TRIMPEX Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 017952/001.

Names and composition

"TRIMPEX" is the commercial name of a drug composed of TRIMETHOPRIM.

Answered questions

What would drug would you use to treat a E. coli causative urinary tract infection UTI? trimethoprim (Trimpex?
i was reading a book that said SxT or tetracycline is standard for typical E. coli infections.... This seems to contradict the internet findings... but if it is trimethoprim i also read 10-20% of E.coli infections will be resistant to trimethoprim??? then whats the treatment? Thanks Asked by Anastacia Delonais 3 months ago.

Trimethoprim is very concentrated in the urine, cheap(!) and 85-95% effective. A culture can be ordered to see what the microbe is susceptible to. Pathogenic E coli strains of the GI tract are treated differently. Trimethoprim doesnt get excreted in the feces too much, but tetracycline is excreted in the feces and it isnt absorbed all that well to begin with (hence its good for GI infection). Answered by Dot Spracklin 3 months ago.

e. Coli is the most common form of uti. Sulfa-trimethoprim is a first line treatment for uti. Tetracycline is not. It is virtually never used to treat uti's. Some ecoli will be resistant to sulfa drugs, typically that's why a urine culture is done with testing for antibiotics and which rhe bacteria are susceptible too. Occasionally the bacteria is resistant and you have to pick a new antiobiotic. Answered by Rosita Agent 3 months ago.


Which of the following is the better antibiotic?
I've bought online before - it's legal if it's sent from a country that doesn't require a prescription - I just can't remember which one it was. Asked by Gita Deever 3 months ago.

Antibiotics are used specific for the type of bacteria that causes the infection. Some antibiotics will not work where others will. Cultures need to be taken. Certain illnesses are usually receptive to certain antibiotics such as strep throat or an ear infection. The doctors usually prescribe the same each time. If you take antibiotics that are not receptive to the bacteria,no help will come from the medicine. When you take antibiotics for non bacterial infections such as the flu or a cold you cause bacteria to become more resistive to drugs, making it harder for antibiotics to work when they are needed. Answered by Cammy Thran 3 months ago.

It all depends. Each is a good antibiotic for different situations. Not all bacteria are sensitive to all antibiotics. If you take the wrong one, you contribute to antibiotic resistance AND risk making yourself even sicker. Besides, any place that sells drugs without a prescription from a doctor that has actually examined you is: 1) breaking the law 2) unreliable. If they don't deliver what they promise, you can't complain. Did I add that it's illegal to buy prescription meds without a valid prescription? If cost is an issue, go to a community clinic. They're inexpensive and WalMart has $4 prescriptions. Answered by Tempie Murat 3 months ago.

erictromothing a nurse told me it was the cheaper in the market and y should refuse takein Answered by Sharen Rinaldi 3 months ago.


Can you get rid of a a bladder infection with out a doctor prescription?
like washing there with soap? -im a girl- Asked by Jocelyn Linquist 3 months ago.

No, sorry, even if you manage to flush it out, it can, and most likely will recur: UTIs are treated with antibacterial drugs. The choice of drug and length of treatment depend on the patient's history and the urine tests that identify the offending bacteria. The sensitivity test is especially useful in helping the doctor select the most effective drug. The drugs most often used to treat routine, uncomplicated UTIs are trimethoprim (Trimpex), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim, Septra, Cotrim), amoxicillin (Amoxil, Trimox, Wymox), nitrofurantoin (Macrodantin, Furadantin), and ampicillin (Omnipen, Polycillin, Principen, Totacillin). A class of drugs called quinolones includes four drugs approved in recent years for treating UTI. These drugs include ofloxacin (Floxin), norfloxacin (Noroxin), ciprofloxacin (Cipro), and trovafloxin (Trovan). Often, a UTI can be cured with 1 or 2 days of treatment if the infection is not complicated by an obstruction or other disorder. Still, many doctors ask their patients to take antibiotics for a week or two to ensure that the infection has been cured. Single-dose treatment is not recommended for some groups of patients, for example, those who have delayed treatment or have signs of a kidney infection, patients with diabetes or structural abnormalities, or men who have prostate infections. Longer treatment is also needed by patients with infections caused by Mycoplasma or Chlamydia, which are usually treated with tetracycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMZ), or doxycycline. A followup urinalysis helps to confirm that the urinary tract is infection-free. It is important to take the full course of treatment because symptoms may disappear before the infection is fully cleared. Severely ill patients with kidney infections may be hospitalized until they can take fluids and needed drugs on their own. Kidney infections generally require several weeks of antibiotic treatment. Researchers at the University of Washington found that 2-week therapy with TMP/SMZ was as effective as 6 weeks of treatment with the same drug in women with kidney infections that did not involve an obstruction or nervous system disorder. In such cases, kidney infections rarely lead to kidney damage or kidney failure unless they go untreated. Various drugs are available to relieve the pain of a UTI. A heating pad may also help. Most doctors suggest that drinking plenty of water helps cleanse the urinary tract of bacteria. During treatment, it is best to avoid coffee, alcohol, and spicy foods. And one of the best things a smoker can do for his or her bladder is to quit smoking. Smoking is the major known cause of bladder cancer. Answered by Bonnie Ferracioli 3 months ago.

