Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 005657/001.

Names and composition

"TUBOCURARINE CHLORIDE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of TUBOCURARINE CHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
005657/001 TUBOCURARINE CHLORIDE TUBOCURARINE CHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
006095/001 TUBOCURARINE CHLORIDE TUBOCURARINE CHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
006325/001 TUBOCURARINE CHLORIDE TUBOCURARINE CHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
089442/001 TUBOCURARINE CHLORIDE TUBOCURARINE CHLORIDE Injectable/ Injection 3MG per ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
005657/001 TUBOCURARINE CHLORIDE TUBOCURARINE CHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
006095/001 TUBOCURARINE CHLORIDE TUBOCURARINE CHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
006325/001 TUBOCURARINE CHLORIDE TUBOCURARINE CHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3MG per ML
089442/001 TUBOCURARINE CHLORIDE TUBOCURARINE CHLORIDE Injectable/ Injection 3MG per ML

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Answered questions

Nerve cells / Excitable cells & their properties?
1- Do chloride ions make a significant contribution towards the resting membrane potential ?2- Is the resting membrane potential lower in excitable cells ?3- Which is longer relative refractory period or absolute refractory period ?4- What is D-tubocurarine ? Is it the same thing as curarine ? What is... Asked by Lexie Yentsch 2 years ago.

1- Do chloride ions make a significant contribution towards the resting membrane potential ? 2- Is the resting membrane potential lower in excitable cells ? 3- Which is longer relative refractory period or absolute refractory period ? 4- What is D-tubocurarine ? Is it the same thing as curarine ? What is its medical significance ? Answered by Cortez Muccigrosso 2 years ago.

that's like all electric powered wire. If an electric powered wire isn't insulated (has no overlaying) all different varieties of overseas count number would land on it. airborne dirt and mud? and so on. Or metallic which impacts the transmission of the electric powered signal. So the myelin sheath acts as an insulation. in the different case the electric powered impulse might want to be lost to parts outdoors the nerve. Answered by Serina Caneva 2 years ago.


Ancient plants/herbs that cause paralysis without loss of conciousness/awareness?
I want to write a book and part of it I require to write a ritual. What herbs cause paralysis without disabling conciousness and keeps a clear state of mind? (Ie: person can't move but thoughts are perfectly fine and keep awake and sees everything) Asked by Darius Heckle 2 years ago.

Yes, I would be at a loss without my floss. I floss every night cause I'm a good boy with good hygiene ;o Answered by Christal Gotthardt 2 years ago.


What changes in the body happen during a lethal injection that kills the person?
Asked by Teressa Grannell 2 years ago.

There are actually more than one drug injected for a lethal injection. Here are the drugs and what each do to the prisoner: The drugs are administered, in this order: Anesthetic - Sodium thiopental, which has the trademark name Pentothal, puts the inmate into a deep sleep. This drug is a barbiturate that induces general anesthesia when administered intravenously. It can reach effective clinical concentrations in the brain within 30 seconds, according to an Amnesty International report. For surgical operations, patients are given a dose of 100 to 150 milligrams over a period of 10 to 15 seconds. For executions, as many as 5 grams (5,000 mg) of Pentothal may be administered. This in itself is a lethal dose. It's believed by some that after this anesthetic is delivered, the inmate doesn't feel anything. Saline solution flushes the intravenous line. Paralyzing agent - Pancuronium bromide, also known as Pavulon, is a muscle relaxant that is given in a dose that stops breathing by paralyzing the diaphragm and lungs. Conventionally, this drug takes effect in one to three minutes after being injected. In many states, this drug is given in doses of up to 100 milligrams, a much higher dose than is used in surgical operations -- usually 40 to 100 micrograms per one kilogram of body weight. Other chemicals that can be used as a paralyzing agent include tubocurarine chloride and succinylcholine chloride. Saline solution flushes the intravenous line. Toxic agent (not used by all states) - Potassium chloride is given at a lethal dose in order to interrupt the electrical signaling essential to heart functions. This induces cardiac arrest. Within a minute or two after the last drug is administered, a physician or medical technician declares the inmate dead. The amount of time between when the prisoner leaves the holding cell and when he or she is declared dead may be just 30 minutes. Death usually occurs anywhere from five to 18 minutes after the execution order is given. After the execution, the body is placed in a body bag and taken to medical examiner, who may perform an autopsy. It is then either claimed by the inmate's family or interred by the state. Answered by Jacob Holtzlander 2 years ago.

