Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 017756/001.

Names and composition

"TYLENOL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of ACETAMINOPHEN.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017756/001 TYLENOL ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 650MG
017756/002 TYLENOL ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 120MG
019872/001 TYLENOL ACETAMINOPHEN TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 650MG
019872/002 TYLENOL ACETAMINOPHEN TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 650MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016401/001 NEOPAP ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 120MG
017756/001 TYLENOL ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 650MG
017756/002 TYLENOL ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 120MG
017785/001 INJECTAPAP ACETAMINOPHEN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per ML
018060/001 ACEPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 120MG
018060/002 ACEPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 650MG
018060/003 ACEPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 325MG
018337/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 650MG
018337/002 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 325MG
018337/003 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 120MG
018337/004 INFANTS' FEVERALL ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 80MG
019872/001 TYLENOL ACETAMINOPHEN TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 650MG
019872/002 TYLENOL ACETAMINOPHEN TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 650MG
022450/001 OFIRMEV ACETAMINOPHEN SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 1GM per 100ML (10MG per ML)
070607/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 120MG
070608/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 650MG
071010/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 120MG
071011/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 650MG
072218/001 ACEPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 120MG
072237/001 ACEPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 650MG
072344/001 ACEPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 325MG
073106/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 120MG
073107/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 325MG
073108/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 650MG
075077/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 650MG
076200/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 650MG
078569/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 650MG
090205/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 650MG
202605/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 1GM per 100ML (10MG per ML)
204052/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 1GM per 100ML (10MG per ML)
204767/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 1GM per 100ML (10MG per ML)
207229/001 ACETAMINOPHEN ACETAMINOPHEN TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 650MG

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Answered questions

How dangerous is acetaminophen (Tylenol)?
I've heard about it's affects on the liver. I'm a 25 year old male in good health. I do drink alcohol. I just wanted to know what my risks are if I use acetaminophen daily. Should I take a break? I have taken it many times and drank before I heard about the liver damage, I was just wondering if... Asked by Fritz Ridpath 1 year ago.

I've heard about it's affects on the liver. I'm a 25 year old male in good health. I do drink alcohol. I just wanted to know what my risks are if I use acetaminophen daily. Should I take a break? I have taken it many times and drank before I heard about the liver damage, I was just wondering if anyone knew more about it. Answered by Desmond Dominy 1 year ago.

REGULAR STRENGTH TYLENOL General Information What are the advantages of Tylenol? How does Tylenol work? Should I take Tylenol with or without food? How is Regular Strength Tylenol different from Extra Strength Tylenol? How is Tylenol different from other brands of pain reliever? When to Use Tylenol What types of pain and ailments can I use this for? Will Tylenol help my minor arthritis pain? Does Tylenol help inflammation (swelling)? Will Tylenol help my migraine headaches? Safety Information Can I take Tylenol with my existing medical conditions? Can I take Tylenol if I have liver disease? Can I take Tylenol if I am pregnant or nursing? Can I drink alcohol and take Tylenol? Why can’t I use Tylenol for more than 10 days? Are there risks to long term use of Tylenol? Does Tylenol cause liver damage? Drug Interactions Can I take Tylenol with my other medications? Can I take Tylenol in between my doses of other pain relievers? General Information If you have any further questions about this Tylenol product, you can: Refer to the product label Talk to your doctor Call 1-800-962-5357 between 9:00 am and 4:30 pm EST What are the advantages of Tylenol? The medicine in Regular Strength Tylenol is recommended most by doctors. Regular Strength Tylenol also contains no aspirin and is unlikely to cause the type of stomach irritation the way that aspirin, naproxen sodium or even ibuprofen sometimes can. How does Tylenol work? Acetaminophen, the active ingredient in Tylenol products, is thought to relieve mild to moderate pain by elevating your body's overall pain threshold. Acetaminophen is thought to lower your fever by helping your body eliminate excess heat. Should I take Tylenol with or without food? You can take Tylenol acetaminophen products anytime, without regard to meals. Simply follow the instructions on the package label. How is Extra Strength Tylenol different from Regular Strength Tylenol? Here is a chart to explain Extra Strength Tylenol for your convenience. Product mg Acetaminophen Usual Dosage Maximum Dosage Extra Strength Tylenol 500 mg acetaminophen per geltab, gelcap, caplet or tablet Two geltabs/gelcaps/caplets or tablets every 4-6 hours Do not exceed 8 (product) in any 24-hour period Regular Strength Tylenol 325 mg acetaminophen per tablet Two tablets every 4-6 hours Do not exceed 12 (product) in any 24-hour period How is Tylenol different from other brands of pain reliever? Acetaminophen is the active ingredient in Regular Strength Tylenol. Tylenol products do not contain aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, or ketoprofen. One of the advantages of using Tylenol is that it is unlikely to cause the stomach irritation often associated with aspirin, naproxen sodium, ketoprofen and even ibuprofen, the active ingredients found in some other nonprescription pain relievers. The medicine in Tylenol is also less likely to interact with other medications you may be taking. Always read and follow labeled directions. Do not use Tylenol with other acetaminophen-containing products, unless directed by your doctor. Back to Top When to Use Tylenol If you have any further questions about this Tylenol product, you can: Refer to the product label Talk to your doctor Call 1-800-962-5357 between 9:00 am and 4:30 pm EST What types of pain and ailments can I use Tylenol for? Tylenol (acetaminophen) is indicated for the reduction of fever and the temporary relief of minor aches and pains associated with: The common cold Headache Toothache Muscular aches Backache Minor pain of arthritis Menstrual cramps Will Tylenol help my minor arthritis pain? There are several types of arthritis. Consult your doctor if you do not know what kind of arthritis you have. The medicine in Tylenol was chosen by America's leading arthritis specialists as their first choice for mild to moderate osteoarthritis pain relief. Does Tylenol help inflammation (swelling)? Acetaminophen, the active ingredient in Tylenol, has not been shown to reduce inflammation. Will Tylenol help my migraine headaches? Tylenol (acetaminophen) is not indicated for migraine pain. It is indicated for the reduction of fever and the temporary relief of minor aches and pains associated with: The common cold Headache Toothache Muscular aches Backache Minor pain of arthritis Menstrual cramps Back to Top Safety Information If you have any further questions about this Tylenol product, you can: Refer to the product label Talk to your doctor Call 1-800-962-5357 between 9:00 am and 4:30 pm EST Can I take Tylenol with my existing medical conditions? If you are under a doctor's care for any serious condition, or are taking any other drugs, you should talk to your doctor if you want to know more or have other questions. Can I take Tylenol if I have liver disease? When taken at recommended doses, acetaminophen, the medicine in Tylenol, is the preferred pain reliever for patients with chronic stable liver disease. If you are under a doctor's care for any serious condition, or are taking any other drugs, you should talk to your doctor if you want to know more or have other questions. Can I take Tylenol if I am pregnant or nursing? If you are pregnant or nursing a baby, seek the advice of your healthcare professional before using Tylenol or any other medication. Can I drink alcohol and take Tylenol? Labeling for Tylenol products reads as follows: "If you consume 3 or more alcoholic drinks every day, ask your doctor whether you should take acetaminophen or other pain relievers/fever reducers. Acetaminophen may cause liver damage." Why can’t I use Tylenol for more than 10 days? Acetaminophen has been used by millions of people throughout the world for over 4 decades and during that time has established a remarkable record of safety. We do not recommend use of TYLENOL acetaminophen products beyond the time period listed on the package label without the advice of a physician. This warning appears on packages of ALL over the counter pain relievers for a consumer who is not under a physician's care for pain/fever. If you have pain/fever beyond 10/3 days, we recommend contacting your physician. If you are under a doctor's care for any serious condition or are taking any other drug, you should talk to your doctor if you want to know more or have other questions. Are there risks to long term use of Tylenol? Acetaminophen has been used by millions of people throughout the world for over 4 decades and during that time has established a remarkable record of safety. We do not recommend use of Tylenol acetaminophen products beyond the time period listed on the package label without the advice of a physician. This warning appears on packages of ALL over the counter pain relievers for a consumer who is not under a physician's care for pain/fever. If you have pain/fever beyond 10/3 days, we recommend contacting your physician. If you are under a doctor's care for any serious condition or are taking any other drug, you should talk to your doctor if you want to know more or have other questions. Does Tylenol cause liver damage? When taken at recommended doses, acetaminophen, the medicine in single ingredient Tylenol products, is the preferred pain reliever for patients with chronic stable liver disease. Tylenol does not carry the risk of gastrointestinal complications sometimes associated with NSAIDs such as aspirin, ketoprofen, naproxen sodium and even ibuprofen. If you are under a doctor's care for any serious condition, or are taking any other drugs, you should talk to your doctor if you want to know more or have other questions. Back to Top Drug Interactions If you have any further questions about this Tylenol product, you can: Refer to the product label Talk to your doctor Call 1-800-962-5357 between 9:00 am and 4:30 pm EST Can I take Tylenol with my other medications? When used as directed, Tylenol has less drug interaction risk than other OTC pain relievers. Always read and follow package label directions. Do not use with any other products containing acetaminophen. If you are under a doctor’s care for any serious condition, or are taking any other drugs, you should talk to your doctor if you want to know more or have other questions. Can I take Tylenol in between my doses of other pain relievers? Use of Tylenol with other pain relievers (such as aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen sodium, ketoprofen or prescription pain relievers) is not recommended, unless directed by your doctor. Do not use Tylenol with any other products containing acetaminophen. If you are under a doctor's care for any serious condition, or are taking any other drugs, you should talk to your doctor if you want to know more or have other questions. Answered by Eric Schimmel 1 year ago.

When taken as directed, it's OK. However, overdosing is easy, especially if you take a product that already contains it -- like some OTC cold medicines -- and then add a dose of acetaminophen on top of it. There have also been overdoses reported when adults used the infant drops but dosed it as the adult liquid - 2 or 3 teaspoons. Overdosing can be very harmful to the liver. You should only take it daily on the advice of a physician. Answered by Genny Varuzzo 1 year ago.

Most of the medicines are harmful to every liver once taken incorrectly (ie. it should be taken after every meal and ensure that your stomach is filled). This is to protect the liver from the chemical effect brought by the medicines. That is why, doctors prescription is always recommended before taking any medications. Answered by Jerald Canedo 1 year ago.


Tylenol overdose? liver damage?
I DO NOT drink alcohol! Asked by Joe Frum 1 year ago.

I've taken around either 1000mg-2000mg of tylenol almost every day for two weeks. Yesterday I took 1500mg at once for my pain. I have hep c and didn't realize until today how much damage it can do! I'm scared to death! I don't have a doc treating me for the hep. Did I just really mess myself up? Please! I'm frieking out! Answered by Aleida Landwehr 1 year ago.