Depends on the severity of the infection. Sometimes your body's immune system can fight off a minor infection without antibiotics. However, if it's difficult to tell if this will be the case and a severe infection left untreated can spread and cause further complications. So, it's probably best to get checked out an get on a short course of antibiotics if needed. In the meantime, keep yourself clean and dry, make sure you're drinking plenty of clear liquids or drink some cranberry juice (it contains a type of acid that helps keep bacteria from sticking to the lining of the bladder), and try to urinate frequently to keep your bladder flushed. If you're sexually active, wash with soap after each encounter and try to pass urine both before and after intercourse. This should help prevent bladder infections in the future (if that's what caused it, of course). Addition after reading other posts - I don't think she actually meant washing her bladder with soap; I think she was talking about the external areas. Don't worry about drinking green tea. What makes liquids like cranberry juice and lemon juice effective is that they contain high levels of acids which lower the pH of urine and make it harder for bacteria to grow. Answered by Aaron Stephan 3 months ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: can you get rid of a a bladder infection with out a doctor prescription? like washing there with soap? -im a girl- Answered by Treena Makarem 3 months ago.

A bladder infection is inside your bladder, So right now, washing it wont really help. If the infection is pretty bad then you NEED the doctor. Dont be emarrased. (they dont look down there or anything.) Just tell them whats up.You'll pee in a cup, and they run a test on it. He will give you a perscription for some meds. For now, drink lots of Lemon Juice (not lemonade) mixed in water, and lots of cranberry juice. Answered by Annamaria Sermersheim 3 months ago.

no dont wash with soap that will probably do more harm than good just plain water will do fine. drink as much water as u can, get a cystitis treatment from yr chemist and take as directed, also cranberry juice2 glasses daily can help but takes a while to take effect. if u have a temperature pass blood or pain then u must see doctor as u will need antibiotics Answered by Neta Montis 3 months ago.

nope...washing won't help infact it can make it worse...by killing good bacteria and growing the wrong kind.... u need to see a doctor as this can get serious...high fevers and stuff like that... but if its a mild case of bladdder infection then drink a lot of water to wash it out of ur system... and a lot really means a lot.... like a whole 1.5 liter bottlel of water in 30 min to hour... but go see ur doctor Answered by Caridad Oesterle 3 months ago.

Cranberry juice (REAL cranberry juice, 100%, not the artificial crap) is supposed to work wonders, as well as drinking alot of water. Do this for 2 weeks or so, drink it constantly. If it's mild I would try this route first. If it's something more progressed go to your doctor and use the combined therapy. Goodluck! :) Answered by Matha Salk 3 months ago.

Drink Cranberry juice that will help out some and might even clear it up. Infection or not you should keep very clean down there... Answered by Cecil Peddy 3 months ago.


Pls help i think i have UTI.?
guy i just read the symptom of UTI (urenia track infection) and i think i have it...But i'm scared to go to the doctor bcs i'm been having this for months maybe 5-6months and i scared to get some really bad news.i would like to know if anyone here had UTI b4 and how long did u wait b4 u went to the doc??? Asked by Apryl Tutaj 3 months ago.