There are 3 injections: a million) a barbiturate (sedative) to bring about coma. 2) a neuromuscular blockading agent to provide up respiratory and sluggish the middle. 3) potassium chloride to provide up the middle beating. dying follows shortly after. As you would be completely subconscious after the 1st injection, you will not experience something. Answered by Lewis Steyer 2 years ago.

There are three chemicals that are injected: 1. Brevatol, which is a benzodiazapine (like Valium) which puts you to sleep. . (Unconscious) then 2. Pavulon, a paralytic, which paralyzes the diaphragm (Muscle responsible for breathing) then 3. Potassium chloride, in a high enough concentration to stop the heart. . Thats it! hope this helps. . . Oh, by the way, "Don't try this at home!" Answered by Johnnie Brienen 2 years ago.

Potassium chloride (KCl) is the "lethal" part of the injection. It causes the heart to stop beating. Answered by Ladonna Keri 2 years ago.

The potassium chloride stops the heart by suppressing nerve impulses. Answered by Idalia Wittry 2 years ago.

the potassium chloride alters the rhythm of the heart that would eventually lead to cardiac arrest :D Answered by Shane Dashner 2 years ago.


How does lethal injection work?
I had thought maybe it was similar to the way you put an animal to sleep? Asked by Marylee Spinello 2 years ago.

Anesthetic - Sodium thiopental, which has the trademark name Pentothal, puts the inmate into a deep sleep. This drug is a barbiturate that induces general anesthesia when administered intravenously. It can reach effective clinical concentrations in the brain within 30 seconds, according to an Amnesty International report. For surgical operations, patients are given a dose of 100 to 150 milligrams over a period of 10 to 15 seconds. For executions, as many as 5 grams (5,000 mg) of Pentothal may be administered. This in itself is a lethal dose. It's believed by some that after this anesthetic is delivered, the inmate doesn't feel anything. Saline solution flushes the intravenous line. Paralyzing agent - Pancuronium bromide, also known as Pavulon, is a muscle relaxant that is given in a dose that stops breathing by paralyzing the diaphragm and lungs. Conventionally, this drug takes effect in one to three minutes after being injected. In many states, this drug is given in doses of up to 100 milligrams, a much higher dose than is used in surgical operations -- usually 40 to 100 micrograms per one kilogram of body weight. Other chemicals that can be used as a paralyzing agent include tubocurarine chloride and succinylcholine chloride. Saline solution flushes the intravenous line. Toxic agent (not used by all states) - Potassium chloride is given at a lethal dose in order to interrupt the electrical signaling essential to heart functions. This induces cardiac arrest. Answered by Ramon Flathers 2 years ago.

Sean S has a good answer, except that the anesthetic dose of Pentothal is about twice what he listed, and we give in quickly - in about a second or two. Answered by Temple Stockfisch 2 years ago.

close, but they're just a little bit different. Answered by Hubert Gaskell 2 years ago.


What's in a "barbiturate cocktail" when it is prescribed for assisted-suicide?
I just read an article about a place in Switzerland that's helping people to commit suicide with the prescription of a "barbiturate cocktail." I was wondering what that consists of? (I'm not into self-harm, I'm just curious) Asked by Shae Viejo 2 years ago.

The intravenous injection is usually a mixture of compounds, designed to induce rapid unconsciousness followed by death through paralysis of respiratory muscles and/or by inducing cardiac hyperpolarization. The execution of the condemned in most states involves three separate injections: Sodium thiopental: to induce a state of unconsciousness intended to last while the other two injections take effect. Pancuronium/Tubocurarine: to stop all muscle movement except the heart. This causes muscle paralysis, collapse of the diaphragm, and would eventually cause death by asphyxiation. Potassium chloride: to stop the heart from beating, and thus cause death: see cardiac arrest. The drugs are not mixed externally as that can cause them to precipitate. Answered by Candance Yerton 2 years ago.

Assisted suicide is legal in the United States in Oregon and may become legal in Hawaii although I am not in favor of it. Since you are not contemplating suicide yourself the most authoritative reference is Final Exit by Derek Humphry which was published by the Hemlock Society. This is such a good 'how to' guide that it was banned in Great Britain and having read it I wonder if it should have been banned in the US. For those contemplating suicide call 1 303 692 0985 or 1 800 621 4000 (each state also has an 800 # so if you are in need of it email me the name of the state in which you reside) - in Canada 1 80 668 6868. This is a sensitive topic so I would hope that readers and responders will approach this with caution and compassion for although I may be opposed to assisted suicide I certainly understand why it is employed and I agree that we are often kinder to our pet than our parents. Answered by Wen Bratt 2 years ago.

a "barbituate cocktail" consists of three or more drugs, commonly barbituates, mixed together to heighten the effect on all the drugs. Barbituates tend to potentiate one another. So taking a large dose of several puts the client to sleep and gradually levels increase eventually leading to respiratory arrest and cardiac failure and ultimately a peaceful death. Answered by Alleen Huizar 2 years ago.

