003 LEVOTHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.075MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
076187/003 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.075MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021301/003 LEVOXYL LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.075MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021292/001 NOVOTHYROX LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.025MG
021342/004 LEVO-T LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.088MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021116/004 LEVOTHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
076187/004 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.088MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021301/004 LEVOXYL LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.088MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021292/002 NOVOTHYROX LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.05MG
021342/005 LEVO-T LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021116/005 LEVOTHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.125MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
076187/005 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021301/005 LEVOXYL LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021292/003 NOVOTHYROX LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.075MG
021342/006 LEVO-T LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.112MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021116/006 LEVOTHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.15MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
076187/006 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.112MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021301/006 LEVOXYL LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.112MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021292/004 NOVOTHYROX LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.088MG
021342/007 LEVO-T LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.125MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021116/007 LEVOTHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.175MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
076187/007 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.125MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021301/007 LEVOXYL LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.125MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021292/005 NOVOTHYROX LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
021342/008 LEVO-T LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.15MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021116/008 LEVOTHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.2MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
076187/008 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.15MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021301/008 LEVOXYL LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.137MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021292/006 NOVOTHYROX LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.112MG
021342/009 LEVO-T LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.175MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021116/009 LEVOTHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.3MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
076187/009 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.175MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021301/009 LEVOXYL LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.15MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021292/007 NOVOTHYROX LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.125MG
021402/001 SYNTHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.025MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021342/010 LEVO-T LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.2MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021116/010 LEVOTHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.088MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
076187/010 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.2MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021301/010 LEVOXYL LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.175MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021292/008 NOVOTHYROX LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.137MG
021402/002 SYNTHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.05MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021342/011 LEVO-T LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.3MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021116/011 LEVOTHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.112MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
076187/011 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.3MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021301/011 LEVOXYL LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.2MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021292/009 NOVOTHYROX LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.15MG
021402/003 SYNTHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.075MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021924/002 TIROSINT LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 0.025MG
021342/012 LEVO-T LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.137MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021116/012 LEVOTHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.137MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
076187/012 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.137MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021301/012 LEVOXYL LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.3MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
021292/010 NOVOTHYROX LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.175MG
021402/004 SYNTHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.088MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021924/003 TIROSINT LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 0.05MG
076752/001 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.025MG
021292/011 NOVOTHYROX LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.2MG
021402/005 SYNTHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021924/004 TIROSINT LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 0.075MG
076752/002 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.05MG
021292/012 NOVOTHYROX LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.3MG
021402/006 SYNTHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.112MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021924/005 TIROSINT LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 0.1MG
021210/001 UNITHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.025MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
076752/003 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.075MG
021402/007 SYNTHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.125MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021924/006 TIROSINT LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 0.125MG
021210/002 UNITHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.05MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
076752/004 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.088MG
021402/008 SYNTHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.137MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021924/007 TIROSINT LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 0.15MG
021210/003 UNITHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.075MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
076752/005 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
021402/009 SYNTHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.15MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021924/008 TIROSINT LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 0.112MG
021210/004 UNITHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.088MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
076752/006 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.112MG
021402/010 SYNTHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.175MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021924/009 TIROSINT LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 0.137MG
021210/005 UNITHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
076752/007 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.125MG
021402/011 SYNTHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.3MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
021924/010 TIROSINT LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 0.088MG
021210/006 UNITHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.112MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
076752/008 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.15MG
021402/012 SYNTHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.2MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
022121/001 TIROSINT LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 0.013MG
021210/007 UNITHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.125MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
076752/009 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.175MG
021210/008 UNITHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.15MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
076752/010 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.2MG
021210/009 UNITHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.175MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
076752/011 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.3MG
021210/010 UNITHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.2MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
076764/001 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ ORAL 0.025MG
021210/011 UNITHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.3MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
076764/002 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ ORAL 0.050MG
076764/003 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ ORAL 0.075MG
021210/012 UNITHROID LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 0.137MG **See current Annual Edition, 1.8 Description of Special Situations, Levothyroxine Sodium
076764/004 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ ORAL 0.088MG
076764/005 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ ORAL 0.1MG
076764/006 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ ORAL 0.112MG
076764/007 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ ORAL 0.125MG
076764/008 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ ORAL 0.15MG
076764/009 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ ORAL 0.175MG
076764/010 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ ORAL 0.2MG
076764/011 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM TABLET/ ORAL 0.3MG
202231/001 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM POWDER/INTRAVENOUS 100MCG per VIAL
202231/002 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM POWDER/INTRAVENOUS 200MCG per VIAL
202231/003 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM POWDER/INTRAVENOUS 500MCG per VIAL
202231/005 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM INJECTABLE/ INJECTION 500MCG
205366/001 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM POWDER/INTRAVENOUS 200MCG per VIAL
206163/001 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM POWDER/INTRAVENOUS 100MCG per VIAL
206163/002 LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM POWDER/INTRAVENOUS 500MCG per VIAL

Ask a question

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question as quickly as possible.

