Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 015500/002.

Names and composition

"TOLINASE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of TOLAZAMIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
015500/002 TOLINASE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
015500/004 TOLINASE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
015500/005 TOLINASE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
015500/002 TOLINASE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
015500/004 TOLINASE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
015500/005 TOLINASE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018894/001 TOLAZAMIDE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
018894/002 TOLAZAMIDE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
018894/003 TOLAZAMIDE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
070159/001 TOLAZAMIDE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
070160/001 TOLAZAMIDE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
070161/001 TOLAZAMIDE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
070162/001 TOLAZAMIDE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
070163/001 TOLAZAMIDE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
070164/001 TOLAZAMIDE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
070165/001 TOLAZAMIDE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
070166/001 TOLAZAMIDE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
070167/001 TOLAZAMIDE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
070168/001 TOLAZAMIDE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
070169/001 TOLAZAMIDE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
070242/001 TOLAZAMIDE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
070243/001 TOLAZAMIDE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
070244/001 TOLAZAMIDE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
070259/001 TOLAZAMIDE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
070259/003 TOLAZAMIDE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
070289/001 TOLAZAMIDE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
070290/001 TOLAZAMIDE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
070513/001 TOLAZAMIDE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
070514/001 TOLAZAMIDE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
070515/001 TOLAZAMIDE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
070763/001 TOLAZAMIDE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
070764/001 TOLAZAMIDE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
071270/001 TOLAZAMIDE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
071271/001 TOLAZAMIDE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
071355/001 TOLAZAMIDE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
071357/001 TOLAZAMIDE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
071358/001 TOLAZAMIDE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
071359/001 TOLAZAMIDE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
071633/001 TOLAZAMIDE TOLAZAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG

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Answered questions

I need the names of several diabetic meds P.O that doesn't cost and arm?
Asked by Rudolph Whyms 1 year ago.

What Types of Oral Diabetes Medicine Are Available? Diabetes medications are grouped in categories based on medication type. There are several categories of oral diabetes medicine -- each works differently. Sulfonylureas. These drugs lower blood glucose by stimulating the pancreas to release more insulin. The first drugs of this type that were developed -- Dymelor, Diabinese, Orinase and Tolinase -- are not as widely used since they tend to be less potent and shorter acting drugs than the newer sulfonylureas. They include Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL, DiaBeta, Micronase, Glynase PresTab and Amaryl. These drugs can cause a decrease in the hemoglobin A1c (/content/article/46/1667_50945?z=1667_5... [link] of up to 1%-2%. Biguanides. These drugs improve insulin's ability to move glucose into cells especially into the muscle cells. They also prevent the liver from releasing stored glucose. Biguanides should not be used in people who have kidney damage or heart failure because of the risk of precipitating a severe build up of acid (called lactic acidosis) in these patients. Biguanides can decrease the HbA1c 1%-2%. Examples include metformin (Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Riomet, Fortamet and Glumetza). Thiazolidinediones. These drugs improve insulin's effectiveness (improving insulin resistance) in muscle and in fat tissue. They lower the amount of glucose released by the liver and make fat cells more sensitive to the effects of insulin. Actos and Avandia are the two drugs of this class. A decrease in the HbA1c of 1%-2% can be seen with this class of medications. These drugs may take a few weeks before they have an effect in lowering blood glucose. They should be used with caution in people with heart failure. Your doctor will do periodic blood testing of your liver function when using this medication. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, including Precose and Glyset. These drugs block enzymes that help digest starches, slowing the rise in blood glucose. These drugs may cause diarrhea or gas. These drugs can result in the reduction of the level of HbA1c of 0.5%-1%. Meglitinides, including Prandin and Starlix. These medicines lower blood glucose by stimulating the pancreas to release more insulin. The effects of these medications depend on the level of glucose. They are said to be glucose dependant. High sugars make this class of medications release insulin. This is unlike the sulfonylureas that cause an increase in insulin release, regardless of glucose levels, and can lead to hypoglycemia. Combination therapy. There are several combination pills that combine two medications into one tablet. One example of this is Glucovance, which combines glyburide (a sulfonylurea) and metformin. Others include Metaglip, which combines glipizide (a sulfonylurea) and metformin, and Avandamet which utilizes both metformin and rosiglitazone (Avandia) in one pill. Metformin and glipizide are generic products which would be less costly that the brand counterparts. Answered by Maureen Gill 1 year ago.

There are pharmaceutical companies that have prescription drug assistance plans for people with limited income -- whether you have insurance, or not. You may be able to get the application from your pharmacist or online. Good luck! Answered by Esperanza Tarbutton 1 year ago.

Why? Are you planning on prescribing them for yourself? Answered by Jessenia Houpt 1 year ago.

whats that. Answered by Kellye Kur 1 year ago.


How many oral hypoglycemics are there?
Asked by Alden Tallent 1 year ago.

Acetohexamide (Dymelor) Chlorpropamide (Diabinese) Glipizide (Glucotrol) Glyburide (DiaBeta, Micronase) Glimepiride (Amaryl) Tolbutamide (Orinase) Tolazamide (Tolinase) Answered by Arnoldo Melkonian 1 year ago.


Can I mix these prescription medications?
I take seroquel and lamictal, bipolar medications. I have a really bad sinus infection. Does mucinex mix with these medications? I know there's only certian over the counter meds that mix with mine. If anyone who knows about these prescriptions could help me out that would be great. Please only answer if you know... Asked by Lyndsay Soros 1 year ago.

I take seroquel and lamictal, bipolar medications. I have a really bad sinus infection. Does mucinex mix with these medications? I know there's only certian over the counter meds that mix with mine. If anyone who knows about these prescriptions could help me out that would be great. Please only answer if you know for sure if you don't move on to the next question don't make a stupid comment about nothing you know. Answered by Silvana Blanton 1 year ago.