With Tylenol Extra Strength, you should not take more than two 500mg tablets every four to six hours and not exceed the limit of 8 tablets in 24 hours. This is what healthy people are allowed to have. You exceeded that by 500mg of taking it all at once. All liver patients are told not to take any medications without the doctor approval. (1)The reason for this is because the liver cells may be damaged and depending on how much the liver is damaged...medications have to be adjusted accordingly. They can tell this by your blood work and other film testing. Someone who overdoses on Tylenol, the doctors can reverse or lessen the effects of the tylenol with other medications given them. However, it has to be done immediately to have an effect. (2)Another reason is because all medication go through the liver first, to be broken down, before going to the rest of the body and a damaged liver cannot handle this process well now. I would get in touch with your doctor. You should be with a gastroenterologist. Simple blood testing will show if there is more damage done to the liver cells and how much. They check the liver enzymes to see this damage, they also check the liver function blood tests to see how the cells are functioning to keep the body healthy. They also do testing to see how well the virus is being controlled. You should be on treatment for this. Hepatitis is inflammation of the liver cells. Hepatitis C is a virus that has caused this inflammation. Inflammation of the liver cells can proceed to the death of the liver cells if left untreated. This is a condition known as Liver Cirrhosis. Once it reaches the stage of cirrhosis, then it is a progressive disease that usually ends up with death or a liver transplant. A liver transplant costs in the range of $250,000 and up. You should tell your doctor all medications you are on now, this includes over the counter, herbs, herbal teas, vitamins, minerals, and prescriptions prescribed by your other doctors. I would get in touch with your doctor office now and request medication for the pain you are having and be sure that he knows you have Hep C. He will adjust your dosage of this medication, if you should take it, or prescribe something that is more easier on your liver. It is good that you don't drink alcohol. Alcohol and tylenol together can immediately cause permanent liver damage if taken together. I would not panic about this...but it does require someone who knows your past medical history and your test results to decide what is beneficial for you right now. Wish I could be of more help. Answered by Shaneka Jarret 1 year ago.

about 6 years ago i got very sick. I ended up overdosing on Acetaminophen on accident. Went to the er for respiratory infection ended up staying 5 days for liver damage. they did a blood test and found my liver enzymes through the roof. so YES i recommend you get to a dr. or er ASAP. I was told if i would not have come in when i did we would have been making arrangements for my funeral not getting me well. Also keep an eye on your skin and eyes. If you start to get jondis which is yellowing of the skin and eyes then its gone too far. so go to the er. they cant turn you down and get that blood test NOW. Answered by Joya Overkamp 1 year ago.

how do you know you have hep c if you don't see a doctor? You should NOT take that much tylenol for so long. Yes it will cause liver damage. You SHOULD see a doctor. HE might be able to give you something else for the pain. Answered by Willa Westfield 1 year ago.


Girlfriend addicted to tylenol?
Help!!...my girlfriend is addicted to tylenol shes been taking 10 to 15 pills a day. I love her with all my heart and I don't want to break-up with her. I can't stand seeing her do this to herself. She had a rough up-bringing and she hasn't recovered from it. She thinks no one cares about her but... Asked by Lynell Dillworth 1 year ago.

Help!!...my girlfriend is addicted to tylenol shes been taking 10 to 15 pills a day. I love her with all my heart and I don't want to break-up with her. I can't stand seeing her do this to herself. She had a rough up-bringing and she hasn't recovered from it. She thinks no one cares about her but I've told her a million times that I love her & care about her, but I don't think she belives me. She won't go see a doctor..what am I supposed to do? Thanks Answered by Jesusita Yankee 1 year ago.

Tell her the dangers of taking that much tylenol...Get her to read the following: The biggest concern: Taking too much of the popular drug acetaminophen can poison the liver. Some 100 million people a year take acetaminophen, and serious liver damage is rare, manufacturers insist. But more than 56,000 emergency room visits a year are due to acetaminophen overdoses, and about 100 people a year die after unintentionally taking too much, according to Food and Drug Administration estimates. Some consumers swallow extra pills in hopes of faster relief. Others unknowingly ingest too much by taking more than one acetaminophen-containing remedy. Best known by the Tylenol brand, acetaminophen is present in more than 600 products that treat pain, coughs, cold and flu. Most are nonprescription, but there are some prescription ones, such as Vicodin. Often the ingredient is listed only in the label's fine print or, for prescription drugs, with the confusing abbreviation APAP. In drugstore brochures and public service ads unveiled this week, the FDA will urge consumers to check which products contain acetaminophen and carefully follow dosage instructions. It's not the only over-the-counter drug getting attention: The FDA's campaign also will warn that certain patients are at increased risk of other side effects from different painkillers -- such as aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen or ketoprofen -- called NSAIDs, or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Those side effects include stomach bleeding and kidney problems. "We want them to take these medications seriously and understand the consequences if they don't follow directions," said Ellen Shapiro, who heads the FDA's consumer outreach. Risk education But the FDA's new campaign falls short of recommendations of its own scientific advisers, who in 2002 urged that warnings be placed directly on the labels of over-the-counter painkillers to ensure users know these risks. Nor is it a large campaign. Armed with just $20,000 to develop the materials, the FDA is depending on pharmacy chains to put the brochure in stores and hopes major magazines will run the ads for free. The agency says it couldn't afford to even develop a public service announcement for television. "I'm a little angry" at the small effort, said Kate Trunk of Fort Myers, Florida, who has urged the FDA for three years to increase acetaminophen warnings after her 23-year-old son died from an unintentional overdose after a wrist injury. People need to know what's in their medicines and then use them properly. If they dose properly and use it properly, these are safe and effective medicines. -- Dr. Anthony Temple "The responsibility should be, at least in some part, put on manufacturers to inform consumers also," Trunk said. Tylenol's maker has voluntarily upgraded liver warnings and has begun listing acetaminophen in large type on the box front of multi-ingredient products like Tylenol Cold. "People need to know what's in their medicines and then use them properly," said Dr. Anthony Temple of McNeil Consumer & Specialty Pharmaceuticals, who wants the FDA to make other manufacturers follow suit. "If they dose properly and use it properly, these are safe and effective medicines." The FDA says work on warning labels is still under way, with a decision expected later this year. "Educating people about the risks of not using these products correctly is more important," said Dr. Charles Ganley, the FDA's nonprescription drugs chief. He points to efforts a few decades ago that successfully taught parents to never give children or teenagers aspirin during a viral illness because of the risk of deadly Reye's syndrome, something drug warning labels alone couldn't accomplish. In addition to dosage warnings, the FDA's new campaign says: • The risk of liver damage increases if you have three or more alcoholic drinks while using acetaminophen. • It's rare for stomach bleeding to occur with NSAIDs using over-the-counter doses for short periods of time. Risk increases, however, for people who are over 60; take prescription blood thinners or steroids; have a history of stomach bleeding or other bleeding disorders; or have three or more alcoholic drinks a day. • NSAIDs also can cause some reversible kidney problems; most at risk are people over 60, who have pre-existing kidney disease or who take blood pressure medicine known as diuretics. Answered by Walter Brienza 1 year ago.

She is in serious danger of killing her liver. The daily dose of tylenol is not to exceed 2 gms a day, that is about (4) 500 mg tablets or (6.5) 350 mg tablets. Why is she abusing tylenol? Is she deliberately overdosing trying to kill herself? Call 911 immediately. Seriously, that much acetaminophen is toxic and if her liver goes, she is a dead woman! As for her upbringing, you can't fix that for her with all the love in the world. She seriously needs a mental health expert to counsel her, then she will be able to love you back once she loves herself first. Answered by Ronnie Lamarca 1 year ago.

Someone should tell her that tylenol effects the liver and taking to much of it can cause liver problems. To take a few more a day I can understand but she is taking way to many and is going to shoot her liver right out. If you can't help her tell her to go to see a Therapist to find out what the real problem is before she gets really sick. Good Luck Answered by Hedy Fellin 1 year ago.

Wow....let her read articles on how Tylenol causes permanent liver damage. She is going to die early if you can't get through to her. Keep trying to support her and encouraging her of the serious harm she is causing her body and that you both cannot live a happy life together if she won't let you help her. This is sad. I wish I could help more. Answered by Alline Delasbour 1 year ago.

Tylenol with codeine right? Uhm, if she's just taking regular tylenol she's obviously not getting high from it and she's not addicted. It's a mental thing. Tell her that tylenol will destroy her liver but, maybe that's her plan. I have no idea why someone would want to take tylenol like that besides slow suicide! If she just wants the codeine she can buy it on the street. WTF? Tylenol?! That's just plain stupid. Answered by Beatrice Sindel 1 year ago.

perhaps you should get her parents involved, have you seen her take these pills? maybe she's lying about it for attention? if you love her so much though you gotta do what you can to help, talk to the parents or if you dont think they will be of help go to the school consolor. Answered by Tempie Helmert 1 year ago.

You should probably seek a professional rehab facility. Codeine addiction is very serious and so are its withdrawl symptoms. Answered by Josette Trites 1 year ago.

Take her to the ER immediately. Don't wait until this gets worse. You love her too much to see this happen to her. Answered by Rashad Tivar 1 year ago.

how old is your girlfriend? i think you should stick by her. she is obviously going through a rough time in her life. but she has to want help in order to get help. do the best you can as long as you can...and pray... Answered by Maybelle Sauerhage 1 year ago.


Tylenol questions?
1. what is the chemical name of tylenol? 2. what is the structural formula of tylenol? 3. how do you make tylenol? [synthesis of the product] 4. what is the drug interaction of it? Asked by Anika Zrake 1 year ago.

1. Tylenol's main active ingredient is called acetaminophen, or N-(4-Hydroxyphenyl)acetamide. There are other types of Tylenol, such as the "Severe Allergy Tylenol," that have drugs like diphenhydramine present (a first-generation antihistamine.) 2. Its molecular formula is C8H9NO2. 3. From what I have seen, it can be prepared from 4-nitrophenol, 4-aminophenol (eh, not a big difference), or 4-hydroxyacetophenone hydrazone. The specific industrial synthesis that used is unknown to me. In my opinion, it is probably not the latter one, since it seems too novel. The synthesis probably begins with either the nitro or aminophenol, but by simply reducing the nitro group you get an amino substituent anyway (you can do this with H2 and palladium on charcoal or with a mild reducing agent.) The 4-aminophenol is reacted with acetic anhydride and the amino group is condensed with acetate. The nitrogen pretty much acts as a Lewis base and attacks one of the two carbonyl carbons of acetic anhydride (both are equivalent, so it does not matter which.) Acetate is booted out, yielding acetaminophen (acetyl-amino-phenyl.) 4. I'm sorry, but I am not sure what you mean by "drug interaction," since that whole sentence throws me off. If this refers to its mechanism of action, then here is my answer: acetaminophen inhibits cyclooxygenase. Because it is a weak peripheral inhibitor of this enzyme, it has low anti-inflammatory properties. However, as a good inhibitor in the CNS (especially in the region of the hypothalamic heat-regulation center), it is a very good antipyretic (or fever reducer.) This difference in effect has to do with peroxide concentrations (which are low in the brain.) If you mean what drugs it interacts with, avoid combining acetaminophen with compounds that are hard on the liver, like ethanol. Acetaminophen is quite hepatotoxic. By itself, it can cause hepatic necrosis only in doses that exceed the recommended amount. Actually, I should clarify: acetaminophen itself is not damaging to the liver; rather, one of its metabolites (N-acetyl-p-benzoquinonimine) is. This metabolite depletes glutathione levels, thus leaving liver cells vulnerable to damage by oxidants. N-acetyl-p-benzoquinonimine is iteself a highly electrophilic molecule that will readilly react with just about anything in the cell. Answered by Loma Dalegowski 1 year ago.


Overdosing on Tylenol?
Before you jump to conclusions.. No, I'm not trying to kill myself. :FSo there's this person on myspace who made a video called "Pill Poppin' Idiots." He took a hand full of Tylenol, some other peach colored pills, and a Vicodin. Well, I was just joking around with him and said "I... Asked by Trula Baunleuang 1 year ago.

Before you jump to conclusions.. No, I'm not trying to kill myself. :F So there's this person on myspace who made a video called "Pill Poppin' Idiots." He took a hand full of Tylenol, some other peach colored pills, and a Vicodin. Well, I was just joking around with him and said "I bet I could make a better pill poppin' video" and now he wants me to try and out do him. But I don't want to accidentally overdose or anything.. So how much Tylenol does it take to overdose? No rude comments, please. :I Answered by Lance Ferriman 1 year ago.

Why tylenol? Like just plain tylenol not tylenol 3 or anything? That wouldnt do anything, unless you are referring to the acetaminophen in a vicodin pill, and certain ones like the 7.5 mg hydrocodone tabs contain 750 mg of acetaminophen (tylenol), which is A LOT. But the 10 mg hydrocodone yellow pills (lortabs) only have 325 mg of acetaminophen, so that is recommended if anything. This will just lead to live failure and can even lead to kidney damage with continuation, and if pure tylenol, will also lead to no recreational outcome. I wouldnt exceed 4000 mgs total of acetaminiphen if this is vicodin, if it is pure tylenol i wouldnt exceed 0 mgs. Acetaminophen can even be toxic for some around doses of 2000-300 mgs. Answered by Milissa Theisen 1 year ago.