Suicide Cocktail Answered by Jesica Engelbrecht 2 years ago.

sodium thiopental, potassium chloride Answered by Jeniffer Askia 2 years ago.


Nerve cells / Excitable cells & their properties?
1- Do chloride ions make a significant contribution towards the resting membrane potential ?2- Is the resting membrane potential lower in excitable cells ?3- Which is longer relative refractory period or absolute refractory period ?4- What is D-tubocurarine ? Is it the same thing as curarine ? What is... Asked by Sam Schopflin 2 years ago.

1- Do chloride ions make a significant contribution towards the resting membrane potential ? 2- Is the resting membrane potential lower in excitable cells ? 3- Which is longer relative refractory period or absolute refractory period ? 4- What is D-tubocurarine ? Is it the same thing as curarine ? What is its medical significance ? Answered by Dedra Barranca 2 years ago.

that's like all electric powered wire. If an electric powered wire isn't insulated (has no overlaying) all different varieties of overseas count number would land on it. airborne dirt and mud? and so on. Or metallic which impacts the transmission of the electric powered signal. So the myelin sheath acts as an insulation. in the different case the electric powered impulse might want to be lost to parts outdoors the nerve. Answered by Elfrieda Hakala 2 years ago.


Ancient plants/herbs that cause paralysis without loss of conciousness/awareness?
I want to write a book and part of it I require to write a ritual. What herbs cause paralysis without disabling conciousness and keeps a clear state of mind? (Ie: person can't move but thoughts are perfectly fine and keep awake and sees everything) Asked by Velia Depaoli 2 years ago.

Yes, I would be at a loss without my floss. I floss every night cause I'm a good boy with good hygiene ;o Answered by Kymberly Pursell 2 years ago.


What changes in the body happen during a lethal injection that kills the person?
Asked by Joan Muston 2 years ago.

There are actually more than one drug injected for a lethal injection. Here are the drugs and what each do to the prisoner: The drugs are administered, in this order: Anesthetic - Sodium thiopental, which has the trademark name Pentothal, puts the inmate into a deep sleep. This drug is a barbiturate that induces general anesthesia when administered intravenously. It can reach effective clinical concentrations in the brain within 30 seconds, according to an Amnesty International report. For surgical operations, patients are given a dose of 100 to 150 milligrams over a period of 10 to 15 seconds. For executions, as many as 5 grams (5,000 mg) of Pentothal may be administered. This in itself is a lethal dose. It's believed by some that after this anesthetic is delivered, the inmate doesn't feel anything. Saline solution flushes the intravenous line. Paralyzing agent - Pancuronium bromide, also known as Pavulon, is a muscle relaxant that is given in a dose that stops breathing by paralyzing the diaphragm and lungs. Conventionally, this drug takes effect in one to three minutes after being injected. In many states, this drug is given in doses of up to 100 milligrams, a much higher dose than is used in surgical operations -- usually 40 to 100 micrograms per one kilogram of body weight. Other chemicals that can be used as a paralyzing agent include tubocurarine chloride and succinylcholine chloride. Saline solution flushes the intravenous line. Toxic agent (not used by all states) - Potassium chloride is given at a lethal dose in order to interrupt the electrical signaling essential to heart functions. This induces cardiac arrest. Within a minute or two after the last drug is administered, a physician or medical technician declares the inmate dead. The amount of time between when the prisoner leaves the holding cell and when he or she is declared dead may be just 30 minutes. Death usually occurs anywhere from five to 18 minutes after the execution order is given. After the execution, the body is placed in a body bag and taken to medical examiner, who may perform an autopsy. It is then either claimed by the inmate's family or interred by the state. Answered by Angelena Hymel 2 years ago.

There are 3 injections: a million) a barbiturate (sedative) to bring about coma. 2) a neuromuscular blockading agent to provide up respiratory and sluggish the middle. 3) potassium chloride to provide up the middle beating. dying follows shortly after. As you would be completely subconscious after the 1st injection, you will not experience something. Answered by Pa Ornedo 2 years ago.