Mucinex is a multi-ingredient drug consisting of pseudoephedrine and guaifenesin. If you'd like to know more about how either one interacts with other medication, Google "pseudoephedrine drug interactions" and "guaifenesin drug interactions," although I don't believe you should be having any problems while on seroquel and lamictal. Here's a list of medication that WILL, however, interact with Mucinex, which I have looked into to double-check myself. I didn't see either of the two medications that you are on on any of the three lists, but here they are anyway, in case you'd like to see so for yourself: Major Interactions Atapryl, Azilect, Carbex, Eldepryl, Emsam, furazolidone, Furoxone, isocarboxazid, Jumex, linezolid, Marplan, Matulane, Nardil, Parnate, phenelzine, procarbazine, rasagiline, selegiline, Selgene, tranylcypromine, Zelapar, Zyvox Moderate Interactions acarbose, acetoHEXAMIDE, Aldomet, Amaryl, Apidra, Apidra OptiClik Cartridge, bromocriptine, chlorproPAMIDE, Citra pH, Citrate-Phos-Dex, D.H.E. 45, deserpidine, DiaBeta, Diabinese, dihydroergotamine, Dymelor, epoprostenol, ergoloid mesylates, Ergomar, ergonovine, ergotamine, Ergotrate Maleate, EXUBERA, EXUBERA Combination Pack 12, EXUBERA Combination Pack 15, EXUBERA Kit, Flolan, Fortamet, glimepiride, glipiZIDE, glipiZIDE extended release, GlipiZIDE XL, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL, Glumetza, glyBURIDE, glyBURIDE micronized, Glynase PresTab, Glyset, guanadrel, guanethidine, Harmonyl, Humalog, Humalog Cartridge, Humalog KwikPen, Humalog Pen, Humulin L, Humulin N, Humulin N Pen, Humulin R, Humulin R (Concentrated), Humulin U, Hydergine, Hydergine LC, Hylorel, Iletin II Lente Pork, Iletin II NPH Pork, Iletin II Regular Pork, Iletin Lente, Iletin NPH, Iletin Regular, iloprost, insulin, insulin analog, insulin aspart, insulin aspart protamine, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, insulin glulisine, insulin inhalation, rapid acting, insulin isophane, Insulin Lente Pork, insulin lispro, insulin lispro protamine, Insulin Purified NPH Pork, Insulin Purified Regular Pork, insulin regular, insulin zinc, insulin zinc extended, insulin, lente, insulin, NPH, insulin, ultralente, Inversine, Ismelin, Januvia, Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen, Lente insulin, Levemir, Levemir FlexPen, Levemir InnoLet, Levemir PenFill, mecamylamine, Meridia, metformin, metformin extended release, Methergine, methyldopa, methylergonovine, methysergide maleate, Micronase, midodrine, miglitol, Migranal, nateglinide, Neut, Novolin L, Novolin N, Novolin N Innolet, Novolin N PenFill, Novolin R, Novolin R Innolet, Novolin R PenFill, NovoLog, NovoLog FlexPen, NovoLog PenFill, NPH insulin, Orinase, Orvaten, oxytocin, Parlodel, Pitocin, potassium citrate, Prandin, Precose, ProAmatine, prostacyclin, protamine zinc insulin, Rauwolfemms, Rauwolfia 1X, rauwolfia serpentina, regular insulin, Relion Novolin N, ReliOn/Novolin R, Remodulin, repaglinide, reserpine, Riomet, Sansert, sibutramine, sitagliptin, sodium acetate, sodium bicarbonate, sodium citrate, sodium lactate, Starlix, Syntocinon, Tham, Tol-Tab, TOLAZamide, TOLBUTamide, Tolinase, treprostinil, Tricitrasol, tromethamine, Twin-K, Ultralente insulin, Urocit-K, Velosulin BR, Ventavis Minor Interactions Acerola, ammonium chloride, Ascor L 500, ascorbic acid, Ascorbic Acid Quick Melts, Ascot, atomoxetine, C-Time, C/Rose Hips, Cardoxin, Cecon, Cee-500, Cemill 1000, Cemill 500, Cenolate, Centrum Singles-Vitamin C, Cevi-Bid, Cotameth, Digitek, digitoxin, digoxin, digoxin capsule, Ester-C, K-Phos Original, Lanoxicaps, Lanoxin, M-Caps, Mega-C/A Plus, methionine, N Ice with Vitamin C, Pedameth, potassium acid phosphate, sodium acid phosphate, sodium ascorbate, Strattera, Sunkist Vitamin C, Vicks Vitamin C Drops, Vitamin C, Vitamin C TR, Vitamin C with Rose Hips Answered by Latina Lindquist 1 year ago.

No interactions were reported. I also checked Mucinex D and Mucinex DM too, just in case. (I am a pharmacist, BTW) Answered by Lizzie Armour 1 year ago.


Please help ten points for the best answer...what are the 38 drugs that can cause drug induced lupus?
Asked by Jeanine Gandrud 1 year ago.

Please note that this list is only partial - there now appear to be at least 70 meds which can cause DILE or DIL, drug-induced Lupus Erythematosis Atenolol (Tenormin) Captopril (Capoten) Carbamazepine Chlorpromazine HCl (Thorazine) Clonidine HCl (Catapres) Danazol (Danocrine) Diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren) Disopyramide (Norpace) Ethosuximide (Zarontin) Gold compounds Griseofulvin Hydralazine HCl (Apresoline) Ibuprofen Interferon alfa Isoniazid (Laniazid, Nydrazid) Labetalol HCl (Normodyne, Trandate) Leuprolide acetate (Lupron) Levodopa (Dopar, Larodopa) Lithium carbonate Lovastatin (Mevacor) Mephenytoin (Mesantoin) Methyldopa (Aldomet) Methysergide maleate (Sansert) Minoxidil (Loniten, Rogaine) Nalidixic acid (NegGram) Nitrofurantoin (Furadantin, Macrobid, Macrodantin) Oral contraceptives Penicillamine (Cuprimine, Depen) Penicillin Phenelzine sulfate (Nardil) Phenytoin sodium (Dilantin) Prazosin (Minipress) Primidone (Mysoline) Procainamide HCl (Procan, Pronestyl) Promethazine HCl (Anergan, Phenergan) Propylthiouracil Psoralen Quinidine Spironolactone (Aldactone) Streptomycin sulfate Sulindac (Clinoril) Sulfasalazine (Azulfidine) Tetracycline Thioridazine HCl (Mellaril) Timolol maleate (Betimol, Timoptic) Tolazamide (Tolinase) Tolmetin sodium (Tolectin) Trimethadione (Tridione) One thing I happened to notice is that several meds used to treat Parkinson's disease are in this list. And the problem is that although Lupus is not curable, in DILE, the symptoms are reversible once the medications are discontinued. Of course in PD, that might not be possible, The most common problems are caused by only a handful of the above. Answered by Moriah Preseren 1 year ago.