Answered questions

What's the difference between Unithroid, Levoxyl, And Synthroid?
I know Jerome Stevens makes Unithroid, Levoxyl is manufactured by Jones Pharma and Synthroid is manufactured by Abbott. But I thought that only one manufacturer can make the brand name drug? And that when their patent expires others can make generics. Unithroid, Levoxyl and Synthroid are brand names for... Asked by Emil Pereida 1 month ago.

I know Jerome Stevens makes Unithroid, Levoxyl is manufactured by Jones Pharma and Synthroid is manufactured by Abbott. But I thought that only one manufacturer can make the brand name drug? And that when their patent expires others can make generics. Unithroid, Levoxyl and Synthroid are brand names for levothyroxine, why do they have different manufacturers? And different names Answered by Talisha Yanchik 1 month ago.

Great question for your local Pharmacist. He/she would be able to explain it is great detail. Answered by Dorine Hauff 1 month ago.


Is there a link between Bipolar disorder and the medecine Unithroid/Synthroid?
Thanks! Asked by Lorenzo Emler 1 month ago.

From my understanding, the link isnt in the disease, but the meds you take. I take Lithium for my bipolar disorder and it effects my Thyroid glands. As a result I take Synthroid to keep it all balanced. Hope this helps.... Good Luck ..... GMM Answered by Terrence Mabey 1 month ago.

the answer to the question isn't so undemanding as one may imagine, and really the adaptation is debated continuously by using psychiatrists themselves. neither is brought about entirely by using genetics or existence activities. Borderline is a "personality affliction," which signifies that that is a wide maladjustment impacting each part of someone's' existence, and lasting for an finished life. Bipolar is considered an "ailment," that signifies that it separates the guy from who they are surely. Borderline people in many situations have very reactive moods. Manic and depressive episodes are non everlasting, and after an episode the guy returns to their usual state. someone "is" borderline, yet they "have" bipolar affliction. yet there are a tremendous kind of similarities interior the indications exhibited, and a tremendous kind of folk have surely said that borderline personality affliction is a few version of an emotional affliction. The time period "borderline" initially meant that the guy changed into continuously on the fence between neurosis and psychosis. Bipolar people may be stated to head through only one at a time. desire that permits. Answered by Allyn Midget 1 month ago.

sometimes a thyroid problem can mimic a mental disorder but i doubt synthroid is linked to bipolar disorder. Answered by Holli Kallstrom 1 month ago.

Have a look here. Answered by Odette Oquinn 1 month ago.


Help with my thyroid lab results?
About 7 weeks ago I started getting tingling in the left side of my face, chest tightness/pain, even worse fatigue than before, brain fog, and weight loss. I went to the doctor and had them check my thyroid the results showed my TSH was 3.07 i asked the doctor to increase the dosage because of how poorly i was... Asked by Veronika Monnet 1 month ago.

About 7 weeks ago I started getting tingling in the left side of my face, chest tightness/pain, even worse fatigue than before, brain fog, and weight loss. I went to the doctor and had them check my thyroid the results showed my TSH was 3.07 i asked the doctor to increase the dosage because of how poorly i was feeling. She agreed and im now on 75mg of unithroid. I went in just this past week to have my levels retested and the results were Free T3 3.2, range 2.0 - 4.4 Free T4 1.93, range 0.82 - 1.77 TSH 2.64, range 0.45 - -4.50 My TSH hardly moved but my free T4 is now elevated. I still don't feel 100% with brain fog, fatigue, chest tightness, and dry eyes but i dont really understand what my results are telling me. Isnt a high T4 hyperthyroid? how could this happen without causing my T3 to be out of range? Anything is helpful! Thanks Answered by Dorie Borroel 1 month ago.

