TRIALODINE Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 070942/001.

Names and composition

"TRIALODINE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
070942/001 TRIALODINE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018207/001 DESYREL TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018207/002 DESYREL TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018207/003 DESYREL TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 150MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018207/004 DESYREL TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 300MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
022411/001 OLEPTRO TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 150MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
022411/002 OLEPTRO TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
070491/001 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
070942/001 TRIALODINE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
070492/001 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
070857/001 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
070858/001 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
070921/001 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
071112/001 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
071113/001 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
071139/001 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
071140/001 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
071196/001 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
071196/002 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
071196/003 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
071258/001 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
071405/001 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
071406/001 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
071514/001 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
071523/001 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
071524/001 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
071525/001 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
071636/001 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
072192/001 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
072193/001 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
072483/001 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
072484/001 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
073137/001 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
073137/002 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
073137/003 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
074357/001 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
090514/001 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
090514/002 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
090514/003 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
090514/004 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
202180/001 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
202180/002 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
202180/003 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
202180/004 TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TRAZODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 300MG

Ask a question

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question as quickly as possible.

Answered questions

Does anyone know if there is a generic available for the drug Trazodone/Desyrel?
Asked by Pandora Mabee 1 month ago.

Trazodone IS the generic for Desyrel, Molipaxin, Trittico, Thombran, Trialodine. Answered by Wilhemina Alberding 1 month ago.

Trazodone is the generic. Desyrel is the brand name. Hope this helps. Answered by Tommy Tempelton 1 month ago.


Can a guy take 25 mg of trazodone and be safe of getting priapism?
Doctor prescribed me Trazodone for sleep, im afraid of Priapism though, i took 25 mg and it did help me sleep, but what are the chances to have priapism using this drug? Asked by Antony Garmon 1 month ago.

