Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 009149/002.

Names and composition

"THORAZINE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
009149/002 THORAZINE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
009149/007 THORAZINE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
009149/011 THORAZINE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 25MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
009149/013 THORAZINE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
009149/018 THORAZINE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
009149/020 THORAZINE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
009149/022 THORAZINE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE SYRUP/ORAL 10MG per 5ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
009149/024 THORAZINE CHLORPROMAZINE SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 25MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
009149/032 THORAZINE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CONCENTRATE/ORAL 30MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
009149/033 THORAZINE CHLORPROMAZINE SUPPOSITORY/RECTAL 100MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
009149/043 THORAZINE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CONCENTRATE/ORAL 100MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
011120/016 THORAZINE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
011120/017 THORAZINE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 75MG
011120/018 THORAZINE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 150MG
011120/019 THORAZINE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
011120/020 THORAZINE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
009149/002 THORAZINE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
009149/007 THORAZINE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
009149/011 THORAZINE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 25MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
009149/013 THORAZINE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
009149/018 THORAZINE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
009149/020 THORAZINE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
009149/022 THORAZINE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE SYRUP/ORAL 10MG per 5ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
009149/032 THORAZINE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CONCENTRATE/ORAL 30MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
009149/043 THORAZINE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CONCENTRATE/ORAL 100MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
011120/016 THORAZINE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
011120/017 THORAZINE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 75MG
011120/018 THORAZINE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 150MG
011120/019 THORAZINE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
011120/020 THORAZINE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
040224/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CONCENTRATE/ORAL 100MG per ML
040231/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CONCENTRATE/ORAL 30MG per ML
080340/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
080340/002 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
080340/003 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
080365/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 25MG per ML
080370/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 25MG per ML
080403/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
080403/002 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
080403/003 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
080403/004 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
080403/005 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
080439/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
080439/002 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
080439/003 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
080439/004 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
080439/005 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
080983/004 SONAZINE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CONCENTRATE/ORAL 30MG per ML
080983/005 SONAZINE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CONCENTRATE/ORAL 100MG per ML
083040/001 SONAZINE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE SYRUP/ORAL 10MG per 5ML
083329/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 25MG per ML
083386/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
083549/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
083549/002 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
083549/003 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
083574/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
083575/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
084112/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
084113/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
084114/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
084115/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
084411/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
084412/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
084413/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
084414/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
084415/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
084423/001 PROMAPAR CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
084789/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
084800/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
084801/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
084802/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
084803/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
084911/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 25MG per ML
085331/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
085331/002 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
085331/003 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
085331/004 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
085331/005 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
085484/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
085591/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 25MG per ML
085748/002 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
085750/002 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
085751/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
085752/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
085956/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
085957/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
085958/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
085959/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
085960/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
086712/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE SYRUP/ORAL 10MG per 5ML
086863/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CONCENTRATE/ORAL 100MG per ML
086885/001 PROMAPAR CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
086886/001 PROMAPAR CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
086887/001 PROMAPAR CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
086888/001 PROMAPAR CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
087032/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CONCENTRATE/ORAL 30MG per ML
087053/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CONCENTRATE/ORAL 100MG per ML
087645/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087646/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087783/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
087865/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087878/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087880/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
087884/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
088038/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
088157/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE INTENSOL CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CONCENTRATE/ORAL 30MG per ML
088158/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE INTENSOL CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CONCENTRATE/ORAL 100MG per ML
089563/001 CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CHLORPROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 25MG per ML

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Answered questions

Mrs S. has been taking Thorazine for about 1 year?
She has been having problems with orthostatic hypotension and akathisia, and has needed to take Cogentin to avoid dystonic reactions. The physician has decided to change her to Clozaril. The patient asks the nurse about the advantages and disadvantages of the new drug. The nurse has chosen Knowledge Deficit as the... Asked by Imogene Ngin 1 year ago.

She has been having problems with orthostatic hypotension and akathisia, and has needed to take Cogentin to avoid dystonic reactions. The physician has decided to change her to Clozaril. The patient asks the nurse about the advantages and disadvantages of the new drug. The nurse has chosen Knowledge Deficit as the nursing diagnosis for this patient. a) What interventions would be used for this diagnosis? b) How would the nurse evaluate the outcome of the interventions? Answered by Maxwell Poulisse 1 year ago.

thorazine is bound to have more severe side effects.. clozaril is an atypical antipsychotic drug, so it will be LESS likely to cause tardive dyskenesia and akathisia and other similarly devastating side effects (thanks to its anticholinergic properties). However, there is recent evidence that such drugs may increase the likelihood of metabolic disturbances (leading to diabetes) and cardiovascular disease. There are also sexual functioning side effects, but that is common to many psychotropic meds...Note that slow titration of dosing of Clozaril significantly decreases the likelihood of orthostatic hypotension, so the switch is right on the money for this mrs. s....... I would say the switch from thorazine to clozaril is not a bad idea. I have no idea what you mean by "knowledge deficit" and "nursing diagnosis", I'm coming from a clinical psych perspective, but hope this helps! Answered by Brianna Kuck 1 year ago.


What is thorazine used for?
Asked by Lavonda Dyals 1 year ago.

Thorazine is used for the treatment of schizophrenia (severe disruptions in thought and perception). It is also prescribed for the short-term treatment of severe behavioral disorders in children, including explosive hyperactivity and combativeness; and for the hyperenergetic phase of manic-depressive illness (severely exaggerated moods). Thorazine is also used to control nausea and vomiting, and to relieve restlessness and apprehension before surgery. It is used as an aid in the treatment of tetanus, and is prescribed for uncontrollable hiccups and acute intermittent porphyria (attacks of severe abdominal pain sometimes accompanied by psychiatric disturbances, cramps in the arms and legs, and muscle weakness). Answered by Prince Pacius 1 year ago.

Thorazine Uses Answered by Arturo Palazola 1 year ago.

I don't know all of its uses, but I was given Thorazine for migraines. Answered by Charolette Kolis 1 year ago.

It is a old anti-psychotic. They use to use it a lot in psychiatric hospitals to calm down patients. It is also used for migraines at times. Answered by Val Lyden 1 year ago.

To mess with kids minds! Answered by Tyler Narcisse 1 year ago.

PAIN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!... Answered by Janella Giardini 1 year ago.

Chlorpromazine was the first antipsychotic drug, used during the 1950s and 1960s. Used as chlorpromazine hydrochloride and sold under the tradenames Largactil® and Thorazine®, it has sedative, hypotensive and antiemetic properties as well as anticholinergic and antidopaminergic effects. It has also anxiolytic (alleviation of anxiety) properties. Today, chlorpromazine is considered a typical antipsychotic. Chlorpromazine acts as an antagonist (blocking agent) on different postsynaptic receptors: on dopaminergic-receptors (subtypes D1, D2, D3 and D4, different antipsychotic properties on productive and unproductive symptoms), on serotonergic-receptors (5-HT1 and 5-HT2, with anxiolytic, antidepressive and antiaggressive properties as well as an attenuation of extrapypramidal side effects, but also leading to weight gain, fall in blood pressure, sedation and ejaculation difficulties), on histaminergic-receptors (H1-receptors, sedation, antiemesis, vertigo, fall in blood pressure and weight gain), on alpha1/alpha2-receptors (antisympathomimetic properties, lowering of blood pressure, reflex tachycardia, vertigo, sedation, hypersalivation and incontinence as well as sexual dysfunction, but may also attenuate pseudoparkinsonism—controversial), and on muscarinic (cholinergic) M1/M2-receptors (causing anticholinergic symptoms like dry mouth, blurred vision, obstipation, difficulty/inability to urinate, sinus tachycardia, ECG-changes and loss of memory, but the anticholinergic action may attenuate extrapyramidal side effects). Additionally, chlorpromazine is a weak presynaptic inhibitor of dopamine reuptake, which may lead to (mild) antidepressive and antiparkinsonian effects. This action could also account for psychomotor agitation and amplification of psychosis (very rarely noted in clinical use). [edit] Peripheral Antagonist to H1 receptors (antiallergic effects), H2 receptors (reduction of forming of gastric juice), M1/M2-receptors (dry mouth, reduction in forming of gastric juice) and some 5-HT receptors (different anti-allergic/gastrointestinal actions). Because it acts on so many receptors, chlorpromazine is often referred to as "dirty drug", whereas the atypical neuroleptic amisulpride for example acts only on central D2/D3-receptors and is therefore a "clean drug". This distinction is not a positive or negative value judgment on the drug, rather it is a neutral term which merely describes the agent's relative pharmacology. [edit] History The drug had been developed by Laboratoires Rhône-Poulenc in 1950 but they sold the rights in 1952 to Smith-Kline & French (today's GlaxoSmithKline). The drug was being sold as an antiemetic when its other use was noted. Smith-Kline was quick to encourage clinical trials and in 1954 the drug was approved in the US for psychiatric treatment. Over 100 million people were treated but the popularity of the drug fell from the late 1960s as the severe extrapyramidal side effects and tardive dyskinesia became more of a concern. From chlorpromazine a number of other similar neuroleptics were developed (e.g. triflupromazine, trifluoperazine). Previously used as an antihistamine and antiemetic its effects on mental state were first reported by the French doctor Henri Laborit in 1951 or 1952 (different sources) as sedation without narcosis. It became possible to cause 'artificial hibernation' in patients, if used as a cocktail together with pethidine and hydergine. Patients with shock, severe trauma or burns, become, if treated so, sedated, without anxiety and unreponsive/indifferent to painful external stimuli like minor surgical interventions. It was first used for psychiatric patients by Pierre Deniker and Jean Delay in 1953. Drug treatment with chlorpromazine went beyond simple sedation with patients showing improvements in thinking and emotional behaviour. Ironically, the antipsychotic properties of chlorpromazine appear to be unrelated to its sedative properties. During long term therapy some tolerance to the sedation effect develops. Chlorpromazine substituted and eclipsed the old therapies of electro- and insulin shocks and other methods such as psychosurgical means (lobotomy) causing permanent brain injury. Chlorpromazine has given approximately 70% of all schizophrenic patients a complete remission or near so and a normal, gainful human life. Before the era of neuroleptics, starting with chlorpromazine, positive long-term results for psychotic patients were only 20%. [edit] Side effects Side effects of chlorpromazine are typical of early generation neuroleptics. They include extrapyramidal side effects such as tardive dyskinesia and akathisia. A particularly severe side effect is the neuroleptic malignant syndrome which occurs in approximately 0.05% and can be fatal. Also, chlorpromazine may lower seizure threshold. Additional side effects include dry mouth, increased appetite with weight gain, constipation and urinary retention. Glucose tolerance may be impaired. An allergic skin rash and photosensitivity may occur. Other important and severe side effects are a strong reduction in the number of white blood cells, referred to as leukopenia, or, in extreme cases, even agranulocytosis may result, which may lead to death via uncontrollable infections and/or sepsis. Chlorpromazine is the neuroleptic drug with the highest rates (0.5% to 1%) of liver toxicity of the cholestatic type. The sedation effect combined with indifference to physical stimuli, anecdotally known as the "thorazine shuffle," has long been associated with the drug. The image of psychiatric patients staggering mute around a padded cell has earned those particular side effects a place in mainstream pop culture. [edit] Interactions Chlorpromazine intensifies the central depressive action of drugs with such activity (tranquilizers, barbiturates, narcotics, antihistamines, OTC-antiemetics etc.). A dose reduction of chlorpromazine or the other drug may be necessary. Chlorpromazine also intensifies the actions and undesired side effects of antihypertensive medications and anticholinergic drugs. The combination of chlorpromazine with other antipsychotics may result in increased central depression, hypotension and extrapyramidal side effects, but may sometimes enhance the clinical results of therapy. The anti-worm drug (antihelminthic) piperazine may intensify extrapyramidal side effects. In general, all neuroleptics may lead to seizures in combination with tramadol (Ultram). Chlorpromazine may increase the insulin needs of diabetic patients. Drugs like SSRIs, St. John's Wort and barbiturates can inhibit various CYP-isoenzymes such as CYP2D6, needed for metabolization of chlorpromazine and/or its metabolites. Theoretically, this should increase the half-lives of chlorpromazine and possibly its metabolites, dosing changes necessary. The exact clinical significance of this enzyme induction and its therapeutic consequences are unknown at present time and remain to be evaluated. [edit] Uses [edit] Common uses [edit] As an antipsychotic The use of chlorpromazine has been primarily replaced by newer generation of atypical antipsychotics which have an improved side effect profile. Chlorpromazine is classified as a low- to moderate-potency antipsychotic and in the past was used in the treatment of both acute and chronic psychoses, including schizophrenia and the manic phase of manic depression as well as amphetamine-induced psychoses. Chlorpromazine formerly was the drug of choice to treat LSD (and other psychedelic/hallucinogen) intoxication in a hospital setting, resulting in it gaining an erroneous reputation as the LSD "antidote". Now haloperidol is more commonly used in such situations. [edit] Other uses It has also been used in porphyria, as part of tetanus treatment and for behavioral problems in children. It still is well recommended for short term management of severe anxiety and aggressive episodes. Resistant and severe hiccups, severe nausea/emesis and preanesthetic conditioning have been other indications in the past. It can be used to treat amphetamine overdose. [1] [edit] Off-label and controversial uses Chlorpromazine is occasionally used off-label for treatment of severe migraine. Sometimes it is used in small doses to improve nausea/emesis opioid-treated cancer patients encounter and to intensify and prolong the analgesic action of the opioids given. Interestingly, it remains controversial whether or not chlorpromazine has its own analgesic properties. Analgesic properties may result from a central action on the hypothalamus; the patient may feel the pain much less than before. Other mechanisms may be an interaction with opioid receptors centrally and/or in the spinal cord. Some experts on the contrary say that chlorpromazine, like other phenothiazines, may even have antianalgesic properties. Chlorpromazine has been proposed as useful in newborns for the treatment of opioid withdrawal, if the mother was opioid-dependent. The latter indication remains highly controversial. Chlorpromazine, as well as other neuroleptics, may also be used to alleviate the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal (chlorpromazine may lower the seizure-threshold in alcoholics). It has a unique action in cholera, reducing the loss of water by approximately 30%. In Germany, the brand of chlorpromazine drug Propaphenin® has additional indications for insomnia and itching skin disease. [edit] Veterinary uses Chlorpromazine is primarily used as an antiemetic in dogs and cats. It is also sometimes used as a preanesthetic and muscle relaxant in cattle, swine, sheep, and goats. It is generally contraindicated for use with horses, due to a high incidence of ataxia and altered mentation. [edit] Dosage In any case, use is determined by an attending physician. The following information is intended to serve as a guideline: A wide range is covered from 25 mg oral or intramuscular for mild sedation, every 8 hours, up to 100 mg every 6 hours for severely disturbed patients. Different qualified sources give 800 mg/day to 1,200 mg/day as highest dose. At least there is one small clinical trial in treatment-resistant patients with a daily dose of 1,200 mg chlorpromazine (and 4 mg Benztropine to counteract early extrapyramidal side effects, which were anticipated with this unusual high chlorpromazine dose). Initial doses should be low and be increased gradually. It is recommended that most of the daily dose (e.g. 2/3) is given at bedtime for maximum hypnotic activity and minimal daytime sedation and hypotension. In the USA there are controlled release forms of Thorazine (e.g. 300 mg). After the individual dose is well established, such a CR capsule can be given with the evening meal as a single dose, covering the next 24 hours. The lowest dosage compatible with good therapeutic effect should be given. Dosage in ambulatory patients should be particularly low (minimizing sedation and hypotension). The direct i.v.-injection of undiluted solution is contraindicated (massive fall in blood pressure, cardiovascular collapse), for i.v.-infusion of dilutions the (hospitalized) patient should be lying and the infusion rate should be as slow as possible. Afterwards the patient should rest in the lying position for at least 30 minutes. [edit] Necessary examinations and laboratory checks during treatment All patients treated with chlorpromazine on a long-term-basis should have regularly checked their blood-pressure, pulse rate, laboratory-tests (liver function tests, kidney-values, blood cell counts including differenciated white blood counts, counts of red blood cells and thrombocytes), ECG and EEG. The frequency of all checks should be determined for the individual patient and may be done in shorter intervals during the first 3 months of treatment and less often afterwards. Some side effects seem to appear more frequently during the first months of therapy (sedation, hypotension, liver damage) while others do not (e.g. tardive dyskinesia). [edit] Discontinuation of treatment Also, in regular intervals the treating physician should evaluate whether continued treatment is needed. If not, the drug should never be stopped suddenly, due to very unpleasant 'withdrawal-symptoms', such as agitation, sleeplessness, states of anxiety, etc. However, these symptoms definitely do not indicate psychological or physical dependence. The dose should rather be slowly tapered down at a rate of approximately 20–25% per week or even slower to avoid the aforementioned bothersome symptoms. Chlorpromazine is derived from phenothiazine, and has an aliphatic side chain, typical for low to middle potency neuroleptics. The oral bioavailability is estimated to be 30–50% due to extensive first pass metabolization in the liver. Its elimination-halflife is 16–30 hours. It has many active metabolites (approx. 75 different ones) with greatly varying halflives and own pharmacological profiles. The CYP-450 isoenzymes 1A2 and 2D6 are needed for metabolization of chlorpromazine and the subtype 2D6 is inhibited by chlorpromazine (NB: possible interactions with other drugs). Answered by Chante Mcredmond 1 year ago.


What are some reasons why a person might be prescribed 200 mg of thorazine?
...from a medical prospective. Asked by Dierdre Mcconney 1 year ago.

Thorazine is used for the treatment of schizophrenia (severe disruptions in thought and perception). It is also prescribed for the short-term treatment of severe behavioral disorders in children, including explosive hyperactivity and combativeness; and for the hyperenergetic phase of manic-depressive illness (severely exaggerated moods). Thorazine is also used to control nausea and vomiting, and to relieve restlessness and apprehension before surgery. It is used as an aid in the treatment of tetanus, and is prescribed for uncontrollable hiccups and acute intermittent porphyria (attacks of severe abdominal pain sometimes accompanied by psychiatric disturbances, cramps in the arms and legs, and muscle weakness). Answered by Ja Guitierrez 1 year ago.

The warding off man or woman will have angry through a comment the have shyed away from man or woman made. The warding off man or woman will have a few prejudice towards the have shyed away from man or woman. The have shyed away from man or woman might remind the warding off man or woman of an ex-boyfriend or ex-female friend or different man or woman who the warding off man or woman desires to omit. Maybe anybody instructed the warding off man or woman that the have shyed away from man or woman does not like him/her. But the object is, why do you care? Answered by Tamiko Rockers 1 year ago.

It's an anti-psychotic, for bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. Answered by Marin Lehrfeld 1 year ago.


What is Thorazine, Lorazepam and Compazine? What are they used for?
Asked by Lou Moxness 1 year ago.

Chlorpromazine is classified as a low-potency typical antipsychotic and in the past was used in the treatment of both acute and chronic psychoses, including schizophrenia and the manic phase of bipolar disorder, as well as amphetamine-induced psychoses. Low-potency antipsychotics have more anticholinergic side effects, such as dry mouth, sedation, and constipation, and lower rates of extrapyramidal side effects, while high-potency antipsychotics (such as haloperidol) have the reverse profile. Chlorpromazine has also been used in porphyria and as part of tetanus treatment. It still is recommended for short-term management of severe anxiety and psychotic aggression. Resistant and severe hiccups, severe nausea/emesis, and preanesthetic conditioning are other uses. Symptoms of delirium in medically-hospitalized AIDS patients have been effectively treated with low doses of chlorpromazine Answered by Jacqui Rease 1 year ago.

They are antipsycotic drugs used to treat manic depression, schizophrenia Answered by Ashli Pavlovich 1 year ago.


Is 25 mg of Thorazine safe to take for anxiety?
Asked by Matilde Pequeno 1 year ago.

Thorazine, at 25 mg, is used for chronic hiccups, nausea and vomitting, sedation before surgery, and sometimes anxiety. However, it is anti-psychotic, a tranquilizer, and very old school, so if it was not prescribed to you, don't tske it. This may just be a question of general curiosity, but if you need meds for anxiety, there are more suitable ones than thorazine. See the doc. to get the right one for you! Answered by Maude Ball 1 year ago.

Thorazine is not an anti-anxiety drug. It is an antipsychotic drug. Please do not take ANY prescription medication unless under the direction of your personal physician. Answered by Lennie Cuddington 1 year ago.

I think I would speak to a Pharmacist before listening to someone on Yahoo answers. Answered by Marshall Revermann 1 year ago.

The potential for causing chronic movement disorders makes it far from ideal. Answered by Jill Caver 1 year ago.

It has more potential side effects than newer drugs. For example, seizures, heat exhaustion, drowsiness. Answered by Odis Baranski 1 year ago.


Is it true that Thorazine is as dangerous and the Psychiatric critics say it is?
From Psychiatric critics they criticize Thorazine a lot and say it messes people up like Lobotomy. Here is an example website criticizing Thorazine: http://www.sntp.net/drugs/thorazine.htm Asked by Doris Hollon 1 year ago.

Thorazine is no more dangerous than the others. Staying on it for too long can lead to specific complications, which is true with other anti-psychotics. It isn't used as much these days, but it is still a consideration for some people. It's OK to critisize thorazine, but no more so than for other such drugs. Answered by Doreen Vanderkam 1 year ago.

Wow! Normally, I don't answer questions that want to learn more and more detail. As in your case, because they require a long process, and it is the risk of not solve all of yours problems. I would suggest to proceed analytically with the help of keywords to be included in Yahoo! From what you climb, narrowing the field with new keywords, until you will be fully satisfied. good luck! Answered by Kirsten Golar 1 year ago.


Is Thorazine(Chlorpromazine) an older anti-psychotic?
I was prescribed this recently for Bipolar Disorder. Is it an older anti-psychotic?Thanks Asked by Jocelyn Okorududu 1 year ago.

Thorazine was one of the first anti-psychotics, created in 1950. It is still occasionally used in the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, but not as often as it was a few decades ago. It's a low potency anti-psychotic, so there is a lower chance of experiencing unwanted side effects. Answered by Larae Zotos 1 year ago.


How long will thorazine take to get in my urine stream?
i want to take a thorazine but i have a drug test at 10:00am and dont know what time yo take it so i can pass the drug test and still take it tonight Asked by Madelene Galuski 1 year ago.

To my understanding, Thorazine is an anti-psychotic medication. It's not typically screened for on a drug test. However, if you do register with a false positive in another drug category as a result of this medication, all you have to do is show proof of a prescription and you're in the clear. Thorazine is excreted primarily through the urine and has a half-life from 10 to 40 hours. Answered by Mollie Denkins 1 year ago.

You can't wait until after the test to take it - just to be on the safe side? Answered by Lady Strength 1 year ago.


About Thorazine/Largactil?
I have read alot about this drug, but I would like to hear from somone that has actually used it, or someone who knows someone who has used it.How sedating/tranquilizing is it? What are the main side-effects, and what pills do I need to counteract these side-effects? Asked by Eladia Raboin 1 year ago.

About counteraction - I'm not sure. You'd have to take it to know if you'd have any counteractions, first. I took Thorazine for about a month for sleep. It never made me tired. It would, however, keep me asleep for 8-12 hrs once I laid down and fell asleep. Not a good drug if you need to be knocked out (in my opinion). I'm sure you've heard it called 'the chemical lobotomy'. I didn't feel like it erased too much of my personality, and I was still heavily addicted to drugs and it never made me seek/want drugs less. I really don't remember much from taking it. I snorted it once, and it burned like a SOB, but it knocked me out right away. Answered by Donita Kniffen 1 year ago.


Mrs S. has been taking Thorazine for about 1 year?
She has been having problems with orthostatic hypotension and akathisia, and has needed to take Cogentin to avoid dystonic reactions. The physician has decided to change her to Clozaril. The patient asks the nurse about the advantages and disadvantages of the new drug. The nurse has chosen Knowledge Deficit as the... Asked by Ernesto Ekstrand 1 year ago.

She has been having problems with orthostatic hypotension and akathisia, and has needed to take Cogentin to avoid dystonic reactions. The physician has decided to change her to Clozaril. The patient asks the nurse about the advantages and disadvantages of the new drug. The nurse has chosen Knowledge Deficit as the nursing diagnosis for this patient. a) What interventions would be used for this diagnosis? b) How would the nurse evaluate the outcome of the interventions? Answered by Jonnie Klee 1 year ago.

thorazine is bound to have more severe side effects.. clozaril is an atypical antipsychotic drug, so it will be LESS likely to cause tardive dyskenesia and akathisia and other similarly devastating side effects (thanks to its anticholinergic properties). However, there is recent evidence that such drugs may increase the likelihood of metabolic disturbances (leading to diabetes) and cardiovascular disease. There are also sexual functioning side effects, but that is common to many psychotropic meds...Note that slow titration of dosing of Clozaril significantly decreases the likelihood of orthostatic hypotension, so the switch is right on the money for this mrs. s....... I would say the switch from thorazine to clozaril is not a bad idea. I have no idea what you mean by "knowledge deficit" and "nursing diagnosis", I'm coming from a clinical psych perspective, but hope this helps! Answered by Georgetta Stocker 1 year ago.


What is thorazine used for?
Asked by Vanda Pharao 1 year ago.

Thorazine is used for the treatment of schizophrenia (severe disruptions in thought and perception). It is also prescribed for the short-term treatment of severe behavioral disorders in children, including explosive hyperactivity and combativeness; and for the hyperenergetic phase of manic-depressive illness (severely exaggerated moods). Thorazine is also used to control nausea and vomiting, and to relieve restlessness and apprehension before surgery. It is used as an aid in the treatment of tetanus, and is prescribed for uncontrollable hiccups and acute intermittent porphyria (attacks of severe abdominal pain sometimes accompanied by psychiatric disturbances, cramps in the arms and legs, and muscle weakness). Answered by Sarai Bonaccorso 1 year ago.

Thorazine Uses Answered by Carmelina Bruh 1 year ago.

I don't know all of its uses, but I was given Thorazine for migraines. Answered by Lashunda Ramy 1 year ago.

It is a old anti-psychotic. They use to use it a lot in psychiatric hospitals to calm down patients. It is also used for migraines at times. Answered by Melvin Shibi 1 year ago.

To mess with kids minds! Answered by Hassie Austgen 1 year ago.

PAIN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!... Answered by Winfred Blankenbecler 1 year ago.