Centrum performance and 500mg ginseng tablets safe to take?
is it safe to take centrum performance and 500mg ginseng tablets once a day? i think it should be ok since centrum performance only has 50mg of ginseng, but i dont know if 550mg is too much. Asked by Sanda Burkhead 1 year ago.

Who should not take ginseng? • Do not take ginseng without first talking to your doctor if you have a bleeding or blood clotting disorder, diabetes, high blood pressure or heart disease, or if you are taking any medicines to prevent or treat these conditions. • Talk to your doctor before taking ginseng if you have any other medical conditions, allergies (especially to plants), or if you take other medicines or herbal/ health supplements. Ginseng may not be recommended in some situations. • Do not take ginseng without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant. It is not known whether ginseng will harm an unborn baby. • Do not take ginseng without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. It is also not known whether ginseng will harm a nursing infant. • There is no information available regarding the use of ginseng by children. Do not give any herbal/ health supplement to a child without first talking to the child's doctor. How should I take ginseng? • The use of ginseng in cultural and traditional settings may differ from concepts accepted by current Western medicine. When considering the use of herbal supplements, consultation with a primary health care professional is advisable. Additionally, consultation with a practitioner trained in the uses of herbal/ health supplements may be beneficial, and coordination of treatment among all health care providers involved may be advantageous. • If you choose to take ginseng, use it as directed on the package or as directed by your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. • Standardized extracts, tinctures, and solid formulations of herbal/ health supplements may provide a more reliable dose of the product. • Ginseng is available in various formulations • Do not use different formulations (e.g., tablets, topical formulations, teas, tinctures, and others) of ginseng at the same time, unless specifically directed to do so by a health care professional. Using different formulations together increases the risk of an overdose of ginseng. • Store Ginseng as directed on the package. In general, ginseng should be protected from light and moisture. What happens if I miss a dose? • No information is available regarding a missed dose of ginseng. Consult your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider if you require further information. What happens if I overdose? • Seek emergency medical attention. • A massive ginseng overdose has been reported to cause the "Ginseng Abuse Syndrome" which is characterized by sleeplessness, muscle tension, and swelling or fluid retention. What should I avoid while taking ginseng? • There are no known restrictions on food, beverages, or activity while taking ginseng, unless otherwise directed by your health care provider. What are the possible side effects of ginseng? • Although uncommon, allergic reactions to ginseng have been reported. Stop taking ginseng and seek emergency medical attention if you experience symptoms of a serious allergic reaction including difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives. • No other side effects have been reported with the use of ginseng. Notify your doctor if you develop any side effect while taking ginseng. What other drugs will affect ginseng? • Do not take ginseng without first talking to your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines: · any heart or blood pressure medicines; · a medicine to control blood sugar levels such as insulin, glipizide (Glucotrol), glyburide (Glynase, Diabeta, Micronase), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), tolbutamide (Orinase), tolazamide (Tolinase), troglitazone (Rezulin), rosiglitazone (Avandia), repaglinide (Prandin), metformin (Glucophage), and others; · warfarin (Coumadin); · aspirin; · a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) including ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, Nuprin, others), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, Naprelan, Anaprox, others), ketoprofen (Orudis KT, Orudis), indomethacin (Indocin), etodolac (Lodine), nabumetone (Relafen), oxaprozin (Daypro), piroxicam (Feldene), sulindac (Clinoril), tolmetin (Tolectin), and others; · ardeparin (Normiflo); · dalteparin (Fragmin); · danaparoid (Orgaran); · enoxaparin (Lovenox); or · heparin. • You may not be able to take ginseng, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring while taking ginseng if you are taking any of the medicines listed above. • Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with ginseng or affect your condition. Talk to your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines or other herbal/ health supplements. Answered by Margaret Schultheiss 1 year ago.

Centrum Ginseng Answered by Janita Legette 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: centrum performance and 500mg ginseng tablets safe to take? is it safe to take centrum performance and 500mg ginseng tablets once a day? i think it should be ok since centrum performance only has 50mg of ginseng, but i dont know if 550mg is too much. Answered by Bobbi Rawlins 1 year ago.

If it is not necessary I would advise against taking the supplements. If you are interested in having him take ginseng and ginkgo biloba, it might be better to ask the doctor for appropriate single supplements (i.e. just plain ginseng or ginkgo) without the additional vitamins and minerals he should be getting from fruits and vegetables. Ginseng is also very common in traditional chinese medicine so that is another route you can go in finding what the best way for your son to take these supplements. Answered by Lacie Tanaka 1 year ago.

in think twice aweek.too much multivitamins may cause blood clotting or high blood pressure. Answered by Barbera Pepperman 1 year ago.

full marks to Jasin above Answered by Jacquelyn Kodera 1 year ago.


I need the names of several diabetic meds P.O that doesn't cost and arm?
Asked by Miss Beaule 1 year ago.