although it is a side effect of the drug it is not a common one. I wouldn't worry about it but if does happen go to the ER. here is all of the info on the drug from a website I use for school (i'm a nursing student)..oh and the drug will take a couple of weeks to work so don't stop taking it yet and if you decide to stop consult your doctor before doing so. Pronunciation TRAZ-oh-done [Audio] Trade Name(s) • Desyrel • Trialodine • Trazon Pregnancy Category Category C Ther. class. antidepressants Indications Major depression Unlabelled Use(s): Insomnia, chronic pain syndromes, including diabetic neuropathy, and anxiety Action Alters the effects of serotonin in the CNS Therapeutic Effect(s): Antidepressant action, which may develop only over several weeks Pharmacokinetics Absorption: Well absorbed after oral administration Distribution: Widely distributed Protein Binding: 89–95% Metabolism and Excretion: Extensively metabolized by the liver (CYP3A4 enzyme system); minimal excretion of unchanged drug by the kidneys Half-life: 5–9 hr TIME/ACTION PROFILE (antidepressant effect) ROUTEONSETPEAKDURATION PO1–2 wk2–4 wkwks Contraindication/Precautions Contraindicated in: • Hypersensitivity • Recovery period after MI • Concurrent electroconvulsive therapy Use Cautiously in: • Cardiovascular disease • Suicidal behavior • May ↑ risk of suicide attempt/ideation especially during early treatment or dose adjustment • Severe hepatic or renal disease (dose reduction recommended) • Lactation: Discontinue drug or bottle feed • Pedi: Suicide risk may be greater in children and adolescents; safe use not established • Geri: Initial dose reduction recommended Adverse Reactions/Side Effects CNS: drowsiness, confusion, dizziness, fatigue, hallucinations, headache, insomnia, nightmares, slurred speech, syncope, weakness. EENT: blurred vision, tinnitus. CV: hypotension, arrhythmias, chest pain, hypertension, palpitations, tachycardia. GI: dry mouth, altered taste, constipation, diarrhea, excess salivation, flatulence, nausea, vomiting. GU: hematuria, erectile dysfunction, priapism, urinary frequency. Derm: rashes. Hemat: anemia, leukopenia. MS: myalgia. Neuro: tremor. *CAPITALS indicates life-threatening. *italic indicates most frequent. Interactions Drug-Drug • May ↑ digoxin or phenytoin serum levels • ↑ CNS depression with other CNS depressants , including alcohol , opioid analgesics , and sedative/hypnotics • ↑ hypotension with antihypertensives , acute ingestion of alcohol , or nitrates • Concurrent use with fluoxetine ↑ levels and risk of toxicity from trazodone • Drugs that inhibit the CYP3A4 enzyme system , including ritonavir indinavir and ketoconazole ↑ levels and the risk of toxicity • Drugs that induce the CYP3A4 enzyme system , including carbamazepine ↓ levels and may decrease effectiveness • Do note use within 14 days of MAOI therapy • May ↑ prothrombin time (PT) with warfarin Drug-Natural Products • Concomitant use of kava , valerian , or chamomile can ↑ CNS depression • ↑ risk of serotinergic side effects including serotonin syndrome with St. John's wort and SAMe Route/Dosage • PO (Adults): Depression—150 mg/day in 3 divided doses; increase by 50 mg/day q 3–4 days until desired response (not to exceed 400 mg/day in outpatients or 600 mg/day in hospitalized patients). Insomnia—25–100 mg at bedtime. • PO (Geriatric Patients): 75 mg/day in divided doses initially; may be increased q 3–4 days. Availability • Tablets: 50 mg, 100 mg, 150 mg, 300 mg Assessment • Monitor blood pressure and pulse rate before and during initial therapy. Monitor ECGs in patients with pre-existing cardiac disease before and periodically during therapy to detect arrhythmias • Assess for possible sexual dysfunction Depression • Assess mental status (orientation, mood, and behavior) frequently. Assess for suicidal tendencies, especially during early therapy. Restrict amount of drug available to patient Pain • Assess location, duration, intensity, and characteristics of pain before and periodically during therapy. Use pain scale to assess effectiveness of medicine Lab Test Considerations • Assess CBC and renal and hepatic function before and periodically during therapy. Slight, clinically insignificant ↓ in leukocyte and neutrophil counts may occur Potential Nursing Diagnoses • Ineffective coping (Indications) • Sexual dysfunction (Side Effects) Implementation PO: Administer with or immediately after meals to minimize side effects (nausea, dizziness) and allow maximum absorption of trazodone. A larger portion of the total daily dose may be given at bedtime to decrease daytime drowsiness and dizziness Patient/Family Teaching • Instruct patient to take medication exactly as directed. If a dose is missed, take as soon as rem Answered by Lazaro Burrington 1 month ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Can a guy take 25 mg of trazodone and be safe of getting priapism? Doctor prescribed me Trazodone for sleep, im afraid of Priapism though, i took 25 mg and it did help me sleep, but what are the chances to have priapism using this drug? Answered by Francis Kalert 1 month ago.

Talk to your doctor about evaluating your current medications. Adding a fourth psychotropic medication usually won't clear muddy waters. From the combination I'll assume you are currently diagnosed as bipolar. You might even need to seek out another doctor who is very conscientious about diagnosis and medication management. Some people do need multiple psychotropic medications, however, many are prescribed a second medication to cover side effects of the first leading to a third to handle a new diagnosis brought on by your poor response to the the interaction of the others. (On and on and on....) Please find someone who will make you and your health a priority. Good luck and good health. Answered by Lacresha Waaga 1 month ago.


Psyc ward or counceling?
I heard you had to be over 18 before you could with out parents knowing. Asked by Yasuko Dade 1 month ago.

I am cutting and really depressed and suicidal at times, I am 17 ill be 18 in February I dint really want my parents to know. I really need some help. Is their any free counseling places in Delaware or Philadelphia? I don't really have any money. i come from an extremely poor family. I was raped, abused and I have bad panic attacks. I didntt really want stuff to get reported to the state or anything but i cant deal with everything going on.. please help... Answered by Hien Campanelli 1 month ago.

you are over the of age 15 . you can get help form the state w out your parents not Knowing. Answered by Yukiko Lapuerta 1 month ago.


What is trazadone used for?
Asked by Nicole Spivey 1 month ago.