Chlorpromazine was the first antipsychotic drug, used during the 1950s and 1960s. Used as chlorpromazine hydrochloride and sold under the tradenames Largactil® and Thorazine®, it has sedative, hypotensive and antiemetic properties as well as anticholinergic and antidopaminergic effects. It has also anxiolytic (alleviation of anxiety) properties. Today, chlorpromazine is considered a typical antipsychotic. Chlorpromazine acts as an antagonist (blocking agent) on different postsynaptic receptors: on dopaminergic-receptors (subtypes D1, D2, D3 and D4, different antipsychotic properties on productive and unproductive symptoms), on serotonergic-receptors (5-HT1 and 5-HT2, with anxiolytic, antidepressive and antiaggressive properties as well as an attenuation of extrapypramidal side effects, but also leading to weight gain, fall in blood pressure, sedation and ejaculation difficulties), on histaminergic-receptors (H1-receptors, sedation, antiemesis, vertigo, fall in blood pressure and weight gain), on alpha1/alpha2-receptors (antisympathomimetic properties, lowering of blood pressure, reflex tachycardia, vertigo, sedation, hypersalivation and incontinence as well as sexual dysfunction, but may also attenuate pseudoparkinsonism—controversial), and on muscarinic (cholinergic) M1/M2-receptors (causing anticholinergic symptoms like dry mouth, blurred vision, obstipation, difficulty/inability to urinate, sinus tachycardia, ECG-changes and loss of memory, but the anticholinergic action may attenuate extrapyramidal side effects). Additionally, chlorpromazine is a weak presynaptic inhibitor of dopamine reuptake, which may lead to (mild) antidepressive and antiparkinsonian effects. This action could also account for psychomotor agitation and amplification of psychosis (very rarely noted in clinical use). [edit] Peripheral Antagonist to H1 receptors (antiallergic effects), H2 receptors (reduction of forming of gastric juice), M1/M2-receptors (dry mouth, reduction in forming of gastric juice) and some 5-HT receptors (different anti-allergic/gastrointestinal actions). Because it acts on so many receptors, chlorpromazine is often referred to as "dirty drug", whereas the atypical neuroleptic amisulpride for example acts only on central D2/D3-receptors and is therefore a "clean drug". This distinction is not a positive or negative value judgment on the drug, rather it is a neutral term which merely describes the agent's relative pharmacology. [edit] History The drug had been developed by Laboratoires Rhône-Poulenc in 1950 but they sold the rights in 1952 to Smith-Kline & French (today's GlaxoSmithKline). The drug was being sold as an antiemetic when its other use was noted. Smith-Kline was quick to encourage clinical trials and in 1954 the drug was approved in the US for psychiatric treatment. Over 100 million people were treated but the popularity of the drug fell from the late 1960s as the severe extrapyramidal side effects and tardive dyskinesia became more of a concern. From chlorpromazine a number of other similar neuroleptics were developed (e.g. triflupromazine, trifluoperazine). Previously used as an antihistamine and antiemetic its effects on mental state were first reported by the French doctor Henri Laborit in 1951 or 1952 (different sources) as sedation without narcosis. It became possible to cause 'artificial hibernation' in patients, if used as a cocktail together with pethidine and hydergine. Patients with shock, severe trauma or burns, become, if treated so, sedated, without anxiety and unreponsive/indifferent to painful external stimuli like minor surgical interventions. It was first used for psychiatric patients by Pierre Deniker and Jean Delay in 1953. Drug treatment with chlorpromazine went beyond simple sedation with patients showing improvements in thinking and emotional behaviour. Ironically, the antipsychotic properties of chlorpromazine appear to be unrelated to its sedative properties. During long term therapy some tolerance to the sedation effect develops. Chlorpromazine substituted and eclipsed the old therapies of electro- and insulin shocks and other methods such as psychosurgical means (lobotomy) causing permanent brain injury. Chlorpromazine has given approximately 70% of all schizophrenic patients a complete remission or near so and a normal, gainful human life. Before the era of neuroleptics, starting with chlorpromazine, positive long-term results for psychotic patients were only 20%. [edit] Side effects Side effects of chlorpromazine are typical of early generation neuroleptics. They include extrapyramidal side effects such as tardive dyskinesia and akathisia. A particularly severe side effect is the neuroleptic malignant syndrome which occurs in approximately 0.05% and can be fatal. Also, chlorpromazine may lower seizure threshold. Additional side effects include dry mouth, increased appetite with weight gain, constipation and urinary retention. Glucose tolerance may be impaired. An allergic skin rash and photosensitivity may occur. Other important and severe side effects are a strong reduction in the number of white blood cells, referred to as leukopenia, or, in extreme cases, even agranulocytosis may result, which may lead to death via uncontrollable infections and/or sepsis. Chlorpromazine is the neuroleptic drug with the highest rates (0.5% to 1%) of liver toxicity of the cholestatic type. The sedation effect combined with indifference to physical stimuli, anecdotally known as the "thorazine shuffle," has long been associated with the drug. The image of psychiatric patients staggering mute around a padded cell has earned those particular side effects a place in mainstream pop culture. [edit] Interactions Chlorpromazine intensifies the central depressive action of drugs with such activity (tranquilizers, barbiturates, narcotics, antihistamines, OTC-antiemetics etc.). A dose reduction of chlorpromazine or the other drug may be necessary. Chlorpromazine also intensifies the actions and undesired side effects of antihypertensive medications and anticholinergic drugs. The combination of chlorpromazine with other antipsychotics may result in increased central depression, hypotension and extrapyramidal side effects, but may sometimes enhance the clinical results of therapy. The anti-worm drug (antihelminthic) piperazine may intensify extrapyramidal side effects. In general, all neuroleptics may lead to seizures in combination with tramadol (Ultram). Chlorpromazine may increase the insulin needs of diabetic patients. Drugs like SSRIs, St. John's Wort and barbiturates can inhibit various CYP-isoenzymes such as CYP2D6, needed for metabolization of chlorpromazine and/or its metabolites. Theoretically, this should increase the half-lives of chlorpromazine and possibly its metabolites, dosing changes necessary. The exact clinical significance of this enzyme induction and its therapeutic consequences are unknown at present time and remain to be evaluated. [edit] Uses [edit] Common uses [edit] As an antipsychotic The use of chlorpromazine has been primarily replaced by newer generation of atypical antipsychotics which have an improved side effect profile. Chlorpromazine is classified as a low- to moderate-potency antipsychotic and in the past was used in the treatment of both acute and chronic psychoses, including schizophrenia and the manic phase of manic depression as well as amphetamine-induced psychoses. Chlorpromazine formerly was the drug of choice to treat LSD (and other psychedelic/hallucinogen) intoxication in a hospital setting, resulting in it gaining an erroneous reputation as the LSD "antidote". Now haloperidol is more commonly used in such situations. [edit] Other uses It has also been used in porphyria, as part of tetanus treatment and for behavioral problems in children. It still is well recommended for short term management of severe anxiety and aggressive episodes. Resistant and severe hiccups, severe nausea/emesis and preanesthetic conditioning have been other indications in the past. It can be used to treat amphetamine overdose. [1] [edit] Off-label and controversial uses Chlorpromazine is occasionally used off-label for treatment of severe migraine. Sometimes it is used in small doses to improve nausea/emesis opioid-treated cancer patients encounter and to intensify and prolong the analgesic action of the opioids given. Interestingly, it remains controversial whether or not chlorpromazine has its own analgesic properties. Analgesic properties may result from a central action on the hypothalamus; the patient may feel the pain much less than before. Other mechanisms may be an interaction with opioid receptors centrally and/or in the spinal cord. Some experts on the contrary say that chlorpromazine, like other phenothiazines, may even have antianalgesic properties. Chlorpromazine has been proposed as useful in newborns for the treatment of opioid withdrawal, if the mother was opioid-dependent. The latter indication remains highly controversial. Chlorpromazine, as well as other neuroleptics, may also be used to alleviate the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal (chlorpromazine may lower the seizure-threshold in alcoholics). It has a unique action in cholera, reducing the loss of water by approximately 30%. In Germany, the brand of chlorpromazine drug Propaphenin® has additional indications for insomnia and itching skin disease. [edit] Veterinary uses Chlorpromazine is primarily used as an antiemetic in dogs and cats. It is also sometimes used as a preanesthetic and muscle relaxant in cattle, swine, sheep, and goats. It is generally contraindicated for use with horses, due to a high incidence of ataxia and altered mentation. [edit] Dosage In any case, use is determined by an attending physician. The following information is intended to serve as a guideline: A wide range is covered from 25 mg oral or intramuscular for mild sedation, every 8 hours, up to 100 mg every 6 hours for severely disturbed patients. Different qualified sources give 800 mg/day to 1,200 mg/day as highest dose. At least there is one small clinical trial in treatment-resistant patients with a daily dose of 1,200 mg chlorpromazine (and 4 mg Benztropine to counteract early extrapyramidal side effects, which were anticipated with this unusual high chlorpromazine dose). Initial doses should be low and be increased gradually. It is recommended that most of the daily dose (e.g. 2/3) is given at bedtime for maximum hypnotic activity and minimal daytime sedation and hypotension. In the USA there are controlled release forms of Thorazine (e.g. 300 mg). After the individual dose is well established, such a CR capsule can be given with the evening meal as a single dose, covering the next 24 hours. The lowest dosage compatible with good therapeutic effect should be given. Dosage in ambulatory patients should be particularly low (minimizing sedation and hypotension). The direct i.v.-injection of undiluted solution is contraindicated (massive fall in blood pressure, cardiovascular collapse), for i.v.-infusion of dilutions the (hospitalized) patient should be lying and the infusion rate should be as slow as possible. Afterwards the patient should rest in the lying position for at least 30 minutes. [edit] Necessary examinations and laboratory checks during treatment All patients treated with chlorpromazine on a long-term-basis should have regularly checked their blood-pressure, pulse rate, laboratory-tests (liver function tests, kidney-values, blood cell counts including differenciated white blood counts, counts of red blood cells and thrombocytes), ECG and EEG. The frequency of all checks should be determined for the individual patient and may be done in shorter intervals during the first 3 months of treatment and less often afterwards. Some side effects seem to appear more frequently during the first months of therapy (sedation, hypotension, liver damage) while others do not (e.g. tardive dyskinesia). [edit] Discontinuation of treatment Also, in regular intervals the treating physician should evaluate whether continued treatment is needed. If not, the drug should never be stopped suddenly, due to very unpleasant 'withdrawal-symptoms', such as agitation, sleeplessness, states of anxiety, etc. However, these symptoms definitely do not indicate psychological or physical dependence. The dose should rather be slowly tapered down at a rate of approximately 20–25% per week or even slower to avoid the aforementioned bothersome symptoms. Chlorpromazine is derived from phenothiazine, and has an aliphatic side chain, typical for low to middle potency neuroleptics. The oral bioavailability is estimated to be 30–50% due to extensive first pass metabolization in the liver. Its elimination-halflife is 16–30 hours. It has many active metabolites (approx. 75 different ones) with greatly varying halflives and own pharmacological profiles. The CYP-450 isoenzymes 1A2 and 2D6 are needed for metabolization of chlorpromazine and the subtype 2D6 is inhibited by chlorpromazine (NB: possible interactions with other drugs). Answered by Doreen Diogo 1 year ago.


What are some reasons why a person might be prescribed 200 mg of thorazine?
...from a medical prospective. Asked by Isaura Foecke 1 year ago.

Thorazine is used for the treatment of schizophrenia (severe disruptions in thought and perception). It is also prescribed for the short-term treatment of severe behavioral disorders in children, including explosive hyperactivity and combativeness; and for the hyperenergetic phase of manic-depressive illness (severely exaggerated moods). Thorazine is also used to control nausea and vomiting, and to relieve restlessness and apprehension before surgery. It is used as an aid in the treatment of tetanus, and is prescribed for uncontrollable hiccups and acute intermittent porphyria (attacks of severe abdominal pain sometimes accompanied by psychiatric disturbances, cramps in the arms and legs, and muscle weakness). Answered by Rosario Babjeck 1 year ago.

The warding off man or woman will have angry through a comment the have shyed away from man or woman made. The warding off man or woman will have a few prejudice towards the have shyed away from man or woman. The have shyed away from man or woman might remind the warding off man or woman of an ex-boyfriend or ex-female friend or different man or woman who the warding off man or woman desires to omit. Maybe anybody instructed the warding off man or woman that the have shyed away from man or woman does not like him/her. But the object is, why do you care? Answered by Kerry Goepel 1 year ago.

It's an anti-psychotic, for bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. Answered by Amy Clancey 1 year ago.


What is Thorazine, Lorazepam and Compazine? What are they used for?
Asked by Shaunda Swider 1 year ago.

Chlorpromazine is classified as a low-potency typical antipsychotic and in the past was used in the treatment of both acute and chronic psychoses, including schizophrenia and the manic phase of bipolar disorder, as well as amphetamine-induced psychoses. Low-potency antipsychotics have more anticholinergic side effects, such as dry mouth, sedation, and constipation, and lower rates of extrapyramidal side effects, while high-potency antipsychotics (such as haloperidol) have the reverse profile. Chlorpromazine has also been used in porphyria and as part of tetanus treatment. It still is recommended for short-term management of severe anxiety and psychotic aggression. Resistant and severe hiccups, severe nausea/emesis, and preanesthetic conditioning are other uses. Symptoms of delirium in medically-hospitalized AIDS patients have been effectively treated with low doses of chlorpromazine Answered by Lyda Smallen 1 year ago.

They are antipsycotic drugs used to treat manic depression, schizophrenia Answered by Monika Latino 1 year ago.


Is 25 mg of Thorazine safe to take for anxiety?
Asked by Josie Hornak 1 year ago.

Thorazine, at 25 mg, is used for chronic hiccups, nausea and vomitting, sedation before surgery, and sometimes anxiety. However, it is anti-psychotic, a tranquilizer, and very old school, so if it was not prescribed to you, don't tske it. This may just be a question of general curiosity, but if you need meds for anxiety, there are more suitable ones than thorazine. See the doc. to get the right one for you! Answered by Rochell Sthilaire 1 year ago.

Thorazine is not an anti-anxiety drug. It is an antipsychotic drug. Please do not take ANY prescription medication unless under the direction of your personal physician. Answered by Bailey Brisco 1 year ago.

I think I would speak to a Pharmacist before listening to someone on Yahoo answers. Answered by Frankie Behunin 1 year ago.

The potential for causing chronic movement disorders makes it far from ideal. Answered by Annalisa Strada 1 year ago.

It has more potential side effects than newer drugs. For example, seizures, heat exhaustion, drowsiness. Answered by Marchelle Hargers 1 year ago.


Is it true that Thorazine is as dangerous and the Psychiatric critics say it is?
From Psychiatric critics they criticize Thorazine a lot and say it messes people up like Lobotomy. Here is an example website criticizing Thorazine: http://www.sntp.net/drugs/thorazine.htm Asked by Darron Brofman 1 year ago.

Thorazine is no more dangerous than the others. Staying on it for too long can lead to specific complications, which is true with other anti-psychotics. It isn't used as much these days, but it is still a consideration for some people. It's OK to critisize thorazine, but no more so than for other such drugs. Answered by Inez Sgueglia 1 year ago.

Wow! Normally, I don't answer questions that want to learn more and more detail. As in your case, because they require a long process, and it is the risk of not solve all of yours problems. I would suggest to proceed analytically with the help of keywords to be included in Yahoo! From what you climb, narrowing the field with new keywords, until you will be fully satisfied. good luck! Answered by Jerome Hummel 1 year ago.


Is Thorazine(Chlorpromazine) an older anti-psychotic?
I was prescribed this recently for Bipolar Disorder. Is it an older anti-psychotic?Thanks Asked by Jayson Rodick 1 year ago.

Thorazine was one of the first anti-psychotics, created in 1950. It is still occasionally used in the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, but not as often as it was a few decades ago. It's a low potency anti-psychotic, so there is a lower chance of experiencing unwanted side effects. Answered by Rosanne Wenker 1 year ago.


How long will thorazine take to get in my urine stream?
i want to take a thorazine but i have a drug test at 10:00am and dont know what time yo take it so i can pass the drug test and still take it tonight Asked by My Decraene 1 year ago.

To my understanding, Thorazine is an anti-psychotic medication. It's not typically screened for on a drug test. However, if you do register with a false positive in another drug category as a result of this medication, all you have to do is show proof of a prescription and you're in the clear. Thorazine is excreted primarily through the urine and has a half-life from 10 to 40 hours. Answered by Carrie Skibbe 1 year ago.

You can't wait until after the test to take it - just to be on the safe side? Answered by Audry Chowdhury 1 year ago.


About Thorazine/Largactil?
I have read alot about this drug, but I would like to hear from somone that has actually used it, or someone who knows someone who has used it.How sedating/tranquilizing is it? What are the main side-effects, and what pills do I need to counteract these side-effects? Asked by Errol Grine 1 year ago.

About counteraction - I'm not sure. You'd have to take it to know if you'd have any counteractions, first. I took Thorazine for about a month for sleep. It never made me tired. It would, however, keep me asleep for 8-12 hrs once I laid down and fell asleep. Not a good drug if you need to be knocked out (in my opinion). I'm sure you've heard it called 'the chemical lobotomy'. I didn't feel like it erased too much of my personality, and I was still heavily addicted to drugs and it never made me seek/want drugs less. I really don't remember much from taking it. I snorted it once, and it burned like a SOB, but it knocked me out right away. Answered by Adaline Cappleman 1 year ago.


Mrs S. has been taking Thorazine for about 1 year?
She has been having problems with orthostatic hypotension and akathisia, and has needed to take Cogentin to avoid dystonic reactions. The physician has decided to change her to Clozaril. The patient asks the nurse about the advantages and disadvantages of the new drug. The nurse has chosen Knowledge Deficit as the... Asked by Fidela Puidokas 1 year ago.

She has been having problems with orthostatic hypotension and akathisia, and has needed to take Cogentin to avoid dystonic reactions. The physician has decided to change her to Clozaril. The patient asks the nurse about the advantages and disadvantages of the new drug. The nurse has chosen Knowledge Deficit as the nursing diagnosis for this patient. a) What interventions would be used for this diagnosis? b) How would the nurse evaluate the outcome of the interventions? Answered by Brande Chean 1 year ago.

thorazine is bound to have more severe side effects.. clozaril is an atypical antipsychotic drug, so it will be LESS likely to cause tardive dyskenesia and akathisia and other similarly devastating side effects (thanks to its anticholinergic properties). However, there is recent evidence that such drugs may increase the likelihood of metabolic disturbances (leading to diabetes) and cardiovascular disease. There are also sexual functioning side effects, but that is common to many psychotropic meds...Note that slow titration of dosing of Clozaril significantly decreases the likelihood of orthostatic hypotension, so the switch is right on the money for this mrs. s....... I would say the switch from thorazine to clozaril is not a bad idea. I have no idea what you mean by "knowledge deficit" and "nursing diagnosis", I'm coming from a clinical psych perspective, but hope this helps! Answered by Renna Mcglothlen 1 year ago.


What is thorazine used for?
Asked by Zula Cokins 1 year ago.

Thorazine is used for the treatment of schizophrenia (severe disruptions in thought and perception). It is also prescribed for the short-term treatment of severe behavioral disorders in children, including explosive hyperactivity and combativeness; and for the hyperenergetic phase of manic-depressive illness (severely exaggerated moods). Thorazine is also used to control nausea and vomiting, and to relieve restlessness and apprehension before surgery. It is used as an aid in the treatment of tetanus, and is prescribed for uncontrollable hiccups and acute intermittent porphyria (attacks of severe abdominal pain sometimes accompanied by psychiatric disturbances, cramps in the arms and legs, and muscle weakness). Answered by Walker Schech 1 year ago.

Thorazine Uses Answered by Michal Kuney 1 year ago.

I don't know all of its uses, but I was given Thorazine for migraines. Answered by Dorethea Stefanow 1 year ago.

It is a old anti-psychotic. They use to use it a lot in psychiatric hospitals to calm down patients. It is also used for migraines at times. Answered by Dagmar Dicocco 1 year ago.

To mess with kids minds! Answered by Leanna Ruffing 1 year ago.

PAIN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!... Answered by Niki Russnak 1 year ago.

Chlorpromazine was the first antipsychotic drug, used during the 1950s and 1960s. Used as chlorpromazine hydrochloride and sold under the tradenames Largactil® and Thorazine®, it has sedative, hypotensive and antiemetic properties as well as anticholinergic and antidopaminergic effects. It has also anxiolytic (alleviation of anxiety) properties. Today, chlorpromazine is considered a typical antipsychotic. Chlorpromazine acts as an antagonist (blocking agent) on different postsynaptic receptors: on dopaminergic-receptors (subtypes D1, D2, D3 and D4, different antipsychotic properties on productive and unproductive symptoms), on serotonergic-receptors (5-HT1 and 5-HT2, with anxiolytic, antidepressive and antiaggressive properties as well as an attenuation of extrapypramidal side effects, but also leading to weight gain, fall in blood pressure, sedation and ejaculation difficulties), on histaminergic-receptors (H1-receptors, sedation, antiemesis, vertigo, fall in blood pressure and weight gain), on alpha1/alpha2-receptors (antisympathomimetic properties, lowering of blood pressure, reflex tachycardia, vertigo, sedation, hypersalivation and incontinence as well as sexual dysfunction, but may also attenuate pseudoparkinsonism—controversial), and on muscarinic (cholinergic) M1/M2-receptors (causing anticholinergic symptoms like dry mouth, blurred vision, obstipation, difficulty/inability to urinate, sinus tachycardia, ECG-changes and loss of memory, but the anticholinergic action may attenuate extrapyramidal side effects). Additionally, chlorpromazine is a weak presynaptic inhibitor of dopamine reuptake, which may lead to (mild) antidepressive and antiparkinsonian effects. This action could also account for psychomotor agitation and amplification of psychosis (very rarely noted in clinical use). [edit] Peripheral Antagonist to H1 receptors (antiallergic effects), H2 receptors (reduction of forming of gastric juice), M1/M2-receptors (dry mouth, reduction in forming of gastric juice) and some 5-HT receptors (different anti-allergic/gastrointestinal actions). Because it acts on so many receptors, chlorpromazine is often referred to as "dirty drug", whereas the atypical neuroleptic amisulpride for example acts only on central D2/D3-receptors and is therefore a "clean drug". This distinction is not a positive or negative value judgment on the drug, rather it is a neutral term which merely describes the agent's relative pharmacology. [edit] History The drug had been developed by Laboratoires Rhône-Poulenc in 1950 but they sold the rights in 1952 to Smith-Kline & French (today's GlaxoSmithKline). The drug was being sold as an antiemetic when its other use was noted. Smith-Kline was quick to encourage clinical trials and in 1954 the drug was approved in the US for psychiatric treatment. Over 100 million people were treated but the popularity of the drug fell from the late 1960s as the severe extrapyramidal side effects and tardive dyskinesia became more of a concern. From chlorpromazine a number of other similar neuroleptics were developed (e.g. triflupromazine, trifluoperazine). Previously used as an antihistamine and antiemetic its effects on mental state were first reported by the French doctor Henri Laborit in 1951 or 1952 (different sources) as sedation without narcosis. It became possible to cause 'artificial hibernation' in patients, if used as a cocktail together with pethidine and hydergine. Patients with shock, severe trauma or burns, become, if treated so, sedated, without anxiety and unreponsive/indifferent to painful external stimuli like minor surgical interventions. It was first used for psychiatric patients by Pierre Deniker and Jean Delay in 1953. Drug treatment with chlorpromazine went beyond simple sedation with patients showing improvements in thinking and emotional behaviour. Ironically, the antipsychotic properties of chlorpromazine appear to be unrelated to its sedative properties. During long term therapy some tolerance to the sedation effect develops. Chlorpromazine substituted and eclipsed the old therapies of electro- and insulin shocks and other methods such as psychosurgical means (lobotomy) causing permanent brain injury. Chlorpromazine has given approximately 70% of all schizophrenic patients a complete remission or near so and a normal, gainful human life. Before the era of neuroleptics, starting with chlorpromazine, positive long-term results for psychotic patients were only 20%. [edit] Side effects Side effects of chlorpromazine are typical of early generation neuroleptics. They include extrapyramidal side effects such as tardive dyskinesia and akathisia. A particularly severe side effect is the neuroleptic malignant syndrome which occurs in approximately 0.05% and can be fatal. Also, chlorpromazine may lower seizure threshold. Additional side effects include dry mouth, increased appetite with weight gain, constipation and urinary retention. Glucose tolerance may be impaired. An allergic skin rash and photosensitivity may occur. Other important and severe side effects are a strong reduction in the number of white blood cells, referred to as leukopenia, or, in extreme cases, even agranulocytosis may result, which may lead to death via uncontrollable infections and/or sepsis. Chlorpromazine is the neuroleptic drug with the highest rates (0.5% to 1%) of liver toxicity of the cholestatic type. The sedation effect combined with indifference to physical stimuli, anecdotally known as the "thorazine shuffle," has long been associated with the drug. The image of psychiatric patients staggering mute around a padded cell has earned those particular side effects a place in mainstream pop culture. [edit] Interactions Chlorpromazine intensifies the central depressive action of drugs with such activity (tranquilizers, barbiturates, narcotics, antihistamines, OTC-antiemetics etc.). A dose reduction of chlorpromazine or the other drug may be necessary. Chlorpromazine also intensifies the actions and undesired side effects of antihypertensive medications and anticholinergic drugs. The combination of chlorpromazine with other antipsychotics may result in increased central depression, hypotension and extrapyramidal side effects, but may sometimes enhance the clinical results of therapy. The anti-worm drug (antihelminthic) piperazine may intensify extrapyramidal side effects. In general, all neuroleptics may lead to seizures in combination with tramadol (Ultram). Chlorpromazine may increase the insulin needs of diabetic patients. Drugs like SSRIs, St. John's Wort and barbiturates can inhibit various CYP-isoenzymes such as CYP2D6, needed for metabolization of chlorpromazine and/or its metabolites. Theoretically, this should increase the half-lives of chlorpromazine and possibly its metabolites, dosing changes necessary. The exact clinical significance of this enzyme induction and its therapeutic consequences are unknown at present time and remain to be evaluated. [edit] Uses [edit] Common uses [edit] As an antipsychotic The use of chlorpromazine has been primarily replaced by newer generation of atypical antipsychotics which have an improved side effect profile. Chlorpromazine is classified as a low- to moderate-potency antipsychotic and in the past was used in the treatment of both acute and chronic psychoses, including schizophrenia and the manic phase of manic depression as well as amphetamine-induced psychoses. Chlorpromazine formerly was the drug of choice to treat LSD (and other psychedelic/hallucinogen) intoxication in a hospital setting, resulting in it gaining an erroneous reputation as the LSD "antidote". Now haloperidol is more commonly used in such situations. [edit] Other uses It has also been used in porphyria, as part of tetanus treatment and for behavioral problems in children. It still is well recommended for short term management of severe anxiety and aggressive episodes. Resistant and severe hiccups, severe nausea/emesis and preanesthetic conditioning have been other indications in the past. It can be used to treat amphetamine overdose. [1] [edit] Off-label and controversial uses Chlorpromazine is occasionally used off-label for treatment of severe migraine. Sometimes it is used in small doses to improve nausea/emesis opioid-treated cancer patients encounter and to intensify and prolong the analgesic action of the opioids given. Interestingly, it remains controversial whether or not chlorpromazine has its own analgesic properties. Analgesic properties may result from a central action on the hypothalamus; the patient may feel the pain much less than before. Other mechanisms may be an interaction with opioid receptors centrally and/or in the spinal cord. Some experts on the contrary say that chlorpromazine, like other phenothiazines, may even have antianalgesic properties. Chlorpromazine has been proposed as useful in newborns for the treatment of opioid withdrawal, if the mother was opioid-dependent. The latter indication remains highly controversial. Chlorpromazine, as well as other neuroleptics, may also be used to alleviate the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal (chlorpromazine may lower the seizure-threshold in alcoholics). It has a unique action in cholera, reducing the loss of water by approximately 30%. In Germany, the brand of chlorpromazine drug Propaphenin® has additional indications for insomnia and itching skin disease. [edit] Veterinary uses Chlorpromazine is primarily used as an antiemetic in dogs and cats. It is also sometimes used as a preanesthetic and muscle relaxant in cattle, swine, sheep, and goats. It is generally contraindicated for use with horses, due to a high incidence of ataxia and altered mentation. [edit] Dosage In any case, use is determined by an attending physician. The following information is intended to serve as a guideline: A wide range is covered from 25 mg oral or intramuscular for mild sedation, every 8 hours, up to 100 mg every 6 hours for severely disturbed patients. Different qualified sources give 800 mg/day to 1,200 mg/day as highest dose. At least there is one small clinical trial in treatment-resistant patients with a daily dose of 1,200 mg chlorpromazine (and 4 mg Benztropine to counteract early extrapyramidal side effects, which were anticipated with this unusual high chlorpromazine dose). Initial doses should be low and be increased gradually. It is recommended that most of the daily dose (e.g. 2/3) is given at bedtime for maximum hypnotic activity and minimal daytime sedation and hypotension. In the USA there are controlled release forms of Thorazine (e.g. 300 mg). After the individual dose is well established, such a CR capsule can be given with the evening meal as a single dose, covering the next 24 hours. The lowest dosage compatible with good therapeutic effect should be given. Dosage in ambulatory patients should be particularly low (minimizing sedation and hypotension). The direct i.v.-injection of undiluted solution is contraindicated (massive fall in blood pressure, cardiovascular collapse), for i.v.-infusion of dilutions the (hospitalized) patient should be lying and the infusion rate should be as slow as possible. Afterwards the patient should rest in the lying position for at least 30 minutes. [edit] Necessary examinations and laboratory checks during treatment All patients treated with chlorpromazine on a long-term-basis should have regularly checked their blood-pressure, pulse rate, laboratory-tests (liver function tests, kidney-values, blood cell counts including differenciated white blood counts, counts of red blood cells and thrombocytes), ECG and EEG. The frequency of all checks should be determined for the individual patient and may be done in shorter intervals during the first 3 months of treatment and less often afterwards. Some side effects seem to appear more frequently during the first months of therapy (sedation, hypotension, liver damage) while others do not (e.g. tardive dyskinesia). [edit] Discontinuation of treatment Also, in regular intervals the treating physician should evaluate whether continued treatment is needed. If not, the drug should never be stopped suddenly, due to very unpleasant 'withdrawal-symptoms', such as agitation, sleeplessness, states of anxiety, etc. However, these symptoms definitely do not indicate psychological or physical dependence. The dose should rather be slowly tapered down at a rate of approximately 20–25% per week or even slower to avoid the aforementioned bothersome symptoms. Chlorpromazine is derived from phenothiazine, and has an aliphatic side chain, typical for low to middle potency neuroleptics. The oral bioavailability is estimated to be 30–50% due to extensive first pass metabolization in the liver. Its elimination-halflife is 16–30 hours. It has many active metabolites (approx. 75 different ones) with greatly varying halflives and own pharmacological profiles. The CYP-450 isoenzymes 1A2 and 2D6 are needed for metabolization of chlorpromazine and the subtype 2D6 is inhibited by chlorpromazine (NB: possible interactions with other drugs). Answered by Etsuko Berkson 1 year ago.


What are some reasons why a person might be prescribed 200 mg of thorazine?
...from a medical prospective. Asked by Nana Ulmer 1 year ago.

Thorazine is used for the treatment of schizophrenia (severe disruptions in thought and perception). It is also prescribed for the short-term treatment of severe behavioral disorders in children, including explosive hyperactivity and combativeness; and for the hyperenergetic phase of manic-depressive illness (severely exaggerated moods). Thorazine is also used to control nausea and vomiting, and to relieve restlessness and apprehension before surgery. It is used as an aid in the treatment of tetanus, and is prescribed for uncontrollable hiccups and acute intermittent porphyria (attacks of severe abdominal pain sometimes accompanied by psychiatric disturbances, cramps in the arms and legs, and muscle weakness). Answered by Marylou Wares 1 year ago.

The warding off man or woman will have angry through a comment the have shyed away from man or woman made. The warding off man or woman will have a few prejudice towards the have shyed away from man or woman. The have shyed away from man or woman might remind the warding off man or woman of an ex-boyfriend or ex-female friend or different man or woman who the warding off man or woman desires to omit. Maybe anybody instructed the warding off man or woman that the have shyed away from man or woman does not like him/her. But the object is, why do you care? Answered by Arthur Ezer 1 year ago.

It's an anti-psychotic, for bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. Answered by Eugene Dreckman 1 year ago.


What is Thorazine, Lorazepam and Compazine? What are they used for?
Asked by Keila Valis 1 year ago.

Chlorpromazine is classified as a low-potency typical antipsychotic and in the past was used in the treatment of both acute and chronic psychoses, including schizophrenia and the manic phase of bipolar disorder, as well as amphetamine-induced psychoses. Low-potency antipsychotics have more anticholinergic side effects, such as dry mouth, sedation, and constipation, and lower rates of extrapyramidal side effects, while high-potency antipsychotics (such as haloperidol) have the reverse profile. Chlorpromazine has also been used in porphyria and as part of tetanus treatment. It still is recommended for short-term management of severe anxiety and psychotic aggression. Resistant and severe hiccups, severe nausea/emesis, and preanesthetic conditioning are other uses. Symptoms of delirium in medically-hospitalized AIDS patients have been effectively treated with low doses of chlorpromazine Answered by Fabiola Collica 1 year ago.

They are antipsycotic drugs used to treat manic depression, schizophrenia Answered by Phillip Hannigan 1 year ago.


Is 25 mg of Thorazine safe to take for anxiety?
Asked by Loris Wintle 1 year ago.

Thorazine, at 25 mg, is used for chronic hiccups, nausea and vomitting, sedation before surgery, and sometimes anxiety. However, it is anti-psychotic, a tranquilizer, and very old school, so if it was not prescribed to you, don't tske it. This may just be a question of general curiosity, but if you need meds for anxiety, there are more suitable ones than thorazine. See the doc. to get the right one for you! Answered by Trudie Nocket 1 year ago.

Thorazine is not an anti-anxiety drug. It is an antipsychotic drug. Please do not take ANY prescription medication unless under the direction of your personal physician. Answered by Kris Walizer 1 year ago.

I think I would speak to a Pharmacist before listening to someone on Yahoo answers. Answered by Joana Waldall 1 year ago.

The potential for causing chronic movement disorders makes it far from ideal. Answered by Laquita Mikulich 1 year ago.

It has more potential side effects than newer drugs. For example, seizures, heat exhaustion, drowsiness. Answered by Dania Paeth 1 year ago.


Is it true that Thorazine is as dangerous and the Psychiatric critics say it is?
From Psychiatric critics they criticize Thorazine a lot and say it messes people up like Lobotomy. Here is an example website criticizing Thorazine: http://www.sntp.net/drugs/thorazine.htm Asked by Valeri Riippi 1 year ago.

Thorazine is no more dangerous than the others. Staying on it for too long can lead to specific complications, which is true with other anti-psychotics. It isn't used as much these days, but it is still a consideration for some people. It's OK to critisize thorazine, but no more so than for other such drugs. Answered by Rafael Patts 1 year ago.

