Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 012678/001.

Names and composition

"TOLBUTAMIDE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of TOLBUTAMIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
012678/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
086047/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
086109/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
086141/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
086445/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
086574/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
086926/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
087093/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
087121/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
087318/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
087541/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
087876/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
088893/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
088950/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
089110/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
089111/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
010670/001 ORINASE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
010670/002 ORINASE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
012678/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
086047/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
086109/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
086141/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
086445/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
086574/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
086926/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
087093/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
087121/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
087318/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
087541/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
087876/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
088893/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
088950/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
089110/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
089111/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG

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Answered questions

HELP, SHOW ME HOW! Calculate 1 dose of the following drug orders. I NEED TO KNOW HOW!?
1. Order: tolbutamide 250 mg p.o. b.i.d. Supply: tolbutamide 0.5 g tables. Give: ___________ tablets(s) 2. Order: codeine gr 1/2 p.o. q. 4h p.r.n., pain Supply: codeine 15 mg tablets Give: _________ tablet(s) 3. Order: Synthroid 0.075 mg p.o. daily Supply: Synthroid 150 mcg tablets Give:... Asked by In Mittchell 1 year ago.

1. Order: tolbutamide 250 mg p.o. b.i.d. Supply: tolbutamide 0.5 g tables. Give: ___________ tablets(s) 2. Order: codeine gr 1/2 p.o. q. 4h p.r.n., pain Supply: codeine 15 mg tablets Give: _________ tablet(s) 3. Order: Synthroid 0.075 mg p.o. daily Supply: Synthroid 150 mcg tablets Give: ________ tablet(s) Answered by Madlyn Glidden 1 year ago.

1. 0.5 grams is equal to 500 mg,(1 gram is 1000mg) so one dose would be 1/2 tablet. The directions would be 1/2 tablet(250 mgs) twice a day, 1 tablet would be a supply for 1 day. 2. 15 mgs is 1/4 grain. so the directions would be 2 tablets every 4 hours as needed for pain. total of 12 pills/day. 2 tablets/dose. 3. 0.075 mg is equal to 75 mcgs. The directions would be 1/2 tablet daily. There are 1000 micrograms per milligram, so you just have to convert 0.075 mg into mcg, by sliding the decimal 3 places to the right(1 for each 0 in the number 1000) and you get 75 mcgs. Answered by Lizbeth Kanner 1 year ago.

how do I cut a 75 mg pill to make a .4 mcg dose Answered by Frank Holsten 1 year ago.


The hameostatic control of blood?
what is the effect of partial pancreotectomy (removal of pancreas) & the treatment with injections of exogenous insulin and tolbutamide on blood and urinary glucose concentrations in the laboratory rat.. Asked by Camellia Canzoneri 1 year ago.

Would lower the rat's blood and urinary glucose concentration to near what it was when it had the pancreas intact. Answered by Tanner Mallar 1 year ago.


How many oral hypoglycemics are there?
Asked by Carmella Barben 1 year ago.

Acetohexamide (Dymelor) Chlorpropamide (Diabinese) Glipizide (Glucotrol) Glyburide (DiaBeta, Micronase) Glimepiride (Amaryl) Tolbutamide (Orinase) Tolazamide (Tolinase) Answered by Michaele Stjacques 1 year ago.


I have neutropenia and thrombocytopenia and am scared to death. What is happening?
Through an answer given to this question and info it was suggested that I give more info. I was not feeling ill when the initial blood work was ordered. And I still do not feel ill. I go see this dr. 1x per year and this is the first time he suggested bloodwork.(WBC3.6/PLAT126) and the 2nd cbc with diff. was... Asked by Carlie Mackessy 1 year ago.

Through an answer given to this question and info it was suggested that I give more info. I was not feeling ill when the initial blood work was ordered. And I still do not feel ill. I go see this dr. 1x per year and this is the first time he suggested bloodwork.(WBC3.6/PLAT126) and the 2nd cbc with diff. was done b/c of 1st cbc #s. Add. info from tests. WBC3.2 (4-10.8) band 2(5-11) SEGS 55(46-80) Lymph36 (16-47) Mono4(1-10) EOS 3(2-4) RBC 5.11(4.27-5.64 HGB 16 (13.8-17.2) HCT45.6 (40.7-50.7) MCV89.3(80-94) MCH31.3(27.5-34.1) mchc 35(32.6-35.2) PLAT 124 (150-450) MPV 10.2(7.2-10.7) RBC Morph - normal All Blood Chemistry normal B12 - 458 (180-914 Ferritin - 127(24-336) Folate, Serum 19.9(5.2-20) C/T of abdomin and pelvis - normal Waiting on Leukemia/Lymphoma Eval and Urine IFE Dr. knew I was anxious beyond words so told me not to jump to conclusions. But how is that possible. This screams leukemia. Someone please shed some light as I have not been able to function. Answered by Nicolette Kresha 1 year ago.