UTIs are treated with antibacterial drugs. The choice of drug and length of treatment depend on the patient's history and the urine tests that identify the offending bacteria. The sensitivity test is especially useful in helping the doctor select the most effective drug. The drugs most often used to treat routine, uncomplicated UTIs are trimethoprim (Trimpex), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim, Septra, Cotrim), amoxicillin (Amoxil, Trimox, Wymox), nitrofurantoin (Macrodantin, Furadantin), and ampicillin (Omnipen, Polycillin, Principen, Totacillin). A class of drugs called quinolones includes four drugs approved in recent years for treating UTI. These drugs include ofloxacin (Floxin), norfloxacin (Noroxin), ciprofloxacin (Cipro), and trovafloxin (Trovan). Often, a UTI can be cured with 1 or 2 days of treatment if the infection is not complicated by an obstruction or other disorder. Still, many doctors ask their patients to take antibiotics for a week or two to ensure that the infection has been cured. Single-dose treatment is not recommended for some groups of patients, for example, those who have delayed treatment or have signs of a kidney infection, patients with diabetes or structural abnormalities, or men who have prostate infections. Longer treatment is also needed by patients with infections caused by Mycoplasma or Chlamydia, which are usually treated with tetracycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMZ), or doxycycline. A followup urinalysis helps to confirm that the urinary tract is infection-free. It is important to take the full course of treatment because symptoms may disappear before the infection is fully cleared. Severely ill patients with kidney infections may be hospitalized until they can take fluids and needed drugs on their own. Kidney infections generally require several weeks of antibiotic treatment. Researchers at the University of Washington found that 2-week therapy with TMP/SMZ was as effective as 6 weeks of treatment with the same drug in women with kidney infections that did not involve an obstruction or nervous system disorder. In such cases, kidney infections rarely lead to kidney damage or kidney failure unless they go untreated. Various drugs are available to relieve the pain of a UTI. A heating pad may also help. Most doctors suggest that drinking plenty of water helps cleanse the urinary tract of bacteria. During treatment, it is best to avoid coffee, alcohol, and spicy foods. And one of the best things a smoker can do for his or her bladder is to quit smoking. Smoking is the major known cause of bladder cancer. Answered by Robin Tafoya 3 months ago.

It looks such as you may desire to have a minor one. In my adventure, the least puzzling answer is to drink lots of cranberry juice (it particularly is a organic anti-biotic). yet an alternate decision is to take cranberry supplements. you will get them at any drug keep. you will possibly desire to objective to pee after intercourse - it enables "wash" out any bacteria that could have been pushed up there. If none of that enables, flow to the surgeon for an antibiotic. Answered by Eliza Wragge 3 months ago.

Don't need a doc for UTI....drink some cranberry juice or you can buy some pills. They're not that serious Answered by Rosalva Wriston 3 months ago.


Girl Problem! Please Help!!?
okay. i believe im in the beginning of getting a UTI. I've Had One once Before And I Just Had To Tough It Out And I Didnt Go To The Doctor. But Now That Im Getting One Again. I Still Cant Go To The Doctor But I Heard From An Ex-Friend That There Is Some Type Of Over The Counter Med To Treat It. Does Any one... Asked by Jerlene Burt 3 months ago.

okay. i believe im in the beginning of getting a UTI. I've Had One once Before And I Just Had To Tough It Out And I Didnt Go To The Doctor. But Now That Im Getting One Again. I Still Cant Go To The Doctor But I Heard From An Ex-Friend That There Is Some Type Of Over The Counter Med To Treat It. Does Any one Know The Name Of That Medicine Or Any other Remidies That Could Help Me. Oh I Know The Whole Cranberry Juice Thing But That took A While. Answered by Myrtis Whitiker 3 months ago.