Trazodone (also sold under the brand names Desyrel, Oleptro, Beneficat, Deprax, Desirel, Molipaxin, Thombran, Trazorel, Trialodine, Trittico, and Mesyrel) is an antidepressant of the serotonin antagonist and reuptake inhibitor (SARI) class. It is a phenylpiperazine compound. Trazodone also has anxiolytic and hypnotic effects. Trazodone has considerably less prominent anticholinergic (dry mouth, constipation, tachycardia) and sexual side effects than most of the tricyclic antidepressants. It's used for: Depression, with or without anxiety Bipolar depression, in some circumstances Insomnia (in some countries, this is an off-label use) Control of nightmares or other sleep disturbances It's "off-label" uses include: Fibromyalgia Panic disorder Diabetic neuropathy Bulimia nervosa Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) Alcohol withdrawal Schizophrenia and other psychosis Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Trazadone has a whole list of possible side effects - check the link below. Answered by Jenny Concepion 1 month ago.

guy, there may be not anything like tarzadone, it simply directly places me out. i hate it. ambien is a far smoother of a tone, in case you get what i imply. abien offers your mind the gear to be equipped to fall asleep. trazadone is an all *** out knockout. my endorse could be to discover anyone who will script out lunesta or ambian. not ever had a larger sleep that from that. i imply i've the script for they all. now not leisure bs. Answered by Leisha Branciforte 1 month ago.


Do i need outpatient pych help..?
I took myself off my meds 2 months ago because I thought I was fine..but recently I have been cutting, picking and scratching. I saw my doctor and he started me on 2 meds..but I can't get the meds till they are pre-authorized. So I'm still hurting myself and I wish I were dead, I also sleep a lot more, cry,... Asked by Reagan Furniss 1 month ago.

I took myself off my meds 2 months ago because I thought I was fine..but recently I have been cutting, picking and scratching. I saw my doctor and he started me on 2 meds..but I can't get the meds till they are pre-authorized. So I'm still hurting myself and I wish I were dead, I also sleep a lot more, cry, and don't have much motivation. I'm 18 and have been struggling for years. Answered by Vida Hisman 1 month ago.

Only if the ones sufferers are a hazard to themselves or a danger to different ones. It approach: Either the ones sufferers threaten to injure or to kill anyone or to dedicate suicide. That is the one approach to ship anyone into psychiatry with out consent. With consent every person can also be despatched to a psychiatric ward however could also be unfastened to go away at any time.Everything else violates the elemental code of moral clinical behavior and in practically each state additionally is unlawful. Answered by Kitty Ramlall 1 month ago.

Ask your pharmacist if he/sh can give you the pills you need until the pre-authorization goe through. if not go to the hospital ER. Answered by Theola Economus 1 month ago.


Is trazodone a narcotic drug?
Asked by Kimberli Grannis 1 month ago.

No, Trazodone is a serotonin reuptake inhibitor and is also a 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, Trazodone (Desyrel®, Trittico®, Thombran®, Trialodine®) is a psychoactive compound with sedative, anxiolytic, and antidepressant properties. The manufacturer claims that the antidepressant activity becomes evident in the first week of therapy. Trazodone has less prominent anticholinergic (dry mouth, constipation, tachycardia) and adrenolytic (hypotension, male sexual problems) side effects than most tricyclic antidepressants. The incidence of nausea and vomiting observed with Trazodone is relatively low compared to SSRIs. Answered by Marilu Perun 1 month ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Is trazodone a narcotic drug? Answered by Marhta Peak 1 month ago.

PRESCRIBED FOR: Trazodone is primarily used for the treatment of depression. It is sometimes prescribed as a sedative, and it also is used in combination with other drugs for the treatment of panic attacks, aggressive behavior, agoraphobia, and cocaine withdrawal. A wide ranging use, panic attacks can be related to anxiety. Answered by Sondra Pacilio 1 month ago.

No. Although it is a prescription drug that assists in sleep deprivation/insomnia. (also known as desyrel) Answered by Cruz Breitmeyer 1 month ago.

Sleeping problems? No, it's suppose to be nonaddictive and only taken for about a 6 month period or so. Also used for an antidepressant. Personally I think they suck. Get your head out of your ***, eat healthy, and get more physical exercise. Answered by Lacresha Oszust 1 month ago.

No an antidepressant. That is all needs to be said. Answered by Patrina Heinicke 1 month ago.


What does trazodone really make you feel like?
Asked by Oneida Santorella 1 month ago.