White cells/platelets * The lower limit of the normal neutrophil count in 2.5 x109 except in black people and the middle east where 1.5 x 109 is normal * When numbers fall below 0.5 x109 the patient is likely to have recurrent infections, when the count falls to below 0.2 x 109 the risk is very serious * Neutropenia may be selective of part of a general cytopenia Causes of neutropenia * Congenital o Kostmann’s syndrome autosomal recessive disease presenting in the first year of life with life-threatening infections. Mostly caused by mutations in neutrophil elastase * Acquired o Drug induced effect is either by direct toxicity of immune “mediated damage + Anti-inflammatory drugs (phenylbutazone) + Antibacterial drugs (chloramphenicol, co-trimoxazole, sulfasalazine, imipenin + Anticonvulsants (phenytoin, carbamazepine) + Antithyroids (carbimazole) + Hypoglycaemics (tolbutamide) + Pheneothiazines (chlorpromazine) + Psychotropics and antidepressants (clozapine, mianserin, imipramine) + Miscellaneous (gold, penicillamine, mepacrine, frusemide, deferiprone) * Benign“ racial or familial * Cyclical “ rare syndrome with a 3-4 week periodicity, severe but temporary neutropenia results. Monocytes tend to rise as neutrophils fall * Immune o Autoimmune o SLE o Felty’s syndrome o Hypersensitivity and anaphylaxis * Large granular lymphocytic leukaemia * Infections o Viral e.g. hepatitis, influenza, HIV o Fulminant infections “ military TB, typhoid * Part of general pancytopenia o BM failure o Splenomegaly Clinical features * Particularly associated with infection of the mouth and the throat * Ulceration can occur in the mouth, skin and the anus * Septicaemia can occur * Commensals such as Staph epidermidis and gram-negative organisms of the bowel can become pathogens Management of neutropenic sepsis * Initial examination with FBC, liver and renal function, cultures of blood (peripheral and central if appropriate). CXR if appropriate. Check for pain at sites commonly infected. Don’t perform a rectal examination * Empirical antibiotic therapy should be administered promptly to all neutropenic patients at the onset of fever * Initial antibiotic therapy “ gentamycin and tazocin * Include vancomycin in initial empirical therapy if; o You suspect line-related infection o There is known colonisation with MRSA o There is positive results of blood culture for gram-positive bacteria before final identification and susceptibility testing o Patient is very ill with evidence of hypotension or other evidence of cardiovascular impairment o There is severe mucositis * Give antibiotic treatment for three days to determine efficacy of the initial regime. If the patient becomes afebrile, modify antibiotic therapy for specific organism and continue use of broadspectrum antibiotics for 7 days (can change to oral) * If the patient is still febrile for >3days * Reassess patient, if this doesn’t yield a cause, there are a number of options; o Continue treatment with the initial antibiotic if the patient is not acutely ill and you expect the neutrophil numbers to recover o Change or add antibiotics if the patient is ill o Add an anti-fungal, generally amphotericin B to the regime * Don’t give G-CSF as, although it reduces the period of neutropenia, it does not decrease the period of fever or infection related mortality rates Thrombocytopenia * Abnormal bleeding associated with thrombocytopenia and abnormal platelet function is characterised by spontaneous skin purpura and mucosal haemorrhage and prolonged bleeding after trauma Answered by Refugio Vera 1 year ago.