Wow! Normally, I don't answer questions that want to learn more and more detail. As in your case, because they require a long process, and it is the risk of not solve all of yours problems. I would suggest to proceed analytically with the help of keywords to be included in Yahoo! From what you climb, narrowing the field with new keywords, until you will be fully satisfied. good luck! Answered by Jeane Zarate 1 year ago.


Is Thorazine(Chlorpromazine) an older anti-psychotic?
I was prescribed this recently for Bipolar Disorder. Is it an older anti-psychotic?Thanks Asked by Danial Creveling 1 year ago.

Thorazine was one of the first anti-psychotics, created in 1950. It is still occasionally used in the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, but not as often as it was a few decades ago. It's a low potency anti-psychotic, so there is a lower chance of experiencing unwanted side effects. Answered by Modesta Dumdei 1 year ago.


How long will thorazine take to get in my urine stream?
i want to take a thorazine but i have a drug test at 10:00am and dont know what time yo take it so i can pass the drug test and still take it tonight Asked by Gerri Petts 1 year ago.

To my understanding, Thorazine is an anti-psychotic medication. It's not typically screened for on a drug test. However, if you do register with a false positive in another drug category as a result of this medication, all you have to do is show proof of a prescription and you're in the clear. Thorazine is excreted primarily through the urine and has a half-life from 10 to 40 hours. Answered by Karin Ponder 1 year ago.

You can't wait until after the test to take it - just to be on the safe side? Answered by Scotty Cherney 1 year ago.


About Thorazine/Largactil?
I have read alot about this drug, but I would like to hear from somone that has actually used it, or someone who knows someone who has used it.How sedating/tranquilizing is it? What are the main side-effects, and what pills do I need to counteract these side-effects? Asked by Lael Mutschler 1 year ago.

About counteraction - I'm not sure. You'd have to take it to know if you'd have any counteractions, first. I took Thorazine for about a month for sleep. It never made me tired. It would, however, keep me asleep for 8-12 hrs once I laid down and fell asleep. Not a good drug if you need to be knocked out (in my opinion). I'm sure you've heard it called 'the chemical lobotomy'. I didn't feel like it erased too much of my personality, and I was still heavily addicted to drugs and it never made me seek/want drugs less. I really don't remember much from taking it. I snorted it once, and it burned like a SOB, but it knocked me out right away. Answered by Jody Pechal 1 year ago.


Mrs S. has been taking Thorazine for about 1 year?
She has been having problems with orthostatic hypotension and akathisia, and has needed to take Cogentin to avoid dystonic reactions. The physician has decided to change her to Clozaril. The patient asks the nurse about the advantages and disadvantages of the new drug. The nurse has chosen Knowledge Deficit as the... Asked by Gwendolyn Alexnder 1 year ago.

She has been having problems with orthostatic hypotension and akathisia, and has needed to take Cogentin to avoid dystonic reactions. The physician has decided to change her to Clozaril. The patient asks the nurse about the advantages and disadvantages of the new drug. The nurse has chosen Knowledge Deficit as the nursing diagnosis for this patient. a) What interventions would be used for this diagnosis? b) How would the nurse evaluate the outcome of the interventions? Answered by Wilbur Gennett 1 year ago.

thorazine is bound to have more severe side effects.. clozaril is an atypical antipsychotic drug, so it will be LESS likely to cause tardive dyskenesia and akathisia and other similarly devastating side effects (thanks to its anticholinergic properties). However, there is recent evidence that such drugs may increase the likelihood of metabolic disturbances (leading to diabetes) and cardiovascular disease. There are also sexual functioning side effects, but that is common to many psychotropic meds...Note that slow titration of dosing of Clozaril significantly decreases the likelihood of orthostatic hypotension, so the switch is right on the money for this mrs. s....... I would say the switch from thorazine to clozaril is not a bad idea. I have no idea what you mean by "knowledge deficit" and "nursing diagnosis", I'm coming from a clinical psych perspective, but hope this helps! Answered by Gerard Lishman 1 year ago.


What is thorazine used for?
Asked by Hollis Biggerstaff 1 year ago.

Thorazine is used for the treatment of schizophrenia (severe disruptions in thought and perception). It is also prescribed for the short-term treatment of severe behavioral disorders in children, including explosive hyperactivity and combativeness; and for the hyperenergetic phase of manic-depressive illness (severely exaggerated moods). Thorazine is also used to control nausea and vomiting, and to relieve restlessness and apprehension before surgery. It is used as an aid in the treatment of tetanus, and is prescribed for uncontrollable hiccups and acute intermittent porphyria (attacks of severe abdominal pain sometimes accompanied by psychiatric disturbances, cramps in the arms and legs, and muscle weakness). Answered by Freeda Souliere 1 year ago.

Thorazine Uses Answered by Donnie Crumpacker 1 year ago.

I don't know all of its uses, but I was given Thorazine for migraines. Answered by Rashad Aldinger 1 year ago.

It is a old anti-psychotic. They use to use it a lot in psychiatric hospitals to calm down patients. It is also used for migraines at times. Answered by Vi Maust 1 year ago.

To mess with kids minds! Answered by Carin Bugge 1 year ago.

PAIN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!... Answered by Vivian Mattix 1 year ago.

Chlorpromazine was the first antipsychotic drug, used during the 1950s and 1960s. Used as chlorpromazine hydrochloride and sold under the tradenames Largactil® and Thorazine®, it has sedative, hypotensive and antiemetic properties as well as anticholinergic and antidopaminergic effects. It has also anxiolytic (alleviation of anxiety) properties. Today, chlorpromazine is considered a typical antipsychotic. Chlorpromazine acts as an antagonist (blocking agent) on different postsynaptic receptors: on dopaminergic-receptors (subtypes D1, D2, D3 and D4, different antipsychotic properties on productive and unproductive symptoms), on serotonergic-receptors (5-HT1 and 5-HT2, with anxiolytic, antidepressive and antiaggressive properties as well as an attenuation of extrapypramidal side effects, but also leading to weight gain, fall in blood pressure, sedation and ejaculation difficulties), on histaminergic-receptors (H1-receptors, sedation, antiemesis, vertigo, fall in blood pressure and weight gain), on alpha1/alpha2-receptors (antisympathomimetic properties, lowering of blood pressure, reflex tachycardia, vertigo, sedation, hypersalivation and incontinence as well as sexual dysfunction, but may also attenuate pseudoparkinsonism—controversial), and on muscarinic (cholinergic) M1/M2-receptors (causing anticholinergic symptoms like dry mouth, blurred vision, obstipation, difficulty/inability to urinate, sinus tachycardia, ECG-changes and loss of memory, but the anticholinergic action may attenuate extrapyramidal side effects). Additionally, chlorpromazine is a weak presynaptic inhibitor of dopamine reuptake, which may lead to (mild) antidepressive and antiparkinsonian effects. This action could also account for psychomotor agitation and amplification of psychosis (very rarely noted in clinical use). [edit] Peripheral Antagonist to H1 receptors (antiallergic effects), H2 receptors (reduction of forming of gastric juice), M1/M2-receptors (dry mouth, reduction in forming of gastric juice) and some 5-HT receptors (different anti-allergic/gastrointestinal actions). Because it acts on so many receptors, chlorpromazine is often referred to as "dirty drug", whereas the atypical neuroleptic amisulpride for example acts only on central D2/D3-receptors and is therefore a "clean drug". This distinction is not a positive or negative value judgment on the drug, rather it is a neutral term which merely describes the agent's relative pharmacology. [edit] History The drug had been developed by Laboratoires Rhône-Poulenc in 1950 but they sold the rights in 1952 to Smith-Kline & French (today's GlaxoSmithKline). The drug was being sold as an antiemetic when its other use was noted. Smith-Kline was quick to encourage clinical trials and in 1954 the drug was approved in the US for psychiatric treatment. Over 100 million people were treated but the popularity of the drug fell from the late 1960s as the severe extrapyramidal side effects and tardive dyskinesia became more of a concern. From chlorpromazine a number of other similar neuroleptics were developed (e.g. triflupromazine, trifluoperazine). Previously used as an antihistamine and antiemetic its effects on mental state were first reported by the French doctor Henri Laborit in 1951 or 1952 (different sources) as sedation without narcosis. It became possible to cause 'artificial hibernation' in patients, if used as a cocktail together with pethidine and hydergine. Patients with shock, severe trauma or burns, become, if treated so, sedated, without anxiety and unreponsive/indifferent to painful external stimuli like minor surgical interventions. It was first used for psychiatric patients by Pierre Deniker and Jean Delay in 1953. Drug treatment with chlorpromazine went beyond simple sedation with patients showing improvements in thinking and emotional behaviour. Ironically, the antipsychotic properties of chlorpromazine appear to be unrelated to its sedative properties. During long term therapy some tolerance to the sedation effect develops. Chlorpromazine substituted and eclipsed the old therapies of electro- and insulin shocks and other methods such as psychosurgical means (lobotomy) causing permanent brain injury. Chlorpromazine has given approximately 70% of all schizophrenic patients a complete remission or near so and a normal, gainful human life. Before the era of neuroleptics, starting with chlorpromazine, positive long-term results for psychotic patients were only 20%. [edit] Side effects Side effects of chlorpromazine are typical of early generation neuroleptics. They include extrapyramidal side effects such as tardive dyskinesia and akathisia. A particularly severe side effect is the neuroleptic malignant syndrome which occurs in approximately 0.05% and can be fatal. Also, chlorpromazine may lower seizure threshold. Additional side effects include dry mouth, increased appetite with weight gain, constipation and urinary retention. Glucose tolerance may be impaired. An allergic skin rash and photosensitivity may occur. Other important and severe side effects are a strong reduction in the number of white blood cells, referred to as leukopenia, or, in extreme cases, even agranulocytosis may result, which may lead to death via uncontrollable infections and/or sepsis. Chlorpromazine is the neuroleptic drug with the highest rates (0.5% to 1%) of liver toxicity of the cholestatic type. The sedation effect combined with indifference to physical stimuli, anecdotally known as the "thorazine shuffle," has long been associated with the drug. The image of psychiatric patients staggering mute around a padded cell has earned those particular side effects a place in mainstream pop culture. [edit] Interactions Chlorpromazine intensifies the central depressive action of drugs with such activity (tranquilizers, barbiturates, narcotics, antihistamines, OTC-antiemetics etc.). A dose reduction of chlorpromazine or the other drug may be necessary. Chlorpromazine also intensifies the actions and undesired side effects of antihypertensive medications and anticholinergic drugs. The combination of chlorpromazine with other antipsychotics may result in increased central depression, hypotension and extrapyramidal side effects, but may sometimes enhance the clinical results of therapy. The anti-worm drug (antihelminthic) piperazine may intensify extrapyramidal side effects. In general, all neuroleptics may lead to seizures in combination with tramadol (Ultram). Chlorpromazine may increase the insulin needs of diabetic patients. Drugs like SSRIs, St. John's Wort and barbiturates can inhibit various CYP-isoenzymes such as CYP2D6, needed for metabolization of chlorpromazine and/or its metabolites. Theoretically, this should increase the half-lives of chlorpromazine and possibly its metabolites, dosing changes necessary. The exact clinical significance of this enzyme induction and its therapeutic consequences are unknown at present time and remain to be evaluated. [edit] Uses [edit] Common uses [edit] As an antipsychotic The use of chlorpromazine has been primarily replaced by newer generation of atypical antipsychotics which have an improved side effect profile. Chlorpromazine is classified as a low- to moderate-potency antipsychotic and in the past was used in the treatment of both acute and chronic psychoses, including schizophrenia and the manic phase of manic depression as well as amphetamine-induced psychoses. Chlorpromazine formerly was the drug of choice to treat LSD (and other psychedelic/hallucinogen) intoxication in a hospital setting, resulting in it gaining an erroneous reputation as the LSD "antidote". Now haloperidol is more commonly used in such situations. [edit] Other uses It has also been used in porphyria, as part of tetanus treatment and for behavioral problems in children. It still is well recommended for short term management of severe anxiety and aggressive episodes. Resistant and severe hiccups, severe nausea/emesis and preanesthetic conditioning have been other indications in the past. It can be used to treat amphetamine overdose. [1] [edit] Off-label and controversial uses Chlorpromazine is occasionally used off-label for treatment of severe migraine. Sometimes it is used in small doses to improve nausea/emesis opioid-treated cancer patients encounter and to intensify and prolong the analgesic action of the opioids given. Interestingly, it remains controversial whether or not chlorpromazine has its own analgesic properties. Analgesic properties may result from a central action on the hypothalamus; the patient may feel the pain much less than before. Other mechanisms may be an interaction with opioid receptors centrally and/or in the spinal cord. Some experts on the contrary say that chlorpromazine, like other phenothiazines, may even have antianalgesic properties. Chlorpromazine has been proposed as useful in newborns for the treatment of opioid withdrawal, if the mother was opioid-dependent. The latter indication remains highly controversial. Chlorpromazine, as well as other neuroleptics, may also be used to alleviate the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal (chlorpromazine may lower the seizure-threshold in alcoholics). It has a unique action in cholera, reducing the loss of water by approximately 30%. In Germany, the brand of chlorpromazine drug Propaphenin® has additional indications for insomnia and itching skin disease. [edit] Veterinary uses Chlorpromazine is primarily used as an antiemetic in dogs and cats. It is also sometimes used as a preanesthetic and muscle relaxant in cattle, swine, sheep, and goats. It is generally contraindicated for use with horses, due to a high incidence of ataxia and altered mentation. [edit] Dosage In any case, use is determined by an attending physician. The following information is intended to serve as a guideline: A wide range is covered from 25 mg oral or intramuscular for mild sedation, every 8 hours, up to 100 mg every 6 hours for severely disturbed patients. Different qualified sources give 800 mg/day to 1,200 mg/day as highest dose. At least there is one small clinical trial in treatment-resistant patients with a daily dose of 1,200 mg chlorpromazine (and 4 mg Benztropine to counteract early extrapyramidal side effects, which were anticipated with this unusual high chlorpromazine dose). Initial doses should be low and be increased gradually. It is recommended that most of the daily dose (e.g. 2/3) is given at bedtime for maximum hypnotic activity and minimal daytime sedation and hypotension. In the USA there are controlled release forms of Thorazine (e.g. 300 mg). After the individual dose is well established, such a CR capsule can be given with the evening meal as a single dose, covering the next 24 hours. The lowest dosage compatible with good therapeutic effect should be given. Dosage in ambulatory patients should be particularly low (minimizing sedation and hypotension). The direct i.v.-injection of undiluted solution is contraindicated (massive fall in blood pressure, cardiovascular collapse), for i.v.-infusion of dilutions the (hospitalized) patient should be lying and the infusion rate should be as slow as possible. Afterwards the patient should rest in the lying position for at least 30 minutes. [edit] Necessary examinations and laboratory checks during treatment All patients treated with chlorpromazine on a long-term-basis should have regularly checked their blood-pressure, pulse rate, laboratory-tests (liver function tests, kidney-values, blood cell counts including differenciated white blood counts, counts of red blood cells and thrombocytes), ECG and EEG. The frequency of all checks should be determined for the individual patient and may be done in shorter intervals during the first 3 months of treatment and less often afterwards. Some side effects seem to appear more frequently during the first months of therapy (sedation, hypotension, liver damage) while others do not (e.g. tardive dyskinesia). [edit] Discontinuation of treatment Also, in regular intervals the treating physician should evaluate whether continued treatment is needed. If not, the drug should never be stopped suddenly, due to very unpleasant 'withdrawal-symptoms', such as agitation, sleeplessness, states of anxiety, etc. However, these symptoms definitely do not indicate psychological or physical dependence. The dose should rather be slowly tapered down at a rate of approximately 20–25% per week or even slower to avoid the aforementioned bothersome symptoms. Chlorpromazine is derived from phenothiazine, and has an aliphatic side chain, typical for low to middle potency neuroleptics. The oral bioavailability is estimated to be 30–50% due to extensive first pass metabolization in the liver. Its elimination-halflife is 16–30 hours. It has many active metabolites (approx. 75 different ones) with greatly varying halflives and own pharmacological profiles. The CYP-450 isoenzymes 1A2 and 2D6 are needed for metabolization of chlorpromazine and the subtype 2D6 is inhibited by chlorpromazine (NB: possible interactions with other drugs). Answered by Rosalind Boyas 1 year ago.


What are some reasons why a person might be prescribed 200 mg of thorazine?
...from a medical prospective. Asked by Sergio Harbin 1 year ago.

Thorazine is used for the treatment of schizophrenia (severe disruptions in thought and perception). It is also prescribed for the short-term treatment of severe behavioral disorders in children, including explosive hyperactivity and combativeness; and for the hyperenergetic phase of manic-depressive illness (severely exaggerated moods). Thorazine is also used to control nausea and vomiting, and to relieve restlessness and apprehension before surgery. It is used as an aid in the treatment of tetanus, and is prescribed for uncontrollable hiccups and acute intermittent porphyria (attacks of severe abdominal pain sometimes accompanied by psychiatric disturbances, cramps in the arms and legs, and muscle weakness). Answered by Darren Ingmire 1 year ago.

The warding off man or woman will have angry through a comment the have shyed away from man or woman made. The warding off man or woman will have a few prejudice towards the have shyed away from man or woman. The have shyed away from man or woman might remind the warding off man or woman of an ex-boyfriend or ex-female friend or different man or woman who the warding off man or woman desires to omit. Maybe anybody instructed the warding off man or woman that the have shyed away from man or woman does not like him/her. But the object is, why do you care? Answered by Demetrius Schemm 1 year ago.

It's an anti-psychotic, for bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. Answered by Venice Burbridge 1 year ago.


What is Thorazine, Lorazepam and Compazine? What are they used for?
Asked by Sanjuanita Didonatis 1 year ago.

Chlorpromazine is classified as a low-potency typical antipsychotic and in the past was used in the treatment of both acute and chronic psychoses, including schizophrenia and the manic phase of bipolar disorder, as well as amphetamine-induced psychoses. Low-potency antipsychotics have more anticholinergic side effects, such as dry mouth, sedation, and constipation, and lower rates of extrapyramidal side effects, while high-potency antipsychotics (such as haloperidol) have the reverse profile. Chlorpromazine has also been used in porphyria and as part of tetanus treatment. It still is recommended for short-term management of severe anxiety and psychotic aggression. Resistant and severe hiccups, severe nausea/emesis, and preanesthetic conditioning are other uses. Symptoms of delirium in medically-hospitalized AIDS patients have been effectively treated with low doses of chlorpromazine Answered by Izetta Carretero 1 year ago.

They are antipsycotic drugs used to treat manic depression, schizophrenia Answered by Sommer Bramel 1 year ago.


Is 25 mg of Thorazine safe to take for anxiety?
Asked by Alison Sams 1 year ago.

Thorazine, at 25 mg, is used for chronic hiccups, nausea and vomitting, sedation before surgery, and sometimes anxiety. However, it is anti-psychotic, a tranquilizer, and very old school, so if it was not prescribed to you, don't tske it. This may just be a question of general curiosity, but if you need meds for anxiety, there are more suitable ones than thorazine. See the doc. to get the right one for you! Answered by Alvin Cumley 1 year ago.

Thorazine is not an anti-anxiety drug. It is an antipsychotic drug. Please do not take ANY prescription medication unless under the direction of your personal physician. Answered by Thomas Zevallos 1 year ago.

I think I would speak to a Pharmacist before listening to someone on Yahoo answers. Answered by Jeneva Havlick 1 year ago.

The potential for causing chronic movement disorders makes it far from ideal. Answered by Elicia Megeath 1 year ago.

It has more potential side effects than newer drugs. For example, seizures, heat exhaustion, drowsiness. Answered by Marla Siebold 1 year ago.


Is it true that Thorazine is as dangerous and the Psychiatric critics say it is?
From Psychiatric critics they criticize Thorazine a lot and say it messes people up like Lobotomy. Here is an example website criticizing Thorazine: http://www.sntp.net/drugs/thorazine.htm Asked by Belia Teoh 1 year ago.

Thorazine is no more dangerous than the others. Staying on it for too long can lead to specific complications, which is true with other anti-psychotics. It isn't used as much these days, but it is still a consideration for some people. It's OK to critisize thorazine, but no more so than for other such drugs. Answered by Dominique Mochel 1 year ago.

Wow! Normally, I don't answer questions that want to learn more and more detail. As in your case, because they require a long process, and it is the risk of not solve all of yours problems. I would suggest to proceed analytically with the help of keywords to be included in Yahoo! From what you climb, narrowing the field with new keywords, until you will be fully satisfied. good luck! Answered by Maureen Amendola 1 year ago.


Is Thorazine(Chlorpromazine) an older anti-psychotic?
I was prescribed this recently for Bipolar Disorder. Is it an older anti-psychotic?Thanks Asked by Cristina Rieff 1 year ago.

Thorazine was one of the first anti-psychotics, created in 1950. It is still occasionally used in the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, but not as often as it was a few decades ago. It's a low potency anti-psychotic, so there is a lower chance of experiencing unwanted side effects. Answered by Barney Prohaska 1 year ago.


How long will thorazine take to get in my urine stream?
i want to take a thorazine but i have a drug test at 10:00am and dont know what time yo take it so i can pass the drug test and still take it tonight Asked by Lane Harvat 1 year ago.

To my understanding, Thorazine is an anti-psychotic medication. It's not typically screened for on a drug test. However, if you do register with a false positive in another drug category as a result of this medication, all you have to do is show proof of a prescription and you're in the clear. Thorazine is excreted primarily through the urine and has a half-life from 10 to 40 hours. Answered by Stephenie Ossenfort 1 year ago.

You can't wait until after the test to take it - just to be on the safe side? Answered by Melodi Bownds 1 year ago.


About Thorazine/Largactil?
I have read alot about this drug, but I would like to hear from somone that has actually used it, or someone who knows someone who has used it.How sedating/tranquilizing is it? What are the main side-effects, and what pills do I need to counteract these side-effects? Asked by Henrietta Atcheson 1 year ago.

About counteraction - I'm not sure. You'd have to take it to know if you'd have any counteractions, first. I took Thorazine for about a month for sleep. It never made me tired. It would, however, keep me asleep for 8-12 hrs once I laid down and fell asleep. Not a good drug if you need to be knocked out (in my opinion). I'm sure you've heard it called 'the chemical lobotomy'. I didn't feel like it erased too much of my personality, and I was still heavily addicted to drugs and it never made me seek/want drugs less. I really don't remember much from taking it. I snorted it once, and it burned like a SOB, but it knocked me out right away. Answered by Meaghan Walkowski 1 year ago.


Mrs S. has been taking Thorazine for about 1 year?
She has been having problems with orthostatic hypotension and akathisia, and has needed to take Cogentin to avoid dystonic reactions. The physician has decided to change her to Clozaril. The patient asks the nurse about the advantages and disadvantages of the new drug. The nurse has chosen Knowledge Deficit as the... Asked by Joslyn Cretsinger 1 year ago.

She has been having problems with orthostatic hypotension and akathisia, and has needed to take Cogentin to avoid dystonic reactions. The physician has decided to change her to Clozaril. The patient asks the nurse about the advantages and disadvantages of the new drug. The nurse has chosen Knowledge Deficit as the nursing diagnosis for this patient. a) What interventions would be used for this diagnosis? b) How would the nurse evaluate the outcome of the interventions? Answered by Corrine Broaden 1 year ago.

thorazine is bound to have more severe side effects.. clozaril is an atypical antipsychotic drug, so it will be LESS likely to cause tardive dyskenesia and akathisia and other similarly devastating side effects (thanks to its anticholinergic properties). However, there is recent evidence that such drugs may increase the likelihood of metabolic disturbances (leading to diabetes) and cardiovascular disease. There are also sexual functioning side effects, but that is common to many psychotropic meds...Note that slow titration of dosing of Clozaril significantly decreases the likelihood of orthostatic hypotension, so the switch is right on the money for this mrs. s....... I would say the switch from thorazine to clozaril is not a bad idea. I have no idea what you mean by "knowledge deficit" and "nursing diagnosis", I'm coming from a clinical psych perspective, but hope this helps! Answered by Denisha Frontz 1 year ago.


What is thorazine used for?
Asked by Kathe Jarboe 1 year ago.

Thorazine is used for the treatment of schizophrenia (severe disruptions in thought and perception). It is also prescribed for the short-term treatment of severe behavioral disorders in children, including explosive hyperactivity and combativeness; and for the hyperenergetic phase of manic-depressive illness (severely exaggerated moods). Thorazine is also used to control nausea and vomiting, and to relieve restlessness and apprehension before surgery. It is used as an aid in the treatment of tetanus, and is prescribed for uncontrollable hiccups and acute intermittent porphyria (attacks of severe abdominal pain sometimes accompanied by psychiatric disturbances, cramps in the arms and legs, and muscle weakness). Answered by Monika Stelzl 1 year ago.

Thorazine Uses Answered by Etsuko Hepperly 1 year ago.

I don't know all of its uses, but I was given Thorazine for migraines. Answered by Kenia Degrace 1 year ago.

It is a old anti-psychotic. They use to use it a lot in psychiatric hospitals to calm down patients. It is also used for migraines at times. Answered by Laine Brazille 1 year ago.

To mess with kids minds! Answered by Fransisca Daloia 1 year ago.

PAIN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!... Answered by Pam Stoppenbach 1 year ago.

Chlorpromazine was the first antipsychotic drug, used during the 1950s and 1960s. Used as chlorpromazine hydrochloride and sold under the tradenames Largactil® and Thorazine®, it has sedative, hypotensive and antiemetic properties as well as anticholinergic and antidopaminergic effects. It has also anxiolytic (alleviation of anxiety) properties. Today, chlorpromazine is considered a typical antipsychotic. Chlorpromazine acts as an antagonist (blocking agent) on different postsynaptic receptors: on dopaminergic-receptors (subtypes D1, D2, D3 and D4, different antipsychotic properties on productive and unproductive symptoms), on serotonergic-receptors (5-HT1 and 5-HT2, with anxiolytic, antidepressive and antiaggressive properties as well as an attenuation of extrapypramidal side effects, but also leading to weight gain, fall in blood pressure, sedation and ejaculation difficulties), on histaminergic-receptors (H1-receptors, sedation, antiemesis, vertigo, fall in blood pressure and weight gain), on alpha1/alpha2-receptors (antisympathomimetic properties, lowering of blood pressure, reflex tachycardia, vertigo, sedation, hypersalivation and incontinence as well as sexual dysfunction, but may also attenuate pseudoparkinsonism—controversial), and on muscarinic (cholinergic) M1/M2-receptors (causing anticholinergic symptoms like dry mouth, blurred vision, obstipation, difficulty/inability to urinate, sinus tachycardia, ECG-changes and loss of memory, but the anticholinergic action may attenuate extrapyramidal side effects). Additionally, chlorpromazine is a weak presynaptic inhibitor of dopamine reuptake, which may lead to (mild) antidepressive and antiparkinsonian effects. This action could also account for psychomotor agitation and amplification of psychosis (very rarely noted in clinical use). [edit] Peripheral Antagonist to H1 receptors (antiallergic effects), H2 receptors (reduction of forming of gastric juice), M1/M2-receptors (dry mouth, reduction in forming of gastric juice) and some 5-HT receptors (different anti-allergic/gastrointestinal actions). Because it acts on so many receptors, chlorpromazine is often referred to as "dirty drug", whereas the atypical neuroleptic amisulpride for example acts only on central D2/D3-receptors and is therefore a "clean drug". This distinction is not a positive or negative value judgment on the drug, rather it is a neutral term which merely describes the agent's relative pharmacology. [edit] History The drug had been developed by Laboratoires Rhône-Poulenc in 1950 but they sold the rights in 1952 to Smith-Kline & French (today's GlaxoSmithKline). The drug was being sold as an antiemetic when its other use was noted. Smith-Kline was quick to encourage clinical trials and in 1954 the drug was approved in the US for psychiatric treatment. Over 100 million people were treated but the popularity of the drug fell from the late 1960s as the severe extrapyramidal side effects and tardive dyskinesia became more of a concern. From chlorpromazine a number of other similar neuroleptics were developed (e.g. triflupromazine, trifluoperazine). Previously used as an antihistamine and antiemetic its effects on mental state were first reported by the French doctor Henri Laborit in 1951 or 1952 (different sources) as sedation without narcosis. It became possible to cause 'artificial hibernation' in patients, if used as a cocktail together with pethidine and hydergine. Patients with shock, severe trauma or burns, become, if treated so, sedated, without anxiety and unreponsive/indifferent to painful external stimuli like minor surgical interventions. It was first used for psychiatric patients by Pierre Deniker and Jean Delay in 1953. Drug treatment with chlorpromazine went beyond simple sedation with patients showing improvements in thinking and emotional behaviour. Ironically, the antipsychotic properties of chlorpromazine appear to be unrelated to its sedative properties. During long term therapy some tolerance to the sedation effect develops. Chlorpromazine substituted and eclipsed the old therapies of electro- and insulin shocks and other methods such as psychosurgical means (lobotomy) causing permanent brain injury. Chlorpromazine has given approximately 70% of all schizophrenic patients a complete remission or near so and a normal, gainful human life. Before the era of neuroleptics, starting with chlorpromazine, positive long-term results for psychotic patients were only 20%. [edit] Side effects Side effects of chlorpromazine are typical of early generation neuroleptics. They include extrapyramidal side effects such as tardive dyskinesia and akathisia. A particularly severe side effect is the neuroleptic malignant syndrome which occurs in approximately 0.05% and can be fatal. Also, chlorpromazine may lower seizure threshold. Additional side effects include dry mouth, increased appetite with weight gain, constipation and urinary retention. Glucose tolerance may be impaired. An allergic skin rash and photosensitivity may occur. Other important and severe side effects are a strong reduction in the number of white blood cells, referred to as leukopenia, or, in extreme cases, even agranulocytosis may result, which may lead to death via uncontrollable infections and/or sepsis. Chlorpromazine is the neuroleptic drug with the highest rates (0.5% to 1%) of liver toxicity of the cholestatic type. The sedation effect combined with indifference to physical stimuli, anecdotally known as the "thorazine shuffle," has long been associated with the drug. The image of psychiatric patients staggering mute around a padded cell has earned those particular side effects a place in mainstream pop culture. [edit] Interactions Chlorpromazine intensifies the central depressive action of drugs with such activity (tranquilizers, barbiturates, narcotics, antihistamines, OTC-antiemetics etc.). A dose reduction of chlorpromazine or the other drug may be necessary. Chlorpromazine also intensifies the actions and undesired side effects of antihypertensive medications and anticholinergic drugs. The combination of chlorpromazine with other antipsychotics may result in increased central depression, hypotension and extrapyramidal side effects, but may sometimes enhance the clinical results of therapy. The anti-worm drug (antihelminthic) piperazine may intensify extrapyramidal side effects. In general, all neuroleptics may lead to seizures in combination with tramadol (Ultram). Chlorpromazine may increase the insulin needs of diabetic patients. Drugs like SSRIs, St. John's Wort and barbiturates can inhibit various CYP-isoenzymes such as CYP2D6, needed for metabolization of chlorpromazine and/or its metabolites. Theoretically, this should increase the half-lives of chlorpromazine and possibly its metabolites, dosing changes necessary. The exact clinical significance of this enzyme induction and its therapeutic consequences are unknown at present time and remain to be evaluated. [edit] Uses [edit] Common uses [edit] As an antipsychotic The use of chlorpromazine has been primarily replaced by newer generation of atypical antipsychotics which have an improved side effect profile. Chlorpromazine is classified as a low- to moderate-potency antipsychotic and in the past was used in the treatment of both acute and chronic psychoses, including schizophrenia and the manic phase of manic depression as well as amphetamine-induced psychoses. Chlorpromazine formerly was the drug of choice to treat LSD (and other psychedelic/hallucinogen) intoxication in a hospital setting, resulting in it gaining an erroneous reputation as the LSD "antidote". Now haloperidol is more commonly used in such situations. [edit] Other uses It has also been used in porphyria, as part of tetanus treatment and for behavioral problems in children. It still is well recommended for short term management of severe anxiety and aggressive episodes. Resistant and severe hiccups, severe nausea/emesis and preanesthetic conditioning have been other indications in the past. It can be used to treat amphetamine overdose. [1] [edit] Off-label and controversial uses Chlorpromazine is occasionally used off-label for treatment of severe migraine. Sometimes it is used in small doses to improve nausea/emesis opioid-treated cancer patients encounter and to intensify and prolong the analgesic action of the opioids given. Interestingly, it remains controversial whether or not chlorpromazine has its own analgesic properties. Analgesic properties may result from a central action on the hypothalamus; the patient may feel the pain much less than before. Other mechanisms may be an interaction with opioid receptors centrally and/or in the spinal cord. Some experts on the contrary say that chlorpromazine, like other phenothiazines, may even have antianalgesic properties. Chlorpromazine has been proposed as useful in newborns for the treatment of opioid withdrawal, if the mother was opioid-dependent. The latter indication remains highly controversial. Chlorpromazine, as well as other neuroleptics, may also be used to alleviate the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal (chlorpromazine may lower the seizure-threshold in alcoholics). It has a unique action in cholera, reducing the loss of water by approximately 30%. In Germany, the brand of chlorpromazine drug Propaphenin® has additional indications for insomnia and itching skin disease. [edit] Veterinary uses Chlorpromazine is primarily used as an antiemetic in dogs and cats. It is also sometimes used as a preanesthetic and muscle relaxant in cattle, swine, sheep, and goats. It is generally contraindicated for use with horses, due to a high incidence of ataxia and altered mentation. [edit] Dosage In any case, use is determined by an attending physician. The following information is intended to serve as a guideline: A wide range is covered from 25 mg oral or intramuscular for mild sedation, every 8 hours, up to 100 mg every 6 hours for severely disturbed patients. Different qualified sources give 800 mg/day to 1,200 mg/day as highest dose. At least there is one small clinical trial in treatment-resistant patients with a daily dose of 1,200 mg chlorpromazine (and 4 mg Benztropine to counteract early extrapyramidal side effects, which were anticipated with this unusual high chlorpromazine dose). Initial doses should be low and be increased gradually. It is recommended that most of the daily dose (e.g. 2/3) is given at bedtime for maximum hypnotic activity and minimal daytime sedation and hypotension. In the USA there are controlled release forms of Thorazine (e.g. 300 mg). After the individual dose is well established, such a CR capsule can be given with the evening meal as a single dose, covering the next 24 hours. The lowest dosage compatible with good therapeutic effect should be given. Dosage in ambulatory patients should be particularly low (minimizing sedation and hypotension). The direct i.v.-injection of undiluted solution is contraindicated (massive fall in blood pressure, cardiovascular collapse), for i.v.-infusion of dilutions the (hospitalized) patient should be lying and the infusion rate should be as slow as possible. Afterwards the patient should rest in the lying position for at least 30 minutes. [edit] Necessary examinations and laboratory checks during treatment All patients treated with chlorpromazine on a long-term-basis should have regularly checked their blood-pressure, pulse rate, laboratory-tests (liver function tests, kidney-values, blood cell counts including differenciated white blood counts, counts of red blood cells and thrombocytes), ECG and EEG. The frequency of all checks should be determined for the individual patient and may be done in shorter intervals during the first 3 months of treatment and less often afterwards. Some side effects seem to appear more frequently during the first months of therapy (sedation, hypotension, liver damage) while others do not (e.g. tardive dyskinesia). [edit] Discontinuation of treatment Also, in regular intervals the treating physician should evaluate whether continued treatment is needed. If not, the drug should never be stopped suddenly, due to very unpleasant 'withdrawal-symptoms', such as agitation, sleeplessness, states of anxiety, etc. However, these symptoms definitely do not indicate psychological or physical dependence. The dose should rather be slowly tapered down at a rate of approximately 20–25% per week or even slower to avoid the aforementioned bothersome symptoms. Chlorpromazine is derived from phenothiazine, and has an aliphatic side chain, typical for low to middle potency neuroleptics. The oral bioavailability is estimated to be 30–50% due to extensive first pass metabolization in the liver. Its elimination-halflife is 16–30 hours. It has many active metabolites (approx. 75 different ones) with greatly varying halflives and own pharmacological profiles. The CYP-450 isoenzymes 1A2 and 2D6 are needed for metabolization of chlorpromazine and the subtype 2D6 is inhibited by chlorpromazine (NB: possible interactions with other drugs). Answered by Clarice Douet 1 year ago.