Still need some time on the new dosage. Be sure you take your thyroid on an EMPTY stomach daily. It is normal to have to have dosage adjustments. Expect your lab results will straighten out in a short period of time. I wouldn't be too concerned about the one abnormal result until you are thoroughly stabilized on the new dose. Answered by Weston Quihuiz 1 month ago.


I'm scared to take synthroid, any advise for me?
I'm worried about talking synthroid, about 4 days ago I took the generic levoxyl and I thought I was having a stroke... I was pale and very nervous trembling my heart was pounding 100 miles per hour.. I saw the doc today and she said maybe it was the generic one so she wants me to start synthroid.. I'm so... Asked by Nick Sebion 1 month ago.

I'm worried about talking synthroid, about 4 days ago I took the generic levoxyl and I thought I was having a stroke... I was pale and very nervous trembling my heart was pounding 100 miles per hour.. I saw the doc today and she said maybe it was the generic one so she wants me to start synthroid.. I'm so scared what my reaction would be she said it was the lowest dosage .025mcg... Has anyone had any bad reactions with synthroid? Answered by Jaime Stuhr 1 month ago.

There are other generics you can try as well, perhaps Unithroid. I know a lot of people who have had good luck with that. You also could try a natural thyroid medication like Armour or Naturethroid. I started out on Levoxyl. It did nothing for my symptoms. I eventually switched to Armour and feel better than I have in years Below is a good thyroid forum. There's lots of info there, even a message board. Also, some Armour links Answered by Jennell Chomka 1 month ago.

There's a good message board system about thyroid drugs and issues. I also had the same reaction to Levoxyl, but I decided to stop taking it because I take bio-identical hormones. I hope it works out for you! Answered by Marissa Betsch 1 month ago.

I am thinking that she had you on too high of a dose. I know when my doc was adjusting my levels .... i felt like that and then they lowered them. Nothing to worry about when they find the right dose ..... synthroid is very similar to what your body makes so there are little side effects .... Answered by Fredricka Boveja 1 month ago.

I wont take the generic...I only stick to the name brand in this case. Pharmicist have said that there is slight difference in between them. Try synthroid and see if you experience a better feeling. Please dont let your thyroid go untreated, my doc said untreated hypothyroidism can lead to irreversible heart problems. Answered by Olimpia Krimple 1 month ago.

Check out this website: www.drlowe.com Answered by Tosha Delosangeles 1 month ago.


What kind of medication are you prescribed to treat hypothyroidism and what are the side effects?
Asked by Nikole Kranich 1 month ago.

Doctors would prescribe synthetic thyroid hormone levothyroxine (Levothroid, Levoxyl, Synthroid, Unithroid). The medication restores hormone levels and will have you feeling less tired/fatigued pretty quickly. The possible side effects of these medications are: headache, sleep problems, nervous or irritable feeling, fever, hot flashes, sweating, changes in your menstrual periods, appetite changes, weight changes (usually weight LOSS). I know plenty of patients that have zero side effects and are very happy to have their energy restored. I'm not saying you won't have any side effects, but thyroid medications are generally well-tolerated by most patients. Best of luck to you, take care! Answered by Leonard Baynham 1 month ago.

There are many different thyroid medications. Some are T4, some are T3, and some are both. I have tried T4, T4 with T3, and finally a T4/T3 combo that is natural. I feel better on the natural medication (Armour) I have been on it for 4 years now and I feel great. There are usually no side effects with thyroid meds when you are on the correct dosage, though I have heard of some people having more hairloss with Synthroid but that depends on the person. Symptoms of too much medication would be diarrhea, fast heart rate, nervousness, anxiety, and weight loss. You usually get tested every 6 to 8 weeks until you find your best dosage. Just remember to always test in the morning, especially if you are only having a TSH test. Some thyroid links below Answered by Marisol Asad 1 month ago.