Hello, I think your question raises a number of questions. First, if you are so well, then why did you have a blood test in the first place? Would I be right in thinking that the second blood test was done, because the first one was considered abnormal? Or was it because you weren't better? How much do you know about medical teminology? You see, there is a difference between a "neutropenia" and a "Low WBC", - - a true neutropenia is a lack of only *one* type of white blood cell, the one called the "neutrophil." But a Low WBC, is a lack of *all* the types of white blood cell, unless further defined. Your "low WBC" (which is not anyway very low), strictly speaking does not express a Neutropenia. You will need to go further, to the "Differential WBC count," to find out exactly how many of those WBC's were Neutrophils. A Low WBC of 3.6 strictly speaking means, "a low total number of all the types of white blood cell," - not just Neutrophils. Your question suggests you may understand this, because "band cells" are immature neutrophils, Band cells appear in the blood when the bone-marrow is trying hard to keep the neutrophil numbers up, and so it releases some immature neutrophils before they are really ready to go. A platelet count of 124 is only marginally low, - the normal range goes down to about 150, depending on your Laboratory. You should check your own results against your own Laboratory's "Normal Values," - these are printed after the results, - like this, for example, - "Platelets 124 (145-400) L" - - means that for your own Laboratory, the normal range is 145 to 400, and that in this case the result is Low, (L). My guess is that these results, express a very mild depression of your bone-marow, - probably caused by a mild infection you have somewhere. The reason the first blood test was taken, may give us a clue. It's unlikely that you have a cancer or other serious disease in your bone-marrow. Especially if your Hb (hemoglobin) result was normal, and your red blood cell "indices" were normal? (the "red blood cell indices" are the ones marked MCV, MCH, and MCHC). If you want to take this question any further on Yahoo, you need make a Post-script to your original question, giving us your full blood test results, including your Lab's normal values, - and your ESR result if there is one. Also, importantly, why you needed your blood test in the first place? What your doctor has told you, (if anything), and whether you are on any drug treatment? Also whether you understand the difference between a "Low WBC" and a "Neutropenia," or if you would like it explaining some more. Hope this helps. Sorry it's maybe more complicated than you might have thought. Best wishes, Belliger retired uk GP Answered by Lachelle Bonine 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: I have neutropenia and thrombocytopenia and am scared to death. What is happening? I have had 2 blood tests - the first showed a wbc of 3.6 and platelets of 126. the second test showed wbc of 3.2, bands of 2 (5-11) and platelets of 124. 3 weeks in between tests. I am scared to death. I am a healthy male 34. No other medical conditions. Answered by Gwyn Vandivort 1 year ago.

First of all, I have been a Christian all my life and I have never heard another Christian say that they were afraid of nothing happening after death and that is why they believe in heaven. Sooooo...if you know a Christian who is saying that, it does not follow the teachings of Jesus Christ. I am not a Christian because I just want to go to heaven when I die, I am a Christian because I want to live a life dedicated to Christ and loving His people while I am still alive. Being a Christian is not about going to heaven. It is about living a life for Christ while still here on this earth. And just because you don't believe the same thing as someone else doesn't make it ok to call what they believe "absurd, uncorroborated, completely illogical dogma associated with an insane, barbaric religion". Answered by Racheal Lippold 1 year ago.

Unless you have other symptoms this is all "gee whiz, look what we found" stuff. You take any meds that could cause this? Bruising or prolonged bleeding? Infections? If not, blow it off. Answered by Elise Jahaly 1 year ago.


Any drug interaction with eptoin?
Asked by Cami Rigali 1 year ago.

It has significant interactions: Drug Interactions: There are many drugs which may increase or decrease phenytoin levels or which Phenytoin may affect. The most commonly occurring drug interactions are listed below: 1. Drugs which may increase Phenytoin serum levels include: chloramphenicol, dicumarol, disulfiram, tolbutamide, isoniazid, phenylbutazone, acute alcohol intake, salicylates, chlordiazepoxide, phenothiazines, diazepam, estrogens, ethosuximide, halothane, methylphenidate, sulfonamides, cimetidine, trazodone. 2. Drugs which may decrease Phenytoin levels include: carbamazepine, chronic alcohol abuse, reserpine, molindone hydrochloride which contains calcium ions interferes with the absorption of phenytoin. Ingestion times of Phenytoin and antacid preparations containing calcium should be staggered in patients with low serum Phenytoin levels to prevent absorption problems. 3. Drugs which may either increase or decrease phenytoin serum levels include: phenobarbital, valproic acid, and sodium valproate. Similarly, the effect of Phenytoin on phenobarbital, valproic acid and sodium valproate serum levels is unpredictable. 4. Although not a true drug interaction, tricyclic antidepressants may precipitate seizures in susceptible patients and Phenytoin dosage may need to be adjusted. 5. Drugs whose efficacy is impaired by Phenytoin include: corticosteroids, coumarin anticoagulants, oral contraceptives, quinidine, vitamin D, digitoxin, rifampin, doxycycline, estrogens, furosemide. Talk to your doctor/chemist/pharmacist Answered by Janet Bernaudo 1 year ago.


Laboratory results. Please help?
Hello, I hope you have the time to give me some suggestions/comments when it comes to my lab results. I was tested earlier this morning. I won't be back to the doctor's office until next week. For now, I hope you can give your suggestions that I can follow for the following days.URINALYSISSugar:... Asked by Elnora Fundis 1 year ago.