What are some reasons why a person might be prescribed 200 mg of thorazine?
...from a medical prospective. Asked by Enid Bylund 1 year ago.

Thorazine is used for the treatment of schizophrenia (severe disruptions in thought and perception). It is also prescribed for the short-term treatment of severe behavioral disorders in children, including explosive hyperactivity and combativeness; and for the hyperenergetic phase of manic-depressive illness (severely exaggerated moods). Thorazine is also used to control nausea and vomiting, and to relieve restlessness and apprehension before surgery. It is used as an aid in the treatment of tetanus, and is prescribed for uncontrollable hiccups and acute intermittent porphyria (attacks of severe abdominal pain sometimes accompanied by psychiatric disturbances, cramps in the arms and legs, and muscle weakness). Answered by Kylie Ornstein 1 year ago.

The warding off man or woman will have angry through a comment the have shyed away from man or woman made. The warding off man or woman will have a few prejudice towards the have shyed away from man or woman. The have shyed away from man or woman might remind the warding off man or woman of an ex-boyfriend or ex-female friend or different man or woman who the warding off man or woman desires to omit. Maybe anybody instructed the warding off man or woman that the have shyed away from man or woman does not like him/her. But the object is, why do you care? Answered by Eugenie Byrom 1 year ago.

It's an anti-psychotic, for bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. Answered by Pauline Sigmund 1 year ago.


What is Thorazine, Lorazepam and Compazine? What are they used for?
Asked by Catherine Lachowsky 1 year ago.

Chlorpromazine is classified as a low-potency typical antipsychotic and in the past was used in the treatment of both acute and chronic psychoses, including schizophrenia and the manic phase of bipolar disorder, as well as amphetamine-induced psychoses. Low-potency antipsychotics have more anticholinergic side effects, such as dry mouth, sedation, and constipation, and lower rates of extrapyramidal side effects, while high-potency antipsychotics (such as haloperidol) have the reverse profile. Chlorpromazine has also been used in porphyria and as part of tetanus treatment. It still is recommended for short-term management of severe anxiety and psychotic aggression. Resistant and severe hiccups, severe nausea/emesis, and preanesthetic conditioning are other uses. Symptoms of delirium in medically-hospitalized AIDS patients have been effectively treated with low doses of chlorpromazine Answered by Darwin Napier 1 year ago.

They are antipsycotic drugs used to treat manic depression, schizophrenia Answered by Chas Cichon 1 year ago.


Is 25 mg of Thorazine safe to take for anxiety?
Asked by Rosetta Kozusko 1 year ago.

Thorazine, at 25 mg, is used for chronic hiccups, nausea and vomitting, sedation before surgery, and sometimes anxiety. However, it is anti-psychotic, a tranquilizer, and very old school, so if it was not prescribed to you, don't tske it. This may just be a question of general curiosity, but if you need meds for anxiety, there are more suitable ones than thorazine. See the doc. to get the right one for you! Answered by Jamie Domenick 1 year ago.

Thorazine is not an anti-anxiety drug. It is an antipsychotic drug. Please do not take ANY prescription medication unless under the direction of your personal physician. Answered by Marisol Hoogland 1 year ago.

I think I would speak to a Pharmacist before listening to someone on Yahoo answers. Answered by Tanja Tish 1 year ago.

The potential for causing chronic movement disorders makes it far from ideal. Answered by Eladia Iossa 1 year ago.

It has more potential side effects than newer drugs. For example, seizures, heat exhaustion, drowsiness. Answered by Ula Rashad 1 year ago.


Is it true that Thorazine is as dangerous and the Psychiatric critics say it is?
From Psychiatric critics they criticize Thorazine a lot and say it messes people up like Lobotomy. Here is an example website criticizing Thorazine: http://www.sntp.net/drugs/thorazine.htm Asked by Verda Carthens 1 year ago.

Thorazine is no more dangerous than the others. Staying on it for too long can lead to specific complications, which is true with other anti-psychotics. It isn't used as much these days, but it is still a consideration for some people. It's OK to critisize thorazine, but no more so than for other such drugs. Answered by Laci Salamacha 1 year ago.

Wow! Normally, I don't answer questions that want to learn more and more detail. As in your case, because they require a long process, and it is the risk of not solve all of yours problems. I would suggest to proceed analytically with the help of keywords to be included in Yahoo! From what you climb, narrowing the field with new keywords, until you will be fully satisfied. good luck! Answered by Marianne Youngstrom 1 year ago.


Is Thorazine(Chlorpromazine) an older anti-psychotic?
I was prescribed this recently for Bipolar Disorder. Is it an older anti-psychotic?Thanks Asked by Adaline Pirrello 1 year ago.

Thorazine was one of the first anti-psychotics, created in 1950. It is still occasionally used in the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, but not as often as it was a few decades ago. It's a low potency anti-psychotic, so there is a lower chance of experiencing unwanted side effects. Answered by Hertha Feno 1 year ago.


How long will thorazine take to get in my urine stream?
i want to take a thorazine but i have a drug test at 10:00am and dont know what time yo take it so i can pass the drug test and still take it tonight Asked by Harry Lefever 1 year ago.

To my understanding, Thorazine is an anti-psychotic medication. It's not typically screened for on a drug test. However, if you do register with a false positive in another drug category as a result of this medication, all you have to do is show proof of a prescription and you're in the clear. Thorazine is excreted primarily through the urine and has a half-life from 10 to 40 hours. Answered by Kasie Goossens 1 year ago.

You can't wait until after the test to take it - just to be on the safe side? Answered by David Drevs 1 year ago.


About Thorazine/Largactil?
I have read alot about this drug, but I would like to hear from somone that has actually used it, or someone who knows someone who has used it.How sedating/tranquilizing is it? What are the main side-effects, and what pills do I need to counteract these side-effects? Asked by Gene Hegler 1 year ago.

About counteraction - I'm not sure. You'd have to take it to know if you'd have any counteractions, first. I took Thorazine for about a month for sleep. It never made me tired. It would, however, keep me asleep for 8-12 hrs once I laid down and fell asleep. Not a good drug if you need to be knocked out (in my opinion). I'm sure you've heard it called 'the chemical lobotomy'. I didn't feel like it erased too much of my personality, and I was still heavily addicted to drugs and it never made me seek/want drugs less. I really don't remember much from taking it. I snorted it once, and it burned like a SOB, but it knocked me out right away. Answered by Roslyn Jadlowiec 1 year ago.


Mrs S. has been taking Thorazine for about 1 year?
She has been having problems with orthostatic hypotension and akathisia, and has needed to take Cogentin to avoid dystonic reactions. The physician has decided to change her to Clozaril. The patient asks the nurse about the advantages and disadvantages of the new drug. The nurse has chosen Knowledge Deficit as the... Asked by Marquita Eckols 1 year ago.

She has been having problems with orthostatic hypotension and akathisia, and has needed to take Cogentin to avoid dystonic reactions. The physician has decided to change her to Clozaril. The patient asks the nurse about the advantages and disadvantages of the new drug. The nurse has chosen Knowledge Deficit as the nursing diagnosis for this patient. a) What interventions would be used for this diagnosis? b) How would the nurse evaluate the outcome of the interventions? Answered by Anabel Rovira 1 year ago.

thorazine is bound to have more severe side effects.. clozaril is an atypical antipsychotic drug, so it will be LESS likely to cause tardive dyskenesia and akathisia and other similarly devastating side effects (thanks to its anticholinergic properties). However, there is recent evidence that such drugs may increase the likelihood of metabolic disturbances (leading to diabetes) and cardiovascular disease. There are also sexual functioning side effects, but that is common to many psychotropic meds...Note that slow titration of dosing of Clozaril significantly decreases the likelihood of orthostatic hypotension, so the switch is right on the money for this mrs. s....... I would say the switch from thorazine to clozaril is not a bad idea. I have no idea what you mean by "knowledge deficit" and "nursing diagnosis", I'm coming from a clinical psych perspective, but hope this helps! Answered by Delcie Rueluas 1 year ago.


What is thorazine used for?
Asked by Chang Enstad 1 year ago.

Thorazine is used for the treatment of schizophrenia (severe disruptions in thought and perception). It is also prescribed for the short-term treatment of severe behavioral disorders in children, including explosive hyperactivity and combativeness; and for the hyperenergetic phase of manic-depressive illness (severely exaggerated moods). Thorazine is also used to control nausea and vomiting, and to relieve restlessness and apprehension before surgery. It is used as an aid in the treatment of tetanus, and is prescribed for uncontrollable hiccups and acute intermittent porphyria (attacks of severe abdominal pain sometimes accompanied by psychiatric disturbances, cramps in the arms and legs, and muscle weakness). Answered by Kallie Knipfel 1 year ago.

Thorazine Uses Answered by Darby Sorrick 1 year ago.

I don't know all of its uses, but I was given Thorazine for migraines. Answered by Guillermina Aspacio 1 year ago.

It is a old anti-psychotic. They use to use it a lot in psychiatric hospitals to calm down patients. It is also used for migraines at times. Answered by Donna Cockrin 1 year ago.

To mess with kids minds! Answered by Madison Birky 1 year ago.

PAIN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!... Answered by Pei Tease 1 year ago.

Chlorpromazine was the first antipsychotic drug, used during the 1950s and 1960s. Used as chlorpromazine hydrochloride and sold under the tradenames Largactil® and Thorazine®, it has sedative, hypotensive and antiemetic properties as well as anticholinergic and antidopaminergic effects. It has also anxiolytic (alleviation of anxiety) properties. Today, chlorpromazine is considered a typical antipsychotic. Chlorpromazine acts as an antagonist (blocking agent) on different postsynaptic receptors: on dopaminergic-receptors (subtypes D1, D2, D3 and D4, different antipsychotic properties on productive and unproductive symptoms), on serotonergic-receptors (5-HT1 and 5-HT2, with anxiolytic, antidepressive and antiaggressive properties as well as an attenuation of extrapypramidal side effects, but also leading to weight gain, fall in blood pressure, sedation and ejaculation difficulties), on histaminergic-receptors (H1-receptors, sedation, antiemesis, vertigo, fall in blood pressure and weight gain), on alpha1/alpha2-receptors (antisympathomimetic properties, lowering of blood pressure, reflex tachycardia, vertigo, sedation, hypersalivation and incontinence as well as sexual dysfunction, but may also attenuate pseudoparkinsonism—controversial), and on muscarinic (cholinergic) M1/M2-receptors (causing anticholinergic symptoms like dry mouth, blurred vision, obstipation, difficulty/inability to urinate, sinus tachycardia, ECG-changes and loss of memory, but the anticholinergic action may attenuate extrapyramidal side effects). Additionally, chlorpromazine is a weak presynaptic inhibitor of dopamine reuptake, which may lead to (mild) antidepressive and antiparkinsonian effects. This action could also account for psychomotor agitation and amplification of psychosis (very rarely noted in clinical use). [edit] Peripheral Antagonist to H1 receptors (antiallergic effects), H2 receptors (reduction of forming of gastric juice), M1/M2-receptors (dry mouth, reduction in forming of gastric juice) and some 5-HT receptors (different anti-allergic/gastrointestinal actions). Because it acts on so many receptors, chlorpromazine is often referred to as "dirty drug", whereas the atypical neuroleptic amisulpride for example acts only on central D2/D3-receptors and is therefore a "clean drug". This distinction is not a positive or negative value judgment on the drug, rather it is a neutral term which merely describes the agent's relative pharmacology. [edit] History The drug had been developed by Laboratoires Rhône-Poulenc in 1950 but they sold the rights in 1952 to Smith-Kline & French (today's GlaxoSmithKline). The drug was being sold as an antiemetic when its other use was noted. Smith-Kline was quick to encourage clinical trials and in 1954 the drug was approved in the US for psychiatric treatment. Over 100 million people were treated but the popularity of the drug fell from the late 1960s as the severe extrapyramidal side effects and tardive dyskinesia became more of a concern. From chlorpromazine a number of other similar neuroleptics were developed (e.g. triflupromazine, trifluoperazine). Previously used as an antihistamine and antiemetic its effects on mental state were first reported by the French doctor Henri Laborit in 1951 or 1952 (different sources) as sedation without narcosis. It became possible to cause 'artificial hibernation' in patients, if used as a cocktail together with pethidine and hydergine. Patients with shock, severe trauma or burns, become, if treated so, sedated, without anxiety and unreponsive/indifferent to painful external stimuli like minor surgical interventions. It was first used for psychiatric patients by Pierre Deniker and Jean Delay in 1953. Drug treatment with chlorpromazine went beyond simple sedation with patients showing improvements in thinking and emotional behaviour. Ironically, the antipsychotic properties of chlorpromazine appear to be unrelated to its sedative properties. During long term therapy some tolerance to the sedation effect develops. Chlorpromazine substituted and eclipsed the old therapies of electro- and insulin shocks and other methods such as psychosurgical means (lobotomy) causing permanent brain injury. Chlorpromazine has given approximately 70% of all schizophrenic patients a complete remission or near so and a normal, gainful human life. Before the era of neuroleptics, starting with chlorpromazine, positive long-term results for psychotic patients were only 20%. [edit] Side effects Side effects of chlorpromazine are typical of early generation neuroleptics. They include extrapyramidal side effects such as tardive dyskinesia and akathisia. A particularly severe side effect is the neuroleptic malignant syndrome which occurs in approximately 0.05% and can be fatal. Also, chlorpromazine may lower seizure threshold. Additional side effects include dry mouth, increased appetite with weight gain, constipation and urinary retention. Glucose tolerance may be impaired. An allergic skin rash and photosensitivity may occur. Other important and severe side effects are a strong reduction in the number of white blood cells, referred to as leukopenia, or, in extreme cases, even agranulocytosis may result, which may lead to death via uncontrollable infections and/or sepsis. Chlorpromazine is the neuroleptic drug with the highest rates (0.5% to 1%) of liver toxicity of the cholestatic type. The sedation effect combined with indifference to physical stimuli, anecdotally known as the "thorazine shuffle," has long been associated with the drug. The image of psychiatric patients staggering mute around a padded cell has earned those particular side effects a place in mainstream pop culture. [edit] Interactions Chlorpromazine intensifies the central depressive action of drugs with such activity (tranquilizers, barbiturates, narcotics, antihistamines, OTC-antiemetics etc.). A dose reduction of chlorpromazine or the other drug may be necessary. Chlorpromazine also intensifies the actions and undesired side effects of antihypertensive medications and anticholinergic drugs. The combination of chlorpromazine with other antipsychotics may result in increased central depression, hypotension and extrapyramidal side effects, but may sometimes enhance the clinical results of therapy. The anti-worm drug (antihelminthic) piperazine may intensify extrapyramidal side effects. In general, all neuroleptics may lead to seizures in combination with tramadol (Ultram). Chlorpromazine may increase the insulin needs of diabetic patients. Drugs like SSRIs, St. John's Wort and barbiturates can inhibit various CYP-isoenzymes such as CYP2D6, needed for metabolization of chlorpromazine and/or its metabolites. Theoretically, this should increase the half-lives of chlorpromazine and possibly its metabolites, dosing changes necessary. The exact clinical significance of this enzyme induction and its therapeutic consequences are unknown at present time and remain to be evaluated. [edit] Uses [edit] Common uses [edit] As an antipsychotic The use of chlorpromazine has been primarily replaced by newer generation of atypical antipsychotics which have an improved side effect profile. Chlorpromazine is classified as a low- to moderate-potency antipsychotic and in the past was used in the treatment of both acute and chronic psychoses, including schizophrenia and the manic phase of manic depression as well as amphetamine-induced psychoses. Chlorpromazine formerly was the drug of choice to treat LSD (and other psychedelic/hallucinogen) intoxication in a hospital setting, resulting in it gaining an erroneous reputation as the LSD "antidote". Now haloperidol is more commonly used in such situations. [edit] Other uses It has also been used in porphyria, as part of tetanus treatment and for behavioral problems in children. It still is well recommended for short term management of severe anxiety and aggressive episodes. Resistant and severe hiccups, severe nausea/emesis and preanesthetic conditioning have been other indications in the past. It can be used to treat amphetamine overdose. [1] [edit] Off-label and controversial uses Chlorpromazine is occasionally used off-label for treatment of severe migraine. Sometimes it is used in small doses to improve nausea/emesis opioid-treated cancer patients encounter and to intensify and prolong the analgesic action of the opioids given. Interestingly, it remains controversial whether or not chlorpromazine has its own analgesic properties. Analgesic properties may result from a central action on the hypothalamus; the patient may feel the pain much less than before. Other mechanisms may be an interaction with opioid receptors centrally and/or in the spinal cord. Some experts on the contrary say that chlorpromazine, like other phenothiazines, may even have antianalgesic properties. Chlorpromazine has been proposed as useful in newborns for the treatment of opioid withdrawal, if the mother was opioid-dependent. The latter indication remains highly controversial. Chlorpromazine, as well as other neuroleptics, may also be used to alleviate the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal (chlorpromazine may lower the seizure-threshold in alcoholics). It has a unique action in cholera, reducing the loss of water by approximately 30%. In Germany, the brand of chlorpromazine drug Propaphenin® has additional indications for insomnia and itching skin disease. [edit] Veterinary uses Chlorpromazine is primarily used as an antiemetic in dogs and cats. It is also sometimes used as a preanesthetic and muscle relaxant in cattle, swine, sheep, and goats. It is generally contraindicated for use with horses, due to a high incidence of ataxia and altered mentation. [edit] Dosage In any case, use is determined by an attending physician. The following information is intended to serve as a guideline: A wide range is covered from 25 mg oral or intramuscular for mild sedation, every 8 hours, up to 100 mg every 6 hours for severely disturbed patients. Different qualified sources give 800 mg/day to 1,200 mg/day as highest dose. At least there is one small clinical trial in treatment-resistant patients with a daily dose of 1,200 mg chlorpromazine (and 4 mg Benztropine to counteract early extrapyramidal side effects, which were anticipated with this unusual high chlorpromazine dose). Initial doses should be low and be increased gradually. It is recommended that most of the daily dose (e.g. 2/3) is given at bedtime for maximum hypnotic activity and minimal daytime sedation and hypotension. In the USA there are controlled release forms of Thorazine (e.g. 300 mg). After the individual dose is well established, such a CR capsule can be given with the evening meal as a single dose, covering the next 24 hours. The lowest dosage compatible with good therapeutic effect should be given. Dosage in ambulatory patients should be particularly low (minimizing sedation and hypotension). The direct i.v.-injection of undiluted solution is contraindicated (massive fall in blood pressure, cardiovascular collapse), for i.v.-infusion of dilutions the (hospitalized) patient should be lying and the infusion rate should be as slow as possible. Afterwards the patient should rest in the lying position for at least 30 minutes. [edit] Necessary examinations and laboratory checks during treatment All patients treated with chlorpromazine on a long-term-basis should have regularly checked their blood-pressure, pulse rate, laboratory-tests (liver function tests, kidney-values, blood cell counts including differenciated white blood counts, counts of red blood cells and thrombocytes), ECG and EEG. The frequency of all checks should be determined for the individual patient and may be done in shorter intervals during the first 3 months of treatment and less often afterwards. Some side effects seem to appear more frequently during the first months of therapy (sedation, hypotension, liver damage) while others do not (e.g. tardive dyskinesia). [edit] Discontinuation of treatment Also, in regular intervals the treating physician should evaluate whether continued treatment is needed. If not, the drug should never be stopped suddenly, due to very unpleasant 'withdrawal-symptoms', such as agitation, sleeplessness, states of anxiety, etc. However, these symptoms definitely do not indicate psychological or physical dependence. The dose should rather be slowly tapered down at a rate of approximately 20–25% per week or even slower to avoid the aforementioned bothersome symptoms. Chlorpromazine is derived from phenothiazine, and has an aliphatic side chain, typical for low to middle potency neuroleptics. The oral bioavailability is estimated to be 30–50% due to extensive first pass metabolization in the liver. Its elimination-halflife is 16–30 hours. It has many active metabolites (approx. 75 different ones) with greatly varying halflives and own pharmacological profiles. The CYP-450 isoenzymes 1A2 and 2D6 are needed for metabolization of chlorpromazine and the subtype 2D6 is inhibited by chlorpromazine (NB: possible interactions with other drugs). Answered by Stefani Dillard 1 year ago.


What are some reasons why a person might be prescribed 200 mg of thorazine?
...from a medical prospective. Asked by Hollie Simoes 1 year ago.

Thorazine is used for the treatment of schizophrenia (severe disruptions in thought and perception). It is also prescribed for the short-term treatment of severe behavioral disorders in children, including explosive hyperactivity and combativeness; and for the hyperenergetic phase of manic-depressive illness (severely exaggerated moods). Thorazine is also used to control nausea and vomiting, and to relieve restlessness and apprehension before surgery. It is used as an aid in the treatment of tetanus, and is prescribed for uncontrollable hiccups and acute intermittent porphyria (attacks of severe abdominal pain sometimes accompanied by psychiatric disturbances, cramps in the arms and legs, and muscle weakness). Answered by Myrta Kuss 1 year ago.

The warding off man or woman will have angry through a comment the have shyed away from man or woman made. The warding off man or woman will have a few prejudice towards the have shyed away from man or woman. The have shyed away from man or woman might remind the warding off man or woman of an ex-boyfriend or ex-female friend or different man or woman who the warding off man or woman desires to omit. Maybe anybody instructed the warding off man or woman that the have shyed away from man or woman does not like him/her. But the object is, why do you care? Answered by Venetta Caprario 1 year ago.

It's an anti-psychotic, for bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. Answered by Lavenia Montey 1 year ago.


What is Thorazine, Lorazepam and Compazine? What are they used for?
Asked by Lynell Bastine 1 year ago.

Chlorpromazine is classified as a low-potency typical antipsychotic and in the past was used in the treatment of both acute and chronic psychoses, including schizophrenia and the manic phase of bipolar disorder, as well as amphetamine-induced psychoses. Low-potency antipsychotics have more anticholinergic side effects, such as dry mouth, sedation, and constipation, and lower rates of extrapyramidal side effects, while high-potency antipsychotics (such as haloperidol) have the reverse profile. Chlorpromazine has also been used in porphyria and as part of tetanus treatment. It still is recommended for short-term management of severe anxiety and psychotic aggression. Resistant and severe hiccups, severe nausea/emesis, and preanesthetic conditioning are other uses. Symptoms of delirium in medically-hospitalized AIDS patients have been effectively treated with low doses of chlorpromazine Answered by Ola Crouthamel 1 year ago.

They are antipsycotic drugs used to treat manic depression, schizophrenia Answered by Lasandra Juras 1 year ago.


Is 25 mg of Thorazine safe to take for anxiety?
Asked by Kurtis Aye 1 year ago.

Thorazine, at 25 mg, is used for chronic hiccups, nausea and vomitting, sedation before surgery, and sometimes anxiety. However, it is anti-psychotic, a tranquilizer, and very old school, so if it was not prescribed to you, don't tske it. This may just be a question of general curiosity, but if you need meds for anxiety, there are more suitable ones than thorazine. See the doc. to get the right one for you! Answered by Judie Seigworth 1 year ago.

Thorazine is not an anti-anxiety drug. It is an antipsychotic drug. Please do not take ANY prescription medication unless under the direction of your personal physician. Answered by Polly Pellot 1 year ago.

I think I would speak to a Pharmacist before listening to someone on Yahoo answers. Answered by Jeannette Slentz 1 year ago.

The potential for causing chronic movement disorders makes it far from ideal. Answered by Sigrid Lopze 1 year ago.

It has more potential side effects than newer drugs. For example, seizures, heat exhaustion, drowsiness. Answered by Assunta Kunkel 1 year ago.


Is it true that Thorazine is as dangerous and the Psychiatric critics say it is?
From Psychiatric critics they criticize Thorazine a lot and say it messes people up like Lobotomy. Here is an example website criticizing Thorazine: http://www.sntp.net/drugs/thorazine.htm Asked by Alease Petrocco 1 year ago.

Thorazine is no more dangerous than the others. Staying on it for too long can lead to specific complications, which is true with other anti-psychotics. It isn't used as much these days, but it is still a consideration for some people. It's OK to critisize thorazine, but no more so than for other such drugs. Answered by Joann Iacovetto 1 year ago.

Wow! Normally, I don't answer questions that want to learn more and more detail. As in your case, because they require a long process, and it is the risk of not solve all of yours problems. I would suggest to proceed analytically with the help of keywords to be included in Yahoo! From what you climb, narrowing the field with new keywords, until you will be fully satisfied. good luck! Answered by Daysi Champa 1 year ago.


Is Thorazine(Chlorpromazine) an older anti-psychotic?
I was prescribed this recently for Bipolar Disorder. Is it an older anti-psychotic?Thanks Asked by Altha Ruppert 1 year ago.

Thorazine was one of the first anti-psychotics, created in 1950. It is still occasionally used in the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, but not as often as it was a few decades ago. It's a low potency anti-psychotic, so there is a lower chance of experiencing unwanted side effects. Answered by Wonda Fossey 1 year ago.


How long will thorazine take to get in my urine stream?
i want to take a thorazine but i have a drug test at 10:00am and dont know what time yo take it so i can pass the drug test and still take it tonight Asked by Lawanna Simeon 1 year ago.