Hypothyroidism is treated with a synthentic thyroid hormone, typically Synthroid or Levothroid (generic name is levothyroxine) you will most likely take 1 pill a day. Your doctor will need to do blood tests to determine the strength of the pill you need, it will typically range from 25 mg to 200 mg. You will need to have regular bood tests to ensure that you are taking the correct amount. What are the possible side effects of levothyroxine? Stop using levothyroxine and get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: headache; sleep problems (insomnia); nervous or irritable feeling; fever, hot flashes, sweating; changes in your menstrual periods; appetite changes, weight changes; Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. You may experience mild hair loss. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect levothyroxine? The following drugs may cause medical problems if you use them with levothyroxine: lithium, amiodarone, or antidepressants. Tell your doctor if you have recently received radiation therapy with iodine (such as I-131). There are many other drugs not listed that can affect levothyroxine. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Certain medicines can be continued, but they may make levothyroxine less effective if taken at the same time. If you use any of the following drugs, use them at least 4 hours before or 4 hours after you take levothyroxine: calcium carbonate (Caltrate, Citracal, Oystercal, and others); ferrous sulfate iron supplement; sucralfate (Carafate); sodium polystyrene sulfonate (Kayexalate, Kionex, and others); antacids that contain aluminum (Amphojel, Gaviscon, Maalox, Mylanta, Riopan, Rulox, Tums, and others); and cholesterol-lowering drugs cholestyramine (Questran) and colestipol (Colestid). Answered by Micheal Zablonski 1 month ago.

Chronic depression took years to get as low as you've become. Chemically that is true also. Once you and your Dr discover which medication will "work" for you, you must take it every single day. My Dr told me to figure it will take as long to come out of the depression as it did for me to sink so low. I'm not sure if that is true or not. I will say this. Each year I have been on the antidepressants people around me comment that I am doing more than I had, that I have had my emotions return, people want to be around me now, I have less of a problem with eating and sleeping. My anger is gone. I'm not worried or anxious anymore. I have become secure in the person that I am. I can speak full sentences that make sense now. Sadness no longer shapes my days and my life. I am calm and in a good mood everyday now. I don't have to push extra hard just to make it through a day. I can now help others who have bigger problems, and they look to me as friend who genuinely cares. The medications have been working in my body for the past 16 years with continual small improvements. A counselor came up to me one day a few years back with this comment ; "You are improving so well, you're no longer disabled" I was taken aback. She was right. Ever since I've seen myself in a whole new light. - And I continue every day to take my antidepressants. The Dr explained that the extreme traumas I lived through actually changed the shape of my brain and made it so I will always need the antidepressants in order to function. That's OK with me. I've finally reached what most other people call "normal". I found my laugh and smile and song along the way. Don't be discouraged that it takes years to come out of depression - you can still live your life ahead. Answered by Mozelle Hoffelt 1 month ago.

I take a med called levoxyl. When I first started taking it, I lost about ten pounds and seemed to have a bit more energy. Now that I have been on it for as many years as I have, I don't notice any affects from it at all. However, I am told that when diagnosed w/hypothyroidism, you probably will need to be on the meds for the rest of your life. Hope I helped you Answered by Blossom Solonika 1 month ago.

Well, there are differnt causes for the condition, so I only know about the actual thyroid as the problem. (I now have it, after having hyPERthyroidism for ten years, unknown.) Basically, you take a synthetic form of the thyroid hormones. The hormones stimulate your whole body, and affect your metabolism as they do it. So, you're more alert, can eat more and still lose a little weight if you're active, and stop feeling so slow and blue. Good luck to you or whoever you're asking for! Answered by Colleen Kreiner 1 month ago.

Hypothyroidism is the disease state in humans and animals caused by insufficient production of thyroid hormone by the thyroid gland. Treatment A doctor can perform a blood test to see if a patient suffers from hypothyroidism. A synthetic thyroid supplement can be prescribed, which the patient must take daily to replace the missing hormone. The American Thyroid Association cautions against taking herbal remedies, and warns that taking too much iodine can actually worsen both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism.[3] Patients with psychiatric symptoms (mood or psychosis) and physical symptoms of hypothyroidism, with subclinical hypothyroidism (normal TSH but low free T3) are often treated with thyroid supplement to bring the free T3 levels into the upper range of normal. Patients with hypothyroidism should have a diet high in fiber and high cellulose foods to prevent costipation; exercise frequently; avoid narcotic sedatives (because of sensitivity to narcotics; barbiturates and anasthetics) and keep warm (patients are not tolerant of cold weather). Diagnostic testing To diagnose primary hypothyroidism, many doctors simply measure the amount of Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) being produced. High levels of TSH indicate that the thyroid is not producing sufficient levels of Thyroid hormone (mainly as thyroxine (T4) and smaller amounts of triiodothyronine (fT3)). However, measuring just TSH fails to diagnose secondary and tertiary forms of hypothyroidism, thus leading to the following suggested minimum blood testing: thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) free triiodothyronine (fT3) free levothyroxine (fT4) total T3 total T4 Additionally, the following measurements may be needed: antithyroid antibodies - for evidence of autoimmune diseases that may be damaging the thyroid gland serum cholesterol - which may be elevated in hypothyroidism prolactin - as a widely available test of pituitary function Answered by Rubin Sheidler 1 month ago.