Different people have different sensitivity levels to substances. No one can tell. Even at the "recommended" dosage, you can experience severe side effects either immediately or later on. People have been found dead in their beds the next morning after taking tylenol for an anticipated hangover. Use your head. Is it worth it? Answered by Samara Kosareff 1 year ago.

Get some Altoids (those really good mints) and some different colored Smarties. Shave em down with a nail file to look like pills. Your breath will smell excillent and you will get a sugar rush. Answered by Ashley Lichtman 1 year ago.

more than one or two at a time is anough to make you sick take more than 4 or something and u risk putting yourself in a coma u might end up being a vegetable for the rest of your life u might get liver failure, and im just saying if you want to out-do him withotu risking killing yourself just find some mints, like teh scottish ones and pop like 25 of those see if he out-does you :P Answered by Ross Knotowicz 1 year ago.

the liver is a vital organ. severe hepato-toxicity may not give much warning before someone is near death. Answered by Selina Thenhaus 1 year ago.

You are an idiot and deserve to die if you attempt this. Don't do what some moron on myspace did. Answered by Astrid Kalaf 1 year ago.

You are flirting with a very painful death. There are other ways to have fun. Answered by Carol Viruet 1 year ago.

You will **** up your liver. I can't believe you would even consider this. Please don't do it! Answered by Lissette Krupke 1 year ago.


How dangerous is acetaminophen (Tylenol)?
I've heard about it's affects on the liver. I'm a 25 year old male in good health. I do drink alcohol. I just wanted to know what my risks are if I use acetaminophen daily. Should I take a break? I have taken it many times and drank before I heard about the liver damage, I was just wondering if... Asked by Dean Kroetch 1 year ago.

I've heard about it's affects on the liver. I'm a 25 year old male in good health. I do drink alcohol. I just wanted to know what my risks are if I use acetaminophen daily. Should I take a break? I have taken it many times and drank before I heard about the liver damage, I was just wondering if anyone knew more about it. Answered by Merideth Weygandt 1 year ago.

REGULAR STRENGTH TYLENOL General Information What are the advantages of Tylenol? How does Tylenol work? Should I take Tylenol with or without food? How is Regular Strength Tylenol different from Extra Strength Tylenol? How is Tylenol different from other brands of pain reliever? When to Use Tylenol What types of pain and ailments can I use this for? Will Tylenol help my minor arthritis pain? Does Tylenol help inflammation (swelling)? Will Tylenol help my migraine headaches? Safety Information Can I take Tylenol with my existing medical conditions? Can I take Tylenol if I have liver disease? Can I take Tylenol if I am pregnant or nursing? Can I drink alcohol and take Tylenol? Why can’t I use Tylenol for more than 10 days? Are there risks to long term use of Tylenol? Does Tylenol cause liver damage? Drug Interactions Can I take Tylenol with my other medications? Can I take Tylenol in between my doses of other pain relievers? General Information If you have any further questions about this Tylenol product, you can: Refer to the product label Talk to your doctor Call 1-800-962-5357 between 9:00 am and 4:30 pm EST What are the advantages of Tylenol? The medicine in Regular Strength Tylenol is recommended most by doctors. Regular Strength Tylenol also contains no aspirin and is unlikely to cause the type of stomach irritation the way that aspirin, naproxen sodium or even ibuprofen sometimes can. How does Tylenol work? Acetaminophen, the active ingredient in Tylenol products, is thought to relieve mild to moderate pain by elevating your body's overall pain threshold. Acetaminophen is thought to lower your fever by helping your body eliminate excess heat. Should I take Tylenol with or without food? You can take Tylenol acetaminophen products anytime, without regard to meals. Simply follow the instructions on the package label. How is Extra Strength Tylenol different from Regular Strength Tylenol? Here is a chart to explain Extra Strength Tylenol for your convenience. Product mg Acetaminophen Usual Dosage Maximum Dosage Extra Strength Tylenol 500 mg acetaminophen per geltab, gelcap, caplet or tablet Two geltabs/gelcaps/caplets or tablets every 4-6 hours Do not exceed 8 (product) in any 24-hour period Regular Strength Tylenol 325 mg acetaminophen per tablet Two tablets every 4-6 hours Do not exceed 12 (product) in any 24-hour period How is Tylenol different from other brands of pain reliever? Acetaminophen is the active ingredient in Regular Strength Tylenol. Tylenol products do not contain aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, or ketoprofen. One of the advantages of using Tylenol is that it is unlikely to cause the stomach irritation often associated with aspirin, naproxen sodium, ketoprofen and even ibuprofen, the active ingredients found in some other nonprescription pain relievers. The medicine in Tylenol is also less likely to interact with other medications you may be taking. Always read and follow labeled directions. Do not use Tylenol with other acetaminophen-containing products, unless directed by your doctor. Back to Top When to Use Tylenol If you have any further questions about this Tylenol product, you can: Refer to the product label Talk to your doctor Call 1-800-962-5357 between 9:00 am and 4:30 pm EST What types of pain and ailments can I use Tylenol for? Tylenol (acetaminophen) is indicated for the reduction of fever and the temporary relief of minor aches and pains associated with: The common cold Headache Toothache Muscular aches Backache Minor pain of arthritis Menstrual cramps Will Tylenol help my minor arthritis pain? There are several types of arthritis. Consult your doctor if you do not know what kind of arthritis you have. The medicine in Tylenol was chosen by America's leading arthritis specialists as their first choice for mild to moderate osteoarthritis pain relief. Does Tylenol help inflammation (swelling)? Acetaminophen, the active ingredient in Tylenol, has not been shown to reduce inflammation. Will Tylenol help my migraine headaches? Tylenol (acetaminophen) is not indicated for migraine pain. It is indicated for the reduction of fever and the temporary relief of minor aches and pains associated with: The common cold Headache Toothache Muscular aches Backache Minor pain of arthritis Menstrual cramps Back to Top Safety Information If you have any further questions about this Tylenol product, you can: Refer to the product label Talk to your doctor Call 1-800-962-5357 between 9:00 am and 4:30 pm EST Can I take Tylenol with my existing medical conditions? If you are under a doctor's care for any serious condition, or are taking any other drugs, you should talk to your doctor if you want to know more or have other questions. Can I take Tylenol if I have liver disease? When taken at recommended doses, acetaminophen, the medicine in Tylenol, is the preferred pain reliever for patients with chronic stable liver disease. If you are under a doctor's care for any serious condition, or are taking any other drugs, you should talk to your doctor if you want to know more or have other questions. Can I take Tylenol if I am pregnant or nursing? If you are pregnant or nursing a baby, seek the advice of your healthcare professional before using Tylenol or any other medication. Can I drink alcohol and take Tylenol? Labeling for Tylenol products reads as follows: "If you consume 3 or more alcoholic drinks every day, ask your doctor whether you should take acetaminophen or other pain relievers/fever reducers. Acetaminophen may cause liver damage." Why can’t I use Tylenol for more than 10 days? Acetaminophen has been used by millions of people throughout the world for over 4 decades and during that time has established a remarkable record of safety. We do not recommend use of TYLENOL acetaminophen products beyond the time period listed on the package label without the advice of a physician. This warning appears on packages of ALL over the counter pain relievers for a consumer who is not under a physician's care for pain/fever. If you have pain/fever beyond 10/3 days, we recommend contacting your physician. If you are under a doctor's care for any serious condition or are taking any other drug, you should talk to your doctor if you want to know more or have other questions. Are there risks to long term use of Tylenol? Acetaminophen has been used by millions of people throughout the world for over 4 decades and during that time has established a remarkable record of safety. We do not recommend use of Tylenol acetaminophen products beyond the time period listed on the package label without the advice of a physician. This warning appears on packages of ALL over the counter pain relievers for a consumer who is not under a physician's care for pain/fever. If you have pain/fever beyond 10/3 days, we recommend contacting your physician. If you are under a doctor's care for any serious condition or are taking any other drug, you should talk to your doctor if you want to know more or have other questions. Does Tylenol cause liver damage? When taken at recommended doses, acetaminophen, the medicine in single ingredient Tylenol products, is the preferred pain reliever for patients with chronic stable liver disease. Tylenol does not carry the risk of gastrointestinal complications sometimes associated with NSAIDs such as aspirin, ketoprofen, naproxen sodium and even ibuprofen. If you are under a doctor's care for any serious condition, or are taking any other drugs, you should talk to your doctor if you want to know more or have other questions. Back to Top Drug Interactions If you have any further questions about this Tylenol product, you can: Refer to the product label Talk to your doctor Call 1-800-962-5357 between 9:00 am and 4:30 pm EST Can I take Tylenol with my other medications? When used as directed, Tylenol has less drug interaction risk than other OTC pain relievers. Always read and follow package label directions. Do not use with any other products containing acetaminophen. If you are under a doctor’s care for any serious condition, or are taking any other drugs, you should talk to your doctor if you want to know more or have other questions. Can I take Tylenol in between my doses of other pain relievers? Use of Tylenol with other pain relievers (such as aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen sodium, ketoprofen or prescription pain relievers) is not recommended, unless directed by your doctor. Do not use Tylenol with any other products containing acetaminophen. If you are under a doctor's care for any serious condition, or are taking any other drugs, you should talk to your doctor if you want to know more or have other questions. Answered by Lamont Calta 1 year ago.

When taken as directed, it's OK. However, overdosing is easy, especially if you take a product that already contains it -- like some OTC cold medicines -- and then add a dose of acetaminophen on top of it. There have also been overdoses reported when adults used the infant drops but dosed it as the adult liquid - 2 or 3 teaspoons. Overdosing can be very harmful to the liver. You should only take it daily on the advice of a physician. Answered by Jon Lizardi 1 year ago.

Most of the medicines are harmful to every liver once taken incorrectly (ie. it should be taken after every meal and ensure that your stomach is filled). This is to protect the liver from the chemical effect brought by the medicines. That is why, doctors prescription is always recommended before taking any medications. Answered by Melvin Wegrzyn 1 year ago.


Tylenol overdose? liver damage?
I DO NOT drink alcohol! Asked by Valrie Deidrick 1 year ago.

I've taken around either 1000mg-2000mg of tylenol almost every day for two weeks. Yesterday I took 1500mg at once for my pain. I have hep c and didn't realize until today how much damage it can do! I'm scared to death! I don't have a doc treating me for the hep. Did I just really mess myself up? Please! I'm frieking out! Answered by Orpha Euresti 1 year ago.

With Tylenol Extra Strength, you should not take more than two 500mg tablets every four to six hours and not exceed the limit of 8 tablets in 24 hours. This is what healthy people are allowed to have. You exceeded that by 500mg of taking it all at once. All liver patients are told not to take any medications without the doctor approval. (1)The reason for this is because the liver cells may be damaged and depending on how much the liver is damaged...medications have to be adjusted accordingly. They can tell this by your blood work and other film testing. Someone who overdoses on Tylenol, the doctors can reverse or lessen the effects of the tylenol with other medications given them. However, it has to be done immediately to have an effect. (2)Another reason is because all medication go through the liver first, to be broken down, before going to the rest of the body and a damaged liver cannot handle this process well now. I would get in touch with your doctor. You should be with a gastroenterologist. Simple blood testing will show if there is more damage done to the liver cells and how much. They check the liver enzymes to see this damage, they also check the liver function blood tests to see how the cells are functioning to keep the body healthy. They also do testing to see how well the virus is being controlled. You should be on treatment for this. Hepatitis is inflammation of the liver cells. Hepatitis C is a virus that has caused this inflammation. Inflammation of the liver cells can proceed to the death of the liver cells if left untreated. This is a condition known as Liver Cirrhosis. Once it reaches the stage of cirrhosis, then it is a progressive disease that usually ends up with death or a liver transplant. A liver transplant costs in the range of $250,000 and up. You should tell your doctor all medications you are on now, this includes over the counter, herbs, herbal teas, vitamins, minerals, and prescriptions prescribed by your other doctors. I would get in touch with your doctor office now and request medication for the pain you are having and be sure that he knows you have Hep C. He will adjust your dosage of this medication, if you should take it, or prescribe something that is more easier on your liver. It is good that you don't drink alcohol. Alcohol and tylenol together can immediately cause permanent liver damage if taken together. I would not panic about this...but it does require someone who knows your past medical history and your test results to decide what is beneficial for you right now. Wish I could be of more help. Answered by Rose Macfarlane 1 year ago.

about 6 years ago i got very sick. I ended up overdosing on Acetaminophen on accident. Went to the er for respiratory infection ended up staying 5 days for liver damage. they did a blood test and found my liver enzymes through the roof. so YES i recommend you get to a dr. or er ASAP. I was told if i would not have come in when i did we would have been making arrangements for my funeral not getting me well. Also keep an eye on your skin and eyes. If you start to get jondis which is yellowing of the skin and eyes then its gone too far. so go to the er. they cant turn you down and get that blood test NOW. Answered by Lesa Depinto 1 year ago.

how do you know you have hep c if you don't see a doctor? You should NOT take that much tylenol for so long. Yes it will cause liver damage. You SHOULD see a doctor. HE might be able to give you something else for the pain. Answered by Stevie Rivard 1 year ago.