To my understanding, Thorazine is an anti-psychotic medication. It's not typically screened for on a drug test. However, if you do register with a false positive in another drug category as a result of this medication, all you have to do is show proof of a prescription and you're in the clear. Thorazine is excreted primarily through the urine and has a half-life from 10 to 40 hours. Answered by Vilma Linsin 1 year ago.

You can't wait until after the test to take it - just to be on the safe side? Answered by Carissa Weipert 1 year ago.


About Thorazine/Largactil?
I have read alot about this drug, but I would like to hear from somone that has actually used it, or someone who knows someone who has used it.How sedating/tranquilizing is it? What are the main side-effects, and what pills do I need to counteract these side-effects? Asked by Hilma Bozzo 1 year ago.

About counteraction - I'm not sure. You'd have to take it to know if you'd have any counteractions, first. I took Thorazine for about a month for sleep. It never made me tired. It would, however, keep me asleep for 8-12 hrs once I laid down and fell asleep. Not a good drug if you need to be knocked out (in my opinion). I'm sure you've heard it called 'the chemical lobotomy'. I didn't feel like it erased too much of my personality, and I was still heavily addicted to drugs and it never made me seek/want drugs less. I really don't remember much from taking it. I snorted it once, and it burned like a SOB, but it knocked me out right away. Answered by Modesta Boarts 1 year ago.


Mrs S. has been taking Thorazine for about 1 year?
She has been having problems with orthostatic hypotension and akathisia, and has needed to take Cogentin to avoid dystonic reactions. The physician has decided to change her to Clozaril. The patient asks the nurse about the advantages and disadvantages of the new drug. The nurse has chosen Knowledge Deficit as the... Asked by Mia Bilder 1 year ago.

She has been having problems with orthostatic hypotension and akathisia, and has needed to take Cogentin to avoid dystonic reactions. The physician has decided to change her to Clozaril. The patient asks the nurse about the advantages and disadvantages of the new drug. The nurse has chosen Knowledge Deficit as the nursing diagnosis for this patient. a) What interventions would be used for this diagnosis? b) How would the nurse evaluate the outcome of the interventions? Answered by Kevin Blomquist 1 year ago.

thorazine is bound to have more severe side effects.. clozaril is an atypical antipsychotic drug, so it will be LESS likely to cause tardive dyskenesia and akathisia and other similarly devastating side effects (thanks to its anticholinergic properties). However, there is recent evidence that such drugs may increase the likelihood of metabolic disturbances (leading to diabetes) and cardiovascular disease. There are also sexual functioning side effects, but that is common to many psychotropic meds...Note that slow titration of dosing of Clozaril significantly decreases the likelihood of orthostatic hypotension, so the switch is right on the money for this mrs. s....... I would say the switch from thorazine to clozaril is not a bad idea. I have no idea what you mean by "knowledge deficit" and "nursing diagnosis", I'm coming from a clinical psych perspective, but hope this helps! Answered by Miss Brotemarkle 1 year ago.


What is thorazine used for?
Asked by Theodore Lindon 1 year ago.

Thorazine is used for the treatment of schizophrenia (severe disruptions in thought and perception). It is also prescribed for the short-term treatment of severe behavioral disorders in children, including explosive hyperactivity and combativeness; and for the hyperenergetic phase of manic-depressive illness (severely exaggerated moods). Thorazine is also used to control nausea and vomiting, and to relieve restlessness and apprehension before surgery. It is used as an aid in the treatment of tetanus, and is prescribed for uncontrollable hiccups and acute intermittent porphyria (attacks of severe abdominal pain sometimes accompanied by psychiatric disturbances, cramps in the arms and legs, and muscle weakness). Answered by Georgianna Dannard 1 year ago.

Thorazine Uses Answered by Shaunta Robson 1 year ago.

I don't know all of its uses, but I was given Thorazine for migraines. Answered by Sumiko Deschner 1 year ago.

It is a old anti-psychotic. They use to use it a lot in psychiatric hospitals to calm down patients. It is also used for migraines at times. Answered by Jacquline Riche 1 year ago.

To mess with kids minds! Answered by Wendolyn Vilcan 1 year ago.

PAIN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!... Answered by Verena Napoles 1 year ago.

Chlorpromazine was the first antipsychotic drug, used during the 1950s and 1960s. Used as chlorpromazine hydrochloride and sold under the tradenames Largactil® and Thorazine®, it has sedative, hypotensive and antiemetic properties as well as anticholinergic and antidopaminergic effects. It has also anxiolytic (alleviation of anxiety) properties. Today, chlorpromazine is considered a typical antipsychotic. Chlorpromazine acts as an antagonist (blocking agent) on different postsynaptic receptors: on dopaminergic-receptors (subtypes D1, D2, D3 and D4, different antipsychotic properties on productive and unproductive symptoms), on serotonergic-receptors (5-HT1 and 5-HT2, with anxiolytic, antidepressive and antiaggressive properties as well as an attenuation of extrapypramidal side effects, but also leading to weight gain, fall in blood pressure, sedation and ejaculation difficulties), on histaminergic-receptors (H1-receptors, sedation, antiemesis, vertigo, fall in blood pressure and weight gain), on alpha1/alpha2-receptors (antisympathomimetic properties, lowering of blood pressure, reflex tachycardia, vertigo, sedation, hypersalivation and incontinence as well as sexual dysfunction, but may also attenuate pseudoparkinsonism—controversial), and on muscarinic (cholinergic) M1/M2-receptors (causing anticholinergic symptoms like dry mouth, blurred vision, obstipation, difficulty/inability to urinate, sinus tachycardia, ECG-changes and loss of memory, but the anticholinergic action may attenuate extrapyramidal side effects). Additionally, chlorpromazine is a weak presynaptic inhibitor of dopamine reuptake, which may lead to (mild) antidepressive and antiparkinsonian effects. This action could also account for psychomotor agitation and amplification of psychosis (very rarely noted in clinical use). [edit] Peripheral Antagonist to H1 receptors (antiallergic effects), H2 receptors (reduction of forming of gastric juice), M1/M2-receptors (dry mouth, reduction in forming of gastric juice) and some 5-HT receptors (different anti-allergic/gastrointestinal actions). Because it acts on so many receptors, chlorpromazine is often referred to as "dirty drug", whereas the atypical neuroleptic amisulpride for example acts only on central D2/D3-receptors and is therefore a "clean drug". This distinction is not a positive or negative value judgment on the drug, rather it is a neutral term which merely describes the agent's relative pharmacology. [edit] History The drug had been developed by Laboratoires Rhône-Poulenc in 1950 but they sold the rights in 1952 to Smith-Kline & French (today's GlaxoSmithKline). The drug was being sold as an antiemetic when its other use was noted. Smith-Kline was quick to encourage clinical trials and in 1954 the drug was approved in the US for psychiatric treatment. Over 100 million people were treated but the popularity of the drug fell from the late 1960s as the severe extrapyramidal side effects and tardive dyskinesia became more of a concern. From chlorpromazine a number of other similar neuroleptics were developed (e.g. triflupromazine, trifluoperazine). Previously used as an antihistamine and antiemetic its effects on mental state were first reported by the French doctor Henri Laborit in 1951 or 1952 (different sources) as sedation without narcosis. It became possible to cause 'artificial hibernation' in patients, if used as a cocktail together with pethidine and hydergine. Patients with shock, severe trauma or burns, become, if treated so, sedated, without anxiety and unreponsive/indifferent to painful external stimuli like minor surgical interventions. It was first used for psychiatric patients by Pierre Deniker and Jean Delay in 1953. Drug treatment with chlorpromazine went beyond simple sedation with patients showing improvements in thinking and emotional behaviour. Ironically, the antipsychotic properties of chlorpromazine appear to be unrelated to its sedative properties. During long term therapy some tolerance to the sedation effect develops. Chlorpromazine substituted and eclipsed the old therapies of electro- and insulin shocks and other methods such as psychosurgical means (lobotomy) causing permanent brain injury. Chlorpromazine has given approximately 70% of all schizophrenic patients a complete remission or near so and a normal, gainful human life. Before the era of neuroleptics, starting with chlorpromazine, positive long-term results for psychotic patients were only 20%. [edit] Side effects Side effects of chlorpromazine are typical of early generation neuroleptics. They include extrapyramidal side effects such as tardive dyskinesia and akathisia. A particularly severe side effect is the neuroleptic malignant syndrome which occurs in approximately 0.05% and can be fatal. Also, chlorpromazine may lower seizure threshold. Additional side effects include dry mouth, increased appetite with weight gain, constipation and urinary retention. Glucose tolerance may be impaired. An allergic skin rash and photosensitivity may occur. Other important and severe side effects are a strong reduction in the number of white blood cells, referred to as leukopenia, or, in extreme cases, even agranulocytosis may result, which may lead to death via uncontrollable infections and/or sepsis. Chlorpromazine is the neuroleptic drug with the highest rates (0.5% to 1%) of liver toxicity of the cholestatic type. The sedation effect combined with indifference to physical stimuli, anecdotally known as the "thorazine shuffle," has long been associated with the drug. The image of psychiatric patients staggering mute around a padded cell has earned those particular side effects a place in mainstream pop culture. [edit] Interactions Chlorpromazine intensifies the central depressive action of drugs with such activity (tranquilizers, barbiturates, narcotics, antihistamines, OTC-antiemetics etc.). A dose reduction of chlorpromazine or the other drug may be necessary. Chlorpromazine also intensifies the actions and undesired side effects of antihypertensive medications and anticholinergic drugs. The combination of chlorpromazine with other antipsychotics may result in increased central depression, hypotension and extrapyramidal side effects, but may sometimes enhance the clinical results of therapy. The anti-worm drug (antihelminthic) piperazine may intensify extrapyramidal side effects. In general, all neuroleptics may lead to seizures in combination with tramadol (Ultram). Chlorpromazine may increase the insulin needs of diabetic patients. Drugs like SSRIs, St. John's Wort and barbiturates can inhibit various CYP-isoenzymes such as CYP2D6, needed for metabolization of chlorpromazine and/or its metabolites. Theoretically, this should increase the half-lives of chlorpromazine and possibly its metabolites, dosing changes necessary. The exact clinical significance of this enzyme induction and its therapeutic consequences are unknown at present time and remain to be evaluated. [edit] Uses [edit] Common uses [edit] As an antipsychotic The use of chlorpromazine has been primarily replaced by newer generation of atypical antipsychotics which have an improved side effect profile. Chlorpromazine is classified as a low- to moderate-potency antipsychotic and in the past was used in the treatment of both acute and chronic psychoses, including schizophrenia and the manic phase of manic depression as well as amphetamine-induced psychoses. Chlorpromazine formerly was the drug of choice to treat LSD (and other psychedelic/hallucinogen) intoxication in a hospital setting, resulting in it gaining an erroneous reputation as the LSD "antidote". Now haloperidol is more commonly used in such situations. [edit] Other uses It has also been used in porphyria, as part of tetanus treatment and for behavioral problems in children. It still is well recommended for short term management of severe anxiety and aggressive episodes. Resistant and severe hiccups, severe nausea/emesis and preanesthetic conditioning have been other indications in the past. It can be used to treat amphetamine overdose. [1] [edit] Off-label and controversial uses Chlorpromazine is occasionally used off-label for treatment of severe migraine. Sometimes it is used in small doses to improve nausea/emesis opioid-treated cancer patients encounter and to intensify and prolong the analgesic action of the opioids given. Interestingly, it remains controversial whether or not chlorpromazine has its own analgesic properties. Analgesic properties may result from a central action on the hypothalamus; the patient may feel the pain much less than before. Other mechanisms may be an interaction with opioid receptors centrally and/or in the spinal cord. Some experts on the contrary say that chlorpromazine, like other phenothiazines, may even have antianalgesic properties. Chlorpromazine has been proposed as useful in newborns for the treatment of opioid withdrawal, if the mother was opioid-dependent. The latter indication remains highly controversial. Chlorpromazine, as well as other neuroleptics, may also be used to alleviate the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal (chlorpromazine may lower the seizure-threshold in alcoholics). It has a unique action in cholera, reducing the loss of water by approximately 30%. In Germany, the brand of chlorpromazine drug Propaphenin® has additional indications for insomnia and itching skin disease. [edit] Veterinary uses Chlorpromazine is primarily used as an antiemetic in dogs and cats. It is also sometimes used as a preanesthetic and muscle relaxant in cattle, swine, sheep, and goats. It is generally contraindicated for use with horses, due to a high incidence of ataxia and altered mentation. [edit] Dosage In any case, use is determined by an attending physician. The following information is intended to serve as a guideline: A wide range is covered from 25 mg oral or intramuscular for mild sedation, every 8 hours, up to 100 mg every 6 hours for severely disturbed patients. Different qualified sources give 800 mg/day to 1,200 mg/day as highest dose. At least there is one small clinical trial in treatment-resistant patients with a daily dose of 1,200 mg chlorpromazine (and 4 mg Benztropine to counteract early extrapyramidal side effects, which were anticipated with this unusual high chlorpromazine dose). Initial doses should be low and be increased gradually. It is recommended that most of the daily dose (e.g. 2/3) is given at bedtime for maximum hypnotic activity and minimal daytime sedation and hypotension. In the USA there are controlled release forms of Thorazine (e.g. 300 mg). After the individual dose is well established, such a CR capsule can be given with the evening meal as a single dose, covering the next 24 hours. The lowest dosage compatible with good therapeutic effect should be given. Dosage in ambulatory patients should be particularly low (minimizing sedation and hypotension). The direct i.v.-injection of undiluted solution is contraindicated (massive fall in blood pressure, cardiovascular collapse), for i.v.-infusion of dilutions the (hospitalized) patient should be lying and the infusion rate should be as slow as possible. Afterwards the patient should rest in the lying position for at least 30 minutes. [edit] Necessary examinations and laboratory checks during treatment All patients treated with chlorpromazine on a long-term-basis should have regularly checked their blood-pressure, pulse rate, laboratory-tests (liver function tests, kidney-values, blood cell counts including differenciated white blood counts, counts of red blood cells and thrombocytes), ECG and EEG. The frequency of all checks should be determined for the individual patient and may be done in shorter intervals during the first 3 months of treatment and less often afterwards. Some side effects seem to appear more frequently during the first months of therapy (sedation, hypotension, liver damage) while others do not (e.g. tardive dyskinesia). [edit] Discontinuation of treatment Also, in regular intervals the treating physician should evaluate whether continued treatment is needed. If not, the drug should never be stopped suddenly, due to very unpleasant 'withdrawal-symptoms', such as agitation, sleeplessness, states of anxiety, etc. However, these symptoms definitely do not indicate psychological or physical dependence. The dose should rather be slowly tapered down at a rate of approximately 20–25% per week or even slower to avoid the aforementioned bothersome symptoms. Chlorpromazine is derived from phenothiazine, and has an aliphatic side chain, typical for low to middle potency neuroleptics. The oral bioavailability is estimated to be 30–50% due to extensive first pass metabolization in the liver. Its elimination-halflife is 16–30 hours. It has many active metabolites (approx. 75 different ones) with greatly varying halflives and own pharmacological profiles. The CYP-450 isoenzymes 1A2 and 2D6 are needed for metabolization of chlorpromazine and the subtype 2D6 is inhibited by chlorpromazine (NB: possible interactions with other drugs). Answered by Bethany Alvara 1 year ago.


What are some reasons why a person might be prescribed 200 mg of thorazine?
...from a medical prospective. Asked by Nolan Boehlar 1 year ago.

Thorazine is used for the treatment of schizophrenia (severe disruptions in thought and perception). It is also prescribed for the short-term treatment of severe behavioral disorders in children, including explosive hyperactivity and combativeness; and for the hyperenergetic phase of manic-depressive illness (severely exaggerated moods). Thorazine is also used to control nausea and vomiting, and to relieve restlessness and apprehension before surgery. It is used as an aid in the treatment of tetanus, and is prescribed for uncontrollable hiccups and acute intermittent porphyria (attacks of severe abdominal pain sometimes accompanied by psychiatric disturbances, cramps in the arms and legs, and muscle weakness). Answered by Andy Demilt 1 year ago.

The warding off man or woman will have angry through a comment the have shyed away from man or woman made. The warding off man or woman will have a few prejudice towards the have shyed away from man or woman. The have shyed away from man or woman might remind the warding off man or woman of an ex-boyfriend or ex-female friend or different man or woman who the warding off man or woman desires to omit. Maybe anybody instructed the warding off man or woman that the have shyed away from man or woman does not like him/her. But the object is, why do you care? Answered by Tonya Theil 1 year ago.

It's an anti-psychotic, for bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. Answered by Gerry Dorries 1 year ago.


What is Thorazine, Lorazepam and Compazine? What are they used for?
Asked by Lashaun Guilfoos 1 year ago.

Chlorpromazine is classified as a low-potency typical antipsychotic and in the past was used in the treatment of both acute and chronic psychoses, including schizophrenia and the manic phase of bipolar disorder, as well as amphetamine-induced psychoses. Low-potency antipsychotics have more anticholinergic side effects, such as dry mouth, sedation, and constipation, and lower rates of extrapyramidal side effects, while high-potency antipsychotics (such as haloperidol) have the reverse profile. Chlorpromazine has also been used in porphyria and as part of tetanus treatment. It still is recommended for short-term management of severe anxiety and psychotic aggression. Resistant and severe hiccups, severe nausea/emesis, and preanesthetic conditioning are other uses. Symptoms of delirium in medically-hospitalized AIDS patients have been effectively treated with low doses of chlorpromazine Answered by Tomasa Wingenter 1 year ago.

They are antipsycotic drugs used to treat manic depression, schizophrenia Answered by Alisa Heimark 1 year ago.


Is 25 mg of Thorazine safe to take for anxiety?
Asked by Deja Niblett 1 year ago.

Thorazine, at 25 mg, is used for chronic hiccups, nausea and vomitting, sedation before surgery, and sometimes anxiety. However, it is anti-psychotic, a tranquilizer, and very old school, so if it was not prescribed to you, don't tske it. This may just be a question of general curiosity, but if you need meds for anxiety, there are more suitable ones than thorazine. See the doc. to get the right one for you! Answered by Tiffani Galustian 1 year ago.

Thorazine is not an anti-anxiety drug. It is an antipsychotic drug. Please do not take ANY prescription medication unless under the direction of your personal physician. Answered by Hyun Holifield 1 year ago.

I think I would speak to a Pharmacist before listening to someone on Yahoo answers. Answered by Veta Gazaille 1 year ago.

The potential for causing chronic movement disorders makes it far from ideal. Answered by Madison Gutknecht 1 year ago.

It has more potential side effects than newer drugs. For example, seizures, heat exhaustion, drowsiness. Answered by Hilaria Flemmon 1 year ago.


Is it true that Thorazine is as dangerous and the Psychiatric critics say it is?
From Psychiatric critics they criticize Thorazine a lot and say it messes people up like Lobotomy. Here is an example website criticizing Thorazine: http://www.sntp.net/drugs/thorazine.htm Asked by Bebe Garon 1 year ago.

Thorazine is no more dangerous than the others. Staying on it for too long can lead to specific complications, which is true with other anti-psychotics. It isn't used as much these days, but it is still a consideration for some people. It's OK to critisize thorazine, but no more so than for other such drugs. Answered by Edwardo Hallinan 1 year ago.

Wow! Normally, I don't answer questions that want to learn more and more detail. As in your case, because they require a long process, and it is the risk of not solve all of yours problems. I would suggest to proceed analytically with the help of keywords to be included in Yahoo! From what you climb, narrowing the field with new keywords, until you will be fully satisfied. good luck! Answered by Aron Flott 1 year ago.


Is Thorazine(Chlorpromazine) an older anti-psychotic?
I was prescribed this recently for Bipolar Disorder. Is it an older anti-psychotic?Thanks Asked by Laurel Sampaga 1 year ago.

Thorazine was one of the first anti-psychotics, created in 1950. It is still occasionally used in the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, but not as often as it was a few decades ago. It's a low potency anti-psychotic, so there is a lower chance of experiencing unwanted side effects. Answered by Shaquita Stefanich 1 year ago.


How long will thorazine take to get in my urine stream?
i want to take a thorazine but i have a drug test at 10:00am and dont know what time yo take it so i can pass the drug test and still take it tonight Asked by Bret Repko 1 year ago.

To my understanding, Thorazine is an anti-psychotic medication. It's not typically screened for on a drug test. However, if you do register with a false positive in another drug category as a result of this medication, all you have to do is show proof of a prescription and you're in the clear. Thorazine is excreted primarily through the urine and has a half-life from 10 to 40 hours. Answered by Steffanie Clos 1 year ago.

You can't wait until after the test to take it - just to be on the safe side? Answered by Demetrice Buttray 1 year ago.


About Thorazine/Largactil?
I have read alot about this drug, but I would like to hear from somone that has actually used it, or someone who knows someone who has used it.How sedating/tranquilizing is it? What are the main side-effects, and what pills do I need to counteract these side-effects? Asked by Zina Roop 1 year ago.

About counteraction - I'm not sure. You'd have to take it to know if you'd have any counteractions, first. I took Thorazine for about a month for sleep. It never made me tired. It would, however, keep me asleep for 8-12 hrs once I laid down and fell asleep. Not a good drug if you need to be knocked out (in my opinion). I'm sure you've heard it called 'the chemical lobotomy'. I didn't feel like it erased too much of my personality, and I was still heavily addicted to drugs and it never made me seek/want drugs less. I really don't remember much from taking it. I snorted it once, and it burned like a SOB, but it knocked me out right away. Answered by Nettie Pase 1 year ago.


Mrs S. has been taking Thorazine for about 1 year?
She has been having problems with orthostatic hypotension and akathisia, and has needed to take Cogentin to avoid dystonic reactions. The physician has decided to change her to Clozaril. The patient asks the nurse about the advantages and disadvantages of the new drug. The nurse has chosen Knowledge Deficit as the... Asked by Alline Arent 1 year ago.

She has been having problems with orthostatic hypotension and akathisia, and has needed to take Cogentin to avoid dystonic reactions. The physician has decided to change her to Clozaril. The patient asks the nurse about the advantages and disadvantages of the new drug. The nurse has chosen Knowledge Deficit as the nursing diagnosis for this patient. a) What interventions would be used for this diagnosis? b) How would the nurse evaluate the outcome of the interventions? Answered by Meda Micciche 1 year ago.

thorazine is bound to have more severe side effects.. clozaril is an atypical antipsychotic drug, so it will be LESS likely to cause tardive dyskenesia and akathisia and other similarly devastating side effects (thanks to its anticholinergic properties). However, there is recent evidence that such drugs may increase the likelihood of metabolic disturbances (leading to diabetes) and cardiovascular disease. There are also sexual functioning side effects, but that is common to many psychotropic meds...Note that slow titration of dosing of Clozaril significantly decreases the likelihood of orthostatic hypotension, so the switch is right on the money for this mrs. s....... I would say the switch from thorazine to clozaril is not a bad idea. I have no idea what you mean by "knowledge deficit" and "nursing diagnosis", I'm coming from a clinical psych perspective, but hope this helps! Answered by Miranda Casto 1 year ago.


What is thorazine used for?
Asked by Izola Lightcap 1 year ago.

Thorazine is used for the treatment of schizophrenia (severe disruptions in thought and perception). It is also prescribed for the short-term treatment of severe behavioral disorders in children, including explosive hyperactivity and combativeness; and for the hyperenergetic phase of manic-depressive illness (severely exaggerated moods). Thorazine is also used to control nausea and vomiting, and to relieve restlessness and apprehension before surgery. It is used as an aid in the treatment of tetanus, and is prescribed for uncontrollable hiccups and acute intermittent porphyria (attacks of severe abdominal pain sometimes accompanied by psychiatric disturbances, cramps in the arms and legs, and muscle weakness). Answered by Randi Efrati 1 year ago.

Thorazine Uses Answered by See Habash 1 year ago.

I don't know all of its uses, but I was given Thorazine for migraines. Answered by Dotty Manzay 1 year ago.

It is a old anti-psychotic. They use to use it a lot in psychiatric hospitals to calm down patients. It is also used for migraines at times. Answered by Waylon Reulet 1 year ago.

To mess with kids minds! Answered by Frank Catalli 1 year ago.

PAIN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!... Answered by Antonina Stodghill 1 year ago.

Chlorpromazine was the first antipsychotic drug, used during the 1950s and 1960s. Used as chlorpromazine hydrochloride and sold under the tradenames Largactil® and Thorazine®, it has sedative, hypotensive and antiemetic properties as well as anticholinergic and antidopaminergic effects. It has also anxiolytic (alleviation of anxiety) properties. Today, chlorpromazine is considered a typical antipsychotic. Chlorpromazine acts as an antagonist (blocking agent) on different postsynaptic receptors: on dopaminergic-receptors (subtypes D1, D2, D3 and D4, different antipsychotic properties on productive and unproductive symptoms), on serotonergic-receptors (5-HT1 and 5-HT2, with anxiolytic, antidepressive and antiaggressive properties as well as an attenuation of extrapypramidal side effects, but also leading to weight gain, fall in blood pressure, sedation and ejaculation difficulties), on histaminergic-receptors (H1-receptors, sedation, antiemesis, vertigo, fall in blood pressure and weight gain), on alpha1/alpha2-receptors (antisympathomimetic properties, lowering of blood pressure, reflex tachycardia, vertigo, sedation, hypersalivation and incontinence as well as sexual dysfunction, but may also attenuate pseudoparkinsonism—controversial), and on muscarinic (cholinergic) M1/M2-receptors (causing anticholinergic symptoms like dry mouth, blurred vision, obstipation, difficulty/inability to urinate, sinus tachycardia, ECG-changes and loss of memory, but the anticholinergic action may attenuate extrapyramidal side effects). Additionally, chlorpromazine is a weak presynaptic inhibitor of dopamine reuptake, which may lead to (mild) antidepressive and antiparkinsonian effects. This action could also account for psychomotor agitation and amplification of psychosis (very rarely noted in clinical use). [edit] Peripheral Antagonist to H1 receptors (antiallergic effects), H2 receptors (reduction of forming of gastric juice), M1/M2-receptors (dry mouth, reduction in forming of gastric juice) and some 5-HT receptors (different anti-allergic/gastrointestinal actions). Because it acts on so many receptors, chlorpromazine is often referred to as "dirty drug", whereas the atypical neuroleptic amisulpride for example acts only on central D2/D3-receptors and is therefore a "clean drug". This distinction is not a positive or negative value judgment on the drug, rather it is a neutral term which merely describes the agent's relative pharmacology. [edit] History The drug had been developed by Laboratoires Rhône-Poulenc in 1950 but they sold the rights in 1952 to Smith-Kline & French (today's GlaxoSmithKline). The drug was being sold as an antiemetic when its other use was noted. Smith-Kline was quick to encourage clinical trials and in 1954 the drug was approved in the US for psychiatric treatment. Over 100 million people were treated but the popularity of the drug fell from the late 1960s as the severe extrapyramidal side effects and tardive dyskinesia became more of a concern. From chlorpromazine a number of other similar neuroleptics were developed (e.g. triflupromazine, trifluoperazine). Previously used as an antihistamine and antiemetic its effects on mental state were first reported by the French doctor Henri Laborit in 1951 or 1952 (different sources) as sedation without narcosis. It became possible to cause 'artificial hibernation' in patients, if used as a cocktail together with pethidine and hydergine. Patients with shock, severe trauma or burns, become, if treated so, sedated, without anxiety and unreponsive/indifferent to painful external stimuli like minor surgical interventions. It was first used for psychiatric patients by Pierre Deniker and Jean Delay in 1953. Drug treatment with chlorpromazine went beyond simple sedation with patients showing improvements in thinking and emotional behaviour. Ironically, the antipsychotic properties of chlorpromazine appear to be unrelated to its sedative properties. During long term therapy some tolerance to the sedation effect develops. Chlorpromazine substituted and eclipsed the old therapies of electro- and insulin shocks and other methods such as psychosurgical means (lobotomy) causing permanent brain injury. Chlorpromazine has given approximately 70% of all schizophrenic patients a complete remission or near so and a normal, gainful human life. Before the era of neuroleptics, starting with chlorpromazine, positive long-term results for psychotic patients were only 20%. [edit] Side effects Side effects of chlorpromazine are typical of early generation neuroleptics. They include extrapyramidal side effects such as tardive dyskinesia and akathisia. A particularly severe side effect is the neuroleptic malignant syndrome which occurs in approximately 0.05% and can be fatal. Also, chlorpromazine may lower seizure threshold. Additional side effects include dry mouth, increased appetite with weight gain, constipation and urinary retention. Glucose tolerance may be impaired. An allergic skin rash and photosensitivity may occur. Other important and severe side effects are a strong reduction in the number of white blood cells, referred to as leukopenia, or, in extreme cases, even agranulocytosis may result, which may lead to death via uncontrollable infections and/or sepsis. Chlorpromazine is the neuroleptic drug with the highest rates (0.5% to 1%) of liver toxicity of the cholestatic type. The sedation effect combined with indifference to physical stimuli, anecdotally known as the "thorazine shuffle," has long been associated with the drug. The image of psychiatric patients staggering mute around a padded cell has earned those particular side effects a place in mainstream pop culture. [edit] Interactions Chlorpromazine intensifies the central depressive action of drugs with such activity (tranquilizers, barbiturates, narcotics, antihistamines, OTC-antiemetics etc.). A dose reduction of chlorpromazine or the other drug may be necessary. Chlorpromazine also intensifies the actions and undesired side effects of antihypertensive medications and anticholinergic drugs. The combination of chlorpromazine with other antipsychotics may result in increased central depression, hypotension and extrapyramidal side effects, but may sometimes enhance the clinical results of therapy. The anti-worm drug (antihelminthic) piperazine may intensify extrapyramidal side effects. In general, all neuroleptics may lead to seizures in combination with tramadol (Ultram). Chlorpromazine may increase the insulin needs of diabetic patients. Drugs like SSRIs, St. John's Wort and barbiturates can inhibit various CYP-isoenzymes such as CYP2D6, needed for metabolization of chlorpromazine and/or its metabolites. Theoretically, this should increase the half-lives of chlorpromazine and possibly its metabolites, dosing changes necessary. The exact clinical significance of this enzyme induction and its therapeutic consequences are unknown at present time and remain to be evaluated. [edit] Uses [edit] Common uses [edit] As an antipsychotic The use of chlorpromazine has been primarily replaced by newer generation of atypical antipsychotics which have an improved side effect profile. Chlorpromazine is classified as a low- to moderate-potency antipsychotic and in the past was used in the treatment of both acute and chronic psychoses, including schizophrenia and the manic phase of manic depression as well as amphetamine-induced psychoses. Chlorpromazine formerly was the drug of choice to treat LSD (and other psychedelic/hallucinogen) intoxication in a hospital setting, resulting in it gaining an erroneous reputation as the LSD "antidote". Now haloperidol is more commonly used in such situations. [edit] Other uses It has also been used in porphyria, as part of tetanus treatment and for behavioral problems in children. It still is well recommended for short term management of severe anxiety and aggressive episodes. Resistant and severe hiccups, severe nausea/emesis and preanesthetic conditioning have been other indications in the past. It can be used to treat amphetamine overdose. [1] [edit] Off-label and controversial uses Chlorpromazine is occasionally used off-label for treatment of severe migraine. Sometimes it is used in small doses to improve nausea/emesis opioid-treated cancer patients encounter and to intensify and prolong the analgesic action of the opioids given. Interestingly, it remains controversial whether or not chlorpromazine has its own analgesic properties. Analgesic properties may result from a central action on the hypothalamus; the patient may feel the pain much less than before. Other mechanisms may be an interaction with opioid receptors centrally and/or in the spinal cord. Some experts on the contrary say that chlorpromazine, like other phenothiazines, may even have antianalgesic properties. Chlorpromazine has been proposed as useful in newborns for the treatment of opioid withdrawal, if the mother was opioid-dependent. The latter indication remains highly controversial. Chlorpromazine, as well as other neuroleptics, may also be used to alleviate the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal (chlorpromazine may lower the seizure-threshold in alcoholics). It has a unique action in cholera, reducing the loss of water by approximately 30%. In Germany, the brand of chlorpromazine drug Propaphenin® has additional indications for insomnia and itching skin disease. [edit] Veterinary uses Chlorpromazine is primarily used as an antiemetic in dogs and cats. It is also sometimes used as a preanesthetic and muscle relaxant in cattle, swine, sheep, and goats. It is generally contraindicated for use with horses, due to a high incidence of ataxia and altered mentation. [edit] Dosage In any case, use is determined by an attending physician. The following information is intended to serve as a guideline: A wide range is covered from 25 mg oral or intramuscular for mild sedation, every 8 hours, up to 100 mg every 6 hours for severely disturbed patients. Different qualified sources give 800 mg/day to 1,200 mg/day as highest dose. At least there is one small clinical trial in treatment-resistant patients with a daily dose of 1,200 mg chlorpromazine (and 4 mg Benztropine to counteract early extrapyramidal side effects, which were anticipated with this unusual high chlorpromazine dose). Initial doses should be low and be increased gradually. It is recommended that most of the daily dose (e.g. 2/3) is given at bedtime for maximum hypnotic activity and minimal daytime sedation and hypotension. In the USA there are controlled release forms of Thorazine (e.g. 300 mg). After the individual dose is well established, such a CR capsule can be given with the evening meal as a single dose, covering the next 24 hours. The lowest dosage compatible with good therapeutic effect should be given. Dosage in ambulatory patients should be particularly low (minimizing sedation and hypotension). The direct i.v.-injection of undiluted solution is contraindicated (massive fall in blood pressure, cardiovascular collapse), for i.v.-infusion of dilutions the (hospitalized) patient should be lying and the infusion rate should be as slow as possible. Afterwards the patient should rest in the lying position for at least 30 minutes. [edit] Necessary examinations and laboratory checks during treatment All patients treated with chlorpromazine on a long-term-basis should have regularly checked their blood-pressure, pulse rate, laboratory-tests (liver function tests, kidney-values, blood cell counts including differenciated white blood counts, counts of red blood cells and thrombocytes), ECG and EEG. The frequency of all checks should be determined for the individual patient and may be done in shorter intervals during the first 3 months of treatment and less often afterwards. Some side effects seem to appear more frequently during the first months of therapy (sedation, hypotension, liver damage) while others do not (e.g. tardive dyskinesia). [edit] Discontinuation of treatment Also, in regular intervals the treating physician should evaluate whether continued treatment is needed. If not, the drug should never be stopped suddenly, due to very unpleasant 'withdrawal-symptoms', such as agitation, sleeplessness, states of anxiety, etc. However, these symptoms definitely do not indicate psychological or physical dependence. The dose should rather be slowly tapered down at a rate of approximately 20–25% per week or even slower to avoid the aforementioned bothersome symptoms. Chlorpromazine is derived from phenothiazine, and has an aliphatic side chain, typical for low to middle potency neuroleptics. The oral bioavailability is estimated to be 30–50% due to extensive first pass metabolization in the liver. Its elimination-halflife is 16–30 hours. It has many active metabolites (approx. 75 different ones) with greatly varying halflives and own pharmacological profiles. The CYP-450 isoenzymes 1A2 and 2D6 are needed for metabolization of chlorpromazine and the subtype 2D6 is inhibited by chlorpromazine (NB: possible interactions with other drugs). Answered by August Stick 1 year ago.