Standard treatment for an underactive thyroid involves daily use of the synthetic thyroid hormone levothyroxine (Levothroid, Levoxyl, Synthroid, Unithroid). The oral medication restores adequate hormone levels, shifting your body back into normal gear. What side effects may I notice from taking levothyroxine? Side effects that you should report to your prescriber or health care professional as soon as possible: •difficulty breathing, wheezing, or shortness of breath •chest pain •excessive sweating or intolerance to heat •fast or irregular heartbeat or pulse rate •nervousness •skin rash or hives •swelling of ankles, feet or legs Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your prescriber or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome): •changes in appetite •changes in menstrual periods •diarrhea •fever •hair loss •headache •irritability •leg cramps •nausea, vomiting •tremors •trouble sleeping •weight loss Click on the links below to learn more about the illness and the drug respectively. Take care Answered by Anita Macura 1 month ago.


Thyroid Meds--Is there a debate about the generics?
Sinthroid is given for thyroid problems like hypothyroidism but for years the word was that the (cheaper) generics didn't work exactly the same in the body. They were broken down slightly differently but in a way that could make a big difference to the user. My friend's doc insists on brand name Sinthroid... Asked by Carline Uhm 1 month ago.

Sinthroid is given for thyroid problems like hypothyroidism but for years the word was that the (cheaper) generics didn't work exactly the same in the body. They were broken down slightly differently but in a way that could make a big difference to the user. My friend's doc insists on brand name Sinthroid only, not on using generics. Has this ever gotten settled? And if there is a difference, how can the FDA okay the substitution of the generic for sinthroid? Lots of people use the generics. What's the real scoop on this? Answered by Arianna Daigneault 1 month ago.

Certain thyroid meds are equivalent to others, but not all the generics are equivalent to all the brands, and all the brands aren't equivalent to each other. Thats what makes it so complex. For example, you have two brands - Synthroid and Unithroid. They may be equivalent to each other, but the respective manufacturers never did any testing to prove it. So, now a generic company wants to make a generic version - they need a brand to compare to - so they pick one. Say they pick Synthroid. They do their studies, and get approval. Now, they are only equivalent to Synthroid. Its not that they aren't equivalent to Unithroid - we just don't know because no testing was ever done. Multiply that by 4 brands, and you can see the complexity. Another issues is this - to be considered equivalent, the generic has to be within a certain percentage of the brand in terms of blood absorption. Any generic, when tested in the body, could either be exactly the same, above or below the brand. Lets say that generic A tests slightly below the brand, and generic B test slightly above the brand. Both A and B are equivalent to the brand, but would they be equivalent to each other? Maybe, maybe not. Another thinng to consider is this - every batch of the brand is not the same as every other batch. There are allowed to be manufacturing variations. For example, a batch of Synthroid, 100 mcg, can contain anywhere from 95 - 105 mcg. What if the generic picked one of the lots that was on the low side to compare to, and what if they were slightly lower. They would still be equivalent to that batch, but are they equivalent overall? These situations aren't unique to thyroid meds. What is unique is this - thyroid medications belong to a very small class of drugs which are known to have a narrow therapeutic range. A very small change in potency could make a large change in efficacy. For most drugs, minor differnces described in the previous paragraphs would have no effect, but for a thyroid med, there could be an effect. Add this to the fact that you were presumably "titrated" to get your optimum dose. That is, the doctor made an educated guess on how much you needed based on a number of factors - blood test results being a key factor. Then, you went back and were tested, and maybe the dose was tweaked, and you repeated until all your blood levels were acceptable. If you switched toa different brand or generic, you would need ot get tested again, because of the minor differences noted above. The actual drug works exactly the same, and is absorbed exactly the same. But, there are a lot of other variables to take into consideration. The bottom line is, is the savings worth the hassle of getting retitrated, and then having to make sure you get the same generic each time. But, if you make the decision, rest assured that once you get titrated on the specific generic, you will be getting the proper amount of drug each time. Answered by Matthew Roston 1 month ago.

I know many people on Unithroid (considered a generic) that are doing well on it. Some do better on the thyroid brand name and others do better on the generic. Just whatever med you start on don't switch suddenly, as each med has to be adsjusted by blood work each time you make a change. I'm on Armour thyroid, which is a brand name, however its a natural med containing T4 and T3 while Synthroid is only T4. I found it works better than T4 alone. I used to be on Levoxyl years ago, but it did nothing for my symptoms. Answered by Gillian Hohlstein 1 month ago.