What Types of Oral Diabetes Medicine Are Available? Diabetes medications are grouped in categories based on medication type. There are several categories of oral diabetes medicine -- each works differently. Sulfonylureas. These drugs lower blood glucose by stimulating the pancreas to release more insulin. The first drugs of this type that were developed -- Dymelor, Diabinese, Orinase and Tolinase -- are not as widely used since they tend to be less potent and shorter acting drugs than the newer sulfonylureas. They include Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL, DiaBeta, Micronase, Glynase PresTab and Amaryl. These drugs can cause a decrease in the hemoglobin A1c (/content/article/46/1667_50945?z=1667_5... [link] of up to 1%-2%. Biguanides. These drugs improve insulin's ability to move glucose into cells especially into the muscle cells. They also prevent the liver from releasing stored glucose. Biguanides should not be used in people who have kidney damage or heart failure because of the risk of precipitating a severe build up of acid (called lactic acidosis) in these patients. Biguanides can decrease the HbA1c 1%-2%. Examples include metformin (Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Riomet, Fortamet and Glumetza). Thiazolidinediones. These drugs improve insulin's effectiveness (improving insulin resistance) in muscle and in fat tissue. They lower the amount of glucose released by the liver and make fat cells more sensitive to the effects of insulin. Actos and Avandia are the two drugs of this class. A decrease in the HbA1c of 1%-2% can be seen with this class of medications. These drugs may take a few weeks before they have an effect in lowering blood glucose. They should be used with caution in people with heart failure. Your doctor will do periodic blood testing of your liver function when using this medication. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, including Precose and Glyset. These drugs block enzymes that help digest starches, slowing the rise in blood glucose. These drugs may cause diarrhea or gas. These drugs can result in the reduction of the level of HbA1c of 0.5%-1%. Meglitinides, including Prandin and Starlix. These medicines lower blood glucose by stimulating the pancreas to release more insulin. The effects of these medications depend on the level of glucose. They are said to be glucose dependant. High sugars make this class of medications release insulin. This is unlike the sulfonylureas that cause an increase in insulin release, regardless of glucose levels, and can lead to hypoglycemia. Combination therapy. There are several combination pills that combine two medications into one tablet. One example of this is Glucovance, which combines glyburide (a sulfonylurea) and metformin. Others include Metaglip, which combines glipizide (a sulfonylurea) and metformin, and Avandamet which utilizes both metformin and rosiglitazone (Avandia) in one pill. Metformin and glipizide are generic products which would be less costly that the brand counterparts. Answered by Teresita Iturralde 1 year ago.

There are pharmaceutical companies that have prescription drug assistance plans for people with limited income -- whether you have insurance, or not. You may be able to get the application from your pharmacist or online. Good luck! Answered by Wilton Mulaney 1 year ago.

Why? Are you planning on prescribing them for yourself? Answered by Kathaleen Tavorn 1 year ago.

whats that. Answered by Jennell Schoepflin 1 year ago.


How many oral hypoglycemics are there?
Asked by Loris Beveridge 1 year ago.

Acetohexamide (Dymelor) Chlorpropamide (Diabinese) Glipizide (Glucotrol) Glyburide (DiaBeta, Micronase) Glimepiride (Amaryl) Tolbutamide (Orinase) Tolazamide (Tolinase) Answered by Charlette Achzet 1 year ago.


Can I mix these prescription medications?
I take seroquel and lamictal, bipolar medications. I have a really bad sinus infection. Does mucinex mix with these medications? I know there's only certian over the counter meds that mix with mine. If anyone who knows about these prescriptions could help me out that would be great. Please only answer if you know... Asked by Eugenia Greuel 1 year ago.

I take seroquel and lamictal, bipolar medications. I have a really bad sinus infection. Does mucinex mix with these medications? I know there's only certian over the counter meds that mix with mine. If anyone who knows about these prescriptions could help me out that would be great. Please only answer if you know for sure if you don't move on to the next question don't make a stupid comment about nothing you know. Answered by Yetta Raw 1 year ago.

Mucinex is a multi-ingredient drug consisting of pseudoephedrine and guaifenesin. If you'd like to know more about how either one interacts with other medication, Google "pseudoephedrine drug interactions" and "guaifenesin drug interactions," although I don't believe you should be having any problems while on seroquel and lamictal. Here's a list of medication that WILL, however, interact with Mucinex, which I have looked into to double-check myself. I didn't see either of the two medications that you are on on any of the three lists, but here they are anyway, in case you'd like to see so for yourself: Major Interactions Atapryl, Azilect, Carbex, Eldepryl, Emsam, furazolidone, Furoxone, isocarboxazid, Jumex, linezolid, Marplan, Matulane, Nardil, Parnate, phenelzine, procarbazine, rasagiline, selegiline, Selgene, tranylcypromine, Zelapar, Zyvox Moderate Interactions acarbose, acetoHEXAMIDE, Aldomet, Amaryl, Apidra, Apidra OptiClik Cartridge, bromocriptine, chlorproPAMIDE, Citra pH, Citrate-Phos-Dex, D.H.E. 45, deserpidine, DiaBeta, Diabinese, dihydroergotamine, Dymelor, epoprostenol, ergoloid mesylates, Ergomar, ergonovine, ergotamine, Ergotrate Maleate, EXUBERA, EXUBERA Combination Pack 12, EXUBERA Combination Pack 15, EXUBERA Kit, Flolan, Fortamet, glimepiride, glipiZIDE, glipiZIDE extended release, GlipiZIDE XL, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL, Glumetza, glyBURIDE, glyBURIDE micronized, Glynase PresTab, Glyset, guanadrel, guanethidine, Harmonyl, Humalog, Humalog Cartridge, Humalog KwikPen, Humalog Pen, Humulin L, Humulin N, Humulin N Pen, Humulin R, Humulin R (Concentrated), Humulin U, Hydergine, Hydergine LC, Hylorel, Iletin II Lente Pork, Iletin II NPH Pork, Iletin II Regular Pork, Iletin Lente, Iletin NPH, Iletin Regular, iloprost, insulin, insulin analog, insulin aspart, insulin aspart protamine, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, insulin glulisine, insulin inhalation, rapid acting, insulin isophane, Insulin Lente Pork, insulin lispro, insulin lispro protamine, Insulin Purified NPH Pork, Insulin Purified Regular Pork, insulin regular, insulin zinc, insulin zinc extended, insulin, lente, insulin, NPH, insulin, ultralente, Inversine, Ismelin, Januvia, Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen, Lente insulin, Levemir, Levemir FlexPen, Levemir InnoLet, Levemir PenFill, mecamylamine, Meridia, metformin, metformin extended release, Methergine, methyldopa, methylergonovine, methysergide maleate, Micronase, midodrine, miglitol, Migranal, nateglinide, Neut, Novolin L, Novolin N, Novolin N Innolet, Novolin N PenFill, Novolin R, Novolin R Innolet, Novolin R PenFill, NovoLog, NovoLog FlexPen, NovoLog PenFill, NPH insulin, Orinase, Orvaten, oxytocin, Parlodel, Pitocin, potassium citrate, Prandin, Precose, ProAmatine, prostacyclin, protamine zinc insulin, Rauwolfemms, Rauwolfia 1X, rauwolfia serpentina, regular insulin, Relion Novolin N, ReliOn/Novolin R, Remodulin, repaglinide, reserpine, Riomet, Sansert, sibutramine, sitagliptin, sodium acetate, sodium bicarbonate, sodium citrate, sodium lactate, Starlix, Syntocinon, Tham, Tol-Tab, TOLAZamide, TOLBUTamide, Tolinase, treprostinil, Tricitrasol, tromethamine, Twin-K, Ultralente insulin, Urocit-K, Velosulin BR, Ventavis Minor Interactions Acerola, ammonium chloride, Ascor L 500, ascorbic acid, Ascorbic Acid Quick Melts, Ascot, atomoxetine, C-Time, C/Rose Hips, Cardoxin, Cecon, Cee-500, Cemill 1000, Cemill 500, Cenolate, Centrum Singles-Vitamin C, Cevi-Bid, Cotameth, Digitek, digitoxin, digoxin, digoxin capsule, Ester-C, K-Phos Original, Lanoxicaps, Lanoxin, M-Caps, Mega-C/A Plus, methionine, N Ice with Vitamin C, Pedameth, potassium acid phosphate, sodium acid phosphate, sodium ascorbate, Strattera, Sunkist Vitamin C, Vicks Vitamin C Drops, Vitamin C, Vitamin C TR, Vitamin C with Rose Hips Answered by Earle Detherage 1 year ago.