Girlfriend addicted to tylenol?
Help!!...my girlfriend is addicted to tylenol shes been taking 10 to 15 pills a day. I love her with all my heart and I don't want to break-up with her. I can't stand seeing her do this to herself. She had a rough up-bringing and she hasn't recovered from it. She thinks no one cares about her but... Asked by Tabatha Witchard 1 year ago.

Help!!...my girlfriend is addicted to tylenol shes been taking 10 to 15 pills a day. I love her with all my heart and I don't want to break-up with her. I can't stand seeing her do this to herself. She had a rough up-bringing and she hasn't recovered from it. She thinks no one cares about her but I've told her a million times that I love her & care about her, but I don't think she belives me. She won't go see a doctor..what am I supposed to do? Thanks Answered by Mikel Maines 1 year ago.

Tell her the dangers of taking that much tylenol...Get her to read the following: The biggest concern: Taking too much of the popular drug acetaminophen can poison the liver. Some 100 million people a year take acetaminophen, and serious liver damage is rare, manufacturers insist. But more than 56,000 emergency room visits a year are due to acetaminophen overdoses, and about 100 people a year die after unintentionally taking too much, according to Food and Drug Administration estimates. Some consumers swallow extra pills in hopes of faster relief. Others unknowingly ingest too much by taking more than one acetaminophen-containing remedy. Best known by the Tylenol brand, acetaminophen is present in more than 600 products that treat pain, coughs, cold and flu. Most are nonprescription, but there are some prescription ones, such as Vicodin. Often the ingredient is listed only in the label's fine print or, for prescription drugs, with the confusing abbreviation APAP. In drugstore brochures and public service ads unveiled this week, the FDA will urge consumers to check which products contain acetaminophen and carefully follow dosage instructions. It's not the only over-the-counter drug getting attention: The FDA's campaign also will warn that certain patients are at increased risk of other side effects from different painkillers -- such as aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen or ketoprofen -- called NSAIDs, or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Those side effects include stomach bleeding and kidney problems. "We want them to take these medications seriously and understand the consequences if they don't follow directions," said Ellen Shapiro, who heads the FDA's consumer outreach. Risk education But the FDA's new campaign falls short of recommendations of its own scientific advisers, who in 2002 urged that warnings be placed directly on the labels of over-the-counter painkillers to ensure users know these risks. Nor is it a large campaign. Armed with just $20,000 to develop the materials, the FDA is depending on pharmacy chains to put the brochure in stores and hopes major magazines will run the ads for free. The agency says it couldn't afford to even develop a public service announcement for television. "I'm a little angry" at the small effort, said Kate Trunk of Fort Myers, Florida, who has urged the FDA for three years to increase acetaminophen warnings after her 23-year-old son died from an unintentional overdose after a wrist injury. People need to know what's in their medicines and then use them properly. If they dose properly and use it properly, these are safe and effective medicines. -- Dr. Anthony Temple "The responsibility should be, at least in some part, put on manufacturers to inform consumers also," Trunk said. Tylenol's maker has voluntarily upgraded liver warnings and has begun listing acetaminophen in large type on the box front of multi-ingredient products like Tylenol Cold. "People need to know what's in their medicines and then use them properly," said Dr. Anthony Temple of McNeil Consumer & Specialty Pharmaceuticals, who wants the FDA to make other manufacturers follow suit. "If they dose properly and use it properly, these are safe and effective medicines." The FDA says work on warning labels is still under way, with a decision expected later this year. "Educating people about the risks of not using these products correctly is more important," said Dr. Charles Ganley, the FDA's nonprescription drugs chief. He points to efforts a few decades ago that successfully taught parents to never give children or teenagers aspirin during a viral illness because of the risk of deadly Reye's syndrome, something drug warning labels alone couldn't accomplish. In addition to dosage warnings, the FDA's new campaign says: • The risk of liver damage increases if you have three or more alcoholic drinks while using acetaminophen. • It's rare for stomach bleeding to occur with NSAIDs using over-the-counter doses for short periods of time. Risk increases, however, for people who are over 60; take prescription blood thinners or steroids; have a history of stomach bleeding or other bleeding disorders; or have three or more alcoholic drinks a day. • NSAIDs also can cause some reversible kidney problems; most at risk are people over 60, who have pre-existing kidney disease or who take blood pressure medicine known as diuretics. Answered by Chung Eblin 1 year ago.

She is in serious danger of killing her liver. The daily dose of tylenol is not to exceed 2 gms a day, that is about (4) 500 mg tablets or (6.5) 350 mg tablets. Why is she abusing tylenol? Is she deliberately overdosing trying to kill herself? Call 911 immediately. Seriously, that much acetaminophen is toxic and if her liver goes, she is a dead woman! As for her upbringing, you can't fix that for her with all the love in the world. She seriously needs a mental health expert to counsel her, then she will be able to love you back once she loves herself first. Answered by Shirlene Doxon 1 year ago.

Someone should tell her that tylenol effects the liver and taking to much of it can cause liver problems. To take a few more a day I can understand but she is taking way to many and is going to shoot her liver right out. If you can't help her tell her to go to see a Therapist to find out what the real problem is before she gets really sick. Good Luck Answered by Jerlene Kneuper 1 year ago.

Wow....let her read articles on how Tylenol causes permanent liver damage. She is going to die early if you can't get through to her. Keep trying to support her and encouraging her of the serious harm she is causing her body and that you both cannot live a happy life together if she won't let you help her. This is sad. I wish I could help more. Answered by Buena Ingraham 1 year ago.

Tylenol with codeine right? Uhm, if she's just taking regular tylenol she's obviously not getting high from it and she's not addicted. It's a mental thing. Tell her that tylenol will destroy her liver but, maybe that's her plan. I have no idea why someone would want to take tylenol like that besides slow suicide! If she just wants the codeine she can buy it on the street. WTF? Tylenol?! That's just plain stupid. Answered by Kenyatta Perrilloux 1 year ago.

perhaps you should get her parents involved, have you seen her take these pills? maybe she's lying about it for attention? if you love her so much though you gotta do what you can to help, talk to the parents or if you dont think they will be of help go to the school consolor. Answered by Blake Keck 1 year ago.

You should probably seek a professional rehab facility. Codeine addiction is very serious and so are its withdrawl symptoms. Answered by Emelina Troxler 1 year ago.

Take her to the ER immediately. Don't wait until this gets worse. You love her too much to see this happen to her. Answered by Sammy Gouzalez 1 year ago.

how old is your girlfriend? i think you should stick by her. she is obviously going through a rough time in her life. but she has to want help in order to get help. do the best you can as long as you can...and pray... Answered by Kelley Flennoy 1 year ago.


Tylenol questions?
1. what is the chemical name of tylenol? 2. what is the structural formula of tylenol? 3. how do you make tylenol? [synthesis of the product] 4. what is the drug interaction of it? Asked by Jackson Ahmann 1 year ago.

1. Tylenol's main active ingredient is called acetaminophen, or N-(4-Hydroxyphenyl)acetamide. There are other types of Tylenol, such as the "Severe Allergy Tylenol," that have drugs like diphenhydramine present (a first-generation antihistamine.) 2. Its molecular formula is C8H9NO2. 3. From what I have seen, it can be prepared from 4-nitrophenol, 4-aminophenol (eh, not a big difference), or 4-hydroxyacetophenone hydrazone. The specific industrial synthesis that used is unknown to me. In my opinion, it is probably not the latter one, since it seems too novel. The synthesis probably begins with either the nitro or aminophenol, but by simply reducing the nitro group you get an amino substituent anyway (you can do this with H2 and palladium on charcoal or with a mild reducing agent.) The 4-aminophenol is reacted with acetic anhydride and the amino group is condensed with acetate. The nitrogen pretty much acts as a Lewis base and attacks one of the two carbonyl carbons of acetic anhydride (both are equivalent, so it does not matter which.) Acetate is booted out, yielding acetaminophen (acetyl-amino-phenyl.) 4. I'm sorry, but I am not sure what you mean by "drug interaction," since that whole sentence throws me off. If this refers to its mechanism of action, then here is my answer: acetaminophen inhibits cyclooxygenase. Because it is a weak peripheral inhibitor of this enzyme, it has low anti-inflammatory properties. However, as a good inhibitor in the CNS (especially in the region of the hypothalamic heat-regulation center), it is a very good antipyretic (or fever reducer.) This difference in effect has to do with peroxide concentrations (which are low in the brain.) If you mean what drugs it interacts with, avoid combining acetaminophen with compounds that are hard on the liver, like ethanol. Acetaminophen is quite hepatotoxic. By itself, it can cause hepatic necrosis only in doses that exceed the recommended amount. Actually, I should clarify: acetaminophen itself is not damaging to the liver; rather, one of its metabolites (N-acetyl-p-benzoquinonimine) is. This metabolite depletes glutathione levels, thus leaving liver cells vulnerable to damage by oxidants. N-acetyl-p-benzoquinonimine is iteself a highly electrophilic molecule that will readilly react with just about anything in the cell. Answered by Stanton Carville 1 year ago.


Overdosing on Tylenol?
Before you jump to conclusions.. No, I'm not trying to kill myself. :FSo there's this person on myspace who made a video called "Pill Poppin' Idiots." He took a hand full of Tylenol, some other peach colored pills, and a Vicodin. Well, I was just joking around with him and said "I... Asked by Tyra Delana 1 year ago.

Before you jump to conclusions.. No, I'm not trying to kill myself. :F So there's this person on myspace who made a video called "Pill Poppin' Idiots." He took a hand full of Tylenol, some other peach colored pills, and a Vicodin. Well, I was just joking around with him and said "I bet I could make a better pill poppin' video" and now he wants me to try and out do him. But I don't want to accidentally overdose or anything.. So how much Tylenol does it take to overdose? No rude comments, please. :I Answered by Bea Sang 1 year ago.

Why tylenol? Like just plain tylenol not tylenol 3 or anything? That wouldnt do anything, unless you are referring to the acetaminophen in a vicodin pill, and certain ones like the 7.5 mg hydrocodone tabs contain 750 mg of acetaminophen (tylenol), which is A LOT. But the 10 mg hydrocodone yellow pills (lortabs) only have 325 mg of acetaminophen, so that is recommended if anything. This will just lead to live failure and can even lead to kidney damage with continuation, and if pure tylenol, will also lead to no recreational outcome. I wouldnt exceed 4000 mgs total of acetaminiphen if this is vicodin, if it is pure tylenol i wouldnt exceed 0 mgs. Acetaminophen can even be toxic for some around doses of 2000-300 mgs. Answered by Leisha Pallino 1 year ago.

Different people have different sensitivity levels to substances. No one can tell. Even at the "recommended" dosage, you can experience severe side effects either immediately or later on. People have been found dead in their beds the next morning after taking tylenol for an anticipated hangover. Use your head. Is it worth it? Answered by Lorette Madrazo 1 year ago.