Salicylic acid is the generic name for aspirin. Many companies put their name on the bottle that sells salicylic acid. Is Bayer's salicylic acid ( 500 mg ) any different from Target's saliclyclic acid ( 500 mg )? All meds have a generic name. This is the name that a medication is at the time of its creation. When Bayer decided that it was going to sell salicylic acid they did not request that the formula be changed to enhance their name. The formula is the same which is why the name is the same. If you pick up a bottle of synthroid, look carefully and you should find the generic name for it as well. Answered by Randee Blaschke 1 month ago.

Generics may be absorbed differently in the body and therefore require a different dose. 1 out of 3 of my endocrinologists were against using generic version. If you do use a generic make sure you use the same generic each month. Here is what I found on American Thyroid Association website. Synthroid®, Levoxyl®, Levothyroid®, and Unithroid® are the brand-name forms of thyroxine currently marketed in the U.S. In addition, there are several different generic versions of thyroxine on the U.S. market. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) considers most of these preparations to be equivalent to each other. Therefore, in most cases your pharmacist is permitted to give you a generic thyroxine product instead of a brand-name product, unless your prescription specifies “no substitutions.” Most endocrinologists believe that the FDA’s methods for testing the equivalence of thyroxine preparations are seriously flawed. Thyroid disease often requires lifelong therapy and is best managed with consistent and precise treatment with the same brand of thyroid hormone. Your doctor may change your dose of thyroid hormone, but the brand of your thyroid hormone medication should be constant. When you go to the pharmacy, do not change the brand of your thyroid medication without checking with your doctor. You should not change from one brand of thyroid medication to another, from your brand of thyroid medication to a generic product, or from one generic product to another without first checking with your doctor. Answered by Rosalee Sappenfield 1 month ago.

A few months ago, I was very sick, zero energy, freezing cold, depressed, weight gain, thought I was dying. I read every word of this Hypothyroidism Revolution program and followed all the advice. My life turned around the first week. I started to feel human again. Within weeks my energy came back and I felt like living again. Get the entire hypothyroidism revolution system today? just choose the best option for you. Answered by Myrtice Sylver 1 month ago.

the actual spelling is synthroid, i take synthroid. my endocrinologist will not let me take levothroxin. he says that the generic is unreliable. the difference in price to me would be $23.00 per 30 pills to buy generic. not sure if saving money if worth it....or doctors could be cahoots with the pharmaceutical companies!!!! Answered by Quincy Beith 1 month ago.

It doesn't matter what brand you take. What matters is that you get a brand and stick with the same brand. And that you get tested regularly and have your dosage adjusted according to the test. Answered by Tamatha Surran 1 month ago.


Can you take Ginsen when you are on Thyroid medication?
Asked by Ranee Pirtle 1 month ago.

No it shouldn't be a problem. I've checked on drug interaction web sites and whether you take Synthroid, Levothyroxine, Levoxyl, Levothroid, Unithroid, Armour Thyroid, Nature-Throid, or Wes-Throid, none of these should have a negative interaction with any type of ginseng. I've also checked for American Ginseng and Panax Ginseng. Are you taking Ginseng for energy? Are you on one of these: Synthroid, Levothyroxine, Levoxyl, Levothroid, Unithroid ? If so, you might want to look into having your doctor prescribe Armour Thyroid, Nature-Throid, or Wes-Throid. I've been on all the thyroid medications for over 55 years and by far Armour Thyroid, Nature-Throid, or Wes-Throid are the best to make you feel more energetic. I did not do well on Synthroid, Levothyroxine, Levoxyl, Levothroid and Unithroid. Right now there is a nationwide shortage of Armour Thyroid so my doctor has me on Nature-Throid and if my pharmacy runs out of it they put me on Wes-Throid. I'm doing very well on these. Answered by Shanon Nguy 1 month ago.