No interactions were reported. I also checked Mucinex D and Mucinex DM too, just in case. (I am a pharmacist, BTW) Answered by Sallie Onan 1 year ago.


Please help ten points for the best answer...what are the 38 drugs that can cause drug induced lupus?
Asked by Krista Lambermont 1 year ago.

Please note that this list is only partial - there now appear to be at least 70 meds which can cause DILE or DIL, drug-induced Lupus Erythematosis Atenolol (Tenormin) Captopril (Capoten) Carbamazepine Chlorpromazine HCl (Thorazine) Clonidine HCl (Catapres) Danazol (Danocrine) Diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren) Disopyramide (Norpace) Ethosuximide (Zarontin) Gold compounds Griseofulvin Hydralazine HCl (Apresoline) Ibuprofen Interferon alfa Isoniazid (Laniazid, Nydrazid) Labetalol HCl (Normodyne, Trandate) Leuprolide acetate (Lupron) Levodopa (Dopar, Larodopa) Lithium carbonate Lovastatin (Mevacor) Mephenytoin (Mesantoin) Methyldopa (Aldomet) Methysergide maleate (Sansert) Minoxidil (Loniten, Rogaine) Nalidixic acid (NegGram) Nitrofurantoin (Furadantin, Macrobid, Macrodantin) Oral contraceptives Penicillamine (Cuprimine, Depen) Penicillin Phenelzine sulfate (Nardil) Phenytoin sodium (Dilantin) Prazosin (Minipress) Primidone (Mysoline) Procainamide HCl (Procan, Pronestyl) Promethazine HCl (Anergan, Phenergan) Propylthiouracil Psoralen Quinidine Spironolactone (Aldactone) Streptomycin sulfate Sulindac (Clinoril) Sulfasalazine (Azulfidine) Tetracycline Thioridazine HCl (Mellaril) Timolol maleate (Betimol, Timoptic) Tolazamide (Tolinase) Tolmetin sodium (Tolectin) Trimethadione (Tridione) One thing I happened to notice is that several meds used to treat Parkinson's disease are in this list. And the problem is that although Lupus is not curable, in DILE, the symptoms are reversible once the medications are discontinued. Of course in PD, that might not be possible, The most common problems are caused by only a handful of the above. Answered by Fiona Klatte 1 year ago.


Centrum performance and 500mg ginseng tablets safe to take?
is it safe to take centrum performance and 500mg ginseng tablets once a day? i think it should be ok since centrum performance only has 50mg of ginseng, but i dont know if 550mg is too much. Asked by Peter Creselious 1 year ago.

Who should not take ginseng? • Do not take ginseng without first talking to your doctor if you have a bleeding or blood clotting disorder, diabetes, high blood pressure or heart disease, or if you are taking any medicines to prevent or treat these conditions. • Talk to your doctor before taking ginseng if you have any other medical conditions, allergies (especially to plants), or if you take other medicines or herbal/ health supplements. Ginseng may not be recommended in some situations. • Do not take ginseng without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant. It is not known whether ginseng will harm an unborn baby. • Do not take ginseng without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. It is also not known whether ginseng will harm a nursing infant. • There is no information available regarding the use of ginseng by children. Do not give any herbal/ health supplement to a child without first talking to the child's doctor. How should I take ginseng? • The use of ginseng in cultural and traditional settings may differ from concepts accepted by current Western medicine. When considering the use of herbal supplements, consultation with a primary health care professional is advisable. Additionally, consultation with a practitioner trained in the uses of herbal/ health supplements may be beneficial, and coordination of treatment among all health care providers involved may be advantageous. • If you choose to take ginseng, use it as directed on the package or as directed by your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. • Standardized extracts, tinctures, and solid formulations of herbal/ health supplements may provide a more reliable dose of the product. • Ginseng is available in various formulations • Do not use different formulations (e.g., tablets, topical formulations, teas, tinctures, and others) of ginseng at the same time, unless specifically directed to do so by a health care professional. Using different formulations together increases the risk of an overdose of ginseng. • Store Ginseng as directed on the package. In general, ginseng should be protected from light and moisture. What happens if I miss a dose? • No information is available regarding a missed dose of ginseng. Consult your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider if you require further information. What happens if I overdose? • Seek emergency medical attention. • A massive ginseng overdose has been reported to cause the "Ginseng Abuse Syndrome" which is characterized by sleeplessness, muscle tension, and swelling or fluid retention. What should I avoid while taking ginseng? • There are no known restrictions on food, beverages, or activity while taking ginseng, unless otherwise directed by your health care provider. What are the possible side effects of ginseng? • Although uncommon, allergic reactions to ginseng have been reported. Stop taking ginseng and seek emergency medical attention if you experience symptoms of a serious allergic reaction including difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives. • No other side effects have been reported with the use of ginseng. Notify your doctor if you develop any side effect while taking ginseng. What other drugs will affect ginseng? • Do not take ginseng without first talking to your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines: · any heart or blood pressure medicines; · a medicine to control blood sugar levels such as insulin, glipizide (Glucotrol), glyburide (Glynase, Diabeta, Micronase), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), tolbutamide (Orinase), tolazamide (Tolinase), troglitazone (Rezulin), rosiglitazone (Avandia), repaglinide (Prandin), metformin (Glucophage), and others; · warfarin (Coumadin); · aspirin; · a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) including ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, Nuprin, others), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, Naprelan, Anaprox, others), ketoprofen (Orudis KT, Orudis), indomethacin (Indocin), etodolac (Lodine), nabumetone (Relafen), oxaprozin (Daypro), piroxicam (Feldene), sulindac (Clinoril), tolmetin (Tolectin), and others; · ardeparin (Normiflo); · dalteparin (Fragmin); · danaparoid (Orgaran); · enoxaparin (Lovenox); or · heparin. • You may not be able to take ginseng, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring while taking ginseng if you are taking any of the medicines listed above. • Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with ginseng or affect your condition. Talk to your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines or other herbal/ health supplements. Answered by Leeanna Edemann 1 year ago.