What are some reasons why a person might be prescribed 200 mg of thorazine?
...from a medical prospective. Asked by Verona Sookoo 1 year ago.

Thorazine is used for the treatment of schizophrenia (severe disruptions in thought and perception). It is also prescribed for the short-term treatment of severe behavioral disorders in children, including explosive hyperactivity and combativeness; and for the hyperenergetic phase of manic-depressive illness (severely exaggerated moods). Thorazine is also used to control nausea and vomiting, and to relieve restlessness and apprehension before surgery. It is used as an aid in the treatment of tetanus, and is prescribed for uncontrollable hiccups and acute intermittent porphyria (attacks of severe abdominal pain sometimes accompanied by psychiatric disturbances, cramps in the arms and legs, and muscle weakness). Answered by Love Delenick 1 year ago.

The warding off man or woman will have angry through a comment the have shyed away from man or woman made. The warding off man or woman will have a few prejudice towards the have shyed away from man or woman. The have shyed away from man or woman might remind the warding off man or woman of an ex-boyfriend or ex-female friend or different man or woman who the warding off man or woman desires to omit. Maybe anybody instructed the warding off man or woman that the have shyed away from man or woman does not like him/her. But the object is, why do you care? Answered by Leona Dottin 1 year ago.

It's an anti-psychotic, for bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. Answered by Moon Akhavan 1 year ago.


What is Thorazine, Lorazepam and Compazine? What are they used for?
Asked by Leanora Hinchliffe 1 year ago.

Chlorpromazine is classified as a low-potency typical antipsychotic and in the past was used in the treatment of both acute and chronic psychoses, including schizophrenia and the manic phase of bipolar disorder, as well as amphetamine-induced psychoses. Low-potency antipsychotics have more anticholinergic side effects, such as dry mouth, sedation, and constipation, and lower rates of extrapyramidal side effects, while high-potency antipsychotics (such as haloperidol) have the reverse profile. Chlorpromazine has also been used in porphyria and as part of tetanus treatment. It still is recommended for short-term management of severe anxiety and psychotic aggression. Resistant and severe hiccups, severe nausea/emesis, and preanesthetic conditioning are other uses. Symptoms of delirium in medically-hospitalized AIDS patients have been effectively treated with low doses of chlorpromazine Answered by Vicky Bossley 1 year ago.

They are antipsycotic drugs used to treat manic depression, schizophrenia Answered by Benton Berlandy 1 year ago.


Is 25 mg of Thorazine safe to take for anxiety?
Asked by Loreta Satmary 1 year ago.

Thorazine, at 25 mg, is used for chronic hiccups, nausea and vomitting, sedation before surgery, and sometimes anxiety. However, it is anti-psychotic, a tranquilizer, and very old school, so if it was not prescribed to you, don't tske it. This may just be a question of general curiosity, but if you need meds for anxiety, there are more suitable ones than thorazine. See the doc. to get the right one for you! Answered by Mariano Keehan 1 year ago.

Thorazine is not an anti-anxiety drug. It is an antipsychotic drug. Please do not take ANY prescription medication unless under the direction of your personal physician. Answered by Ines Liccione 1 year ago.

I think I would speak to a Pharmacist before listening to someone on Yahoo answers. Answered by Terry Vandersteen 1 year ago.

The potential for causing chronic movement disorders makes it far from ideal. Answered by Alysha Lieu 1 year ago.

It has more potential side effects than newer drugs. For example, seizures, heat exhaustion, drowsiness. Answered by Erinn Bobrow 1 year ago.


Is it true that Thorazine is as dangerous and the Psychiatric critics say it is?
From Psychiatric critics they criticize Thorazine a lot and say it messes people up like Lobotomy. Here is an example website criticizing Thorazine: http://www.sntp.net/drugs/thorazine.htm Asked by Kirstie Schear 1 year ago.

Thorazine is no more dangerous than the others. Staying on it for too long can lead to specific complications, which is true with other anti-psychotics. It isn't used as much these days, but it is still a consideration for some people. It's OK to critisize thorazine, but no more so than for other such drugs. Answered by Casandra Restivo 1 year ago.

Wow! Normally, I don't answer questions that want to learn more and more detail. As in your case, because they require a long process, and it is the risk of not solve all of yours problems. I would suggest to proceed analytically with the help of keywords to be included in Yahoo! From what you climb, narrowing the field with new keywords, until you will be fully satisfied. good luck! Answered by Anjanette Plumbar 1 year ago.


Is Thorazine(Chlorpromazine) an older anti-psychotic?
I was prescribed this recently for Bipolar Disorder. Is it an older anti-psychotic?Thanks Asked by Bernard Woolum 1 year ago.

Thorazine was one of the first anti-psychotics, created in 1950. It is still occasionally used in the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, but not as often as it was a few decades ago. It's a low potency anti-psychotic, so there is a lower chance of experiencing unwanted side effects. Answered by Normand Gossi 1 year ago.


How long will thorazine take to get in my urine stream?
i want to take a thorazine but i have a drug test at 10:00am and dont know what time yo take it so i can pass the drug test and still take it tonight Asked by Yesenia Gean 1 year ago.

To my understanding, Thorazine is an anti-psychotic medication. It's not typically screened for on a drug test. However, if you do register with a false positive in another drug category as a result of this medication, all you have to do is show proof of a prescription and you're in the clear. Thorazine is excreted primarily through the urine and has a half-life from 10 to 40 hours. Answered by Eun Hartsell 1 year ago.

You can't wait until after the test to take it - just to be on the safe side? Answered by Horace Finkler 1 year ago.


About Thorazine/Largactil?
I have read alot about this drug, but I would like to hear from somone that has actually used it, or someone who knows someone who has used it.How sedating/tranquilizing is it? What are the main side-effects, and what pills do I need to counteract these side-effects? Asked by Sana Towse 1 year ago.

About counteraction - I'm not sure. You'd have to take it to know if you'd have any counteractions, first. I took Thorazine for about a month for sleep. It never made me tired. It would, however, keep me asleep for 8-12 hrs once I laid down and fell asleep. Not a good drug if you need to be knocked out (in my opinion). I'm sure you've heard it called 'the chemical lobotomy'. I didn't feel like it erased too much of my personality, and I was still heavily addicted to drugs and it never made me seek/want drugs less. I really don't remember much from taking it. I snorted it once, and it burned like a SOB, but it knocked me out right away. Answered by Sandee Herbers 1 year ago.


Mrs S. has been taking Thorazine for about 1 year?
She has been having problems with orthostatic hypotension and akathisia, and has needed to take Cogentin to avoid dystonic reactions. The physician has decided to change her to Clozaril. The patient asks the nurse about the advantages and disadvantages of the new drug. The nurse has chosen Knowledge Deficit as the... Asked by Elene Arichabala 1 year ago.

She has been having problems with orthostatic hypotension and akathisia, and has needed to take Cogentin to avoid dystonic reactions. The physician has decided to change her to Clozaril. The patient asks the nurse about the advantages and disadvantages of the new drug. The nurse has chosen Knowledge Deficit as the nursing diagnosis for this patient. a) What interventions would be used for this diagnosis? b) How would the nurse evaluate the outcome of the interventions? Answered by Sylvia Narum 1 year ago.

thorazine is bound to have more severe side effects.. clozaril is an atypical antipsychotic drug, so it will be LESS likely to cause tardive dyskenesia and akathisia and other similarly devastating side effects (thanks to its anticholinergic properties). However, there is recent evidence that such drugs may increase the likelihood of metabolic disturbances (leading to diabetes) and cardiovascular disease. There are also sexual functioning side effects, but that is common to many psychotropic meds...Note that slow titration of dosing of Clozaril significantly decreases the likelihood of orthostatic hypotension, so the switch is right on the money for this mrs. s....... I would say the switch from thorazine to clozaril is not a bad idea. I have no idea what you mean by "knowledge deficit" and "nursing diagnosis", I'm coming from a clinical psych perspective, but hope this helps! Answered by Glennie Quail 1 year ago.


What is thorazine used for?
Asked by Hunter Leventer 1 year ago.

Thorazine is used for the treatment of schizophrenia (severe disruptions in thought and perception). It is also prescribed for the short-term treatment of severe behavioral disorders in children, including explosive hyperactivity and combativeness; and for the hyperenergetic phase of manic-depressive illness (severely exaggerated moods). Thorazine is also used to control nausea and vomiting, and to relieve restlessness and apprehension before surgery. It is used as an aid in the treatment of tetanus, and is prescribed for uncontrollable hiccups and acute intermittent porphyria (attacks of severe abdominal pain sometimes accompanied by psychiatric disturbances, cramps in the arms and legs, and muscle weakness). Answered by Nelda Howard 1 year ago.

Thorazine Uses Answered by Barabara Hobden 1 year ago.

I don't know all of its uses, but I was given Thorazine for migraines. Answered by Virgina Daughtrey 1 year ago.

It is a old anti-psychotic. They use to use it a lot in psychiatric hospitals to calm down patients. It is also used for migraines at times. Answered by Trudy Bela 1 year ago.

To mess with kids minds! Answered by Morton Wucherer 1 year ago.

PAIN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!... Answered by Curtis Seirer 1 year ago.

Chlorpromazine was the first antipsychotic drug, used during the 1950s and 1960s. Used as chlorpromazine hydrochloride and sold under the tradenames Largactil® and Thorazine®, it has sedative, hypotensive and antiemetic properties as well as anticholinergic and antidopaminergic effects. It has also anxiolytic (alleviation of anxiety) properties. Today, chlorpromazine is considered a typical antipsychotic. Chlorpromazine acts as an antagonist (blocking agent) on different postsynaptic receptors: on dopaminergic-receptors (subtypes D1, D2, D3 and D4, different antipsychotic properties on productive and unproductive symptoms), on serotonergic-receptors (5-HT1 and 5-HT2, with anxiolytic, antidepressive and antiaggressive properties as well as an attenuation of extrapypramidal side effects, but also leading to weight gain, fall in blood pressure, sedation and ejaculation difficulties), on histaminergic-receptors (H1-receptors, sedation, antiemesis, vertigo, fall in blood pressure and weight gain), on alpha1/alpha2-receptors (antisympathomimetic properties, lowering of blood pressure, reflex tachycardia, vertigo, sedation, hypersalivation and incontinence as well as sexual dysfunction, but may also attenuate pseudoparkinsonism—controversial), and on muscarinic (cholinergic) M1/M2-receptors (causing anticholinergic symptoms like dry mouth, blurred vision, obstipation, difficulty/inability to urinate, sinus tachycardia, ECG-changes and loss of memory, but the anticholinergic action may attenuate extrapyramidal side effects). Additionally, chlorpromazine is a weak presynaptic inhibitor of dopamine reuptake, which may lead to (mild) antidepressive and antiparkinsonian effects. This action could also account for psychomotor agitation and amplification of psychosis (very rarely noted in clinical use). [edit] Peripheral Antagonist to H1 receptors (antiallergic effects), H2 receptors (reduction of forming of gastric juice), M1/M2-receptors (dry mouth, reduction in forming of gastric juice) and some 5-HT receptors (different anti-allergic/gastrointestinal actions). Because it acts on so many receptors, chlorpromazine is often referred to as "dirty drug", whereas the atypical neuroleptic amisulpride for example acts only on central D2/D3-receptors and is therefore a "clean drug". This distinction is not a positive or negative value judgment on the drug, rather it is a neutral term which merely describes the agent's relative pharmacology. [edit] History The drug had been developed by Laboratoires Rhône-Poulenc in 1950 but they sold the rights in 1952 to Smith-Kline & French (today's GlaxoSmithKline). The drug was being sold as an antiemetic when its other use was noted. Smith-Kline was quick to encourage clinical trials and in 1954 the drug was approved in the US for psychiatric treatment. Over 100 million people were treated but the popularity of the drug fell from the late 1960s as the severe extrapyramidal side effects and tardive dyskinesia became more of a concern. From chlorpromazine a number of other similar neuroleptics were developed (e.g. triflupromazine, trifluoperazine). Previously used as an antihistamine and antiemetic its effects on mental state were first reported by the French doctor Henri Laborit in 1951 or 1952 (different sources) as sedation without narcosis. It became possible to cause 'artificial hibernation' in patients, if used as a cocktail together with pethidine and hydergine. Patients with shock, severe trauma or burns, become, if treated so, sedated, without anxiety and unreponsive/indifferent to painful external stimuli like minor surgical interventions. It was first used for psychiatric patients by Pierre Deniker and Jean Delay in 1953. Drug treatment with chlorpromazine went beyond simple sedation with patients showing improvements in thinking and emotional behaviour. Ironically, the antipsychotic properties of chlorpromazine appear to be unrelated to its sedative properties. During long term therapy some tolerance to the sedation effect develops. Chlorpromazine substituted and eclipsed the old therapies of electro- and insulin shocks and other methods such as psychosurgical means (lobotomy) causing permanent brain injury. Chlorpromazine has given approximately 70% of all schizophrenic patients a complete remission or near so and a normal, gainful human life. Before the era of neuroleptics, starting with chlorpromazine, positive long-term results for psychotic patients were only 20%. [edit] Side effects Side effects of chlorpromazine are typical of early generation neuroleptics. They include extrapyramidal side effects such as tardive dyskinesia and akathisia. A particularly severe side effect is the neuroleptic malignant syndrome which occurs in approximately 0.05% and can be fatal. Also, chlorpromazine may lower seizure threshold. Additional side effects include dry mouth, increased appetite with weight gain, constipation and urinary retention. Glucose tolerance may be impaired. An allergic skin rash and photosensitivity may occur. Other important and severe side effects are a strong reduction in the number of white blood cells, referred to as leukopenia, or, in extreme cases, even agranulocytosis may result, which may lead to death via uncontrollable infections and/or sepsis. Chlorpromazine is the neuroleptic drug with the highest rates (0.5% to 1%) of liver toxicity of the cholestatic type. The sedation effect combined with indifference to physical stimuli, anecdotally known as the "thorazine shuffle," has long been associated with the drug. The image of psychiatric patients staggering mute around a padded cell has earned those particular side effects a place in mainstream pop culture. [edit] Interactions Chlorpromazine intensifies the central depressive action of drugs with such activity (tranquilizers, barbiturates, narcotics, antihistamines, OTC-antiemetics etc.). A dose reduction of chlorpromazine or the other drug may be necessary. Chlorpromazine also intensifies the actions and undesired side effects of antihypertensive medications and anticholinergic drugs. The combination of chlorpromazine with other antipsychotics may result in increased central depression, hypotension and extrapyramidal side effects, but may sometimes enhance the clinical results of therapy. The anti-worm drug (antihelminthic) piperazine may intensify extrapyramidal side effects. In general, all neuroleptics may lead to seizures in combination with tramadol (Ultram). Chlorpromazine may increase the insulin needs of diabetic patients. Drugs like SSRIs, St. John's Wort and barbiturates can inhibit various CYP-isoenzymes such as CYP2D6, needed for metabolization of chlorpromazine and/or its metabolites. Theoretically, this should increase the half-lives of chlorpromazine and possibly its metabolites, dosing changes necessary. The exact clinical significance of this enzyme induction and its therapeutic consequences are unknown at present time and remain to be evaluated. [edit] Uses [edit] Common uses [edit] As an antipsychotic The use of chlorpromazine has been primarily replaced by newer generation of atypical antipsychotics which have an improved side effect profile. Chlorpromazine is classified as a low- to moderate-potency antipsychotic and in the past was used in the treatment of both acute and chronic psychoses, including schizophrenia and the manic phase of manic depression as well as amphetamine-induced psychoses. Chlorpromazine formerly was the drug of choice to treat LSD (and other psychedelic/hallucinogen) intoxication in a hospital setting, resulting in it gaining an erroneous reputation as the LSD "antidote". Now haloperidol is more commonly used in such situations. [edit] Other uses It has also been used in porphyria, as part of tetanus treatment and for behavioral problems in children. It still is well recommended for short term management of severe anxiety and aggressive episodes. Resistant and severe hiccups, severe nausea/emesis and preanesthetic conditioning have been other indications in the past. It can be used to treat amphetamine overdose. [1] [edit] Off-label and controversial uses Chlorpromazine is occasionally used off-label for treatment of severe migraine. Sometimes it is used in small doses to improve nausea/emesis opioid-treated cancer patients encounter and to intensify and prolong the analgesic action of the opioids given. Interestingly, it remains controversial whether or not chlorpromazine has its own analgesic properties. Analgesic properties may result from a central action on the hypothalamus; the patient may feel the pain much less than before. Other mechanisms may be an interaction with opioid receptors centrally and/or in the spinal cord. Some experts on the contrary say that chlorpromazine, like other phenothiazines, may even have antianalgesic properties. Chlorpromazine has been proposed as useful in newborns for the treatment of opioid withdrawal, if the mother was opioid-dependent. The latter indication remains highly controversial. Chlorpromazine, as well as other neuroleptics, may also be used to alleviate the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal (chlorpromazine may lower the seizure-threshold in alcoholics). It has a unique action in cholera, reducing the loss of water by approximately 30%. In Germany, the brand of chlorpromazine drug Propaphenin® has additional indications for insomnia and itching skin disease. [edit] Veterinary uses Chlorpromazine is primarily used as an antiemetic in dogs and cats. It is also sometimes used as a preanesthetic and muscle relaxant in cattle, swine, sheep, and goats. It is generally contraindicated for use with horses, due to a high incidence of ataxia and altered mentation. [edit] Dosage In any case, use is determined by an attending physician. The following information is intended to serve as a guideline: A wide range is covered from 25 mg oral or intramuscular for mild sedation, every 8 hours, up to 100 mg every 6 hours for severely disturbed patients. Different qualified sources give 800 mg/day to 1,200 mg/day as highest dose. At least there is one small clinical trial in treatment-resistant patients with a daily dose of 1,200 mg chlorpromazine (and 4 mg Benztropine to counteract early extrapyramidal side effects, which were anticipated with this unusual high chlorpromazine dose). Initial doses should be low and be increased gradually. It is recommended that most of the daily dose (e.g. 2/3) is given at bedtime for maximum hypnotic activity and minimal daytime sedation and hypotension. In the USA there are controlled release forms of Thorazine (e.g. 300 mg). After the individual dose is well established, such a CR capsule can be given with the evening meal as a single dose, covering the next 24 hours. The lowest dosage compatible with good therapeutic effect should be given. Dosage in ambulatory patients should be particularly low (minimizing sedation and hypotension). The direct i.v.-injection of undiluted solution is contraindicated (massive fall in blood pressure, cardiovascular collapse), for i.v.-infusion of dilutions the (hospitalized) patient should be lying and the infusion rate should be as slow as possible. Afterwards the patient should rest in the lying position for at least 30 minutes. [edit] Necessary examinations and laboratory checks during treatment All patients treated with chlorpromazine on a long-term-basis should have regularly checked their blood-pressure, pulse rate, laboratory-tests (liver function tests, kidney-values, blood cell counts including differenciated white blood counts, counts of red blood cells and thrombocytes), ECG and EEG. The frequency of all checks should be determined for the individual patient and may be done in shorter intervals during the first 3 months of treatment and less often afterwards. Some side effects seem to appear more frequently during the first months of therapy (sedation, hypotension, liver damage) while others do not (e.g. tardive dyskinesia). [edit] Discontinuation of treatment Also, in regular intervals the treating physician should evaluate whether continued treatment is needed. If not, the drug should never be stopped suddenly, due to very unpleasant 'withdrawal-symptoms', such as agitation, sleeplessness, states of anxiety, etc. However, these symptoms definitely do not indicate psychological or physical dependence. The dose should rather be slowly tapered down at a rate of approximately 20–25% per week or even slower to avoid the aforementioned bothersome symptoms. Chlorpromazine is derived from phenothiazine, and has an aliphatic side chain, typical for low to middle potency neuroleptics. The oral bioavailability is estimated to be 30–50% due to extensive first pass metabolization in the liver. Its elimination-halflife is 16–30 hours. It has many active metabolites (approx. 75 different ones) with greatly varying halflives and own pharmacological profiles. The CYP-450 isoenzymes 1A2 and 2D6 are needed for metabolization of chlorpromazine and the subtype 2D6 is inhibited by chlorpromazine (NB: possible interactions with other drugs). Answered by Irina Murriel 1 year ago.


What are some reasons why a person might be prescribed 200 mg of thorazine?
...from a medical prospective. Asked by Myrle Viele 1 year ago.

Thorazine is used for the treatment of schizophrenia (severe disruptions in thought and perception). It is also prescribed for the short-term treatment of severe behavioral disorders in children, including explosive hyperactivity and combativeness; and for the hyperenergetic phase of manic-depressive illness (severely exaggerated moods). Thorazine is also used to control nausea and vomiting, and to relieve restlessness and apprehension before surgery. It is used as an aid in the treatment of tetanus, and is prescribed for uncontrollable hiccups and acute intermittent porphyria (attacks of severe abdominal pain sometimes accompanied by psychiatric disturbances, cramps in the arms and legs, and muscle weakness). Answered by Nilsa Swenk 1 year ago.

The warding off man or woman will have angry through a comment the have shyed away from man or woman made. The warding off man or woman will have a few prejudice towards the have shyed away from man or woman. The have shyed away from man or woman might remind the warding off man or woman of an ex-boyfriend or ex-female friend or different man or woman who the warding off man or woman desires to omit. Maybe anybody instructed the warding off man or woman that the have shyed away from man or woman does not like him/her. But the object is, why do you care? Answered by Amiee Cerar 1 year ago.

It's an anti-psychotic, for bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. Answered by Noel Stoessel 1 year ago.


What is Thorazine, Lorazepam and Compazine? What are they used for?
Asked by Angel Lutke 1 year ago.

Chlorpromazine is classified as a low-potency typical antipsychotic and in the past was used in the treatment of both acute and chronic psychoses, including schizophrenia and the manic phase of bipolar disorder, as well as amphetamine-induced psychoses. Low-potency antipsychotics have more anticholinergic side effects, such as dry mouth, sedation, and constipation, and lower rates of extrapyramidal side effects, while high-potency antipsychotics (such as haloperidol) have the reverse profile. Chlorpromazine has also been used in porphyria and as part of tetanus treatment. It still is recommended for short-term management of severe anxiety and psychotic aggression. Resistant and severe hiccups, severe nausea/emesis, and preanesthetic conditioning are other uses. Symptoms of delirium in medically-hospitalized AIDS patients have been effectively treated with low doses of chlorpromazine Answered by Zulma Toscani 1 year ago.

They are antipsycotic drugs used to treat manic depression, schizophrenia Answered by Theodore Spessard 1 year ago.


Is 25 mg of Thorazine safe to take for anxiety?
Asked by Robin Albanez 1 year ago.

Thorazine, at 25 mg, is used for chronic hiccups, nausea and vomitting, sedation before surgery, and sometimes anxiety. However, it is anti-psychotic, a tranquilizer, and very old school, so if it was not prescribed to you, don't tske it. This may just be a question of general curiosity, but if you need meds for anxiety, there are more suitable ones than thorazine. See the doc. to get the right one for you! Answered by Kerry Renneker 1 year ago.

Thorazine is not an anti-anxiety drug. It is an antipsychotic drug. Please do not take ANY prescription medication unless under the direction of your personal physician. Answered by Hae Carchidi 1 year ago.

I think I would speak to a Pharmacist before listening to someone on Yahoo answers. Answered by Carmen Lisk 1 year ago.

The potential for causing chronic movement disorders makes it far from ideal. Answered by Lai Durtsche 1 year ago.

It has more potential side effects than newer drugs. For example, seizures, heat exhaustion, drowsiness. Answered by Marnie Fester 1 year ago.


Is it true that Thorazine is as dangerous and the Psychiatric critics say it is?
From Psychiatric critics they criticize Thorazine a lot and say it messes people up like Lobotomy. Here is an example website criticizing Thorazine: http://www.sntp.net/drugs/thorazine.htm Asked by Juan Muncrief 1 year ago.

Thorazine is no more dangerous than the others. Staying on it for too long can lead to specific complications, which is true with other anti-psychotics. It isn't used as much these days, but it is still a consideration for some people. It's OK to critisize thorazine, but no more so than for other such drugs. Answered by Gertha Pownell 1 year ago.

Wow! Normally, I don't answer questions that want to learn more and more detail. As in your case, because they require a long process, and it is the risk of not solve all of yours problems. I would suggest to proceed analytically with the help of keywords to be included in Yahoo! From what you climb, narrowing the field with new keywords, until you will be fully satisfied. good luck! Answered by Eusebia Poundstone 1 year ago.


Is Thorazine(Chlorpromazine) an older anti-psychotic?
I was prescribed this recently for Bipolar Disorder. Is it an older anti-psychotic?Thanks Asked by Talitha Conrady 1 year ago.

Thorazine was one of the first anti-psychotics, created in 1950. It is still occasionally used in the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, but not as often as it was a few decades ago. It's a low potency anti-psychotic, so there is a lower chance of experiencing unwanted side effects. Answered by Misha Owston 1 year ago.


How long will thorazine take to get in my urine stream?
i want to take a thorazine but i have a drug test at 10:00am and dont know what time yo take it so i can pass the drug test and still take it tonight Asked by Moshe Dardagnac 1 year ago.

To my understanding, Thorazine is an anti-psychotic medication. It's not typically screened for on a drug test. However, if you do register with a false positive in another drug category as a result of this medication, all you have to do is show proof of a prescription and you're in the clear. Thorazine is excreted primarily through the urine and has a half-life from 10 to 40 hours. Answered by Tatiana Lundquist 1 year ago.

You can't wait until after the test to take it - just to be on the safe side? Answered by Latesha Panowicz 1 year ago.


About Thorazine/Largactil?
I have read alot about this drug, but I would like to hear from somone that has actually used it, or someone who knows someone who has used it.How sedating/tranquilizing is it? What are the main side-effects, and what pills do I need to counteract these side-effects? Asked by Shanel Ruess 1 year ago.

About counteraction - I'm not sure. You'd have to take it to know if you'd have any counteractions, first. I took Thorazine for about a month for sleep. It never made me tired. It would, however, keep me asleep for 8-12 hrs once I laid down and fell asleep. Not a good drug if you need to be knocked out (in my opinion). I'm sure you've heard it called 'the chemical lobotomy'. I didn't feel like it erased too much of my personality, and I was still heavily addicted to drugs and it never made me seek/want drugs less. I really don't remember much from taking it. I snorted it once, and it burned like a SOB, but it knocked me out right away. Answered by Vallie Forsgren 1 year ago.