Does synthroid make you moody or make you have mood swings?
Asked by Angelina Rumer 1 month ago.

the medication itself usually doesn't but if you aren't taking it right your levels will change and this can. Make sure that you are taking it in the morning before you eat. If you forget and eat make sure you wait for 4 hours before taking it. This medication comes in microgram doses so anything in your stomach, even an antacid tablet can mess with how much you get into your body. Here is some more info. Levothroid • Levoxyl • Synthroid • Unithroid LEVOTHYROXINE is a thyroid hormone. This medicine can improve symptoms of thyroid deficiency such as slow speech, lack of energy, weight gain, hair loss, dry skin, and feeling cold. It also helps to treat goiter (an enlarged thyroid gland). What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine? They need to know if you have any of these conditions: • angina • diabetes • dieting or on a weight loss program • fertility problems • heart disease • high levels of thyroid hormone • pituitary gland problem • previous heart attack • an unusual or allergic reaction to levothyroxine, thyroid hormones, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives • pregnant or trying to get pregnant • breast-feeding How should I use this medicine? Take this medicine by mouth with plenty of water. It is best to take on an empty stomach, at least 30 minutes before or 4 hours after food. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Take at the same time each day. Do not take your medicine more often than directed. Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once. What may interact with this medicine? • amiodarone • antacids • anti-thyroid medicines • calcium supplements • carbamazepine • cholestyramine • colestipol • digoxin • female hormones, including contraceptive or birth control pills • iron supplements • ketamine • liquid nutrition products like Ensure • medicines for colds and breathing difficulties • medicines for diabetes • medicines for mental depression • medicines or herbals used to decrease weight or appetite • phenobarbital or other barbiturate medications • phenytoin • prednisone or other corticosteroids • rifabutin • rifampin • soy isoflavones • sucralfate • theophylline • warfarin This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine. What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine? Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible: • difficulty breathing, wheezing, or shortness of breath • chest pain • excessive sweating or intolerance to heat • fast or irregular heartbeat • nervousness • skin rash or hives • swelling of ankles, feet, or legs • tremors Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome): • changes in appetite • changes in menstrual periods • diarrhea • hair loss • headache • trouble sleeping • weight loss This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. What should I watch for while using this medicine? Be sure to take this medicine with plenty of fluids. Some tablets may cause choking, gagging, or difficulty swallowing from the tablet getting stuck in your throat. Most of these problems disappear if the medicine is taken with the right amount of water or other fluids. Do not switch brands of this medicine unless your health care professional agrees with the change. Ask questions if you are uncertain. You will need regular exams and occasional blood tests to check the response to treatment. If you are receiving this medicine for an underactive thyroid, it may be several weeks before you notice an improvement. Check with your doctor or health care professional if your symptoms do not improve. It may be necessary for you to take this medicine for the rest of your life. Do not stop using this medicine unless your doctor or health care professional advises you to. This medicine can affect blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, check your blood sugar as directed. You may lose some of your hair when you first start treatment. With time, this usually corrects itself. If you are going to have surgery, tell your doctor or health care professional that you are taking this medicine. Where should I keep my medicine? Keep out of the reach of children. Store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C (59 and 86 degrees F). Protect from light and moisture. Keep container tightly closed. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date. Answered by Kelle Guialdo 1 month ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Does synthroid make you moody or make you have mood swings? Answered by Elwood Potocnik 1 month ago.

Hypothyroidism And Mood Swings Answered by Brenda Kottlowski 1 month ago.

Thyroid And Mood Swings Answered by Terra Fazzina 1 month ago.

yup. it made all my thyroid symptoms worse and when i complained the doctors told me my levels were normal therefore all the symptoms they initially told me were from thyroid and promised would go away with synthroid werent real and to just go exercise and take antidepressants. so im slowly taking myself off of it and my symptoms are improving. i also started taking selenium as a selenium deficiency will cause hypothyroidism. most people try iodine but that will make symptoms worse if the thyroid doesnt have enough selenium. live and learn. i was actually shocked my my year long experience with doctors who refused to change my meds or listen to me when it was they who told me the initial symptoms i was having were due to low thyroid. then once my levels came back normal it was as if i imagined all of it. they also were not checking my t3 after the first time they checked it after starting synthroid and it had dropped instead of going up. they were only checking t4 and tsh. so if i am unable to convert t4/synth to t3 they wouldnt know it and i guess since they refused to check it that is all in my head too. Answered by Cammie Wubbena 1 month ago.

I have been on synthroid for about 6 months. I know if you are on the incorrect dose it may. Your thyroid controls many different hormones in your body. I know when my thyroid was underactive I did suffer from depression more severly then when my thyroid is working correctly. Maybe ask your doctor to check your levels. Answered by Chung Richard 1 month ago.