Centrum Ginseng Answered by Louvenia Bugayong 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: centrum performance and 500mg ginseng tablets safe to take? is it safe to take centrum performance and 500mg ginseng tablets once a day? i think it should be ok since centrum performance only has 50mg of ginseng, but i dont know if 550mg is too much. Answered by Natalia Gallishaw 1 year ago.

If it is not necessary I would advise against taking the supplements. If you are interested in having him take ginseng and ginkgo biloba, it might be better to ask the doctor for appropriate single supplements (i.e. just plain ginseng or ginkgo) without the additional vitamins and minerals he should be getting from fruits and vegetables. Ginseng is also very common in traditional chinese medicine so that is another route you can go in finding what the best way for your son to take these supplements. Answered by Rene Kall 1 year ago.

in think twice aweek.too much multivitamins may cause blood clotting or high blood pressure. Answered by Mohammed Wraspir 1 year ago.

full marks to Jasin above Answered by Golda Growell 1 year ago.


I need the names of several diabetic meds P.O that doesn't cost and arm?
Asked by Earl Patmon 1 year ago.

What Types of Oral Diabetes Medicine Are Available? Diabetes medications are grouped in categories based on medication type. There are several categories of oral diabetes medicine -- each works differently. Sulfonylureas. These drugs lower blood glucose by stimulating the pancreas to release more insulin. The first drugs of this type that were developed -- Dymelor, Diabinese, Orinase and Tolinase -- are not as widely used since they tend to be less potent and shorter acting drugs than the newer sulfonylureas. They include Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL, DiaBeta, Micronase, Glynase PresTab and Amaryl. These drugs can cause a decrease in the hemoglobin A1c (/content/article/46/1667_50945?z=1667_5... [link] of up to 1%-2%. Biguanides. These drugs improve insulin's ability to move glucose into cells especially into the muscle cells. They also prevent the liver from releasing stored glucose. Biguanides should not be used in people who have kidney damage or heart failure because of the risk of precipitating a severe build up of acid (called lactic acidosis) in these patients. Biguanides can decrease the HbA1c 1%-2%. Examples include metformin (Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Riomet, Fortamet and Glumetza). Thiazolidinediones. These drugs improve insulin's effectiveness (improving insulin resistance) in muscle and in fat tissue. They lower the amount of glucose released by the liver and make fat cells more sensitive to the effects of insulin. Actos and Avandia are the two drugs of this class. A decrease in the HbA1c of 1%-2% can be seen with this class of medications. These drugs may take a few weeks before they have an effect in lowering blood glucose. They should be used with caution in people with heart failure. Your doctor will do periodic blood testing of your liver function when using this medication. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, including Precose and Glyset. These drugs block enzymes that help digest starches, slowing the rise in blood glucose. These drugs may cause diarrhea or gas. These drugs can result in the reduction of the level of HbA1c of 0.5%-1%. Meglitinides, including Prandin and Starlix. These medicines lower blood glucose by stimulating the pancreas to release more insulin. The effects of these medications depend on the level of glucose. They are said to be glucose dependant. High sugars make this class of medications release insulin. This is unlike the sulfonylureas that cause an increase in insulin release, regardless of glucose levels, and can lead to hypoglycemia. Combination therapy. There are several combination pills that combine two medications into one tablet. One example of this is Glucovance, which combines glyburide (a sulfonylurea) and metformin. Others include Metaglip, which combines glipizide (a sulfonylurea) and metformin, and Avandamet which utilizes both metformin and rosiglitazone (Avandia) in one pill. Metformin and glipizide are generic products which would be less costly that the brand counterparts. Answered by Christene Lunetta 1 year ago.

There are pharmaceutical companies that have prescription drug assistance plans for people with limited income -- whether you have insurance, or not. You may be able to get the application from your pharmacist or online. Good luck! Answered by Janella Toffton 1 year ago.

Why? Are you planning on prescribing them for yourself? Answered by Penny Ogara 1 year ago.

whats that. Answered by Jay Armon 1 year ago.


How many oral hypoglycemics are there?
Asked by Jacki Hodgens 1 year ago.

Acetohexamide (Dymelor) Chlorpropamide (Diabinese) Glipizide (Glucotrol) Glyburide (DiaBeta, Micronase) Glimepiride (Amaryl) Tolbutamide (Orinase) Tolazamide (Tolinase) Answered by Glenn Geurin 1 year ago.