Mrs S. has been taking Thorazine for about 1 year?
She has been having problems with orthostatic hypotension and akathisia, and has needed to take Cogentin to avoid dystonic reactions. The physician has decided to change her to Clozaril. The patient asks the nurse about the advantages and disadvantages of the new drug. The nurse has chosen Knowledge Deficit as the... Asked by Sona Eberwein 1 year ago.

She has been having problems with orthostatic hypotension and akathisia, and has needed to take Cogentin to avoid dystonic reactions. The physician has decided to change her to Clozaril. The patient asks the nurse about the advantages and disadvantages of the new drug. The nurse has chosen Knowledge Deficit as the nursing diagnosis for this patient. a) What interventions would be used for this diagnosis? b) How would the nurse evaluate the outcome of the interventions? Answered by Lilliana Kesner 1 year ago.

thorazine is bound to have more severe side effects.. clozaril is an atypical antipsychotic drug, so it will be LESS likely to cause tardive dyskenesia and akathisia and other similarly devastating side effects (thanks to its anticholinergic properties). However, there is recent evidence that such drugs may increase the likelihood of metabolic disturbances (leading to diabetes) and cardiovascular disease. There are also sexual functioning side effects, but that is common to many psychotropic meds...Note that slow titration of dosing of Clozaril significantly decreases the likelihood of orthostatic hypotension, so the switch is right on the money for this mrs. s....... I would say the switch from thorazine to clozaril is not a bad idea. I have no idea what you mean by "knowledge deficit" and "nursing diagnosis", I'm coming from a clinical psych perspective, but hope this helps! Answered by Shelby Greytak 1 year ago.


What is thorazine used for?
Asked by Wes Kobbe 1 year ago.

Thorazine is used for the treatment of schizophrenia (severe disruptions in thought and perception). It is also prescribed for the short-term treatment of severe behavioral disorders in children, including explosive hyperactivity and combativeness; and for the hyperenergetic phase of manic-depressive illness (severely exaggerated moods). Thorazine is also used to control nausea and vomiting, and to relieve restlessness and apprehension before surgery. It is used as an aid in the treatment of tetanus, and is prescribed for uncontrollable hiccups and acute intermittent porphyria (attacks of severe abdominal pain sometimes accompanied by psychiatric disturbances, cramps in the arms and legs, and muscle weakness). Answered by Alvin Scholin 1 year ago.

Thorazine Uses Answered by Nicholas Ladner 1 year ago.

I don't know all of its uses, but I was given Thorazine for migraines. Answered by Maryam Dicus 1 year ago.

It is a old anti-psychotic. They use to use it a lot in psychiatric hospitals to calm down patients. It is also used for migraines at times. Answered by Sonja Casar 1 year ago.

To mess with kids minds! Answered by Breann Breth 1 year ago.

PAIN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!... Answered by Anika Bearden 1 year ago.

Chlorpromazine was the first antipsychotic drug, used during the 1950s and 1960s. Used as chlorpromazine hydrochloride and sold under the tradenames Largactil® and Thorazine®, it has sedative, hypotensive and antiemetic properties as well as anticholinergic and antidopaminergic effects. It has also anxiolytic (alleviation of anxiety) properties. Today, chlorpromazine is considered a typical antipsychotic. Chlorpromazine acts as an antagonist (blocking agent) on different postsynaptic receptors: on dopaminergic-receptors (subtypes D1, D2, D3 and D4, different antipsychotic properties on productive and unproductive symptoms), on serotonergic-receptors (5-HT1 and 5-HT2, with anxiolytic, antidepressive and antiaggressive properties as well as an attenuation of extrapypramidal side effects, but also leading to weight gain, fall in blood pressure, sedation and ejaculation difficulties), on histaminergic-receptors (H1-receptors, sedation, antiemesis, vertigo, fall in blood pressure and weight gain), on alpha1/alpha2-receptors (antisympathomimetic properties, lowering of blood pressure, reflex tachycardia, vertigo, sedation, hypersalivation and incontinence as well as sexual dysfunction, but may also attenuate pseudoparkinsonism—controversial), and on muscarinic (cholinergic) M1/M2-receptors (causing anticholinergic symptoms like dry mouth, blurred vision, obstipation, difficulty/inability to urinate, sinus tachycardia, ECG-changes and loss of memory, but the anticholinergic action may attenuate extrapyramidal side effects). Additionally, chlorpromazine is a weak presynaptic inhibitor of dopamine reuptake, which may lead to (mild) antidepressive and antiparkinsonian effects. This action could also account for psychomotor agitation and amplification of psychosis (very rarely noted in clinical use). [edit] Peripheral Antagonist to H1 receptors (antiallergic effects), H2 receptors (reduction of forming of gastric juice), M1/M2-receptors (dry mouth, reduction in forming of gastric juice) and some 5-HT receptors (different anti-allergic/gastrointestinal actions). Because it acts on so many receptors, chlorpromazine is often referred to as "dirty drug", whereas the atypical neuroleptic amisulpride for example acts only on central D2/D3-receptors and is therefore a "clean drug". This distinction is not a positive or negative value judgment on the drug, rather it is a neutral term which merely describes the agent's relative pharmacology. [edit] History The drug had been developed by Laboratoires Rhône-Poulenc in 1950 but they sold the rights in 1952 to Smith-Kline & French (today's GlaxoSmithKline). The drug was being sold as an antiemetic when its other use was noted. Smith-Kline was quick to encourage clinical trials and in 1954 the drug was approved in the US for psychiatric treatment. Over 100 million people were treated but the popularity of the drug fell from the late 1960s as the severe extrapyramidal side effects and tardive dyskinesia became more of a concern. From chlorpromazine a number of other similar neuroleptics were developed (e.g. triflupromazine, trifluoperazine). Previously used as an antihistamine and antiemetic its effects on mental state were first reported by the French doctor Henri Laborit in 1951 or 1952 (different sources) as sedation without narcosis. It became possible to cause 'artificial hibernation' in patients, if used as a cocktail together with pethidine and hydergine. Patients with shock, severe trauma or burns, become, if treated so, sedated, without anxiety and unreponsive/indifferent to painful external stimuli like minor surgical interventions. It was first used for psychiatric patients by Pierre Deniker and Jean Delay in 1953. Drug treatment with chlorpromazine went beyond simple sedation with patients showing improvements in thinking and emotional behaviour. Ironically, the antipsychotic properties of chlorpromazine appear to be unrelated to its sedative properties. During long term therapy some tolerance to the sedation effect develops. Chlorpromazine substituted and eclipsed the old therapies of electro- and insulin shocks and other methods such as psychosurgical means (lobotomy) causing permanent brain injury. Chlorpromazine has given approximately 70% of all schizophrenic patients a complete remission or near so and a normal, gainful human life. Before the era of neuroleptics, starting with chlorpromazine, positive long-term results for psychotic patients were only 20%. [edit] Side effects Side effects of chlorpromazine are typical of early generation neuroleptics. They include extrapyramidal side effects such as tardive dyskinesia and akathisia. A particularly severe side effect is the neuroleptic malignant syndrome which occurs in approximately 0.05% and can be fatal. Also, chlorpromazine may lower seizure threshold. Additional side effects include dry mouth, increased appetite with weight gain, constipation and urinary retention. Glucose tolerance may be impaired. An allergic skin rash and photosensitivity may occur. Other important and severe side effects are a strong reduction in the number of white blood cells, referred to as leukopenia, or, in extreme cases, even agranulocytosis may result, which may lead to death via uncontrollable infections and/or sepsis. Chlorpromazine is the neuroleptic drug with the highest rates (0.5% to 1%) of liver toxicity of the cholestatic type. The sedation effect combined with indifference to physical stimuli, anecdotally known as the "thorazine shuffle," has long been associated with the drug. The image of psychiatric patients staggering mute around a padded cell has earned those particular side effects a place in mainstream pop culture. [edit] Interactions Chlorpromazine intensifies the central depressive action of drugs with such activity (tranquilizers, barbiturates, narcotics, antihistamines, OTC-antiemetics etc.). A dose reduction of chlorpromazine or the other drug may be necessary. Chlorpromazine also intensifies the actions and undesired side effects of antihypertensive medications and anticholinergic drugs. The combination of chlorpromazine with other antipsychotics may result in increased central depression, hypotension and extrapyramidal side effects, but may sometimes enhance the clinical results of therapy. The anti-worm drug (antihelminthic) piperazine may intensify extrapyramidal side effects. In general, all neuroleptics may lead to seizures in combination with tramadol (Ultram). Chlorpromazine may increase the insulin needs of diabetic patients. Drugs like SSRIs, St. John's Wort and barbiturates can inhibit various CYP-isoenzymes such as CYP2D6, needed for metabolization of chlorpromazine and/or its metabolites. Theoretically, this should increase the half-lives of chlorpromazine and possibly its metabolites, dosing changes necessary. The exact clinical significance of this enzyme induction and its therapeutic consequences are unknown at present time and remain to be evaluated. [edit] Uses [edit] Common uses [edit] As an antipsychotic The use of chlorpromazine has been primarily replaced by newer generation of atypical antipsychotics which have an improved side effect profile. Chlorpromazine is classified as a low- to moderate-potency antipsychotic and in the past was used in the treatment of both acute and chronic psychoses, including schizophrenia and the manic phase of manic depression as well as amphetamine-induced psychoses. Chlorpromazine formerly was the drug of choice to treat LSD (and other psychedelic/hallucinogen) intoxication in a hospital setting, resulting in it gaining an erroneous reputation as the LSD "antidote". Now haloperidol is more commonly used in such situations. [edit] Other uses It has also been used in porphyria, as part of tetanus treatment and for behavioral problems in children. It still is well recommended for short term management of severe anxiety and aggressive episodes. Resistant and severe hiccups, severe nausea/emesis and preanesthetic conditioning have been other indications in the past. It can be used to treat amphetamine overdose. [1] [edit] Off-label and controversial uses Chlorpromazine is occasionally used off-label for treatment of severe migraine. Sometimes it is used in small doses to improve nausea/emesis opioid-treated cancer patients encounter and to intensify and prolong the analgesic action of the opioids given. Interestingly, it remains controversial whether or not chlorpromazine has its own analgesic properties. Analgesic properties may result from a central action on the hypothalamus; the patient may feel the pain much less than before. Other mechanisms may be an interaction with opioid receptors centrally and/or in the spinal cord. Some experts on the contrary say that chlorpromazine, like other phenothiazines, may even have antianalgesic properties. Chlorpromazine has been proposed as useful in newborns for the treatment of opioid withdrawal, if the mother was opioid-dependent. The latter indication remains highly controversial. Chlorpromazine, as well as other neuroleptics, may also be used to alleviate the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal (chlorpromazine may lower the seizure-threshold in alcoholics). It has a unique action in cholera, reducing the loss of water by approximately 30%. In Germany, the brand of chlorpromazine drug Propaphenin® has additional indications for insomnia and itching skin disease. [edit] Veterinary uses Chlorpromazine is primarily used as an antiemetic in dogs and cats. It is also sometimes used as a preanesthetic and muscle relaxant in cattle, swine, sheep, and goats. It is generally contraindicated for use with horses, due to a high incidence of ataxia and altered mentation. [edit] Dosage In any case, use is determined by an attending physician. The following information is intended to serve as a guideline: A wide range is covered from 25 mg oral or intramuscular for mild sedation, every 8 hours, up to 100 mg every 6 hours for severely disturbed patients. Different qualified sources give 800 mg/day to 1,200 mg/day as highest dose. At least there is one small clinical trial in treatment-resistant patients with a daily dose of 1,200 mg chlorpromazine (and 4 mg Benztropine to counteract early extrapyramidal side effects, which were anticipated with this unusual high chlorpromazine dose). Initial doses should be low and be increased gradually. It is recommended that most of the daily dose (e.g. 2/3) is given at bedtime for maximum hypnotic activity and minimal daytime sedation and hypotension. In the USA there are controlled release forms of Thorazine (e.g. 300 mg). After the individual dose is well established, such a CR capsule can be given with the evening meal as a single dose, covering the next 24 hours. The lowest dosage compatible with good therapeutic effect should be given. Dosage in ambulatory patients should be particularly low (minimizing sedation and hypotension). The direct i.v.-injection of undiluted solution is contraindicated (massive fall in blood pressure, cardiovascular collapse), for i.v.-infusion of dilutions the (hospitalized) patient should be lying and the infusion rate should be as slow as possible. Afterwards the patient should rest in the lying position for at least 30 minutes. [edit] Necessary examinations and laboratory checks during treatment All patients treated with chlorpromazine on a long-term-basis should have regularly checked their blood-pressure, pulse rate, laboratory-tests (liver function tests, kidney-values, blood cell counts including differenciated white blood counts, counts of red blood cells and thrombocytes), ECG and EEG. The frequency of all checks should be determined for the individual patient and may be done in shorter intervals during the first 3 months of treatment and less often afterwards. Some side effects seem to appear more frequently during the first months of therapy (sedation, hypotension, liver damage) while others do not (e.g. tardive dyskinesia). [edit] Discontinuation of treatment Also, in regular intervals the treating physician should evaluate whether continued treatment is needed. If not, the drug should never be stopped suddenly, due to very unpleasant 'withdrawal-symptoms', such as agitation, sleeplessness, states of anxiety, etc. However, these symptoms definitely do not indicate psychological or physical dependence. The dose should rather be slowly tapered down at a rate of approximately 20–25% per week or even slower to avoid the aforementioned bothersome symptoms. Chlorpromazine is derived from phenothiazine, and has an aliphatic side chain, typical for low to middle potency neuroleptics. The oral bioavailability is estimated to be 30–50% due to extensive first pass metabolization in the liver. Its elimination-halflife is 16–30 hours. It has many active metabolites (approx. 75 different ones) with greatly varying halflives and own pharmacological profiles. The CYP-450 isoenzymes 1A2 and 2D6 are needed for metabolization of chlorpromazine and the subtype 2D6 is inhibited by chlorpromazine (NB: possible interactions with other drugs). Answered by Monroe Tibbitts 1 year ago.


What are some reasons why a person might be prescribed 200 mg of thorazine?
...from a medical prospective. Asked by Andrea Voros 1 year ago.

Thorazine is used for the treatment of schizophrenia (severe disruptions in thought and perception). It is also prescribed for the short-term treatment of severe behavioral disorders in children, including explosive hyperactivity and combativeness; and for the hyperenergetic phase of manic-depressive illness (severely exaggerated moods). Thorazine is also used to control nausea and vomiting, and to relieve restlessness and apprehension before surgery. It is used as an aid in the treatment of tetanus, and is prescribed for uncontrollable hiccups and acute intermittent porphyria (attacks of severe abdominal pain sometimes accompanied by psychiatric disturbances, cramps in the arms and legs, and muscle weakness). Answered by Thresa Gerfin 1 year ago.

The warding off man or woman will have angry through a comment the have shyed away from man or woman made. The warding off man or woman will have a few prejudice towards the have shyed away from man or woman. The have shyed away from man or woman might remind the warding off man or woman of an ex-boyfriend or ex-female friend or different man or woman who the warding off man or woman desires to omit. Maybe anybody instructed the warding off man or woman that the have shyed away from man or woman does not like him/her. But the object is, why do you care? Answered by Andrew Dahlgren 1 year ago.

It's an anti-psychotic, for bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. Answered by Myung Dillow 1 year ago.


What is Thorazine, Lorazepam and Compazine? What are they used for?
Asked by Yolande Mccan 1 year ago.

Chlorpromazine is classified as a low-potency typical antipsychotic and in the past was used in the treatment of both acute and chronic psychoses, including schizophrenia and the manic phase of bipolar disorder, as well as amphetamine-induced psychoses. Low-potency antipsychotics have more anticholinergic side effects, such as dry mouth, sedation, and constipation, and lower rates of extrapyramidal side effects, while high-potency antipsychotics (such as haloperidol) have the reverse profile. Chlorpromazine has also been used in porphyria and as part of tetanus treatment. It still is recommended for short-term management of severe anxiety and psychotic aggression. Resistant and severe hiccups, severe nausea/emesis, and preanesthetic conditioning are other uses. Symptoms of delirium in medically-hospitalized AIDS patients have been effectively treated with low doses of chlorpromazine Answered by Lincoln Merkwan 1 year ago.

They are antipsycotic drugs used to treat manic depression, schizophrenia Answered by Viki Koepper 1 year ago.


Is 25 mg of Thorazine safe to take for anxiety?
Asked by Vito Wasem 1 year ago.

Thorazine, at 25 mg, is used for chronic hiccups, nausea and vomitting, sedation before surgery, and sometimes anxiety. However, it is anti-psychotic, a tranquilizer, and very old school, so if it was not prescribed to you, don't tske it. This may just be a question of general curiosity, but if you need meds for anxiety, there are more suitable ones than thorazine. See the doc. to get the right one for you! Answered by Adrianna Moscoffian 1 year ago.

Thorazine is not an anti-anxiety drug. It is an antipsychotic drug. Please do not take ANY prescription medication unless under the direction of your personal physician. Answered by Flor Gartenmayer 1 year ago.

I think I would speak to a Pharmacist before listening to someone on Yahoo answers. Answered by Isidro Flechsig 1 year ago.

The potential for causing chronic movement disorders makes it far from ideal. Answered by Trish Dekalb 1 year ago.

It has more potential side effects than newer drugs. For example, seizures, heat exhaustion, drowsiness. Answered by Sanora Dutro 1 year ago.


Is it true that Thorazine is as dangerous and the Psychiatric critics say it is?
From Psychiatric critics they criticize Thorazine a lot and say it messes people up like Lobotomy. Here is an example website criticizing Thorazine: http://www.sntp.net/drugs/thorazine.htm Asked by Yael Lockner 1 year ago.

Thorazine is no more dangerous than the others. Staying on it for too long can lead to specific complications, which is true with other anti-psychotics. It isn't used as much these days, but it is still a consideration for some people. It's OK to critisize thorazine, but no more so than for other such drugs. Answered by Taren Zarlengo 1 year ago.

Wow! Normally, I don't answer questions that want to learn more and more detail. As in your case, because they require a long process, and it is the risk of not solve all of yours problems. I would suggest to proceed analytically with the help of keywords to be included in Yahoo! From what you climb, narrowing the field with new keywords, until you will be fully satisfied. good luck! Answered by Fred Mason 1 year ago.


Is Thorazine(Chlorpromazine) an older anti-psychotic?
I was prescribed this recently for Bipolar Disorder. Is it an older anti-psychotic?Thanks Asked by Misti Lippy 1 year ago.

Thorazine was one of the first anti-psychotics, created in 1950. It is still occasionally used in the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, but not as often as it was a few decades ago. It's a low potency anti-psychotic, so there is a lower chance of experiencing unwanted side effects. Answered by Rhett Leveto 1 year ago.


How long will thorazine take to get in my urine stream?
i want to take a thorazine but i have a drug test at 10:00am and dont know what time yo take it so i can pass the drug test and still take it tonight Asked by Sharan Crowley 1 year ago.

To my understanding, Thorazine is an anti-psychotic medication. It's not typically screened for on a drug test. However, if you do register with a false positive in another drug category as a result of this medication, all you have to do is show proof of a prescription and you're in the clear. Thorazine is excreted primarily through the urine and has a half-life from 10 to 40 hours. Answered by Maryjo Stabler 1 year ago.

You can't wait until after the test to take it - just to be on the safe side? Answered by Kimberly Dysart 1 year ago.


About Thorazine/Largactil?
I have read alot about this drug, but I would like to hear from somone that has actually used it, or someone who knows someone who has used it.How sedating/tranquilizing is it? What are the main side-effects, and what pills do I need to counteract these side-effects? Asked by Benny Dann 1 year ago.

About counteraction - I'm not sure. You'd have to take it to know if you'd have any counteractions, first. I took Thorazine for about a month for sleep. It never made me tired. It would, however, keep me asleep for 8-12 hrs once I laid down and fell asleep. Not a good drug if you need to be knocked out (in my opinion). I'm sure you've heard it called 'the chemical lobotomy'. I didn't feel like it erased too much of my personality, and I was still heavily addicted to drugs and it never made me seek/want drugs less. I really don't remember much from taking it. I snorted it once, and it burned like a SOB, but it knocked me out right away. Answered by Jon Demaranville 1 year ago.


Mrs S. has been taking Thorazine for about 1 year?
She has been having problems with orthostatic hypotension and akathisia, and has needed to take Cogentin to avoid dystonic reactions. The physician has decided to change her to Clozaril. The patient asks the nurse about the advantages and disadvantages of the new drug. The nurse has chosen Knowledge Deficit as the... Asked by Charles Gilliss 1 year ago.

She has been having problems with orthostatic hypotension and akathisia, and has needed to take Cogentin to avoid dystonic reactions. The physician has decided to change her to Clozaril. The patient asks the nurse about the advantages and disadvantages of the new drug. The nurse has chosen Knowledge Deficit as the nursing diagnosis for this patient. a) What interventions would be used for this diagnosis? b) How would the nurse evaluate the outcome of the interventions? Answered by Collen Yeakle 1 year ago.

thorazine is bound to have more severe side effects.. clozaril is an atypical antipsychotic drug, so it will be LESS likely to cause tardive dyskenesia and akathisia and other similarly devastating side effects (thanks to its anticholinergic properties). However, there is recent evidence that such drugs may increase the likelihood of metabolic disturbances (leading to diabetes) and cardiovascular disease. There are also sexual functioning side effects, but that is common to many psychotropic meds...Note that slow titration of dosing of Clozaril significantly decreases the likelihood of orthostatic hypotension, so the switch is right on the money for this mrs. s....... I would say the switch from thorazine to clozaril is not a bad idea. I have no idea what you mean by "knowledge deficit" and "nursing diagnosis", I'm coming from a clinical psych perspective, but hope this helps! Answered by Sheree Partee 1 year ago.


What is thorazine used for?
Asked by Ava Pinela 1 year ago.

Thorazine is used for the treatment of schizophrenia (severe disruptions in thought and perception). It is also prescribed for the short-term treatment of severe behavioral disorders in children, including explosive hyperactivity and combativeness; and for the hyperenergetic phase of manic-depressive illness (severely exaggerated moods). Thorazine is also used to control nausea and vomiting, and to relieve restlessness and apprehension before surgery. It is used as an aid in the treatment of tetanus, and is prescribed for uncontrollable hiccups and acute intermittent porphyria (attacks of severe abdominal pain sometimes accompanied by psychiatric disturbances, cramps in the arms and legs, and muscle weakness). Answered by Racquel Spatafore 1 year ago.

Thorazine Uses Answered by Melody Peroutka 1 year ago.

I don't know all of its uses, but I was given Thorazine for migraines. Answered by Ria Cravatta 1 year ago.

It is a old anti-psychotic. They use to use it a lot in psychiatric hospitals to calm down patients. It is also used for migraines at times. Answered by Charlene Lovejoy 1 year ago.

To mess with kids minds! Answered by Julian Wilkson 1 year ago.

PAIN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!... Answered by Rey Janoski 1 year ago.

Chlorpromazine was the first antipsychotic drug, used during the 1950s and 1960s. Used as chlorpromazine hydrochloride and sold under the tradenames Largactil® and Thorazine®, it has sedative, hypotensive and antiemetic properties as well as anticholinergic and antidopaminergic effects. It has also anxiolytic (alleviation of anxiety) properties. Today, chlorpromazine is considered a typical antipsychotic. Chlorpromazine acts as an antagonist (blocking agent) on different postsynaptic receptors: on dopaminergic-receptors (subtypes D1, D2, D3 and D4, different antipsychotic properties on productive and unproductive symptoms), on serotonergic-receptors (5-HT1 and 5-HT2, with anxiolytic, antidepressive and antiaggressive properties as well as an attenuation of extrapypramidal side effects, but also leading to weight gain, fall in blood pressure, sedation and ejaculation difficulties), on histaminergic-receptors (H1-receptors, sedation, antiemesis, vertigo, fall in blood pressure and weight gain), on alpha1/alpha2-receptors (antisympathomimetic properties, lowering of blood pressure, reflex tachycardia, vertigo, sedation, hypersalivation and incontinence as well as sexual dysfunction, but may also attenuate pseudoparkinsonism—controversial), and on muscarinic (cholinergic) M1/M2-receptors (causing anticholinergic symptoms like dry mouth, blurred vision, obstipation, difficulty/inability to urinate, sinus tachycardia, ECG-changes and loss of memory, but the anticholinergic action may attenuate extrapyramidal side effects). Additionally, chlorpromazine is a weak presynaptic inhibitor of dopamine reuptake, which may lead to (mild) antidepressive and antiparkinsonian effects. This action could also account for psychomotor agitation and amplification of psychosis (very rarely noted in clinical use). [edit] Peripheral Antagonist to H1 receptors (antiallergic effects), H2 receptors (reduction of forming of gastric juice), M1/M2-receptors (dry mouth, reduction in forming of gastric juice) and some 5-HT receptors (different anti-allergic/gastrointestinal actions). Because it acts on so many receptors, chlorpromazine is often referred to as "dirty drug", whereas the atypical neuroleptic amisulpride for example acts only on central D2/D3-receptors and is therefore a "clean drug". This distinction is not a positive or negative value judgment on the drug, rather it is a neutral term which merely describes the agent's relative pharmacology. [edit] History The drug had been developed by Laboratoires Rhône-Poulenc in 1950 but they sold the rights in 1952 to Smith-Kline & French (today's GlaxoSmithKline). The drug was being sold as an antiemetic when its other use was noted. Smith-Kline was quick to encourage clinical trials and in 1954 the drug was approved in the US for psychiatric treatment. Over 100 million people were treated but the popularity of the drug fell from the late 1960s as the severe extrapyramidal side effects and tardive dyskinesia became more of a concern. From chlorpromazine a number of other similar neuroleptics were developed (e.g. triflupromazine, trifluoperazine). Previously used as an antihistamine and antiemetic its effects on mental state were first reported by the French doctor Henri Laborit in 1951 or 1952 (different sources) as sedation without narcosis. It became possible to cause 'artificial hibernation' in patients, if used as a cocktail together with pethidine and hydergine. Patients with shock, severe trauma or burns, become, if treated so, sedated, without anxiety and unreponsive/indifferent to painful external stimuli like minor surgical interventions. It was first used for psychiatric patients by Pierre Deniker and Jean Delay in 1953. Drug treatment with chlorpromazine went beyond simple sedation with patients showing improvements in thinking and emotional behaviour. Ironically, the antipsychotic properties of chlorpromazine appear to be unrelated to its sedative properties. During long term therapy some tolerance to the sedation effect develops. Chlorpromazine substituted and eclipsed the old therapies of electro- and insulin shocks and other methods such as psychosurgical means (lobotomy) causing permanent brain injury. Chlorpromazine has given approximately 70% of all schizophrenic patients a complete remission or near so and a normal, gainful human life. Before the era of neuroleptics, starting with chlorpromazine, positive long-term results for psychotic patients were only 20%. [edit] Side effects Side effects of chlorpromazine are typical of early generation neuroleptics. They include extrapyramidal side effects such as tardive dyskinesia and akathisia. A particularly severe side effect is the neuroleptic malignant syndrome which occurs in approximately 0.05% and can be fatal. Also, chlorpromazine may lower seizure threshold. Additional side effects include dry mouth, increased appetite with weight gain, constipation and urinary retention. Glucose tolerance may be impaired. An allergic skin rash and photosensitivity may occur. Other important and severe side effects are a strong reduction in the number of white blood cells, referred to as leukopenia, or, in extreme cases, even agranulocytosis may result, which may lead to death via uncontrollable infections and/or sepsis. Chlorpromazine is the neuroleptic drug with the highest rates (0.5% to 1%) of liver toxicity of the cholestatic type. The sedation effect combined with indifference to physical stimuli, anecdotally known as the "thorazine shuffle," has long been associated with the drug. The image of psychiatric patients staggering mute around a padded cell has earned those particular side effects a place in mainstream pop culture. [edit] Interactions Chlorpromazine intensifies the central depressive action of drugs with such activity (tranquilizers, barbiturates, narcotics, antihistamines, OTC-antiemetics etc.). A dose reduction of chlorpromazine or the other drug may be necessary. Chlorpromazine also intensifies the actions and undesired side effects of antihypertensive medications and anticholinergic drugs. The combination of chlorpromazine with other antipsychotics may result in increased central depression, hypotension and extrapyramidal side effects, but may sometimes enhance the clinical results of therapy. The anti-worm drug (antihelminthic) piperazine may intensify extrapyramidal side effects. In general, all neuroleptics may lead to seizures in combination with tramadol (Ultram). Chlorpromazine may increase the insulin needs of diabetic patients. Drugs like SSRIs, St. John's Wort and barbiturates can inhibit various CYP-isoenzymes such as CYP2D6, needed for metabolization of chlorpromazine and/or its metabolites. Theoretically, this should increase the half-lives of chlorpromazine and possibly its metabolites, dosing changes necessary. The exact clinical significance of this enzyme induction and its therapeutic consequences are unknown at present time and remain to be evaluated. [edit] Uses [edit] Common uses [edit] As an antipsychotic The use of chlorpromazine has been primarily replaced by newer generation of atypical antipsychotics which have an improved side effect profile. Chlorpromazine is classified as a low- to moderate-potency antipsychotic and in the past was used in the treatment of both acute and chronic psychoses, including schizophrenia and the manic phase of manic depression as well as amphetamine-induced psychoses. Chlorpromazine formerly was the drug of choice to treat LSD (and other psychedelic/hallucinogen) intoxication in a hospital setting, resulting in it gaining an erroneous reputation as the LSD "antidote". Now haloperidol is more commonly used in such situations. [edit] Other uses It has also been used in porphyria, as part of tetanus treatment and for behavioral problems in children. It still is well recommended for short term management of severe anxiety and aggressive episodes. Resistant and severe hiccups, severe nausea/emesis and preanesthetic conditioning have been other indications in the past. It can be used to treat amphetamine overdose. [1] [edit] Off-label and controversial uses Chlorpromazine is occasionally used off-label for treatment of severe migraine. Sometimes it is used in small doses to improve nausea/emesis opioid-treated cancer patients encounter and to intensify and prolong the analgesic action of the opioids given. Interestingly, it remains controversial whether or not chlorpromazine has its own analgesic properties. Analgesic properties may result from a central action on the hypothalamus; the patient may feel the pain much less than before. Other mechanisms may be an interaction with opioid receptors centrally and/or in the spinal cord. Some experts on the contrary say that chlorpromazine, like other phenothiazines, may even have antianalgesic properties. Chlorpromazine has been proposed as useful in newborns for the treatment of opioid withdrawal, if the mother was opioid-dependent. The latter indication remains highly controversial. Chlorpromazine, as well as other neuroleptics, may also be used to alleviate the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal (chlorpromazine may lower the seizure-threshold in alcoholics). It has a unique action in cholera, reducing the loss of water by approximately 30%. In Germany, the brand of chlorpromazine drug Propaphenin® has additional indications for insomnia and itching skin disease. [edit] Veterinary uses Chlorpromazine is primarily used as an antiemetic in dogs and cats. It is also sometimes used as a preanesthetic and muscle relaxant in cattle, swine, sheep, and goats. It is generally contraindicated for use with horses, due to a high incidence of ataxia and altered mentation. [edit] Dosage In any case, use is determined by an attending physician. The following information is intended to serve as a guideline: A wide range is covered from 25 mg oral or intramuscular for mild sedation, every 8 hours, up to 100 mg every 6 hours for severely disturbed patients. Different qualified sources give 800 mg/day to 1,200 mg/day as highest dose. At least there is one small clinical trial in treatment-resistant patients with a daily dose of 1,200 mg chlorpromazine (and 4 mg Benztropine to counteract early extrapyramidal side effects, which were anticipated with this unusual high chlorpromazine dose). Initial doses should be low and be increased gradually. It is recommended that most of the daily dose (e.g. 2/3) is given at bedtime for maximum hypnotic activity and minimal daytime sedation and hypotension. In the USA there are controlled release forms of Thorazine (e.g. 300 mg). After the individual dose is well established, such a CR capsule can be given with the evening meal as a single dose, covering the next 24 hours. The lowest dosage compatible with good therapeutic effect should be given. Dosage in ambulatory patients should be particularly low (minimizing sedation and hypotension). The direct i.v.-injection of undiluted solution is contraindicated (massive fall in blood pressure, cardiovascular collapse), for i.v.-infusion of dilutions the (hospitalized) patient should be lying and the infusion rate should be as slow as possible. Afterwards the patient should rest in the lying position for at least 30 minutes. [edit] Necessary examinations and laboratory checks during treatment All patients treated with chlorpromazine on a long-term-basis should have regularly checked their blood-pressure, pulse rate, laboratory-tests (liver function tests, kidney-values, blood cell counts including differenciated white blood counts, counts of red blood cells and thrombocytes), ECG and EEG. The frequency of all checks should be determined for the individual patient and may be done in shorter intervals during the first 3 months of treatment and less often afterwards. Some side effects seem to appear more frequently during the first months of therapy (sedation, hypotension, liver damage) while others do not (e.g. tardive dyskinesia). [edit] Discontinuation of treatment Also, in regular intervals the treating physician should evaluate whether continued treatment is needed. If not, the drug should never be stopped suddenly, due to very unpleasant 'withdrawal-symptoms', such as agitation, sleeplessness, states of anxiety, etc. However, these symptoms definitely do not indicate psychological or physical dependence. The dose should rather be slowly tapered down at a rate of approximately 20–25% per week or even slower to avoid the aforementioned bothersome symptoms. Chlorpromazine is derived from phenothiazine, and has an aliphatic side chain, typical for low to middle potency neuroleptics. The oral bioavailability is estimated to be 30–50% due to extensive first pass metabolization in the liver. Its elimination-halflife is 16–30 hours. It has many active metabolites (approx. 75 different ones) with greatly varying halflives and own pharmacological profiles. The CYP-450 isoenzymes 1A2 and 2D6 are needed for metabolization of chlorpromazine and the subtype 2D6 is inhibited by chlorpromazine (NB: possible interactions with other drugs). Answered by Mayra Leleux 1 year ago.