UTIs are treated with antibacterial drugs. The choice of drug and length of treatment depend on the patient's history and the urine tests that identify the offending bacteria. The sensitivity test is especially useful in helping the doctor select the most effective drug. The drugs most often used to treat routine, uncomplicated UTIs are trimethoprim (Trimpex), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim, Septra, Cotrim), amoxicillin (Amoxil, Trimox, Wymox), nitrofurantoin (Macrodantin, Furadantin), and ampicillin (Omnipen, Polycillin, Principen, Totacillin). A class of drugs called quinolones includes four drugs approved in recent years for treating UTI. These drugs include ofloxacin (Floxin), norfloxacin (Noroxin), ciprofloxacin (Cipro), and trovafloxin (Trovan). Often, a UTI can be cured with 1 or 2 days of treatment if the infection is not complicated by an obstruction or other disorder. Still, many doctors ask their patients to take antibiotics for a week or two to ensure that the infection has been cured. Single-dose treatment is not recommended for some groups of patients, for example, those who have delayed treatment or have signs of a kidney infection, patients with diabetes or structural abnormalities, or men who have prostate infections. Longer treatment is also needed by patients with infections caused by Mycoplasma or Chlamydia, which are usually treated with tetracycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMZ), or doxycycline. A followup urinalysis helps to confirm that the urinary tract is infection-free. It is important to take the full course of treatment because symptoms may disappear before the infection is fully cleared. Severely ill patients with kidney infections may be hospitalized until they can take fluids and needed drugs on their own. Kidney infections generally require several weeks of antibiotic treatment. Researchers at the University of Washington found that 2-week therapy with TMP/SMZ was as effective as 6 weeks of treatment with the same drug in women with kidney infections that did not involve an obstruction or nervous system disorder. In such cases, kidney infections rarely lead to kidney damage or kidney failure unless they go untreated. Various drugs are available to relieve the pain of a UTI. A heating pad may also help. Most doctors suggest that drinking plenty of water helps cleanse the urinary tract of bacteria. During treatment, it is best to avoid coffee, alcohol, and spicy foods. And one of the best things a smoker can do for his or her bladder is to quit smoking. Smoking is the major known cause of bladder cancer. Answered by Cynthia Pavia 3 months ago.

I know it's time consuming, but you should really just go to a doctor, because if indeed it is a UTI then you need antibiotics. If you go then you will be able to start feeling better quicker anyway, so it's the most logical solution. Also, if you leave it and it gets worse then you can end up with kidney damage or the infection could spread to your other organs. I had a friend who became really ill because of a UTI she left untreated. but as some other people have said, in the meantime drink lots and lots of water, to try and flush out some of the infection. You could also get these homeopathic cranberry extract sachets from the pharmacy.. I'm not sure if you have them over there, but there must be something similar. They worked for me when I had a very mild UTI once. Good luck, and go to the doctor! Answered by Moses Seeholzer 3 months ago.

The ones that I know of are Uricalm, Azo, and Cystex (not too sure about the last one). I think that Uricalm and Azo have the same ingredients, but Uricalm has more milligrams of the active ingredient in it and I think it may even be cheaper, too. I've used them and they've been very helpful with the pain. Don't neglect to see your doctor, though, because if you do have a UTI, it can become very serious if you don't get the proper treatment for it. Answered by Jaimie Kilver 3 months ago.

Water, Water, Water. I still have kidney stones. If you let it get to bad without medical attention it could derive into something worse. Have you not heard on the news were a Brazilian Miss Teen died from a UTI? The bacteria can be fatal and spread if not corrected. This is rare, however not impossible. Drink plenty of water and pee pee pee. But I encourage you to go to a doctor asap. Answered by Alina Midgley 3 months ago.

YOU CANT GET RID OF A BLADDER INFECTION WITHOUT ANTI BIOTICS do you know how dangerous that is ? you can loose your kidney! you might have made some of the side effects go away with your toughing it out but the infection itself is always there.go to the doctor, all you have to do is describe your symptoms and pee in a cup and then he gives you a 7 to 10 day med please GO! Answered by Dyan Battiest 3 months ago.

try the cranberry pills. they are stronger and i take like 2 to 3 a day... plus drink LOADS of water to flush yourself out. in the future make sure you take the pills or juice everyday to prevent them Answered by Dominque Spiliakos 3 months ago.


Girls only!!!!!?
i have uti (urinsrie track infection) HHHEEELLLPPP Asked by Tamisha Talladino 3 months ago.