Get some Altoids (those really good mints) and some different colored Smarties. Shave em down with a nail file to look like pills. Your breath will smell excillent and you will get a sugar rush. Answered by Sonia Weightman 1 year ago.

more than one or two at a time is anough to make you sick take more than 4 or something and u risk putting yourself in a coma u might end up being a vegetable for the rest of your life u might get liver failure, and im just saying if you want to out-do him withotu risking killing yourself just find some mints, like teh scottish ones and pop like 25 of those see if he out-does you :P Answered by Iris Hohn 1 year ago.

the liver is a vital organ. severe hepato-toxicity may not give much warning before someone is near death. Answered by Iliana Brandon 1 year ago.

You are an idiot and deserve to die if you attempt this. Don't do what some moron on myspace did. Answered by Royce Razo 1 year ago.

You are flirting with a very painful death. There are other ways to have fun. Answered by Thi Heidtbrink 1 year ago.

You will **** up your liver. I can't believe you would even consider this. Please don't do it! Answered by Jung Acocella 1 year ago.


How dangerous is acetaminophen (Tylenol)?
I've heard about it's affects on the liver. I'm a 25 year old male in good health. I do drink alcohol. I just wanted to know what my risks are if I use acetaminophen daily. Should I take a break? I have taken it many times and drank before I heard about the liver damage, I was just wondering if... Asked by Willow Ravotta 1 year ago.

I've heard about it's affects on the liver. I'm a 25 year old male in good health. I do drink alcohol. I just wanted to know what my risks are if I use acetaminophen daily. Should I take a break? I have taken it many times and drank before I heard about the liver damage, I was just wondering if anyone knew more about it. Answered by Leigh Devall 1 year ago.

REGULAR STRENGTH TYLENOL General Information What are the advantages of Tylenol? How does Tylenol work? Should I take Tylenol with or without food? How is Regular Strength Tylenol different from Extra Strength Tylenol? How is Tylenol different from other brands of pain reliever? When to Use Tylenol What types of pain and ailments can I use this for? Will Tylenol help my minor arthritis pain? Does Tylenol help inflammation (swelling)? Will Tylenol help my migraine headaches? Safety Information Can I take Tylenol with my existing medical conditions? Can I take Tylenol if I have liver disease? Can I take Tylenol if I am pregnant or nursing? Can I drink alcohol and take Tylenol? Why can’t I use Tylenol for more than 10 days? Are there risks to long term use of Tylenol? Does Tylenol cause liver damage? Drug Interactions Can I take Tylenol with my other medications? Can I take Tylenol in between my doses of other pain relievers? General Information If you have any further questions about this Tylenol product, you can: Refer to the product label Talk to your doctor Call 1-800-962-5357 between 9:00 am and 4:30 pm EST What are the advantages of Tylenol? The medicine in Regular Strength Tylenol is recommended most by doctors. Regular Strength Tylenol also contains no aspirin and is unlikely to cause the type of stomach irritation the way that aspirin, naproxen sodium or even ibuprofen sometimes can. How does Tylenol work? Acetaminophen, the active ingredient in Tylenol products, is thought to relieve mild to moderate pain by elevating your body's overall pain threshold. Acetaminophen is thought to lower your fever by helping your body eliminate excess heat. Should I take Tylenol with or without food? You can take Tylenol acetaminophen products anytime, without regard to meals. Simply follow the instructions on the package label. How is Extra Strength Tylenol different from Regular Strength Tylenol? Here is a chart to explain Extra Strength Tylenol for your convenience. Product mg Acetaminophen Usual Dosage Maximum Dosage Extra Strength Tylenol 500 mg acetaminophen per geltab, gelcap, caplet or tablet Two geltabs/gelcaps/caplets or tablets every 4-6 hours Do not exceed 8 (product) in any 24-hour period Regular Strength Tylenol 325 mg acetaminophen per tablet Two tablets every 4-6 hours Do not exceed 12 (product) in any 24-hour period How is Tylenol different from other brands of pain reliever? Acetaminophen is the active ingredient in Regular Strength Tylenol. Tylenol products do not contain aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, or ketoprofen. One of the advantages of using Tylenol is that it is unlikely to cause the stomach irritation often associated with aspirin, naproxen sodium, ketoprofen and even ibuprofen, the active ingredients found in some other nonprescription pain relievers. The medicine in Tylenol is also less likely to interact with other medications you may be taking. Always read and follow labeled directions. Do not use Tylenol with other acetaminophen-containing products, unless directed by your doctor. Back to Top When to Use Tylenol If you have any further questions about this Tylenol product, you can: Refer to the product label Talk to your doctor Call 1-800-962-5357 between 9:00 am and 4:30 pm EST What types of pain and ailments can I use Tylenol for? Tylenol (acetaminophen) is indicated for the reduction of fever and the temporary relief of minor aches and pains associated with: The common cold Headache Toothache Muscular aches Backache Minor pain of arthritis Menstrual cramps Will Tylenol help my minor arthritis pain? There are several types of arthritis. Consult your doctor if you do not know what kind of arthritis you have. The medicine in Tylenol was chosen by America's leading arthritis specialists as their first choice for mild to moderate osteoarthritis pain relief. Does Tylenol help inflammation (swelling)? Acetaminophen, the active ingredient in Tylenol, has not been shown to reduce inflammation. Will Tylenol help my migraine headaches? Tylenol (acetaminophen) is not indicated for migraine pain. It is indicated for the reduction of fever and the temporary relief of minor aches and pains associated with: The common cold Headache Toothache Muscular aches Backache Minor pain of arthritis Menstrual cramps Back to Top Safety Information If you have any further questions about this Tylenol product, you can: Refer to the product label Talk to your doctor Call 1-800-962-5357 between 9:00 am and 4:30 pm EST Can I take Tylenol with my existing medical conditions? If you are under a doctor's care for any serious condition, or are taking any other drugs, you should talk to your doctor if you want to know more or have other questions. Can I take Tylenol if I have liver disease? When taken at recommended doses, acetaminophen, the medicine in Tylenol, is the preferred pain reliever for patients with chronic stable liver disease. If you are under a doctor's care for any serious condition, or are taking any other drugs, you should talk to your doctor if you want to know more or have other questions. Can I take Tylenol if I am pregnant or nursing? If you are pregnant or nursing a baby, seek the advice of your healthcare professional before using Tylenol or any other medication. Can I drink alcohol and take Tylenol? Labeling for Tylenol products reads as follows: "If you consume 3 or more alcoholic drinks every day, ask your doctor whether you should take acetaminophen or other pain relievers/fever reducers. Acetaminophen may cause liver damage." Why can’t I use Tylenol for more than 10 days? Acetaminophen has been used by millions of people throughout the world for over 4 decades and during that time has established a remarkable record of safety. We do not recommend use of TYLENOL acetaminophen products beyond the time period listed on the package label without the advice of a physician. This warning appears on packages of ALL over the counter pain relievers for a consumer who is not under a physician's care for pain/fever. If you have pain/fever beyond 10/3 days, we recommend contacting your physician. If you are under a doctor's care for any serious condition or are taking any other drug, you should talk to your doctor if you want to know more or have other questions. Are there risks to long term use of Tylenol? Acetaminophen has been used by millions of people throughout the world for over 4 decades and during that time has established a remarkable record of safety. We do not recommend use of Tylenol acetaminophen products beyond the time period listed on the package label without the advice of a physician. This warning appears on packages of ALL over the counter pain relievers for a consumer who is not under a physician's care for pain/fever. If you have pain/fever beyond 10/3 days, we recommend contacting your physician. If you are under a doctor's care for any serious condition or are taking any other drug, you should talk to your doctor if you want to know more or have other questions. Does Tylenol cause liver damage? When taken at recommended doses, acetaminophen, the medicine in single ingredient Tylenol products, is the preferred pain reliever for patients with chronic stable liver disease. Tylenol does not carry the risk of gastrointestinal complications sometimes associated with NSAIDs such as aspirin, ketoprofen, naproxen sodium and even ibuprofen. If you are under a doctor's care for any serious condition, or are taking any other drugs, you should talk to your doctor if you want to know more or have other questions. Back to Top Drug Interactions If you have any further questions about this Tylenol product, you can: Refer to the product label Talk to your doctor Call 1-800-962-5357 between 9:00 am and 4:30 pm EST Can I take Tylenol with my other medications? When used as directed, Tylenol has less drug interaction risk than other OTC pain relievers. Always read and follow package label directions. Do not use with any other products containing acetaminophen. If you are under a doctor’s care for any serious condition, or are taking any other drugs, you should talk to your doctor if you want to know more or have other questions. Can I take Tylenol in between my doses of other pain relievers? Use of Tylenol with other pain relievers (such as aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen sodium, ketoprofen or prescription pain relievers) is not recommended, unless directed by your doctor. Do not use Tylenol with any other products containing acetaminophen. If you are under a doctor's care for any serious condition, or are taking any other drugs, you should talk to your doctor if you want to know more or have other questions. Answered by Margrett Buerstatte 1 year ago.

When taken as directed, it's OK. However, overdosing is easy, especially if you take a product that already contains it -- like some OTC cold medicines -- and then add a dose of acetaminophen on top of it. There have also been overdoses reported when adults used the infant drops but dosed it as the adult liquid - 2 or 3 teaspoons. Overdosing can be very harmful to the liver. You should only take it daily on the advice of a physician. Answered by Miki Pannhoff 1 year ago.

Most of the medicines are harmful to every liver once taken incorrectly (ie. it should be taken after every meal and ensure that your stomach is filled). This is to protect the liver from the chemical effect brought by the medicines. That is why, doctors prescription is always recommended before taking any medications. Answered by Tamie Serrant 1 year ago.


Tylenol overdose? liver damage?
I DO NOT drink alcohol! Asked by Collen Kiflezghie 1 year ago.

I've taken around either 1000mg-2000mg of tylenol almost every day for two weeks. Yesterday I took 1500mg at once for my pain. I have hep c and didn't realize until today how much damage it can do! I'm scared to death! I don't have a doc treating me for the hep. Did I just really mess myself up? Please! I'm frieking out! Answered by Liza Altier 1 year ago.

With Tylenol Extra Strength, you should not take more than two 500mg tablets every four to six hours and not exceed the limit of 8 tablets in 24 hours. This is what healthy people are allowed to have. You exceeded that by 500mg of taking it all at once. All liver patients are told not to take any medications without the doctor approval. (1)The reason for this is because the liver cells may be damaged and depending on how much the liver is damaged...medications have to be adjusted accordingly. They can tell this by your blood work and other film testing. Someone who overdoses on Tylenol, the doctors can reverse or lessen the effects of the tylenol with other medications given them. However, it has to be done immediately to have an effect. (2)Another reason is because all medication go through the liver first, to be broken down, before going to the rest of the body and a damaged liver cannot handle this process well now. I would get in touch with your doctor. You should be with a gastroenterologist. Simple blood testing will show if there is more damage done to the liver cells and how much. They check the liver enzymes to see this damage, they also check the liver function blood tests to see how the cells are functioning to keep the body healthy. They also do testing to see how well the virus is being controlled. You should be on treatment for this. Hepatitis is inflammation of the liver cells. Hepatitis C is a virus that has caused this inflammation. Inflammation of the liver cells can proceed to the death of the liver cells if left untreated. This is a condition known as Liver Cirrhosis. Once it reaches the stage of cirrhosis, then it is a progressive disease that usually ends up with death or a liver transplant. A liver transplant costs in the range of $250,000 and up. You should tell your doctor all medications you are on now, this includes over the counter, herbs, herbal teas, vitamins, minerals, and prescriptions prescribed by your other doctors. I would get in touch with your doctor office now and request medication for the pain you are having and be sure that he knows you have Hep C. He will adjust your dosage of this medication, if you should take it, or prescribe something that is more easier on your liver. It is good that you don't drink alcohol. Alcohol and tylenol together can immediately cause permanent liver damage if taken together. I would not panic about this...but it does require someone who knows your past medical history and your test results to decide what is beneficial for you right now. Wish I could be of more help. Answered by Jerold Mcilwaine 1 year ago.

about 6 years ago i got very sick. I ended up overdosing on Acetaminophen on accident. Went to the er for respiratory infection ended up staying 5 days for liver damage. they did a blood test and found my liver enzymes through the roof. so YES i recommend you get to a dr. or er ASAP. I was told if i would not have come in when i did we would have been making arrangements for my funeral not getting me well. Also keep an eye on your skin and eyes. If you start to get jondis which is yellowing of the skin and eyes then its gone too far. so go to the er. they cant turn you down and get that blood test NOW. Answered by Shaunda Carridine 1 year ago.

how do you know you have hep c if you don't see a doctor? You should NOT take that much tylenol for so long. Yes it will cause liver damage. You SHOULD see a doctor. HE might be able to give you something else for the pain. Answered by Kyong Saltz 1 year ago.