Hello Dear Trazodone (also sold under the brand names Desyrel, Oleptro, Beneficat, Deprax, Desirel, Molipaxin, Thombran, Trazorel, Trialodine, Trittico, and Mesyrel) is an antidepressant of the serotonin antagonist and reuptake inhibitor (SARI) class. It is a phenylpiperazine compound. Trazodone also has anxiolytic and hypnotic effects.[1] Trazodone has considerably less prominent anticholinergic (dry mouth, constipation, tachycardia) and sexual side effects than most of the tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs). Regards Answered by Isreal Stotz 1 month ago.


Can someone ever fully "recover" from true clinical depression?
I have been diagnosed as clinically depressed in the last 2 years at age 25. The lack of focus and concentration that I feel as a result has caused me to leave several jobs, which has made me more depressed. Can intensive therapy and practicing mindfulness as well as other medical interventions restore me to... Asked by Keith Siglow 1 month ago.

I have been diagnosed as clinically depressed in the last 2 years at age 25. The lack of focus and concentration that I feel as a result has caused me to leave several jobs, which has made me more depressed. Can intensive therapy and practicing mindfulness as well as other medical interventions restore me to somewhat normal functioning or is clinical depression something one just has to cope with? Answered by Alease Malbon 1 month ago.

yes...you have to be able to manage it. It's in a way like alcoholism. It's always going to be there. But like alcoholism..there is always ways to manage it. The development of newer antidepressant medications and mood-stabilizing drugs has improved the treatment of depression. Medications can relieve symptoms of depression and have become the first line of treatment for most types of the disorder. Treatment may also include psychotherapy, which may help you cope with ongoing problems that may trigger or contribute to depression. A combination of medications and a brief course of psychotherapy usually is effective if you have mild to moderate depression. If you're severely depressed, initial treatment usually is with medications or electroconvulsive therapy. Once you improve, psychotherapy can be more effective. Doctors usually treat depression in two stages. Acute treatment with medications helps relieve symptoms until you feel well. Once your symptoms ease, maintenance treatment typically continues for four to nine months to prevent a relapse. It's important to keep taking your medication even though you feel fine and are back to your usual activities. Episodes of depression recur in the majority of people who have one episode, but continuing treatment greatly reduces your risk of a rapid relapse. If you've had two or more previous episodes of depression, your doctor may suggest long-term treatment with antidepressants. Medications Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Doctors often consider selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, such as fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem), paroxetine (Paxil), sertraline (Zoloft), citalopram (Celexa) and escitalopram (Lexapro), as the first-line treatment for depression because they have fewer serious side effects. They seem to work by increasing the availability of the neurotransmitter serotonin in your brain. Drugs similar to SSRIs include serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), such as trazodone (Desyrel, Trialodine) and venlafaxine (Effexor), and dopamine reuptake inhibitors, such as bupropion (Wellbutrin). Tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants. These medications also affect neurotransmitters, but by a different mechanism than that of SSRIs. They may be used for any type of depression, be it mild or severe. Among tricyclic antidepressants are amitriptyline, desipramine (Norpramin), nortriptyline (Aventyl, Pamelor), protriptyline (Vivactil), trimipramine (Surmontil), and a combination of perphenazine and amitriptyline. Tetracyclics include maprotiline and mirtazapine (Remeron). Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs). These drugs, which include phenelzine (Nardil) and tranylcypromine (Parnate), prevent the breakdown of neurotransmitters. The drugs have potentially serious side effects if combined with certain other medications or food products. Doctors rarely use them unless other options have failed. Your doctor may prescribe them if you have chronic depression and eat or sleep excessively. Stimulants. Your doctor may initially prescribe a stimulant such as methylphenidate (Ritalin, Concerta), dextroamphetamine (Dexedrine, Dextrostat) or modafinil (Provigil) if you can't take antidepressants because they're contraindicated due to another medical condition. These medications are also sometimes given in conjunction with antidepressants. Lithium and mood-stabilizing medications. Doctors prescribe lithium (Eskalith, Lithobid), valproic acid (Depakene), divalproex (Depakote) and carbamazepine (Tegretol, Carbatrol) to treat bipolar depression. Medications called atypical antipsychotics such as olanzapine (Zyprexa), risperidone (Risperdal) and quetiapine (Seroquel) were initially developed for treatment of psychotic disorders. Doctors sometimes also use them to treat bipolar disorder. Precautions for children, teens and young adults In some cases, antidepressants have been linked to an increase in suicidal thoughts and behavior. The Food