UTIs are treated with antibacterial drugs. The choice of drug and length of treatment depend on the patient's history and the urine tests that identify the offending bacteria. The sensitivity test is especially useful in helping the doctor select the most effective drug. The drugs most often used to treat routine, uncomplicated UTIs are trimethoprim (Trimpex), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim, Septra, Cotrim), amoxicillin (Amoxil, Trimox, Wymox), nitrofurantoin (Macrodantin, Furadantin), and ampicillin (Omnipen, Polycillin, Principen, Totacillin). A class of drugs called quinolones includes four drugs approved in recent years for treating UTI. These drugs include ofloxacin (Floxin), norfloxacin (Noroxin), ciprofloxacin (Cipro), and trovafloxin (Trovan). Often, a UTI can be cured with 1 or 2 days of treatment if the infection is not complicated by an obstruction or other disorder. Still, many doctors ask their patients to take antibiotics for a week or two to ensure that the infection has been cured. Single-dose treatment is not recommended for some groups of patients, for example, those who have delayed treatment or have signs of a kidney infection, patients with diabetes or structural abnormalities, or men who have prostate infections. Longer treatment is also needed by patients with infections caused by Mycoplasma or Chlamydia, which are usually treated with tetracycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMZ), or doxycycline. A followup urinalysis helps to confirm that the urinary tract is infection-free. It is important to take the full course of treatment because symptoms may disappear before the infection is fully cleared. Doctors suggest some additional steps that a woman can take on her own to avoid an infection: Drink plenty of water every day. Urinate when you feel the need; don't resist the urge to urinate. Wipe from front to back to prevent bacteria around the anus from entering the vagina or urethra. Take showers instead of tub baths. Cleanse the genital area before sexual intercourse. Avoid using feminine hygiene sprays and scented douches, which may irritate the urethra. Some doctors suggest drinking cranberry juice. Answered by Thomasina Vandersloot 3 months ago.

Best, easiest and fastest - get to the Emergency Room and get a prescription for pyridium and an anti-biotic. The pyridium will take care of the symptoms - it will also make you pee orange to bright yellow for a while. The anti-biotic will take care of the bug. Prevention? I take cranberry capsules every other day, and on the in between days I take Black Cherry Extract capsules. I get them from the local health food store. Long term mine may have been linked with a systemic yeast syndrome I am trying to kick. If you also get vaginitis (also the same yeast) then this is a possible reason for the UTI, other than not yet learning basic prevention through cleanliness. Check out yeast at www.hufa.org. Answered by Dorris Wyble 3 months ago.

1. Go to the doctor you will probably need antibiotics. 2. Drink plenty of liquids especially water to flush it out. 3. Limit bubble baths they can cause infection from sitting in the hot germy water. Showers are better. If you want a bubble bath limit the time you sit in the water. Stand up when you wash off, drain the tub and rinse with the shower. Answered by Cecille Penalver 3 months ago.

If you've been diagnosed by a doctor with a UTI, then you should already have the antibiotics you need to get better. If you haven't SEEN a doctor, you need to do that immediately! Answered by Shanon Talbott 3 months ago.

Get to a doctor for antibiotics its the only way to cure it. Dont bother with over the counter stuff, it just mask the syptoms and then you really will have pain. Answered by Chelsea Mccurty 3 months ago.