There are three chemicals that are injected: 1. Brevatol, which is a benzodiazapine (like Valium) which puts you to sleep. . (Unconscious) then 2. Pavulon, a paralytic, which paralyzes the diaphragm (Muscle responsible for breathing) then 3. Potassium chloride, in a high enough concentration to stop the heart. . Thats it! hope this helps. . . Oh, by the way, "Don't try this at home!" Answered by Kathyrn Abendroth 2 years ago.

Potassium chloride (KCl) is the "lethal" part of the injection. It causes the heart to stop beating. Answered by Kaylee Banis 2 years ago.

The potassium chloride stops the heart by suppressing nerve impulses. Answered by Tricia Kuroda 2 years ago.

the potassium chloride alters the rhythm of the heart that would eventually lead to cardiac arrest :D Answered by Mellie Rix 2 years ago.


How does lethal injection work?
I had thought maybe it was similar to the way you put an animal to sleep? Asked by Carolann Schlabach 2 years ago.

Anesthetic - Sodium thiopental, which has the trademark name Pentothal, puts the inmate into a deep sleep. This drug is a barbiturate that induces general anesthesia when administered intravenously. It can reach effective clinical concentrations in the brain within 30 seconds, according to an Amnesty International report. For surgical operations, patients are given a dose of 100 to 150 milligrams over a period of 10 to 15 seconds. For executions, as many as 5 grams (5,000 mg) of Pentothal may be administered. This in itself is a lethal dose. It's believed by some that after this anesthetic is delivered, the inmate doesn't feel anything. Saline solution flushes the intravenous line. Paralyzing agent - Pancuronium bromide, also known as Pavulon, is a muscle relaxant that is given in a dose that stops breathing by paralyzing the diaphragm and lungs. Conventionally, this drug takes effect in one to three minutes after being injected. In many states, this drug is given in doses of up to 100 milligrams, a much higher dose than is used in surgical operations -- usually 40 to 100 micrograms per one kilogram of body weight. Other chemicals that can be used as a paralyzing agent include tubocurarine chloride and succinylcholine chloride. Saline solution flushes the intravenous line. Toxic agent (not used by all states) - Potassium chloride is given at a lethal dose in order to interrupt the electrical signaling essential to heart functions. This induces cardiac arrest. Answered by Avery Beauprez 2 years ago.

Sean S has a good answer, except that the anesthetic dose of Pentothal is about twice what he listed, and we give in quickly - in about a second or two. Answered by Dannie Schweinert 2 years ago.

close, but they're just a little bit different. Answered by Maudie Flot 2 years ago.


What's in a "barbiturate cocktail" when it is prescribed for assisted-suicide?
I just read an article about a place in Switzerland that's helping people to commit suicide with the prescription of a "barbiturate cocktail." I was wondering what that consists of? (I'm not into self-harm, I'm just curious) Asked by Lorita Kerbs 2 years ago.

The intravenous injection is usually a mixture of compounds, designed to induce rapid unconsciousness followed by death through paralysis of respiratory muscles and/or by inducing cardiac hyperpolarization. The execution of the condemned in most states involves three separate injections: Sodium thiopental: to induce a state of unconsciousness intended to last while the other two injections take effect. Pancuronium/Tubocurarine: to stop all muscle movement except the heart. This causes muscle paralysis, collapse of the diaphragm, and would eventually cause death by asphyxiation. Potassium chloride: to stop the heart from beating, and thus cause death: see cardiac arrest. The drugs are not mixed externally as that can cause them to precipitate. Answered by Latoyia Splitt 2 years ago.

Assisted suicide is legal in the United States in Oregon and may become legal in Hawaii although I am not in favor of it. Since you are not contemplating suicide yourself the most authoritative reference is Final Exit by Derek Humphry which was published by the Hemlock Society. This is such a good 'how to' guide that it was banned in Great Britain and having read it I wonder if it should have been banned in the US. For those contemplating suicide call 1 303 692 0985 or 1 800 621 4000 (each state also has an 800 # so if you are in need of it email me the name of the state in which you reside) - in Canada 1 80 668 6868. This is a sensitive topic so I would hope that readers and responders will approach this with caution and compassion for although I may be opposed to assisted suicide I certainly understand why it is employed and I agree that we are often kinder to our pet than our parents. Answered by Seema Kaines 2 years ago.

a "barbituate cocktail" consists of three or more drugs, commonly barbituates, mixed together to heighten the effect on all the drugs. Barbituates tend to potentiate one another. So taking a large dose of several puts the client to sleep and gradually levels increase eventually leading to respiratory arrest and cardiac failure and ultimately a peaceful death. Answered by Sherril Wolff 2 years ago.