Hello, I hope you have the time to give me some suggestions/comments when it comes to my lab results. I was tested earlier this morning. I won't be back to the doctor's office until next week. For now, I hope you can give your suggestions that I can follow for the following days. URINALYSIS Sugar: Negative Albumin: Trace Pus: 0-2/HPF BLOOD CHEM (expressed in mmol/l) Glucose: 4.53 (normal: 3.89-5.84) Creatinine: 77.37 (normal: M:57-92) Cholesterol: 4.53 (normal:3.9-6.18) Triglycerides: 1.16 (normal: 0.45-1.86) HDL: .90 (M: 1.04-1.3) LDL: 3.10 (0-4.0) Guys, I'm worried about the traces of albumin in urine (yeah, I do love to eat meat) and my HDL (it's low. what do you mean by that?). What can you I do to make me normalize the results next time? Like I said, my next appointment is still next week. I'm still 17. years old. Thank you all! Answered by Breanna Tjepkema 1 year ago.

The trace albumin in your urine is nothing to be overly concerned about. This test is most often performed when kidney disease is suspected. It may be used as a screening test. Normally, protein is not found in urine when a routine dipstick test is performed. This is because the kidney is supposed to keep large molecules, such as protein, in the blood and only filter out smaller impurities. Even if small amounts of protein do get through, they are normally re-absorbed by the body and used as a source of energy. Some proteins will appear in the urine if the levels of protein in blood become high, even when the kidney is functioning properly. If the kidney is diseased, protein will appear in the urine - even if the blood levels are normal. Factors that affect urine levels in the blood include: -Severe emotional stress -Strenuous exercise -Radiopaque contrast media within 3 days of the urine test -Urine contaminated with vaginal secretions -Drugs that can increase measurements include acetazolamide, aminoglycosides, amphotericin B, cephalosporins, colistin, griseofulvin, lithium, methicillin, nafcillin, nephrotoxic drugs (such as arsenicals, gold salts), oxacillin, penicillamine, penicillin G, phenazopyridine, polymyxin B, salicylates, sulfonamides, tolbutamide, and viomycin. As for the rest of your blood tests, your HDL needs to be raised. A low HDL level is correlated with increased chances of CAD, as it has been shown to actually remove deposits of LDL cholesterol from the artery walls. This can be increased with Aerobic exercise. Many people don't like to hear it, but regular aerobic exercise (any exercise, such as walking, jogging or bike riding, that raises your heart rate for 20 to 30 minutes at a time) may be the most effective way to increase HDL levels. Recent evidence suggests that the duration of exercise, rather than the intensity, is the more important factor in raising HDL choleserol. But any aerobic exercise helps. - Lose weight. Obesity results not only in increased LDL cholesterol, but also in reduced HDL cholesterol. If you are overweight, reducing your weight should increase your HDL levels. This is especially important if your excess weight is stored in your abdominal area; your weight-to-hip ratio is particularly important in determining whether you ought to concentrate on weight loss. -Dont smoke. If you smoke, giving up tobacco will result in an increase in HDL levels. -Cut out the Trans Fat. Trans fatty acids are almost present in many of your favorite prepared foods -- anything in which the nutrition label reads "partially hydrogenated ____ oils" -- so eliminating them from the diet is not a trivial task. But trans fatty acids not only increase LDL cholesterol levels, they also reduce HDL cholesterol levels. Removing them from your diet will almost certainly result in a measurable increase in HDL levels. -Increase the monounsaturated fats in your diet. Monounsaturated fats such as canola oil, avocado oil, or olive oil and in the fats found in peanut butter can increase HDL cholesterol levels without increasing the total cholesterol. -Add soluble fiber to your diet. Soluble fibers are found in oats, fruits, vegetables, and legumes, and result in both a reduction in LDL cholesterol and an increase HDL cholesterol. For best results, at least two servings a day should be used. -Cranberry juice has been shown to increase HDL levels. Fish and other foods containing omega-3 fatty acids can also increase HDL levels. In postmenopausal women (but not, apparently, in men or pre-menopausal women) calcium supplementation can increase HDL levels. Answered by Shanae Entress 1 year ago.

Trace albumin in the urine usually means nothing at all. Most likely, your doctor will simply ignore it. HDL is the "good" cholesterol and yours is a little low but the LDL ("bad" cholesterol) and triglycerides are normal so the doctor will probably just opt to keep an eye on it. Answered by Beth Arters 1 year ago.


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