If you haven't seen a DR. yet, then I would suggest you get in to see one tomorrow right away. I have pasted Treatment information below for you. Let me know if you need more information or if you need information on how you get uti. Good luck to you and hope you are feeling better soon. :) Antibiotics can treat most urinary tract infections (UTIs) successfully. The goals of treatment for UTIs are to relieve symptoms, eliminate the infection and prevent recurrence, and prevent unlikely but serious complications such as kidney damage and sepsis. In pregnant women, treatment protects the unborn baby as well. Initial treatment Treatment for uncomplicated bladder infections in women usually is 3 days of antibiotics. Home treatment includes drinking a lot of water and fluids and urinating frequently, emptying your bladder each time. Additional testing is not necessary if your symptoms improve. Oral antibiotics usually can treat kidney infections (pyelonephritis), although you may need brief hospitalization and a short course of intravenous (IV) antibiotics if you are too ill or nauseated to take medicine by mouth (oral medication). Kidney infections tend to make people more severely ill than bladder infections. Once you are feeling better, you may take oral antibiotics, typically for about 2 weeks. Your doctor probably will test your urine for bacteria after treatment to be certain you no longer have an infection. The duration of antibiotic treatment for urinary tract infections (UTIs) may be longer and you may require further testing before and after treatment if you: Are pregnant. Are older than 65. Have diabetes or an impaired immune system. Are a man. UTIs in men typically require 1 to 2 weeks of antibiotics. Additional testing and treatment for prostate problems (such as prostatitis) or sexually transmitted diseases (such as chlamydia or gonorrhea) may be necessary. If you have a severe kidney infection or if a bladder or kidney infection is complicated by other factors, you may need hospitalization. Treatment if the condition gets worse or recurs If your urinary tract infection (UTI) does not improve after treatment with antibiotics, you will need further evaluation and additional antibiotic treatment. If the infection spreads and affects your kidney function or causes widespread infection (sepsis), you will need hospital care. These complications are not common, and they rarely occur in people who are otherwise healthy. People with impaired immune systems, diabetes, untreated urinary tract obstruction, and other conditions that affect the kidneys or bladder are at higher risk. A new infection, rather than a relapse of the same infection, usually is the cause of a UTI that keeps coming back (recurs). Women with recurrent bladder infections may take antibiotics for 6 months, followed by preventive antibiotic therapy. 1 Recurrent UTIs in men are usually a sign of prostate infection (prostatitis). Chronic prostatitis can be difficult to treat and may take up to 6 weeks of antibiotic therapy. For more information, see the topic, Prostatitis. Follow-up evaluations are usually necessary in men who have UTIs and are always necessary if the infection recurs. What To Think About Your doctor may base treatment decisions for a bladder infection on your symptoms and urinalysis results, without doing a urine culture. If treatment clears up the symptoms, it confirms the diagnosis of a simple, uncomplicated UTI. If the symptoms do not clear up, you will need further testing to look for: A kidney infection. Structural problems with the kidneys that increase the risk of infection. Infection with an uncommon bacteria. An impaired immune system. A cause for the symptoms that is not an infection. If group B streptococcal infection causes a UTI in a pregnant woman, she will receive antibiotic treatment during labor so that she does not pass the infection to her baby. 2 Many forms of bacteria have become resistant to common antibiotics designed to destroy them. These are called antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Antibiotic resistance among bacteria that cause UTIs increased steadily in recent decades. You and your doctor may have to try different antibiotics, and different combinations of antibiotics, to find the right medication that will kill the bacteria causing the UTI. 3 Answered by Carlena Zeis 3 months ago.

First its a urinary track infection not urinsrie. talk to your doctor or look it up on www.webmd.com. I have had one before and they are nothing to worry about. I hope this helps. Answered by Sixta Amboise 3 months ago.

it is impossible to know you have one if you have not been to the Dr. It could me many things like a yeast infection, a sexual transmitted disease. But you need to see your Dr. and drink lots of cranberry juice. and good luck Answered by Ericka Farra 3 months ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Urinary tract infection. It is more appropriate if you culture your urine and identify the bacteria and administer the right medicine. Consult an Urologist. Answered by Donnette Liggons 3 months ago.

hey guys she said girls only!!! i had one and the best thing to do is see a doctor and they should give you some treatment for it!! but also try to stay as clean as possible im not saying you're dirty but you just should to help it Answered by Bell Wheeley 3 months ago.


Kidney infection medications?
It's my friend here with me, he has had back pain for 3 days (lower) He thought it was his degenerative disk pain, he went to the bathroom 4 times in 20 minutes. I have had a kidney infection, the symptoms reminded me, I will tell him to go see a doctor. He had some anitbiotics and wanted me to ask if they... Asked by Delmy Fairy 3 months ago.

It's my friend here with me, he has had back pain for 3 days (lower) He thought it was his degenerative disk pain, he went to the bathroom 4 times in 20 minutes. I have had a kidney infection, the symptoms reminded me, I will tell him to go see a doctor. He had some anitbiotics and wanted me to ask if they would help to avoid emergency room waiting. Answered by Mohamed Capalbo 3 months ago.