Girlfriend addicted to tylenol?
Help!!...my girlfriend is addicted to tylenol shes been taking 10 to 15 pills a day. I love her with all my heart and I don't want to break-up with her. I can't stand seeing her do this to herself. She had a rough up-bringing and she hasn't recovered from it. She thinks no one cares about her but... Asked by Huong Mayorca 1 year ago.

Help!!...my girlfriend is addicted to tylenol shes been taking 10 to 15 pills a day. I love her with all my heart and I don't want to break-up with her. I can't stand seeing her do this to herself. She had a rough up-bringing and she hasn't recovered from it. She thinks no one cares about her but I've told her a million times that I love her & care about her, but I don't think she belives me. She won't go see a doctor..what am I supposed to do? Thanks Answered by Lenora Waldron 1 year ago.

Tell her the dangers of taking that much tylenol...Get her to read the following: The biggest concern: Taking too much of the popular drug acetaminophen can poison the liver. Some 100 million people a year take acetaminophen, and serious liver damage is rare, manufacturers insist. But more than 56,000 emergency room visits a year are due to acetaminophen overdoses, and about 100 people a year die after unintentionally taking too much, according to Food and Drug Administration estimates. Some consumers swallow extra pills in hopes of faster relief. Others unknowingly ingest too much by taking more than one acetaminophen-containing remedy. Best known by the Tylenol brand, acetaminophen is present in more than 600 products that treat pain, coughs, cold and flu. Most are nonprescription, but there are some prescription ones, such as Vicodin. Often the ingredient is listed only in the label's fine print or, for prescription drugs, with the confusing abbreviation APAP. In drugstore brochures and public service ads unveiled this week, the FDA will urge consumers to check which products contain acetaminophen and carefully follow dosage instructions. It's not the only over-the-counter drug getting attention: The FDA's campaign also will warn that certain patients are at increased risk of other side effects from different painkillers -- such as aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen or ketoprofen -- called NSAIDs, or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Those side effects include stomach bleeding and kidney problems. "We want them to take these medications seriously and understand the consequences if they don't follow directions," said Ellen Shapiro, who heads the FDA's consumer outreach. Risk education But the FDA's new campaign falls short of recommendations of its own scientific advisers, who in 2002 urged that warnings be placed directly on the labels of over-the-counter painkillers to ensure users know these risks. Nor is it a large campaign. Armed with just $20,000 to develop the materials, the FDA is depending on pharmacy chains to put the brochure in stores and hopes major magazines will run the ads for free. The agency says it couldn't afford to even develop a public service announcement for television. "I'm a little angry" at the small effort, said Kate Trunk of Fort Myers, Florida, who has urged the FDA for three years to increase acetaminophen warnings after her 23-year-old son died from an unintentional overdose after a wrist injury. People need to know what's in their medicines and then use them properly. If they dose properly and use it properly, these are safe and effective medicines. -- Dr. Anthony Temple "The responsibility should be, at least in some part, put on manufacturers to inform consumers also," Trunk said. Tylenol's maker has voluntarily upgraded liver warnings and has begun listing acetaminophen in large type on the box front of multi-ingredient products like Tylenol Cold. "People need to know what's in their medicines and then use them properly," said Dr. Anthony Temple of McNeil Consumer & Specialty Pharmaceuticals, who wants the FDA to make other manufacturers follow suit. "If they dose properly and use it properly, these are safe and effective medicines." The FDA says work on warning labels is still under way, with a decision expected later this year. "Educating people about the risks of not using these products correctly is more important," said Dr. Charles Ganley, the FDA's nonprescription drugs chief. He points to efforts a few decades ago that successfully taught parents to never give children or teenagers aspirin during a viral illness because of the risk of deadly Reye's syndrome, something drug warning labels alone couldn't accomplish. In addition to dosage warnings, the FDA's new campaign says: • The risk of liver damage increases if you have three or more alcoholic drinks while using acetaminophen. • It's rare for stomach bleeding to occur with NSAIDs using over-the-counter doses for short periods of time. Risk increases, however, for people who are over 60; take prescription blood thinners or steroids; have a history of stomach bleeding or other bleeding disorders; or have three or more alcoholic drinks a day. • NSAIDs also can cause some reversible kidney problems; most at risk are people over 60, who have pre-existing kidney disease or who take blood pressure medicine known as diuretics. Answered by Ramonita Olivencia 1 year ago.

She is in serious danger of killing her liver. The daily dose of tylenol is not to exceed 2 gms a day, that is about (4) 500 mg tablets or (6.5) 350 mg tablets. Why is she abusing tylenol? Is she deliberately overdosing trying to kill herself? Call 911 immediately. Seriously, that much acetaminophen is toxic and if her liver goes, she is a dead woman! As for her upbringing, you can't fix that for her with all the love in the world. She seriously needs a mental health expert to counsel her, then she will be able to love you back once she loves herself first. Answered by Jeffery Lehmberg 1 year ago.

Someone should tell her that tylenol effects the liver and taking to much of it can cause liver problems. To take a few more a day I can understand but she is taking way to many and is going to shoot her liver right out. If you can't help her tell her to go to see a Therapist to find out what the real problem is before she gets really sick. Good Luck Answered by Johana Geoly 1 year ago.

Wow....let her read articles on how Tylenol causes permanent liver damage. She is going to die early if you can't get through to her. Keep trying to support her and encouraging her of the serious harm she is causing her body and that you both cannot live a happy life together if she won't let you help her. This is sad. I wish I could help more. Answered by Rubie Sicilian 1 year ago.

Tylenol with codeine right? Uhm, if she's just taking regular tylenol she's obviously not getting high from it and she's not addicted. It's a mental thing. Tell her that tylenol will destroy her liver but, maybe that's her plan. I have no idea why someone would want to take tylenol like that besides slow suicide! If she just wants the codeine she can buy it on the street. WTF? Tylenol?! That's just plain stupid. Answered by Lani Kennebrew 1 year ago.

perhaps you should get her parents involved, have you seen her take these pills? maybe she's lying about it for attention? if you love her so much though you gotta do what you can to help, talk to the parents or if you dont think they will be of help go to the school consolor. Answered by Allison Too 1 year ago.

You should probably seek a professional rehab facility. Codeine addiction is very serious and so are its withdrawl symptoms. Answered by Bev Baio 1 year ago.

Take her to the ER immediately. Don't wait until this gets worse. You love her too much to see this happen to her. Answered by Fanny Talor 1 year ago.

how old is your girlfriend? i think you should stick by her. she is obviously going through a rough time in her life. but she has to want help in order to get help. do the best you can as long as you can...and pray... Answered by Carmelina Allex 1 year ago.


Tylenol questions?
1. what is the chemical name of tylenol? 2. what is the structural formula of tylenol? 3. how do you make tylenol? [synthesis of the product] 4. what is the drug interaction of it? Asked by Zulma Sales 1 year ago.

1. Tylenol's main active ingredient is called acetaminophen, or N-(4-Hydroxyphenyl)acetamide. There are other types of Tylenol, such as the "Severe Allergy Tylenol," that have drugs like diphenhydramine present (a first-generation antihistamine.) 2. Its molecular formula is C8H9NO2. 3. From what I have seen, it can be prepared from 4-nitrophenol, 4-aminophenol (eh, not a big difference), or 4-hydroxyacetophenone hydrazone. The specific industrial synthesis that used is unknown to me. In my opinion, it is probably not the latter one, since it seems too novel. The synthesis probably begins with either the nitro or aminophenol, but by simply reducing the nitro group you get an amino substituent anyway (you can do this with H2 and palladium on charcoal or with a mild reducing agent.) The 4-aminophenol is reacted with acetic anhydride and the amino group is condensed with acetate. The nitrogen pretty much acts as a Lewis base and attacks one of the two carbonyl carbons of acetic anhydride (both are equivalent, so it does not matter which.) Acetate is booted out, yielding acetaminophen (acetyl-amino-phenyl.) 4. I'm sorry, but I am not sure what you mean by "drug interaction," since that whole sentence throws me off. If this refers to its mechanism of action, then here is my answer: acetaminophen inhibits cyclooxygenase. Because it is a weak peripheral inhibitor of this enzyme, it has low anti-inflammatory properties. However, as a good inhibitor in the CNS (especially in the region of the hypothalamic heat-regulation center), it is a very good antipyretic (or fever reducer.) This difference in effect has to do with peroxide concentrations (which are low in the brain.) If you mean what drugs it interacts with, avoid combining acetaminophen with compounds that are hard on the liver, like ethanol. Acetaminophen is quite hepatotoxic. By itself, it can cause hepatic necrosis only in doses that exceed the recommended amount. Actually, I should clarify: acetaminophen itself is not damaging to the liver; rather, one of its metabolites (N-acetyl-p-benzoquinonimine) is. This metabolite depletes glutathione levels, thus leaving liver cells vulnerable to damage by oxidants. N-acetyl-p-benzoquinonimine is iteself a highly electrophilic molecule that will readilly react with just about anything in the cell. Answered by Major Goosey 1 year ago.


Overdosing on Tylenol?
Before you jump to conclusions.. No, I'm not trying to kill myself. :FSo there's this person on myspace who made a video called "Pill Poppin' Idiots." He took a hand full of Tylenol, some other peach colored pills, and a Vicodin. Well, I was just joking around with him and said "I... Asked by Gudrun Comp 1 year ago.

Before you jump to conclusions.. No, I'm not trying to kill myself. :F So there's this person on myspace who made a video called "Pill Poppin' Idiots." He took a hand full of Tylenol, some other peach colored pills, and a Vicodin. Well, I was just joking around with him and said "I bet I could make a better pill poppin' video" and now he wants me to try and out do him. But I don't want to accidentally overdose or anything.. So how much Tylenol does it take to overdose? No rude comments, please. :I Answered by Karin Cardona 1 year ago.

Why tylenol? Like just plain tylenol not tylenol 3 or anything? That wouldnt do anything, unless you are referring to the acetaminophen in a vicodin pill, and certain ones like the 7.5 mg hydrocodone tabs contain 750 mg of acetaminophen (tylenol), which is A LOT. But the 10 mg hydrocodone yellow pills (lortabs) only have 325 mg of acetaminophen, so that is recommended if anything. This will just lead to live failure and can even lead to kidney damage with continuation, and if pure tylenol, will also lead to no recreational outcome. I wouldnt exceed 4000 mgs total of acetaminiphen if this is vicodin, if it is pure tylenol i wouldnt exceed 0 mgs. Acetaminophen can even be toxic for some around doses of 2000-300 mgs. Answered by Wilton Litton 1 year ago.

Different people have different sensitivity levels to substances. No one can tell. Even at the "recommended" dosage, you can experience severe side effects either immediately or later on. People have been found dead in their beds the next morning after taking tylenol for an anticipated hangover. Use your head. Is it worth it? Answered by Jc Catapano 1 year ago.

Get some Altoids (those really good mints) and some different colored Smarties. Shave em down with a nail file to look like pills. Your breath will smell excillent and you will get a sugar rush. Answered by Lani Catacutan 1 year ago.

more than one or two at a time is anough to make you sick take more than 4 or something and u risk putting yourself in a coma u might end up being a vegetable for the rest of your life u might get liver failure, and im just saying if you want to out-do him withotu risking killing yourself just find some mints, like teh scottish ones and pop like 25 of those see if he out-does you :P Answered by Charlette Dalley 1 year ago.

the liver is a vital organ. severe hepato-toxicity may not give much warning before someone is near death. Answered by Billye Menjiva 1 year ago.