Can I mix these prescription medications?
I take seroquel and lamictal, bipolar medications. I have a really bad sinus infection. Does mucinex mix with these medications? I know there's only certian over the counter meds that mix with mine. If anyone who knows about these prescriptions could help me out that would be great. Please only answer if you know... Asked by Jannie Housman 1 year ago.

I take seroquel and lamictal, bipolar medications. I have a really bad sinus infection. Does mucinex mix with these medications? I know there's only certian over the counter meds that mix with mine. If anyone who knows about these prescriptions could help me out that would be great. Please only answer if you know for sure if you don't move on to the next question don't make a stupid comment about nothing you know. Answered by Tami Willi 1 year ago.

Mucinex is a multi-ingredient drug consisting of pseudoephedrine and guaifenesin. If you'd like to know more about how either one interacts with other medication, Google "pseudoephedrine drug interactions" and "guaifenesin drug interactions," although I don't believe you should be having any problems while on seroquel and lamictal. Here's a list of medication that WILL, however, interact with Mucinex, which I have looked into to double-check myself. I didn't see either of the two medications that you are on on any of the three lists, but here they are anyway, in case you'd like to see so for yourself: Major Interactions Atapryl, Azilect, Carbex, Eldepryl, Emsam, furazolidone, Furoxone, isocarboxazid, Jumex, linezolid, Marplan, Matulane, Nardil, Parnate, phenelzine, procarbazine, rasagiline, selegiline, Selgene, tranylcypromine, Zelapar, Zyvox Moderate Interactions acarbose, acetoHEXAMIDE, Aldomet, Amaryl, Apidra, Apidra OptiClik Cartridge, bromocriptine, chlorproPAMIDE, Citra pH, Citrate-Phos-Dex, D.H.E. 45, deserpidine, DiaBeta, Diabinese, dihydroergotamine, Dymelor, epoprostenol, ergoloid mesylates, Ergomar, ergonovine, ergotamine, Ergotrate Maleate, EXUBERA, EXUBERA Combination Pack 12, EXUBERA Combination Pack 15, EXUBERA Kit, Flolan, Fortamet, glimepiride, glipiZIDE, glipiZIDE extended release, GlipiZIDE XL, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL, Glumetza, glyBURIDE, glyBURIDE micronized, Glynase PresTab, Glyset, guanadrel, guanethidine, Harmonyl, Humalog, Humalog Cartridge, Humalog KwikPen, Humalog Pen, Humulin L, Humulin N, Humulin N Pen, Humulin R, Humulin R (Concentrated), Humulin U, Hydergine, Hydergine LC, Hylorel, Iletin II Lente Pork, Iletin II NPH Pork, Iletin II Regular Pork, Iletin Lente, Iletin NPH, Iletin Regular, iloprost, insulin, insulin analog, insulin aspart, insulin aspart protamine, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, insulin glulisine, insulin inhalation, rapid acting, insulin isophane, Insulin Lente Pork, insulin lispro, insulin lispro protamine, Insulin Purified NPH Pork, Insulin Purified Regular Pork, insulin regular, insulin zinc, insulin zinc extended, insulin, lente, insulin, NPH, insulin, ultralente, Inversine, Ismelin, Januvia, Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen, Lente insulin, Levemir, Levemir FlexPen, Levemir InnoLet, Levemir PenFill, mecamylamine, Meridia, metformin, metformin extended release, Methergine, methyldopa, methylergonovine, methysergide maleate, Micronase, midodrine, miglitol, Migranal, nateglinide, Neut, Novolin L, Novolin N, Novolin N Innolet, Novolin N PenFill, Novolin R, Novolin R Innolet, Novolin R PenFill, NovoLog, NovoLog FlexPen, NovoLog PenFill, NPH insulin, Orinase, Orvaten, oxytocin, Parlodel, Pitocin, potassium citrate, Prandin, Precose, ProAmatine, prostacyclin, protamine zinc insulin, Rauwolfemms, Rauwolfia 1X, rauwolfia serpentina, regular insulin, Relion Novolin N, ReliOn/Novolin R, Remodulin, repaglinide, reserpine, Riomet, Sansert, sibutramine, sitagliptin, sodium acetate, sodium bicarbonate, sodium citrate, sodium lactate, Starlix, Syntocinon, Tham, Tol-Tab, TOLAZamide, TOLBUTamide, Tolinase, treprostinil, Tricitrasol, tromethamine, Twin-K, Ultralente insulin, Urocit-K, Velosulin BR, Ventavis Minor Interactions Acerola, ammonium chloride, Ascor L 500, ascorbic acid, Ascorbic Acid Quick Melts, Ascot, atomoxetine, C-Time, C/Rose Hips, Cardoxin, Cecon, Cee-500, Cemill 1000, Cemill 500, Cenolate, Centrum Singles-Vitamin C, Cevi-Bid, Cotameth, Digitek, digitoxin, digoxin, digoxin capsule, Ester-C, K-Phos Original, Lanoxicaps, Lanoxin, M-Caps, Mega-C/A Plus, methionine, N Ice with Vitamin C, Pedameth, potassium acid phosphate, sodium acid phosphate, sodium ascorbate, Strattera, Sunkist Vitamin C, Vicks Vitamin C Drops, Vitamin C, Vitamin C TR, Vitamin C with Rose Hips Answered by Cherish Racki 1 year ago.

No interactions were reported. I also checked Mucinex D and Mucinex DM too, just in case. (I am a pharmacist, BTW) Answered by Lyndsay Cerqueira 1 year ago.


Please help ten points for the best answer...what are the 38 drugs that can cause drug induced lupus?
Asked by Hiram Heberlein 1 year ago.