Kidney infections are treated with anti-bacterial drugs. The choice of drug depends on the patient's history and a urine test identifying the types of bacteria. The drugs most often used are trimethoprim(Trimpex), trimethoprim sulfamethoxazole(Bactrim, Septra,Cotrim), amoxicillian(Amoxil, Trimox, Wymox), nitrofurantoin(Macrodatin,Furdatin), and ampcillin(Omnipen, Polycillin,Principen, Totacillin). A class of drugs known asquinlones includes four drugs for treating UTIs. They are ofloxacin(Floxicin), norfloxacin(Noroxin), ciprofloxacin(Cipro) and trovafloxin(Trovin). Often, a UTI can be cured with 1 or 2 days of treatment if the infection is not complicated by an obstruction or other disorder. Still, many doctors ask their patients to take antibiotics for a week or two to ensure that the infection has been cured. Single-dose treatment is not recommended for some groups of patients, for example, those who have delayed treatment or have signs of a kidney infection, patients with diabetes or structural abnormalities, or men who have prostate infections. Longer treatment is also needed by patients with infections caused by Mycoplasma or Chlamydia, which are usually treated with tetracycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMZ), or doxycycline. A followup urinalysis helps to confirm that the urinary tract is infection-free. It is important to take the full course of treatment because symptoms may disappear before the infection is fully cleared. Answered by Jacinto Feehery 3 months ago.

Antibiotics Used For Kidney Infection Answered by Benny Buonocore 3 months ago.

Your friend could have a kidney infection, or he could have low kidney function like I do. I had the lower back pains (I am also a survivor of 3 spinal surgeries for my degenerative disk disease), last month and went to my doctor. I had to have a urine catch (you bring a bottle home to catch your urine for 24 hours) and turned it in the next day also had blood drawn for this test. I got the results that my kidneys are not functioning properly and have to go back to the doctor periodially to be tested to see if it is any worse or if it has corrected itself. It is very important that he see the doctor and have tests done as this is very seriouse. If he only has a kidney infection, then his doctor will put him on antibiotics. It takes a few weeks for the antibotics to kick in so he needs to take them as directed until all of the medicine is gone. Good Luck :-) Answered by Jesse Faulkenburg 3 months ago.

Cranberry juice will not cure a kidney infection, it can only help prevent one. The doctor will normally do a urine culture to see what kind of infection you have and give you the correct antibiotic to kill the infection. You should see your doc ASAP...if you let it go too long without meds then it could get really bad, I know from experience...after a whole week in the hospital!!! Good luck! Answered by Luvenia Holibaugh 3 months ago.


How can I relieve Urinal-track infection naturally?
Asked by Eloy Yokiel 3 months ago.

UTIs are treated with antibacterial drugs. The choice of drug and length of treatment depend on the patient's history and the urine tests that identify the offending bacteria. The sensitivity test is especially useful in helping the doctor select the most effective drug. The drugs most often used to treat routine, uncomplicated UTIs are trimethoprim (Trimpex), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim, Septra, Cotrim), amoxicillin (Amoxil, Trimox, Wymox), nitrofurantoin (Macrodantin, Furadantin), and ampicillin (Omnipen, Polycillin, Principen, Totacillin). A class of drugs called quinolones includes four drugs approved in recent years for treating UTI. These drugs include ofloxacin (Floxin), norfloxacin (Noroxin), ciprofloxacin (Cipro), and trovafloxin (Trovan). Often, a UTI can be cured with 1 or 2 days of treatment if the infection is not complicated by an obstruction or other disorder. Still, many doctors ask their patients to take antibiotics for a week or two to ensure that the infection has been cured. Single-dose treatment is not recommended for some groups of patients, for example, those who have delayed treatment or have signs of a kidney infection, patients with diabetes or structural abnormalities, or men who have prostate infections. Longer treatment is also needed by patients with infections caused by Mycoplasma or Chlamydia, which are usually treated with tetracycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMZ), or doxycycline. A followup urinalysis helps to confirm that the urinary tract is infection-free. It is important to take the full course of treatment because symptoms may disappear before the infection is fully cleared. Severely ill patients with kidney infections may be hospitalized until they can take fluids and needed drugs on their own. Kidney infections generally require several weeks of antibiotic treatment. Researchers at the University of Washington found that 2-week therapy with TMP/SMZ was as effective as 6 weeks of treatment with the same drug in women with kidney infections that did not involve an obstruction or nervous system disorder. In such cases, kidney infections rarely lead to kidney damage or kidney failure unless they go untreated. Various drugs are available to relieve the pain of a UTI. A heating pad may also help. Most doctors suggest that drinking plenty of water helps cleanse the urinary tract of bacteria. During treatment, it is best to avoid coffee, alcohol, and spicy foods. And one of the best things a smoker can do for his or her bladder is to quit smoking. Smoking is the major known cause of bladder cancer. Answered by Jody Matt 3 months ago.

relieve urinaltrack infection naturally Answered by Oda Shrimplin 3 months ago.