You are an idiot and deserve to die if you attempt this. Don't do what some moron on myspace did. Answered by Sherril Smithers 1 year ago.

You are flirting with a very painful death. There are other ways to have fun. Answered by Barry Quiralte 1 year ago.

You will **** up your liver. I can't believe you would even consider this. Please don't do it! Answered by Dallas Kolinski 1 year ago.


How dangerous is acetaminophen (Tylenol)?
I've heard about it's affects on the liver. I'm a 25 year old male in good health. I do drink alcohol. I just wanted to know what my risks are if I use acetaminophen daily. Should I take a break? I have taken it many times and drank before I heard about the liver damage, I was just wondering if... Asked by Arletha Schulman 1 year ago.

I've heard about it's affects on the liver. I'm a 25 year old male in good health. I do drink alcohol. I just wanted to know what my risks are if I use acetaminophen daily. Should I take a break? I have taken it many times and drank before I heard about the liver damage, I was just wondering if anyone knew more about it. Answered by Iris Fuhrmann 1 year ago.

REGULAR STRENGTH TYLENOL General Information What are the advantages of Tylenol? How does Tylenol work? Should I take Tylenol with or without food? How is Regular Strength Tylenol different from Extra Strength Tylenol? How is Tylenol different from other brands of pain reliever? When to Use Tylenol What types of pain and ailments can I use this for? Will Tylenol help my minor arthritis pain? Does Tylenol help inflammation (swelling)? Will Tylenol help my migraine headaches? Safety Information Can I take Tylenol with my existing medical conditions? Can I take Tylenol if I have liver disease? Can I take Tylenol if I am pregnant or nursing? Can I drink alcohol and take Tylenol? Why can’t I use Tylenol for more than 10 days? Are there risks to long term use of Tylenol? Does Tylenol cause liver damage? Drug Interactions Can I take Tylenol with my other medications? Can I take Tylenol in between my doses of other pain relievers? General Information If you have any further questions about this Tylenol product, you can: Refer to the product label Talk to your doctor Call 1-800-962-5357 between 9:00 am and 4:30 pm EST What are the advantages of Tylenol? The medicine in Regular Strength Tylenol is recommended most by doctors. Regular Strength Tylenol also contains no aspirin and is unlikely to cause the type of stomach irritation the way that aspirin, naproxen sodium or even ibuprofen sometimes can. How does Tylenol work? Acetaminophen, the active ingredient in Tylenol products, is thought to relieve mild to moderate pain by elevating your body's overall pain threshold. Acetaminophen is thought to lower your fever by helping your body eliminate excess heat. Should I take Tylenol with or without food? You can take Tylenol acetaminophen products anytime, without regard to meals. Simply follow the instructions on the package label. How is Extra Strength Tylenol different from Regular Strength Tylenol? Here is a chart to explain Extra Strength Tylenol for your convenience. Product mg Acetaminophen Usual Dosage Maximum Dosage Extra Strength Tylenol 500 mg acetaminophen per geltab, gelcap, caplet or tablet Two geltabs/gelcaps/caplets or tablets every 4-6 hours Do not exceed 8 (product) in any 24-hour period Regular Strength Tylenol 325 mg acetaminophen per tablet Two tablets every 4-6 hours Do not exceed 12 (product) in any 24-hour period How is Tylenol different from other brands of pain reliever? Acetaminophen is the active ingredient in Regular Strength Tylenol. Tylenol products do not contain aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, or ketoprofen. One of the advantages of using Tylenol is that it is unlikely to cause the stomach irritation often associated with aspirin, naproxen sodium, ketoprofen and even ibuprofen, the active ingredients found in some other nonprescription pain relievers. The medicine in Tylenol is also less likely to interact with other medications you may be taking. Always read and follow labeled directions. Do not use Tylenol with other acetaminophen-containing products, unless directed by your doctor. Back to Top When to Use Tylenol If you have any further questions about this Tylenol product, you can: Refer to the product label Talk to your doctor Call 1-800-962-5357 between 9:00 am and 4:30 pm EST What types of pain and ailments can I use Tylenol for? Tylenol (acetaminophen) is indicated for the reduction of fever and the temporary relief of minor aches and pains associated with: The common cold Headache Toothache Muscular aches Backache Minor pain of arthritis Menstrual cramps Will Tylenol help my minor arthritis pain? There are several types of arthritis. Consult your doctor if you do not know what kind of arthritis you have. The medicine in Tylenol was chosen by America's leading arthritis specialists as their first choice for mild to moderate osteoarthritis pain relief. Does Tylenol help inflammation (swelling)? Acetaminophen, the active ingredient in Tylenol, has not been shown to reduce inflammation. Will Tylenol help my migraine headaches? Tylenol (acetaminophen) is not indicated for migraine pain. It is indicated for the reduction of fever and the temporary relief of minor aches and pains associated with: The common cold Headache Toothache Muscular aches Backache Minor pain of arthritis Menstrual cramps Back to Top Safety Information If you have any further questions about this Tylenol product, you can: Refer to the product label Talk to your doctor Call 1-800-962-5357 between 9:00 am and 4:30 pm EST Can I take Tylenol with my existing medical conditions? If you are under a doctor's care for any serious condition, or are taking any other drugs, you should talk to your doctor if you want to know more or have other questions. Can I take Tylenol if I have liver disease? When taken at recommended doses, acetaminophen, the medicine in Tylenol, is the preferred pain reliever for patients with chronic stable liver disease. If you are under a doctor's care for any serious condition, or are taking any other drugs, you should talk to your doctor if you want to know more or have other questions. Can I take Tylenol if I am pregnant or nursing? If you are pregnant or nursing a baby, seek the advice of your healthcare professional before using Tylenol or any other medication. Can I drink alcohol and take Tylenol? Labeling for Tylenol products reads as follows: "If you consume 3 or more alcoholic drinks every day, ask your doctor whether you should take acetaminophen or other pain relievers/fever reducers. Acetaminophen may cause liver damage." Why can’t I use Tylenol for more than 10 days? Acetaminophen has been used by millions of people throughout the world for over 4 decades and during that time has established a remarkable record of safety. We do not recommend use of TYLENOL acetaminophen products beyond the time period listed on the package label without the advice of a physician. This warning appears on packages of ALL over the counter pain relievers for a consumer who is not under a physician's care for pain/fever. If you have pain/fever beyond 10/3 days, we recommend contacting your physician. If you are under a doctor's care for any serious condition or are taking any other drug, you should talk to your doctor if you want to know more or have other questions. Are there risks to long term use of Tylenol? Acetaminophen has been used by millions of people throughout the world for over 4 decades and during that time has established a remarkable record of safety. We do not recommend use of Tylenol acetaminophen products beyond the time period listed on the package label without the advice of a physician. This warning appears on packages of ALL over the counter pain relievers for a consumer who is not under a physician's care for pain/fever. If you have pain/fever beyond 10/3 days, we recommend contacting your physician. If you are under a doctor's care for any serious condition or are taking any other drug, you should talk to your doctor if you want to know more or have other questions. Does Tylenol cause liver damage? When taken at recommended doses, acetaminophen, the medicine in single ingredient Tylenol products, is the preferred pain reliever for patients with chronic stable liver disease. Tylenol does not carry the risk of gastrointestinal complications sometimes associated with NSAIDs such as aspirin, ketoprofen, naproxen sodium and even ibuprofen. If you are under a doctor's care for any serious condition, or are taking any other drugs, you should talk to your doctor if you want to know more or have other questions. Back to Top Drug Interactions If you have any further questions about this Tylenol product, you can: Refer to the product label Talk to your doctor Call 1-800-962-5357 between 9:00 am and 4:30 pm EST Can I take Tylenol with my other medications? When used as directed, Tylenol has less drug interaction risk than other OTC pain relievers. Always read and follow package label directions. Do not use with any other products containing acetaminophen. If you are under a doctor’s care for any serious condition, or are taking any other drugs, you should talk to your doctor if you want to know more or have other questions. Can I take Tylenol in between my doses of other pain relievers? Use of Tylenol with other pain relievers (such as aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen sodium, ketoprofen or prescription pain relievers) is not recommended, unless directed by your doctor. Do not use Tylenol with any other products containing acetaminophen. If you are under a doctor's care for any serious condition, or are taking any other drugs, you should talk to your doctor if you want to know more or have other questions. Answered by Helen Klutts 1 year ago.

When taken as directed, it's OK. However, overdosing is easy, especially if you take a product that already contains it -- like some OTC cold medicines -- and then add a dose of acetaminophen on top of it. There have also been overdoses reported when adults used the infant drops but dosed it as the adult liquid - 2 or 3 teaspoons. Overdosing can be very harmful to the liver. You should only take it daily on the advice of a physician. Answered by Kortney Creitz 1 year ago.

Most of the medicines are harmful to every liver once taken incorrectly (ie. it should be taken after every meal and ensure that your stomach is filled). This is to protect the liver from the chemical effect brought by the medicines. That is why, doctors prescription is always recommended before taking any medications. Answered by Hank Amendola 1 year ago.


Tylenol overdose? liver damage?
I DO NOT drink alcohol! Asked by Amparo Hirezi 1 year ago.

I've taken around either 1000mg-2000mg of tylenol almost every day for two weeks. Yesterday I took 1500mg at once for my pain. I have hep c and didn't realize until today how much damage it can do! I'm scared to death! I don't have a doc treating me for the hep. Did I just really mess myself up? Please! I'm frieking out! Answered by Jeni Bitto 1 year ago.

With Tylenol Extra Strength, you should not take more than two 500mg tablets every four to six hours and not exceed the limit of 8 tablets in 24 hours. This is what healthy people are allowed to have. You exceeded that by 500mg of taking it all at once. All liver patients are told not to take any medications without the doctor approval. (1)The reason for this is because the liver cells may be damaged and depending on how much the liver is damaged...medications have to be adjusted accordingly. They can tell this by your blood work and other film testing. Someone who overdoses on Tylenol, the doctors can reverse or lessen the effects of the tylenol with other medications given them. However, it has to be done immediately to have an effect. (2)Another reason is because all medication go through the liver first, to be broken down, before going to the rest of the body and a damaged liver cannot handle this process well now. I would get in touch with your doctor. You should be with a gastroenterologist. Simple blood testing will show if there is more damage done to the liver cells and how much. They check the liver enzymes to see this damage, they also check the liver function blood tests to see how the cells are functioning to keep the body healthy. They also do testing to see how well the virus is being controlled. You should be on treatment for this. Hepatitis is inflammation of the liver cells. Hepatitis C is a virus that has caused this inflammation. Inflammation of the liver cells can proceed to the death of the liver cells if left untreated. This is a condition known as Liver Cirrhosis. Once it reaches the stage of cirrhosis, then it is a progressive disease that usually ends up with death or a liver transplant. A liver transplant costs in the range of $250,000 and up. You should tell your doctor all medications you are on now, this includes over the counter, herbs, herbal teas, vitamins, minerals, and prescriptions prescribed by your other doctors. I would get in touch with your doctor office now and request medication for the pain you are having and be sure that he knows you have Hep C. He will adjust your dosage of this medication, if you should take it, or prescribe something that is more easier on your liver. It is good that you don't drink alcohol. Alcohol and tylenol together can immediately cause permanent liver damage if taken together. I would not panic about this...but it does require someone who knows your past medical history and your test results to decide what is beneficial for you right now. Wish I could be of more help. Answered by Pilar Breister 1 year ago.

about 6 years ago i got very sick. I ended up overdosing on Acetaminophen on accident. Went to the er for respiratory infection ended up staying 5 days for liver damage. they did a blood test and found my liver enzymes through the roof. so YES i recommend you get to a dr. or er ASAP. I was told if i would not have come in when i did we would have been making arrangements for my funeral not getting me well. Also keep an eye on your skin and eyes. If you start to get jondis which is yellowing of the skin and eyes then its gone too far. so go to the er. they cant turn you down and get that blood test NOW. Answered by Jessica Lato 1 year ago.

how do you know you have hep c if you don't see a doctor? You should NOT take that much tylenol for so long. Yes it will cause liver damage. You SHOULD see a doctor. HE might be able to give you something else for the pain. Answered by Craig Tackitt 1 year ago.