A few months ago, I was very sick, zero energy, freezing cold, depressed, weight gain, thought I was dying. I read every word of this Hypothyroidism Revolution program and followed all the advice. My life turned around the first week. I started to feel human again. Within weeks my energy came back and I felt like living again. Get the entire hypothyroidism revolution system today? just choose the best option for you. Answered by Morris Nevarez 1 month ago.


Question about Positive ANA results?? 1:80 Titre Speckled Pattern?
I feel like a Hypochondriac. I went undiagnosed with Thyroid Disease (Hypothyroid) for 3 years Between the ages of 18-21. I have always been very aware of my body; and when things are wrong. At 25; I contracted Epstein Barr Virus (Mono) otherwise- I've led a very healthy life. Since turning 30; I've... Asked by Daren Clever 1 month ago.

I feel like a Hypochondriac. I went undiagnosed with Thyroid Disease (Hypothyroid) for 3 years Between the ages of 18-21. I have always been very aware of my body; and when things are wrong. At 25; I contracted Epstein Barr Virus (Mono) otherwise- I've led a very healthy life. Since turning 30; I've struggled with muscle and joint pain, swelling in face; hands and feet; headaches; extreme fatigue, high blood pressure, hyper-gylcemia, IBS; brain fog and memory problems. I'm tested regularily for my TSH levels; and most recently; for the first time- My tests showed a Positive 1:80 Titre- Speckled Pattern. I was going through what I would call a "flare-up" of extreme symptoms at the time of the test. I am scheduled with a Ruematologist end of March. My other blood work I guess did NOT suggest lupus- despite the new development of a Positive anti-body test. I guess I feel as though "something" is going on- yet my blood work- is within normal relms. Does anyone have any suggestions? These symptoms are almost deblilitating- and while it was suggested I might have Fibromyalgia- I can't believe I feel so terrible inside and out- yet my blood work says I'm normal. I am also at a loss as to why I might suddenly show a Positive ANA test after years of being negative. Many say normal people have positive results for ANA. I would appreciate anyone who might have some insight on autoimmune challenges. Thank you. Answered by Tracie Minniti 1 month ago.

I know this is a couple years old but may I can help someone out who is going thru some similar issues. I'm going to save my story for now and if you have Psoriatic Arthritis and also use adderall ..there maybe a Connection to the inflammation and severe pain! Whenever I seem to take my meds I can barely move physically (and which stinks not taking it bc I walk in circles) but I rather walk in circles than not walk at all at this point! My psoriasis flares up when I use my adderall as well as my joints severely inflame! So , try to taper down and after a week being off it u should see lots of improvements ! I do know I react (not saying u all are the same but it can't hurt to do a test ) There's not enough info on the topic for doctors to say if it does or doesn't. But I know my body and I know what it's reacting from. Lots of luck Answered by Eva Hatton 1 month ago.

I was tested and my results were 180 titre Speckled pattern what does that mean for me Answered by Stasia Syria 1 month ago.


When will my food drug reaction for Levoxyl wear off?
I've mistakenly been eating foods that have interacted with my thyroid medicine for the past 2 weeks. I've experienced fatigue, brain fog, mood swings, and depression/anger. Now that I've figured out what the problem is, I'm wondering how long it will take to get back to normal? I felt great before... Asked by Shalonda Kociolek 1 month ago.

I've mistakenly been eating foods that have interacted with my thyroid medicine for the past 2 weeks. I've experienced fatigue, brain fog, mood swings, and depression/anger. Now that I've figured out what the problem is, I'm wondering how long it will take to get back to normal? I felt great before I changed my diet. Answered by Ursula Everet 1 month ago.

I wish you had shown what those foods are....... I would like to know. Now if you mean the goitrogens, they interfere w/ the thyroid function itself. You should not take Calcium or Iron at the same time (of the thyroid meds) but wait 3 or 4 hrs for those. Also, thyroid meds should be 1st thing, on empty stomach, then wait 1 hr before eating. Blessings Answered by Quinn Counceller 1 month ago.

Drug-induced psychosis is caused by the drugs, or the withdrawal. After these things end, the psychosis will most likely end as well. Schizophrenia that presents itself after drug use is not CAUSED by the drugs, it was just a trigger that led to the schizophrenia becoming active. Stress, illness, or trauma can also cause a first episode of schizophrenia. When the drug use ceases, the schizophrenia will continue. Answered by Grayce Freudenthal 1 month ago.


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