Go to the doctor and get some antibiotics! That's the only sure fire way to cure an infection. Answered by Shelly Topolansky 3 months ago.

it is Urinary and you can't. You HAVE TO HAVE antibiotics ASAP! If you don't it WILL turn into a kidney infection. Anything natural only PREVENTS a UTI it DOES NOT CURE one! Answered by Bree Scurti 3 months ago.

Even if you could resolve a urinary infection, how would you know what bacteria are involved? See a doctor, get diagnosed and treated. Answered by Ellis Lague 3 months ago.

It will usually clear up on its own, but drinking cranberry juice every day will help prevent future UTIs. Answered by Jerrell Tombrello 3 months ago.


Urinary Track Infection?
Urinary Tract Infection* Asked by Felicia Avitabile 3 months ago.

That's urinary TRACT and the answer is no, you need a urine analysis and the proper treatment from a doc. Answered by Ailene Jarding 3 months ago.


Urinary tract infection?
Do you have to go on antibioics to treat a urinary tract infection? Asked by Noelia Hollner 3 months ago.

Yes, Cosult your doctor. Urinary Tract Infections (UTI) are treated with antibacterial drugs. The choice of drug and length of treatment depend on the patient's history and the urine tests that identify the offending bacteria. The sensitivity test is especially useful in helping the doctor select the most effective drug. The drugs most often used to treat routine, uncomplicated UTIs are trimethoprim (Trimpex), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim, Septra, Cotrim), amoxicillin (Amoxil, Trimox, Wymox), nitrofurantoin (Macrodantin, Furadantin), and ampicillin (Omnipen, Polycillin, Principen, Totacillin). A class of drugs called quinolones includes four drugs approved in recent years for treating UTI. These drugs include ofloxacin (Floxin), norfloxacin (Noroxin), ciprofloxacin (Cipro), and trovafloxin (Trovan). Often, a UTI can be cured with 1 or 2 days of treatment if the infection is not complicated by an obstruction or other disorder. Still, many doctors ask their patients to take antibiotics for a week or two to ensure that the infection has been cured. Single-dose treatment is not recommended for some groups of patients, for example, those who have delayed treatment or have signs of a kidney infection, patients with diabetes or structural abnormalities, or men who have prostate infections. Longer treatment is also needed by patients with infections caused by Mycoplasma or Chlamydia, which are usually treated with tetracycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMZ), or doxycycline. A followup urinalysis helps to confirm that the urinary tract is infection-free. It is important to take the full course of treatment because symptoms may disappear before the infection is fully cleared. Answered by Mahalia Emmerich 3 months ago.

Buy a 640z bottle of Ocean Spray Cranberry Juice and drink it all in a 48 hr period. Get the 100% cranberry. My Doctor friend and I were just discussing this today because his niece has the same problem. You will usually be well within 48 hrs. Look it up on the net. Answered by Toshia Proffit 3 months ago.

just go to your doctor, the sooner the better. They'll take a quick urine test and most likely give you two sorts of pills, an antibiotic and another pill to help with the pain of the inflamed tract. Answered by Lacey Kappes 3 months ago.

If you have had an urinalysis and it was positive for bacteria then you need to be on antibiotics to fight the bacteria. You also need to cut out the sodas and tea. Water,beer and cranberry juice are all good to help flush out the kidneys. Answered by Marjory Franklyn 3 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017952/001 TRIMPEX TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 100MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017943/001 PROLOPRIM TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 100MG
017943/003 PROLOPRIM TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 200MG
017952/001 TRIMPEX TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 100MG
017952/002 TRIMPEX 200 TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 200MG
018679/001 TRIMETHOPRIM TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 100MG
070049/001 TRIMETHOPRIM TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 100MG
070494/001 TRIMETHOPRIM TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 100MG
070495/001 TRIMETHOPRIM TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 200MG
071259/001 TRIMETHOPRIM TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 200MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
091437/001 TRIMETHOPRIM TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 100MG

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