Suicide Cocktail Answered by Charlette Comfort 2 years ago.

sodium thiopental, potassium chloride Answered by May Dunkel 2 years ago.


Nerve cells / Excitable cells & their properties?
1- Do chloride ions make a significant contribution towards the resting membrane potential ?2- Is the resting membrane potential lower in excitable cells ?3- Which is longer relative refractory period or absolute refractory period ?4- What is D-tubocurarine ? Is it the same thing as curarine ? What is... Asked by Jaymie Palazzolo 2 years ago.

1- Do chloride ions make a significant contribution towards the resting membrane potential ? 2- Is the resting membrane potential lower in excitable cells ? 3- Which is longer relative refractory period or absolute refractory period ? 4- What is D-tubocurarine ? Is it the same thing as curarine ? What is its medical significance ? Answered by Briana Barish 2 years ago.

that's like all electric powered wire. If an electric powered wire isn't insulated (has no overlaying) all different varieties of overseas count number would land on it. airborne dirt and mud? and so on. Or metallic which impacts the transmission of the electric powered signal. So the myelin sheath acts as an insulation. in the different case the electric powered impulse might want to be lost to parts outdoors the nerve. Answered by Rikki Lepper 2 years ago.


Ancient plants/herbs that cause paralysis without loss of conciousness/awareness?
I want to write a book and part of it I require to write a ritual. What herbs cause paralysis without disabling conciousness and keeps a clear state of mind? (Ie: person can't move but thoughts are perfectly fine and keep awake and sees everything) Asked by Danyell Rainier 2 years ago.

Yes, I would be at a loss without my floss. I floss every night cause I'm a good boy with good hygiene ;o Answered by Layla Barritt 2 years ago.


What changes in the body happen during a lethal injection that kills the person?
Asked by Scottie Crozat 2 years ago.

There are actually more than one drug injected for a lethal injection. Here are the drugs and what each do to the prisoner: The drugs are administered, in this order: Anesthetic - Sodium thiopental, which has the trademark name Pentothal, puts the inmate into a deep sleep. This drug is a barbiturate that induces general anesthesia when administered intravenously. It can reach effective clinical concentrations in the brain within 30 seconds, according to an Amnesty International report. For surgical operations, patients are given a dose of 100 to 150 milligrams over a period of 10 to 15 seconds. For executions, as many as 5 grams (5,000 mg) of Pentothal may be administered. This in itself is a lethal dose. It's believed by some that after this anesthetic is delivered, the inmate doesn't feel anything. Saline solution flushes the intravenous line. Paralyzing agent - Pancuronium bromide, also known as Pavulon, is a muscle relaxant that is given in a dose that stops breathing by paralyzing the diaphragm and lungs. Conventionally, this drug takes effect in one to three minutes after being injected. In many states, this drug is given in doses of up to 100 milligrams, a much higher dose than is used in surgical operations -- usually 40 to 100 micrograms per one kilogram of body weight. Other chemicals that can be used as a paralyzing agent include tubocurarine chloride and succinylcholine chloride. Saline solution flushes the intravenous line. Toxic agent (not used by all states) - Potassium chloride is given at a lethal dose in order to interrupt the electrical signaling essential to heart functions. This induces cardiac arrest. Within a minute or two after the last drug is administered, a physician or medical technician declares the inmate dead. The amount of time between when the prisoner leaves the holding cell and when he or she is declared dead may be just 30 minutes. Death usually occurs anywhere from five to 18 minutes after the execution order is given. After the execution, the body is placed in a body bag and taken to medical examiner, who may perform an autopsy. It is then either claimed by the inmate's family or interred by the state. Answered by Renea Salasar 2 years ago.

There are 3 injections: a million) a barbiturate (sedative) to bring about coma. 2) a neuromuscular blockading agent to provide up respiratory and sluggish the middle. 3) potassium chloride to provide up the middle beating. dying follows shortly after. As you would be completely subconscious after the 1st injection, you will not experience something. Answered by Bok Aguillard 2 years ago.

There are three chemicals that are injected: 1. Brevatol, which is a benzodiazapine (like Valium) which puts you to sleep. . (Unconscious) then 2. Pavulon, a paralytic, which paralyzes the diaphragm (Muscle responsible for breathing) then 3. Potassium chloride, in a high enough concentration to stop the heart. . Thats it! hope this helps. . . Oh, by the way, "Don't try this at home!" Answered by Annalee Buddington 2 years ago.