and Drug Administration requires that all antidepressants have black box warnings — the strongest health warnings possible on prescription medications — about their link to suicide in children, adolescents and young adults ages 18 to 24. These warnings don't mean that people in these age groups should avoid antidepressants entirely. However, anyone in these age groups who takes antidepressants must be closely monitored by their loved ones, caregivers and health care providers. The increased risk of suicidal thoughts and behavior doesn't appear to apply to adults older than age 24. In fact, for adults age 65 and older, antidepressants can actually decrease the risk of suicidal thoughts and behavior. Side effects of antidepressants: As with any medication, antidepressants often cause side effects. You may notice side effects before you can feel the drug begin to ease your depression. Most of the side effects from antidepressants are temporary and will disappear as your body gets used to the medication. Let your doctor know about any side effects that interfere with daily functioning, or if they're especially bothersome. SSRIs. Side effects that may occur with SSRIs and other new antidepressants include headache, nausea, insomnia, agitation or a jittery feeling, and sexual difficulties. Tricyclic antidepressants. Older medications, such as tricyclics, may cause dry mouth, constipation, sexual difficulties, blurred vision, dizziness, bladder problems and daytime drowsiness. MAOIs. These drugs can cause a significant increase in blood pressure if you eat foods high in tyramine, such as wine, cheese or pickles, or if you take certain drugs, such as decongestants, while taking an MAOI. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for a list of foods and drugs to avoid. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), certain antipsychotic medications may increase the risk of diabetes, obesity and high blood pressure. The ADA recommends that anyone taking Risperdal, Seroquel and Zyprexa be screened and monitored. Alcohol can interfere with the way your body absorbs antidepressants. Talk with your doctor before drinking alcohol while you're taking an antidepressant. Not everyone responds the same way: Most antidepressants have a similar level of effectiveness. But a medication that works for someone else might not work for you. Doctors choose antidepressants based on your family history and the match between your symptoms and the medication's side effects. For example, if you have insomnia, a sedating antidepressant may help you. But if you're lethargic, then a more energizing antidepressant may be more helpful. It can take up to eight to 12 weeks before you feel the full effects of an antidepressant, though you may feel some changes earlier. If your response to medication hasn't resulted in satisfactory progress after that time, your doctor may suggest either adding another antidepressant or replacing the first medication with another drug from a different chemical family. Other treatments In addition to medications, depression treatment may include: Psychotherapy. There are several types of psychotherapy. Each type involves a short-term, goal-oriented approach aimed at helping you deal with a specific issue. Prolonged psychotherapy is seldom necessary to treat depression. If an underlying factor contributing to your depression is an inability to get along with others or difficulty finding your place in life, then prolonged psychotherapy could help you. The success of therapy depends on finding a doctor, psychiatrist or psychologist you're comfortable with. Both medications and psychotherapy can take weeks to have an effect. Specialized and supervised group therapy, such as bereavement groups, stress management classes, marital counseling and family therapy, also may help. Electroconvulsive therapy. Despite the images that many people conjure up, electroconvulsive therapy is generally safe and effective. Experts aren't sure how this therapy relieves the signs and symptoms of depression. The procedure may affect levels of neurotransmitters in your brain. The most common side effect is confusion that lasts a few minutes to several hours. Some people experience some transient memory loss. This therapy is usually used for people who don't respond to medications and for those at high risk of suicide. It may be the only treatment available for severely depressed older adults who can't take medications because of heart disease. Light therapy. This therapy may help if you have seasonal affective disorder. This disorder involves periods of depression that recur at the same time each year, usually when days are shorter in the fall and winter. Scientists believe fewer hours of sunlight may increase levels of melatonin, a brain hormone thought to induce sleep and depress mood. Treatment in the morning with a specialized type of bright light, which suppresses production of melatonin, may help if you have this disorder. Answered by Macy Cumpston 1 month ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Can someone ever fully "recover" from true clinical depression? I have been diagnosed as clinically depressed in the last 2 years at age 25. The lack of focus and concentration that I feel as a result has caused me to leave several jobs, which has made me more depressed. Can intensive therapy and practicing mindfulness as well as other medical interventions... Answered by Gene Sippel 1 month ago.