Please note that this list is only partial - there now appear to be at least 70 meds which can cause DILE or DIL, drug-induced Lupus Erythematosis Atenolol (Tenormin) Captopril (Capoten) Carbamazepine Chlorpromazine HCl (Thorazine) Clonidine HCl (Catapres) Danazol (Danocrine) Diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren) Disopyramide (Norpace) Ethosuximide (Zarontin) Gold compounds Griseofulvin Hydralazine HCl (Apresoline) Ibuprofen Interferon alfa Isoniazid (Laniazid, Nydrazid) Labetalol HCl (Normodyne, Trandate) Leuprolide acetate (Lupron) Levodopa (Dopar, Larodopa) Lithium carbonate Lovastatin (Mevacor) Mephenytoin (Mesantoin) Methyldopa (Aldomet) Methysergide maleate (Sansert) Minoxidil (Loniten, Rogaine) Nalidixic acid (NegGram) Nitrofurantoin (Furadantin, Macrobid, Macrodantin) Oral contraceptives Penicillamine (Cuprimine, Depen) Penicillin Phenelzine sulfate (Nardil) Phenytoin sodium (Dilantin) Prazosin (Minipress) Primidone (Mysoline) Procainamide HCl (Procan, Pronestyl) Promethazine HCl (Anergan, Phenergan) Propylthiouracil Psoralen Quinidine Spironolactone (Aldactone) Streptomycin sulfate Sulindac (Clinoril) Sulfasalazine (Azulfidine) Tetracycline Thioridazine HCl (Mellaril) Timolol maleate (Betimol, Timoptic) Tolazamide (Tolinase) Tolmetin sodium (Tolectin) Trimethadione (Tridione) One thing I happened to notice is that several meds used to treat Parkinson's disease are in this list. And the problem is that although Lupus is not curable, in DILE, the symptoms are reversible once the medications are discontinued. Of course in PD, that might not be possible, The most common problems are caused by only a handful of the above. Answered by Santina Kenan 1 year ago.


Centrum performance and 500mg ginseng tablets safe to take?
is it safe to take centrum performance and 500mg ginseng tablets once a day? i think it should be ok since centrum performance only has 50mg of ginseng, but i dont know if 550mg is too much. Asked by Nilsa Martel 1 year ago.

Who should not take ginseng? • Do not take ginseng without first talking to your doctor if you have a bleeding or blood clotting disorder, diabetes, high blood pressure or heart disease, or if you are taking any medicines to prevent or treat these conditions. • Talk to your doctor before taking ginseng if you have any other medical conditions, allergies (especially to plants), or if you take other medicines or herbal/ health supplements. Ginseng may not be recommended in some situations. • Do not take ginseng without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant. It is not known whether ginseng will harm an unborn baby. • Do not take ginseng without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. It is also not known whether ginseng will harm a nursing infant. • There is no information available regarding the use of ginseng by children. Do not give any herbal/ health supplement to a child without first talking to the child's doctor. How should I take ginseng? • The use of ginseng in cultural and traditional settings may differ from concepts accepted by current Western medicine. When considering the use of herbal supplements, consultation with a primary health care professional is advisable. Additionally, consultation with a practitioner trained in the uses of herbal/ health supplements may be beneficial, and coordination of treatment among all health care providers involved may be advantageous. • If you choose to take ginseng, use it as directed on the package or as directed by your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. • Standardized extracts, tinctures, and solid formulations of herbal/ health supplements may provide a more reliable dose of the product. • Ginseng is available in various formulations • Do not use different formulations (e.g., tablets, topical formulations, teas, tinctures, and others) of ginseng at the same time, unless specifically directed to do so by a health care professional. Using different formulations together increases the risk of an overdose of ginseng. • Store Ginseng as directed on the package. In general, ginseng should be protected from light and moisture. What happens if I miss a dose? • No information is available regarding a missed dose of ginseng. Consult your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider if you require further information. What happens if I overdose? • Seek emergency medical attention. • A massive ginseng overdose has been reported to cause the "Ginseng Abuse Syndrome" which is characterized by sleeplessness, muscle tension, and swelling or fluid retention. What should I avoid while taking ginseng? • There are no known restrictions on food, beverages, or activity while taking ginseng, unless otherwise directed by your health care provider. What are the possible side effects of ginseng? • Although uncommon, allergic reactions to ginseng have been reported. Stop taking ginseng and seek emergency medical attention if you experience symptoms of a serious allergic reaction including difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives. • No other side effects have been reported with the use of ginseng. Notify your doctor if you develop any side effect while taking ginseng. What other drugs will affect ginseng? • Do not take ginseng without first talking to your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines: · any heart or blood pressure medicines; · a medicine to control blood sugar levels such as insulin, glipizide (Glucotrol), glyburide (Glynase, Diabeta, Micronase), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), tolbutamide (Orinase), tolazamide (Tolinase), troglitazone (Rezulin), rosiglitazone (Avandia), repaglinide (Prandin), metformin (Glucophage), and others; · warfarin (Coumadin); · aspirin; · a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) including ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, Nuprin, others), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, Naprelan, Anaprox, others), ketoprofen (Orudis KT, Orudis), indomethacin (Indocin), etodolac (Lodine), nabumetone (Relafen), oxaprozin (Daypro), piroxicam (Feldene), sulindac (Clinoril), tolmetin (Tolectin), and others; · ardeparin (Normiflo); · dalteparin (Fragmin); · danaparoid (Orgaran); · enoxaparin (Lovenox); or · heparin. • You may not be able to take ginseng, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring while taking ginseng if you are taking any of the medicines listed above. • Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with ginseng or affect your condition. Talk to your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines or other herbal/ health supplements. Answered by Tamekia Antonakos 1 year ago.

Centrum Ginseng Answered by Onie Carle 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: centrum performance and 500mg ginseng tablets safe to take? is it safe to take centrum performance and 500mg ginseng tablets once a day? i think it should be ok since centrum performance only has 50mg of ginseng, but i dont know if 550mg is too much. Answered by Willa Borgen 1 year ago.

If it is not necessary I would advise against taking the supplements. If you are interested in having him take ginseng and ginkgo biloba, it might be better to ask the doctor for appropriate single supplements (i.e. just plain ginseng or ginkgo) without the additional vitamins and minerals he should be getting from fruits and vegetables. Ginseng is also very common in traditional chinese medicine so that is another route you can go in finding what the best way for your son to take these supplements. Answered by Luvenia Wardrup 1 year ago.

in think twice aweek.too much multivitamins may cause blood clotting or high blood pressure. Answered by Malinda Maret 1 year ago.

full marks to Jasin above Answered by Consuelo Kleparek 1 year ago.


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