Girlfriend addicted to tylenol?
Help!!...my girlfriend is addicted to tylenol shes been taking 10 to 15 pills a day. I love her with all my heart and I don't want to break-up with her. I can't stand seeing her do this to herself. She had a rough up-bringing and she hasn't recovered from it. She thinks no one cares about her but... Asked by Lee Bierwirth 1 year ago.

Help!!...my girlfriend is addicted to tylenol shes been taking 10 to 15 pills a day. I love her with all my heart and I don't want to break-up with her. I can't stand seeing her do this to herself. She had a rough up-bringing and she hasn't recovered from it. She thinks no one cares about her but I've told her a million times that I love her & care about her, but I don't think she belives me. She won't go see a doctor..what am I supposed to do? Thanks Answered by Noella Moreci 1 year ago.

Tell her the dangers of taking that much tylenol...Get her to read the following: The biggest concern: Taking too much of the popular drug acetaminophen can poison the liver. Some 100 million people a year take acetaminophen, and serious liver damage is rare, manufacturers insist. But more than 56,000 emergency room visits a year are due to acetaminophen overdoses, and about 100 people a year die after unintentionally taking too much, according to Food and Drug Administration estimates. Some consumers swallow extra pills in hopes of faster relief. Others unknowingly ingest too much by taking more than one acetaminophen-containing remedy. Best known by the Tylenol brand, acetaminophen is present in more than 600 products that treat pain, coughs, cold and flu. Most are nonprescription, but there are some prescription ones, such as Vicodin. Often the ingredient is listed only in the label's fine print or, for prescription drugs, with the confusing abbreviation APAP. In drugstore brochures and public service ads unveiled this week, the FDA will urge consumers to check which products contain acetaminophen and carefully follow dosage instructions. It's not the only over-the-counter drug getting attention: The FDA's campaign also will warn that certain patients are at increased risk of other side effects from different painkillers -- such as aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen or ketoprofen -- called NSAIDs, or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Those side effects include stomach bleeding and kidney problems. "We want them to take these medications seriously and understand the consequences if they don't follow directions," said Ellen Shapiro, who heads the FDA's consumer outreach. Risk education But the FDA's new campaign falls short of recommendations of its own scientific advisers, who in 2002 urged that warnings be placed directly on the labels of over-the-counter painkillers to ensure users know these risks. Nor is it a large campaign. Armed with just $20,000 to develop the materials, the FDA is depending on pharmacy chains to put the brochure in stores and hopes major magazines will run the ads for free. The agency says it couldn't afford to even develop a public service announcement for television. "I'm a little angry" at the small effort, said Kate Trunk of Fort Myers, Florida, who has urged the FDA for three years to increase acetaminophen warnings after her 23-year-old son died from an unintentional overdose after a wrist injury. People need to know what's in their medicines and then use them properly. If they dose properly and use it properly, these are safe and effective medicines. -- Dr. Anthony Temple "The responsibility should be, at least in some part, put on manufacturers to inform consumers also," Trunk said. Tylenol's maker has voluntarily upgraded liver warnings and has begun listing acetaminophen in large type on the box front of multi-ingredient products like Tylenol Cold. "People need to know what's in their medicines and then use them properly," said Dr. Anthony Temple of McNeil Consumer & Specialty Pharmaceuticals, who wants the FDA to make other manufacturers follow suit. "If they dose properly and use it properly, these are safe and effective medicines." The FDA says work on warning labels is still under way, with a decision expected later this year. "Educating people about the risks of not using these products correctly is more important," said Dr. Charles Ganley, the FDA's nonprescription drugs chief. He points to efforts a few decades ago that successfully taught parents to never give children or teenagers aspirin during a viral illness because of the risk of deadly Reye's syndrome, something drug warning labels alone couldn't accomplish. In addition to dosage warnings, the FDA's new campaign says: • The risk of liver damage increases if you have three or more alcoholic drinks while using acetaminophen. • It's rare for stomach bleeding to occur with NSAIDs using over-the-counter doses for short periods of time. Risk increases, however, for people who are over 60; take prescription blood thinners or steroids; have a history of stomach bleeding or other bleeding disorders; or have three or more alcoholic drinks a day. • NSAIDs also can cause some reversible kidney problems; most at risk are people over 60, who have pre-existing kidney disease or who take blood pressure medicine known as diuretics. Answered by Josef Potter 1 year ago.

She is in serious danger of killing her liver. The daily dose of tylenol is not to exceed 2 gms a day, that is about (4) 500 mg tablets or (6.5) 350 mg tablets. Why is she abusing tylenol? Is she deliberately overdosing trying to kill herself? Call 911 immediately. Seriously, that much acetaminophen is toxic and if her liver goes, she is a dead woman! As for her upbringing, you can't fix that for her with all the love in the world. She seriously needs a mental health expert to counsel her, then she will be able to love you back once she loves herself first. Answered by Lucy Delamare 1 year ago.

Someone should tell her that tylenol effects the liver and taking to much of it can cause liver problems. To take a few more a day I can understand but she is taking way to many and is going to shoot her liver right out. If you can't help her tell her to go to see a Therapist to find out what the real problem is before she gets really sick. Good Luck Answered by Kenyatta Carmin 1 year ago.

Wow....let her read articles on how Tylenol causes permanent liver damage. She is going to die early if you can't get through to her. Keep trying to support her and encouraging her of the serious harm she is causing her body and that you both cannot live a happy life together if she won't let you help her. This is sad. I wish I could help more. Answered by Diego Fondaw 1 year ago.

Tylenol with codeine right? Uhm, if she's just taking regular tylenol she's obviously not getting high from it and she's not addicted. It's a mental thing. Tell her that tylenol will destroy her liver but, maybe that's her plan. I have no idea why someone would want to take tylenol like that besides slow suicide! If she just wants the codeine she can buy it on the street. WTF? Tylenol?! That's just plain stupid. Answered by Jenell Minshew 1 year ago.

perhaps you should get her parents involved, have you seen her take these pills? maybe she's lying about it for attention? if you love her so much though you gotta do what you can to help, talk to the parents or if you dont think they will be of help go to the school consolor. Answered by Jacquline Pomrenke 1 year ago.

You should probably seek a professional rehab facility. Codeine addiction is very serious and so are its withdrawl symptoms. Answered by Reinaldo Windover 1 year ago.

Take her to the ER immediately. Don't wait until this gets worse. You love her too much to see this happen to her. Answered by Wava Kruyt 1 year ago.

how old is your girlfriend? i think you should stick by her. she is obviously going through a rough time in her life. but she has to want help in order to get help. do the best you can as long as you can...and pray... Answered by Paulette Griffith 1 year ago.


Tylenol questions?
1. what is the chemical name of tylenol? 2. what is the structural formula of tylenol? 3. how do you make tylenol? [synthesis of the product] 4. what is the drug interaction of it? Asked by Signe Carlin 1 year ago.

1. Tylenol's main active ingredient is called acetaminophen, or N-(4-Hydroxyphenyl)acetamide. There are other types of Tylenol, such as the "Severe Allergy Tylenol," that have drugs like diphenhydramine present (a first-generation antihistamine.) 2. Its molecular formula is C8H9NO2. 3. From what I have seen, it can be prepared from 4-nitrophenol, 4-aminophenol (eh, not a big difference), or 4-hydroxyacetophenone hydrazone. The specific industrial synthesis that used is unknown to me. In my opinion, it is probably not the latter one, since it seems too novel. The synthesis probably begins with either the nitro or aminophenol, but by simply reducing the nitro group you get an amino substituent anyway (you can do this with H2 and palladium on charcoal or with a mild reducing agent.) The 4-aminophenol is reacted with acetic anhydride and the amino group is condensed with acetate. The nitrogen pretty much acts as a Lewis base and attacks one of the two carbonyl carbons of acetic anhydride (both are equivalent, so it does not matter which.) Acetate is booted out, yielding acetaminophen (acetyl-amino-phenyl.) 4. I'm sorry, but I am not sure what you mean by "drug interaction," since that whole sentence throws me off. If this refers to its mechanism of action, then here is my answer: acetaminophen inhibits cyclooxygenase. Because it is a weak peripheral inhibitor of this enzyme, it has low anti-inflammatory properties. However, as a good inhibitor in the CNS (especially in the region of the hypothalamic heat-regulation center), it is a very good antipyretic (or fever reducer.) This difference in effect has to do with peroxide concentrations (which are low in the brain.) If you mean what drugs it interacts with, avoid combining acetaminophen with compounds that are hard on the liver, like ethanol. Acetaminophen is quite hepatotoxic. By itself, it can cause hepatic necrosis only in doses that exceed the recommended amount. Actually, I should clarify: acetaminophen itself is not damaging to the liver; rather, one of its metabolites (N-acetyl-p-benzoquinonimine) is. This metabolite depletes glutathione levels, thus leaving liver cells vulnerable to damage by oxidants. N-acetyl-p-benzoquinonimine is iteself a highly electrophilic molecule that will readilly react with just about anything in the cell. Answered by Lloyd Luarca 1 year ago.


Overdosing on Tylenol?
Before you jump to conclusions.. No, I'm not trying to kill myself. :FSo there's this person on myspace who made a video called "Pill Poppin' Idiots." He took a hand full of Tylenol, some other peach colored pills, and a Vicodin. Well, I was just joking around with him and said "I... Asked by Miesha Fie 1 year ago.

Before you jump to conclusions.. No, I'm not trying to kill myself. :F So there's this person on myspace who made a video called "Pill Poppin' Idiots." He took a hand full of Tylenol, some other peach colored pills, and a Vicodin. Well, I was just joking around with him and said "I bet I could make a better pill poppin' video" and now he wants me to try and out do him. But I don't want to accidentally overdose or anything.. So how much Tylenol does it take to overdose? No rude comments, please. :I Answered by Treena Dockwiller 1 year ago.

Why tylenol? Like just plain tylenol not tylenol 3 or anything? That wouldnt do anything, unless you are referring to the acetaminophen in a vicodin pill, and certain ones like the 7.5 mg hydrocodone tabs contain 750 mg of acetaminophen (tylenol), which is A LOT. But the 10 mg hydrocodone yellow pills (lortabs) only have 325 mg of acetaminophen, so that is recommended if anything. This will just lead to live failure and can even lead to kidney damage with continuation, and if pure tylenol, will also lead to no recreational outcome. I wouldnt exceed 4000 mgs total of acetaminiphen if this is vicodin, if it is pure tylenol i wouldnt exceed 0 mgs. Acetaminophen can even be toxic for some around doses of 2000-300 mgs. Answered by Racquel Schellhorn 1 year ago.

Different people have different sensitivity levels to substances. No one can tell. Even at the "recommended" dosage, you can experience severe side effects either immediately or later on. People have been found dead in their beds the next morning after taking tylenol for an anticipated hangover. Use your head. Is it worth it? Answered by Darrell Harbold 1 year ago.

Get some Altoids (those really good mints) and some different colored Smarties. Shave em down with a nail file to look like pills. Your breath will smell excillent and you will get a sugar rush. Answered by Harriette Dossett 1 year ago.

more than one or two at a time is anough to make you sick take more than 4 or something and u risk putting yourself in a coma u might end up being a vegetable for the rest of your life u might get liver failure, and im just saying if you want to out-do him withotu risking killing yourself just find some mints, like teh scottish ones and pop like 25 of those see if he out-does you :P Answered by Otilia Kohlmeier 1 year ago.

the liver is a vital organ. severe hepato-toxicity may not give much warning before someone is near death. Answered by Donny Spraggins 1 year ago.

You are an idiot and deserve to die if you attempt this. Don't do what some moron on myspace did. Answered by Aracelis Banther 1 year ago.

You are flirting with a very painful death. There are other ways to have fun. Answered by Juanita Agro 1 year ago.

You will **** up your liver. I can't believe you would even consider this. Please don't do it! Answered by Loreta Jacobi 1 year ago.


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