about 5 years ago, I started to fall into a really depressive episode. At first I thought it was only because I had a bad break from a relationship but the feelings wouldn't go away even after I got a new girlfriend. It was wrecking my life until a point where it was seriously affecting my work and personal life. She was very worried but at the same time couldn't understand why I was still sad and thought that I still couldn't let go of my previous relationship. Being the wonderful person that she is, she put aside her feelings and suggested I go for psychiatric evaluation. Many months later and even more anti-depressants, I was not coming close to being better at all. After doing some research online, I found out the real cause as you described it really makes a lot of sense and purchased this program. The results were simply astonishing. I read this book over three times and put all words in action. Using this method, I've kept my depression at bay ever since. Up to date I'm still living happily with my girlfriend. Depression Free Method? Answered by Lilli Planagan 1 month ago.

Yes, without a doubt. I was clinically depressed for years and found my way again. The question of significance is : How badly do you want to fight it? You have to be fed up and willing to want to recover. The first step is finding an antidepressant that work for you. Then you must find a professional to help you uncover the underlying cause of your depression. You have to also do the research and educate yourself about depression. Start exercising, eating healthy, hooking up with friends or a church group. Find a project that is not too demanding but manageable, to sink your mind into during the day. Slowly work your way back into society. It will take some time but if you are committed to ending it you will push yourself to make it work. Answered by Adelaide Tierman 1 month ago.

Depression is Anger turned inward. If you are depressed, you need to understand why you are angry, and why you have turned it on yourself. In order to do this, you will probably have to take some medication to put some distance between yourself and your depression so that you can look at it. Usually, when we are depressed it is because we feel powerless to alter our circumstances, and we get angry because of it. We turn that anger on ourselves, because we cannot justify directing it at someone or something else, or we are afraid to. Often the social constructs of our lives are what causes depression, and in that case, there doesn't seem to be any way out. If you truly want to avoid a relapse, you have to change those constructs. This can be more scary than the depression. Answered by Lyndsey Inlow 1 month ago.

If U decide to figure out the true sources of your depression and if possible,find ways to get rid of the stresses that are causing your depression,along with the right medications,I'd say yeah,it is possible to truly recover in time. Answered by Farah Colgin 1 month ago.

The depressing answer is "No". The positive answer is that the things you mention do help. Answered by Sigrid Pendegraft 1 month ago.

I think so. I expect to fully recover. Answered by Sallie Bogatitus 1 month ago.


Questions about obtaining Sleeping Pills.?
Oh, and thanks for the multiple replies about seeing a doctor. Unfortunately I can't see one as we haven't invented them in Australia yet. Asked by Dominique Tukes 1 month ago.

For the past few years I've always suffered sleeping problems. At most I'd be able to get 5-6 hours of sleep and for a while I was fine with that. But as of recent I've been getting less, I don't know if it is because of stress of uni, but I can't manage sleeping for more than 4 hours at a time... and whenever I do wake up, I find it nerely impossible to get back to sleep. Basically what I was wondering is where can I go about getting GOOD sleeping pills? Who do I need to ask? And what would I need to say? Thanks. Answered by Jenelle Solverud 1 month ago.

Could it be that you only need that amount of sleep at any one time? I know, athough I aqm a good deal older than you, that i can sleep for a few hours, often only four or five and wake up functional. It may be that I need some sleep during the course of the day, although rarely more than half an hour. I, too, find I cannot sleep at times, probably because I don't need that sleep. Of course, the sensible thing to do is to consult a doctor and find out if you really do have a problem, in which case it could be treated. Maybe that is the way to go. Answered by Michale Keele 1 month ago.

Before you run out to the clinic for pills try this: Valerian or Valerian Root is a natural herbal over the counter treatment that has been around for thousands of years. It's a natural sleep aid without side effects and can be bought at natural food stores and better grocery stores. It stinks to high heaven but works. Combine a couple or 3 of those a night with some Sleepy-Time tea by Celestial Seasonings. It works for most of my patients. If that doesn't work then get some Lunesta from your health care provider. Answered by Machelle Schmeiser 1 month ago.