Potassium chloride (KCl) is the "lethal" part of the injection. It causes the heart to stop beating. Answered by Margot Shapero 2 years ago.

The potassium chloride stops the heart by suppressing nerve impulses. Answered by Meridith Hearson 2 years ago.

the potassium chloride alters the rhythm of the heart that would eventually lead to cardiac arrest :D Answered by Norman Zunker 2 years ago.


How does lethal injection work?
I had thought maybe it was similar to the way you put an animal to sleep? Asked by Valerie Gord 2 years ago.

Anesthetic - Sodium thiopental, which has the trademark name Pentothal, puts the inmate into a deep sleep. This drug is a barbiturate that induces general anesthesia when administered intravenously. It can reach effective clinical concentrations in the brain within 30 seconds, according to an Amnesty International report. For surgical operations, patients are given a dose of 100 to 150 milligrams over a period of 10 to 15 seconds. For executions, as many as 5 grams (5,000 mg) of Pentothal may be administered. This in itself is a lethal dose. It's believed by some that after this anesthetic is delivered, the inmate doesn't feel anything. Saline solution flushes the intravenous line. Paralyzing agent - Pancuronium bromide, also known as Pavulon, is a muscle relaxant that is given in a dose that stops breathing by paralyzing the diaphragm and lungs. Conventionally, this drug takes effect in one to three minutes after being injected. In many states, this drug is given in doses of up to 100 milligrams, a much higher dose than is used in surgical operations -- usually 40 to 100 micrograms per one kilogram of body weight. Other chemicals that can be used as a paralyzing agent include tubocurarine chloride and succinylcholine chloride. Saline solution flushes the intravenous line. Toxic agent (not used by all states) - Potassium chloride is given at a lethal dose in order to interrupt the electrical signaling essential to heart functions. This induces cardiac arrest. Answered by Charis Marcisak 2 years ago.

Sean S has a good answer, except that the anesthetic dose of Pentothal is about twice what he listed, and we give in quickly - in about a second or two. Answered by Kristin Ordner 2 years ago.

close, but they're just a little bit different. Answered by Hettie Portnoff 2 years ago.


What's in a "barbiturate cocktail" when it is prescribed for assisted-suicide?
I just read an article about a place in Switzerland that's helping people to commit suicide with the prescription of a "barbiturate cocktail." I was wondering what that consists of? (I'm not into self-harm, I'm just curious) Asked by Emelda Libert 2 years ago.

The intravenous injection is usually a mixture of compounds, designed to induce rapid unconsciousness followed by death through paralysis of respiratory muscles and/or by inducing cardiac hyperpolarization. The execution of the condemned in most states involves three separate injections: Sodium thiopental: to induce a state of unconsciousness intended to last while the other two injections take effect. Pancuronium/Tubocurarine: to stop all muscle movement except the heart. This causes muscle paralysis, collapse of the diaphragm, and would eventually cause death by asphyxiation. Potassium chloride: to stop the heart from beating, and thus cause death: see cardiac arrest. The drugs are not mixed externally as that can cause them to precipitate. Answered by Rosalinda Mavle 2 years ago.

Assisted suicide is legal in the United States in Oregon and may become legal in Hawaii although I am not in favor of it. Since you are not contemplating suicide yourself the most authoritative reference is Final Exit by Derek Humphry which was published by the Hemlock Society. This is such a good 'how to' guide that it was banned in Great Britain and having read it I wonder if it should have been banned in the US. For those contemplating suicide call 1 303 692 0985 or 1 800 621 4000 (each state also has an 800 # so if you are in need of it email me the name of the state in which you reside) - in Canada 1 80 668 6868. This is a sensitive topic so I would hope that readers and responders will approach this with caution and compassion for although I may be opposed to assisted suicide I certainly understand why it is employed and I agree that we are often kinder to our pet than our parents. Answered by Betty Araki 2 years ago.

a "barbituate cocktail" consists of three or more drugs, commonly barbituates, mixed together to heighten the effect on all the drugs. Barbituates tend to potentiate one another. So taking a large dose of several puts the client to sleep and gradually levels increase eventually leading to respiratory arrest and cardiac failure and ultimately a peaceful death. Answered by Ignacia Rump 2 years ago.

Suicide Cocktail Answered by Dorian Stahly 2 years ago.

sodium thiopental, potassium chloride Answered by Stewart Aasen 2 years ago.


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