sleeping pills are not the ultimate solution you need to learn to relax a bit take a chill pill dont over burden yourself however if you still want sleeping pills then consult a doctor who will recommend you the appropriate medication all yoy have to tell him is that you are not able to sleep and mention the duration of your sleep also ask him to prescribe you relaxants rather than sleeping pills coz sleeping pills tend to give you a hang over where as relaxants dont give a hangover Answered by Deja Halmstead 1 month ago.

go to your general physician tell him/her what your problem is. Most doctors will give you a non habit form of a sleeping pill. Tylenol pm is wonderful but consult a doctor before using sleeping pills. Answered by Kenisha Hanrahan 1 month ago.

you can see a doctor for a prescription (you would just go in and tell them you're having trouble sleeping) or try a local drug store which does sell over the counter pills. many of them are habit forming. i personally recommend melatonin. it's an all natural supplement and i've had really good results with it. best wishes Answered by Taisha Wolvin 1 month ago.

Start at your local drug store or Wal Mart. I take the generic version of Unisom, supposed to be non habit forming, do not wake up groggy, etc. My husband takes the generic form of Benadryl, which makes me wired, so I don't use that, but there are over the counter sleep aids that you do not need to see a doctor for. Try those first. Answered by Val Fleshner 1 month ago.

You could try talking to, you know, a doctor. And saying what you said here, but not emphasizing the "good" part, as it might make you sound like a drug seeker. edit to add - most home remedies and OTCs meds won't be as good at helping you stay asleep as a prescription. And don't fall for the Tylenol PM trick. It's just Tylenol + benadryl. If you aren't having the aches and pains, skip the tylenol part. Answered by Hollis Chou 1 month ago.

I'm sorry that you have this problem. I was just diagnosed with chronic insomnia. What I found was that there is always a underlying problem that is causing the symptom of insomnia. I went to see my doctor and and now on medication that has nothing to do with "sleeping pills" I have never slept better! Go and see your doc! Answered by Cicely Woolum 1 month ago.

Go to your pharmacist and ask for the herbal sleeping pill. Very good, and non addictive. I think it is called sleep eez. Try and avoid taking other forms, as you become addictive and eventually cant sleep without them. Answered by Ryann Krabbe 1 month ago.


I just uncovered a suppressed memory and figured out that I was molested by my brothers when I was little?
I'm 18 now and this happened over ten years ago. I want to go to a therapist or a psychiatrist, but I don't have a job. I live in Arcata and there is a mental health office but I'm not sure if they'll charge me. I'm also manic-depressive, but I don't want to get on any meds. I'm scared... Asked by Ozie Sahu 1 month ago.

I'm 18 now and this happened over ten years ago. I want to go to a therapist or a psychiatrist, but I don't have a job. I live in Arcata and there is a mental health office but I'm not sure if they'll charge me. I'm also manic-depressive, but I don't want to get on any meds. I'm scared to death of meds. I'm starting to feel like I'm going crazy, like I'm a monster trapped in my own skin. I don't know what to do. It's taking alot to even admit that theres anything wrong with me, and to be honest I'm almost scared of professional help. Answered by Delpha Meinert 1 month ago.

Your father and mother are breaking breaking youngster endangerment legislation through knowingly leaving her in a difficulty in which she shall be molested. It is their accountability to safeguard her, and they don't seem to be doing it! And apart from the legislation, they're betraying her through letting this occur, and that's going to result in much more emotional harm. Your brother has a significant obstacle, and quite often is not going to quit with out a critical intervention. I feel that you simply will have to name DSS your self and inform them what is occurring...it sort of feels dubious that your father and mother honestly referred to as them, bc they might have despatched caseworkers over for your residence to interview everybody within the loved ones, so that you might have identified approximately it. Kudos to you for in need of to step up and safeguard your little sister whilst no person else will...it feels like she fairly demands you! Answered by Ivonne Daviau 1 month ago.

get to a professional you must feel its hard to get help but your in a shell and it's normal.You need help and I agree medication is nonsense a true professional will talk to you don't be afraid you will only go in the deep end do yourself a favor.Dobt let your dignity go away keep hope and positive you know what's best to make a investment for your life wish you luck Answered by Jacob Jacquem 1 month ago.

Talk to someone very close to you about this Answered by Bryce Vaubel 1 month ago.

its ok i was molested too and dnt know wat to do it was pretty embaracing when my ex found out i felt week, lost scared Answered by Nga Simonis 1 month ago.


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