What are some reasons why a person might be prescribed 200 mg of thorazine?
...from a medical prospective. Asked by Francisco Carpinelli 1 year ago.

Thorazine is used for the treatment of schizophrenia (severe disruptions in thought and perception). It is also prescribed for the short-term treatment of severe behavioral disorders in children, including explosive hyperactivity and combativeness; and for the hyperenergetic phase of manic-depressive illness (severely exaggerated moods). Thorazine is also used to control nausea and vomiting, and to relieve restlessness and apprehension before surgery. It is used as an aid in the treatment of tetanus, and is prescribed for uncontrollable hiccups and acute intermittent porphyria (attacks of severe abdominal pain sometimes accompanied by psychiatric disturbances, cramps in the arms and legs, and muscle weakness). Answered by Adeline Malik 1 year ago.

The warding off man or woman will have angry through a comment the have shyed away from man or woman made. The warding off man or woman will have a few prejudice towards the have shyed away from man or woman. The have shyed away from man or woman might remind the warding off man or woman of an ex-boyfriend or ex-female friend or different man or woman who the warding off man or woman desires to omit. Maybe anybody instructed the warding off man or woman that the have shyed away from man or woman does not like him/her. But the object is, why do you care? Answered by Jordan Pompi 1 year ago.

It's an anti-psychotic, for bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. Answered by Randy Koehly 1 year ago.


What is Thorazine, Lorazepam and Compazine? What are they used for?
Asked by Lorrine Magnani 1 year ago.

Chlorpromazine is classified as a low-potency typical antipsychotic and in the past was used in the treatment of both acute and chronic psychoses, including schizophrenia and the manic phase of bipolar disorder, as well as amphetamine-induced psychoses. Low-potency antipsychotics have more anticholinergic side effects, such as dry mouth, sedation, and constipation, and lower rates of extrapyramidal side effects, while high-potency antipsychotics (such as haloperidol) have the reverse profile. Chlorpromazine has also been used in porphyria and as part of tetanus treatment. It still is recommended for short-term management of severe anxiety and psychotic aggression. Resistant and severe hiccups, severe nausea/emesis, and preanesthetic conditioning are other uses. Symptoms of delirium in medically-hospitalized AIDS patients have been effectively treated with low doses of chlorpromazine Answered by Barbie Vanderlaan 1 year ago.

They are antipsycotic drugs used to treat manic depression, schizophrenia Answered by Sharda Bishoff 1 year ago.


Is 25 mg of Thorazine safe to take for anxiety?
Asked by Teisha Funari 1 year ago.

Thorazine, at 25 mg, is used for chronic hiccups, nausea and vomitting, sedation before surgery, and sometimes anxiety. However, it is anti-psychotic, a tranquilizer, and very old school, so if it was not prescribed to you, don't tske it. This may just be a question of general curiosity, but if you need meds for anxiety, there are more suitable ones than thorazine. See the doc. to get the right one for you! Answered by Delfina Glasby 1 year ago.

Thorazine is not an anti-anxiety drug. It is an antipsychotic drug. Please do not take ANY prescription medication unless under the direction of your personal physician. Answered by Aurora Zipkin 1 year ago.

I think I would speak to a Pharmacist before listening to someone on Yahoo answers. Answered by Candie Beschorner 1 year ago.

The potential for causing chronic movement disorders makes it far from ideal. Answered by Chassidy Bierschbach 1 year ago.

It has more potential side effects than newer drugs. For example, seizures, heat exhaustion, drowsiness. Answered by Shoshana Lovins 1 year ago.


Is it true that Thorazine is as dangerous and the Psychiatric critics say it is?
From Psychiatric critics they criticize Thorazine a lot and say it messes people up like Lobotomy. Here is an example website criticizing Thorazine: http://www.sntp.net/drugs/thorazine.htm Asked by Carey Manis 1 year ago.

Thorazine is no more dangerous than the others. Staying on it for too long can lead to specific complications, which is true with other anti-psychotics. It isn't used as much these days, but it is still a consideration for some people. It's OK to critisize thorazine, but no more so than for other such drugs. Answered by Robert Neddenriep 1 year ago.

Wow! Normally, I don't answer questions that want to learn more and more detail. As in your case, because they require a long process, and it is the risk of not solve all of yours problems. I would suggest to proceed analytically with the help of keywords to be included in Yahoo! From what you climb, narrowing the field with new keywords, until you will be fully satisfied. good luck! Answered by Guillermo Priore 1 year ago.


Is Thorazine(Chlorpromazine) an older anti-psychotic?
I was prescribed this recently for Bipolar Disorder. Is it an older anti-psychotic?Thanks Asked by Milton Harton 1 year ago.

Thorazine was one of the first anti-psychotics, created in 1950. It is still occasionally used in the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, but not as often as it was a few decades ago. It's a low potency anti-psychotic, so there is a lower chance of experiencing unwanted side effects. Answered by Janelle Cerda 1 year ago.


How long will thorazine take to get in my urine stream?
i want to take a thorazine but i have a drug test at 10:00am and dont know what time yo take it so i can pass the drug test and still take it tonight Asked by Kelsie Ragusa 1 year ago.

To my understanding, Thorazine is an anti-psychotic medication. It's not typically screened for on a drug test. However, if you do register with a false positive in another drug category as a result of this medication, all you have to do is show proof of a prescription and you're in the clear. Thorazine is excreted primarily through the urine and has a half-life from 10 to 40 hours. Answered by Hilton Katra 1 year ago.

You can't wait until after the test to take it - just to be on the safe side? Answered by Louetta Mathern 1 year ago.


About Thorazine/Largactil?
I have read alot about this drug, but I would like to hear from somone that has actually used it, or someone who knows someone who has used it.How sedating/tranquilizing is it? What are the main side-effects, and what pills do I need to counteract these side-effects? Asked by Eleni Samora 1 year ago.

About counteraction - I'm not sure. You'd have to take it to know if you'd have any counteractions, first. I took Thorazine for about a month for sleep. It never made me tired. It would, however, keep me asleep for 8-12 hrs once I laid down and fell asleep. Not a good drug if you need to be knocked out (in my opinion). I'm sure you've heard it called 'the chemical lobotomy'. I didn't feel like it erased too much of my personality, and I was still heavily addicted to drugs and it never made me seek/want drugs less. I really don't remember much from taking it. I snorted it once, and it burned like a SOB, but it knocked me out right away. Answered by Leonard Odenheimer 1 year ago.


Mrs S. has been taking Thorazine for about 1 year?
She has been having problems with orthostatic hypotension and akathisia, and has needed to take Cogentin to avoid dystonic reactions. The physician has decided to change her to Clozaril. The patient asks the nurse about the advantages and disadvantages of the new drug. The nurse has chosen Knowledge Deficit as the... Asked by Arcelia Marzella 1 year ago.

She has been having problems with orthostatic hypotension and akathisia, and has needed to take Cogentin to avoid dystonic reactions. The physician has decided to change her to Clozaril. The patient asks the nurse about the advantages and disadvantages of the new drug. The nurse has chosen Knowledge Deficit as the nursing diagnosis for this patient. a) What interventions would be used for this diagnosis? b) How would the nurse evaluate the outcome of the interventions? Answered by Cleo Biorkman 1 year ago.

thorazine is bound to have more severe side effects.. clozaril is an atypical antipsychotic drug, so it will be LESS likely to cause tardive dyskenesia and akathisia and other similarly devastating side effects (thanks to its anticholinergic properties). However, there is recent evidence that such drugs may increase the likelihood of metabolic disturbances (leading to diabetes) and cardiovascular disease. There are also sexual functioning side effects, but that is common to many psychotropic meds...Note that slow titration of dosing of Clozaril significantly decreases the likelihood of orthostatic hypotension, so the switch is right on the money for this mrs. s....... I would say the switch from thorazine to clozaril is not a bad idea. I have no idea what you mean by "knowledge deficit" and "nursing diagnosis", I'm coming from a clinical psych perspective, but hope this helps! Answered by Desire Beckerdite 1 year ago.


What is thorazine used for?
Asked by Eden Paladin 1 year ago.

Thorazine is used for the treatment of schizophrenia (severe disruptions in thought and perception). It is also prescribed for the short-term treatment of severe behavioral disorders in children, including explosive hyperactivity and combativeness; and for the hyperenergetic phase of manic-depressive illness (severely exaggerated moods). Thorazine is also used to control nausea and vomiting, and to relieve restlessness and apprehension before surgery. It is used as an aid in the treatment of tetanus, and is prescribed for uncontrollable hiccups and acute intermittent porphyria (attacks of severe abdominal pain sometimes accompanied by psychiatric disturbances, cramps in the arms and legs, and muscle weakness). Answered by Bernie Cockley 1 year ago.

Thorazine Uses Answered by Louis Aegerter 1 year ago.

I don't know all of its uses, but I was given Thorazine for migraines. Answered by Evette Carovski 1 year ago.

It is a old anti-psychotic. They use to use it a lot in psychiatric hospitals to calm down patients. It is also used for migraines at times. Answered by Dahlia Hatstat 1 year ago.

To mess with kids minds! Answered by Ivy Milkowski 1 year ago.

PAIN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!... Answered by Candra Aylor 1 year ago.

Chlorpromazine was the first antipsychotic drug, used during the 1950s and 1960s. Used as chlorpromazine hydrochloride and sold under the tradenames Largactil® and Thorazine®, it has sedative, hypotensive and antiemetic properties as well as anticholinergic and antidopaminergic effects. It has also anxiolytic (alleviation of anxiety) properties. Today, chlorpromazine is considered a typical antipsychotic. Chlorpromazine acts as an antagonist (blocking agent) on different postsynaptic receptors: on dopaminergic-receptors (subtypes D1, D2, D3 and D4, different antipsychotic properties on productive and unproductive symptoms), on serotonergic-receptors (5-HT1 and 5-HT2, with anxiolytic, antidepressive and antiaggressive properties as well as an attenuation of extrapypramidal side effects, but also leading to weight gain, fall in blood pressure, sedation and ejaculation difficulties), on histaminergic-receptors (H1-receptors, sedation, antiemesis, vertigo, fall in blood pressure and weight gain), on alpha1/alpha2-receptors (antisympathomimetic properties, lowering of blood pressure, reflex tachycardia, vertigo, sedation, hypersalivation and incontinence as well as sexual dysfunction, but may also attenuate pseudoparkinsonism—controversial), and on muscarinic (cholinergic) M1/M2-receptors (causing anticholinergic symptoms like dry mouth, blurred vision, obstipation, difficulty/inability to urinate, sinus tachycardia, ECG-changes and loss of memory, but the anticholinergic action may attenuate extrapyramidal side effects). Additionally, chlorpromazine is a weak presynaptic inhibitor of dopamine reuptake, which may lead to (mild) antidepressive and antiparkinsonian effects. This action could also account for psychomotor agitation and amplification of psychosis (very rarely noted in clinical use). [edit] Peripheral Antagonist to H1 receptors (antiallergic effects), H2 receptors (reduction of forming of gastric juice), M1/M2-receptors (dry mouth, reduction in forming of gastric juice) and some 5-HT receptors (different anti-allergic/gastrointestinal actions). Because it acts on so many receptors, chlorpromazine is often referred to as "dirty drug", whereas the atypical neuroleptic amisulpride for example acts only on central D2/D3-receptors and is therefore a "clean drug". This distinction is not a positive or negative value judgment on the drug, rather it is a neutral term which merely describes the agent's relative pharmacology. [edit] History The drug had been developed by Laboratoires Rhône-Poulenc in 1950 but they sold the rights in 1952 to Smith-Kline & French (today's GlaxoSmithKline). The drug was being sold as an antiemetic when its other use was noted. Smith-Kline was quick to encourage clinical trials and in 1954 the drug was approved in the US for psychiatric treatment. Over 100 million people were treated but the popularity of the drug fell from the late 1960s as the severe extrapyramidal side effects and tardive dyskinesia became more of a concern. From chlorpromazine a number of other similar neuroleptics were developed (e.g. triflupromazine, trifluoperazine). Previously used as an antihistamine and antiemetic its effects on mental state were first reported by the French doctor Henri Laborit in 1951 or 1952 (different sources) as sedation without narcosis. It became possible to cause 'artificial hibernation' in patients, if used as a cocktail together with pethidine and hydergine. Patients with shock, severe trauma or burns, become, if treated so, sedated, without anxiety and unreponsive/indifferent to painful external stimuli like minor surgical interventions. It was first used for psychiatric patients by Pierre Deniker and Jean Delay in 1953. Drug treatment with chlorpromazine went beyond simple sedation with patients showing improvements in thinking and emotional behaviour. Ironically, the antipsychotic properties of chlorpromazine appear to be unrelated to its sedative properties. During long term therapy some tolerance to the sedation effect develops. Chlorpromazine substituted and eclipsed the old therapies of electro- and insulin shocks and other methods such as psychosurgical means (lobotomy) causing permanent brain injury. Chlorpromazine has given approximately 70% of all schizophrenic patients a complete remission or near so and a normal, gainful human life. Before the era of neuroleptics, starting with chlorpromazine, positive long-term results for psychotic patients were only 20%. [edit] Side effects Side effects of chlorpromazine are typical of early generation neuroleptics. They include extrapyramidal side effects such as tardive dyskinesia and akathisia. A particularly severe side effect is the neuroleptic malignant syndrome which occurs in approximately 0.05% and can be fatal. Also, chlorpromazine may lower seizure threshold. Additional side effects include dry mouth, increased appetite with weight gain, constipation and urinary retention. Glucose tolerance may be impaired. An allergic skin rash and photosensitivity may occur. Other important and severe side effects are a strong reduction in the number of white blood cells, referred to as leukopenia, or, in extreme cases, even agranulocytosis may result, which may lead to death via uncontrollable infections and/or sepsis. Chlorpromazine is the neuroleptic drug with the highest rates (0.5% to 1%) of liver toxicity of the cholestatic type. The sedation effect combined with indifference to physical stimuli, anecdotally known as the "thorazine shuffle," has long been associated with the drug. The image of psychiatric patients staggering mute around a padded cell has earned those particular side effects a place in mainstream pop culture. [edit] Interactions Chlorpromazine intensifies the central depressive action of drugs with such activity (tranquilizers, barbiturates, narcotics, antihistamines, OTC-antiemetics etc.). A dose reduction of chlorpromazine or the other drug may be necessary. Chlorpromazine also intensifies the actions and undesired side effects of antihypertensive medications and anticholinergic drugs. The combination of chlorpromazine with other antipsychotics may result in increased central depression, hypotension and extrapyramidal side effects, but may sometimes enhance the clinical results of therapy. The anti-worm drug (antihelminthic) piperazine may intensify extrapyramidal side effects. In general, all neuroleptics may lead to seizures in combination with tramadol (Ultram). Chlorpromazine may increase the insulin needs of diabetic patients. Drugs like SSRIs, St. John's Wort and barbiturates can inhibit various CYP-isoenzymes such as CYP2D6, needed for metabolization of chlorpromazine and/or its metabolites. Theoretically, this should increase the half-lives of chlorpromazine and possibly its metabolites, dosing changes necessary. The exact clinical significance of this enzyme induction and its therapeutic consequences are unknown at present time and remain to be evaluated. [edit] Uses [edit] Common uses [edit] As an antipsychotic The use of chlorpromazine has been primarily replaced by newer generation of atypical antipsychotics which have an improved side effect profile. Chlorpromazine is classified as a low- to moderate-potency antipsychotic and in the past was used in the treatment of both acute and chronic psychoses, including schizophrenia and the manic phase of manic depression as well as amphetamine-induced psychoses. Chlorpromazine formerly was the drug of choice to treat LSD (and other psychedelic/hallucinogen) intoxication in a hospital setting, resulting in it gaining an erroneous reputation as the LSD "antidote". Now haloperidol is more commonly used in such situations. [edit] Other uses It has also been used in porphyria, as part of tetanus treatment and for behavioral problems in children. It still is well recommended for short term management of severe anxiety and aggressive episodes. Resistant and severe hiccups, severe nausea/emesis and preanesthetic conditioning have been other indications in the past. It can be used to treat amphetamine overdose. [1] [edit] Off-label and controversial uses Chlorpromazine is occasionally used off-label for treatment of severe migraine. Sometimes it is used in small doses to improve nausea/emesis opioid-treated cancer patients encounter and to intensify and prolong the analgesic action of the opioids given. Interestingly, it remains controversial whether or not chlorpromazine has its own analgesic properties. Analgesic properties may result from a central action on the hypothalamus; the patient may feel the pain much less than before. Other mechanisms may be an interaction with opioid receptors centrally and/or in the spinal cord. Some experts on the contrary say that chlorpromazine, like other phenothiazines, may even have antianalgesic properties. Chlorpromazine has been proposed as useful in newborns for the treatment of opioid withdrawal, if the mother was opioid-dependent. The latter indication remains highly controversial. Chlorpromazine, as well as other neuroleptics, may also be used to alleviate the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal (chlorpromazine may lower the seizure-threshold in alcoholics). It has a unique action in cholera, reducing the loss of water by approximately 30%. In Germany, the brand of chlorpromazine drug Propaphenin® has additional indications for insomnia and itching skin disease. [edit] Veterinary uses Chlorpromazine is primarily used as an antiemetic in dogs and cats. It is also sometimes used as a preanesthetic and muscle relaxant in cattle, swine, sheep, and goats. It is generally contraindicated for use with horses, due to a high incidence of ataxia and altered mentation. [edit] Dosage In any case, use is determined by an attending physician. The following information is intended to serve as a guideline: A wide range is covered from 25 mg oral or intramuscular for mild sedation, every 8 hours, up to 100 mg every 6 hours for severely disturbed patients. Different qualified sources give 800 mg/day to 1,200 mg/day as highest dose. At least there is one small clinical trial in treatment-resistant patients with a daily dose of 1,200 mg chlorpromazine (and 4 mg Benztropine to counteract early extrapyramidal side effects, which were anticipated with this unusual high chlorpromazine dose). Initial doses should be low and be increased gradually. It is recommended that most of the daily dose (e.g. 2/3) is given at bedtime for maximum hypnotic activity and minimal daytime sedation and hypotension. In the USA there are controlled release forms of Thorazine (e.g. 300 mg). After the individual dose is well established, such a CR capsule can be given with the evening meal as a single dose, covering the next 24 hours. The lowest dosage compatible with good therapeutic effect should be given. Dosage in ambulatory patients should be particularly low (minimizing sedation and hypotension). The direct i.v.-injection of undiluted solution is contraindicated (massive fall in blood pressure, cardiovascular collapse), for i.v.-infusion of dilutions the (hospitalized) patient should be lying and the infusion rate should be as slow as possible. Afterwards the patient should rest in the lying position for at least 30 minutes. [edit] Necessary examinations and laboratory checks during treatment All patients treated with chlorpromazine on a long-term-basis should have regularly checked their blood-pressure, pulse rate, laboratory-tests (liver function tests, kidney-values, blood cell counts including differenciated white blood counts, counts of red blood cells and thrombocytes), ECG and EEG. The frequency of all checks should be determined for the individual patient and may be done in shorter intervals during the first 3 months of treatment and less often afterwards. Some side effects seem to appear more frequently during the first months of therapy (sedation, hypotension, liver damage) while others do not (e.g. tardive dyskinesia). [edit] Discontinuation of treatment Also, in regular intervals the treating physician should evaluate whether continued treatment is needed. If not, the drug should never be stopped suddenly, due to very unpleasant 'withdrawal-symptoms', such as agitation, sleeplessness, states of anxiety, etc. However, these symptoms definitely do not indicate psychological or physical dependence. The dose should rather be slowly tapered down at a rate of approximately 20–25% per week or even slower to avoid the aforementioned bothersome symptoms. Chlorpromazine is derived from phenothiazine, and has an aliphatic side chain, typical for low to middle potency neuroleptics. The oral bioavailability is estimated to be 30–50% due to extensive first pass metabolization in the liver. Its elimination-halflife is 16–30 hours. It has many active metabolites (approx. 75 different ones) with greatly varying halflives and own pharmacological profiles. The CYP-450 isoenzymes 1A2 and 2D6 are needed for metabolization of chlorpromazine and the subtype 2D6 is inhibited by chlorpromazine (NB: possible interactions with other drugs). Answered by Liz Lacks 1 year ago.


What are some reasons why a person might be prescribed 200 mg of thorazine?
...from a medical prospective. Asked by Keturah Niemela 1 year ago.

Thorazine is used for the treatment of schizophrenia (severe disruptions in thought and perception). It is also prescribed for the short-term treatment of severe behavioral disorders in children, including explosive hyperactivity and combativeness; and for the hyperenergetic phase of manic-depressive illness (severely exaggerated moods). Thorazine is also used to control nausea and vomiting, and to relieve restlessness and apprehension before surgery. It is used as an aid in the treatment of tetanus, and is prescribed for uncontrollable hiccups and acute intermittent porphyria (attacks of severe abdominal pain sometimes accompanied by psychiatric disturbances, cramps in the arms and legs, and muscle weakness). Answered by Charissa Touchet 1 year ago.

The warding off man or woman will have angry through a comment the have shyed away from man or woman made. The warding off man or woman will have a few prejudice towards the have shyed away from man or woman. The have shyed away from man or woman might remind the warding off man or woman of an ex-boyfriend or ex-female friend or different man or woman who the warding off man or woman desires to omit. Maybe anybody instructed the warding off man or woman that the have shyed away from man or woman does not like him/her. But the object is, why do you care? Answered by Alan Werger 1 year ago.

It's an anti-psychotic, for bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. Answered by Tabitha Barnes 1 year ago.


What is Thorazine, Lorazepam and Compazine? What are they used for?
Asked by Meghann Manigo 1 year ago.

Chlorpromazine is classified as a low-potency typical antipsychotic and in the past was used in the treatment of both acute and chronic psychoses, including schizophrenia and the manic phase of bipolar disorder, as well as amphetamine-induced psychoses. Low-potency antipsychotics have more anticholinergic side effects, such as dry mouth, sedation, and constipation, and lower rates of extrapyramidal side effects, while high-potency antipsychotics (such as haloperidol) have the reverse profile. Chlorpromazine has also been used in porphyria and as part of tetanus treatment. It still is recommended for short-term management of severe anxiety and psychotic aggression. Resistant and severe hiccups, severe nausea/emesis, and preanesthetic conditioning are other uses. Symptoms of delirium in medically-hospitalized AIDS patients have been effectively treated with low doses of chlorpromazine Answered by Darryl Washpun 1 year ago.

They are antipsycotic drugs used to treat manic depression, schizophrenia Answered by Violeta Chamlee 1 year ago.


Is 25 mg of Thorazine safe to take for anxiety?
Asked by Aide Mcfall 1 year ago.

Thorazine, at 25 mg, is used for chronic hiccups, nausea and vomitting, sedation before surgery, and sometimes anxiety. However, it is anti-psychotic, a tranquilizer, and very old school, so if it was not prescribed to you, don't tske it. This may just be a question of general curiosity, but if you need meds for anxiety, there are more suitable ones than thorazine. See the doc. to get the right one for you! Answered by Beatris Pavlat 1 year ago.

Thorazine is not an anti-anxiety drug. It is an antipsychotic drug. Please do not take ANY prescription medication unless under the direction of your personal physician. Answered by Mechelle Ellzey 1 year ago.

I think I would speak to a Pharmacist before listening to someone on Yahoo answers. Answered by Kristine Linsenmayer 1 year ago.

The potential for causing chronic movement disorders makes it far from ideal. Answered by Johnna Pasho 1 year ago.

It has more potential side effects than newer drugs. For example, seizures, heat exhaustion, drowsiness. Answered by Joanie Pestoni 1 year ago.


Is it true that Thorazine is as dangerous and the Psychiatric critics say it is?
From Psychiatric critics they criticize Thorazine a lot and say it messes people up like Lobotomy. Here is an example website criticizing Thorazine: http://www.sntp.net/drugs/thorazine.htm Asked by Gertrudis Estess 1 year ago.

Thorazine is no more dangerous than the others. Staying on it for too long can lead to specific complications, which is true with other anti-psychotics. It isn't used as much these days, but it is still a consideration for some people. It's OK to critisize thorazine, but no more so than for other such drugs. Answered by Otelia Bonamico 1 year ago.

Wow! Normally, I don't answer questions that want to learn more and more detail. As in your case, because they require a long process, and it is the risk of not solve all of yours problems. I would suggest to proceed analytically with the help of keywords to be included in Yahoo! From what you climb, narrowing the field with new keywords, until you will be fully satisfied. good luck! Answered by Julissa Fromdahl 1 year ago.


Is Thorazine(Chlorpromazine) an older anti-psychotic?
I was prescribed this recently for Bipolar Disorder. Is it an older anti-psychotic?Thanks Asked by Jordon Amara 1 year ago.

Thorazine was one of the first anti-psychotics, created in 1950. It is still occasionally used in the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, but not as often as it was a few decades ago. It's a low potency anti-psychotic, so there is a lower chance of experiencing unwanted side effects. Answered by Luna Vento 1 year ago.


How long will thorazine take to get in my urine stream?
i want to take a thorazine but i have a drug test at 10:00am and dont know what time yo take it so i can pass the drug test and still take it tonight Asked by Rose Olten 1 year ago.

To my understanding, Thorazine is an anti-psychotic medication. It's not typically screened for on a drug test. However, if you do register with a false positive in another drug category as a result of this medication, all you have to do is show proof of a prescription and you're in the clear. Thorazine is excreted primarily through the urine and has a half-life from 10 to 40 hours. Answered by Golda Payden 1 year ago.

You can't wait until after the test to take it - just to be on the safe side? Answered by Patria Darnstaedt 1 year ago.


About Thorazine/Largactil?
I have read alot about this drug, but I would like to hear from somone that has actually used it, or someone who knows someone who has used it.How sedating/tranquilizing is it? What are the main side-effects, and what pills do I need to counteract these side-effects? Asked by Shea Pedulla 1 year ago.

About counteraction - I'm not sure. You'd have to take it to know if you'd have any counteractions, first. I took Thorazine for about a month for sleep. It never made me tired. It would, however, keep me asleep for 8-12 hrs once I laid down and fell asleep. Not a good drug if you need to be knocked out (in my opinion). I'm sure you've heard it called 'the chemical lobotomy'. I didn't feel like it erased too much of my personality, and I was still heavily addicted to drugs and it never made me seek/want drugs less. I really don't remember much from taking it. I snorted it once, and it burned like a SOB, but it knocked me out right away. Answered by Ellyn Girote 1 year ago.


Mrs S. has been taking Thorazine for about 1 year?
She has been having problems with orthostatic hypotension and akathisia, and has needed to take Cogentin to avoid dystonic reactions. The physician has decided to change her to Clozaril. The patient asks the nurse about the advantages and disadvantages of the new drug. The nurse has chosen Knowledge Deficit as the... Asked by Rutha Brereton 1 year ago.

She has been having problems with orthostatic hypotension and akathisia, and has needed to take Cogentin to avoid dystonic reactions. The physician has decided to change her to Clozaril. The patient asks the nurse about the advantages and disadvantages of the new drug. The nurse has chosen Knowledge Deficit as the nursing diagnosis for this patient. a) What interventions would be used for this diagnosis? b) How would the nurse evaluate the outcome of the interventions? Answered by Lilliana Fiebich 1 year ago.

thorazine is bound to have more severe side effects.. clozaril is an atypical antipsychotic drug, so it will be LESS likely to cause tardive dyskenesia and akathisia and other similarly devastating side effects (thanks to its anticholinergic properties). However, there is recent evidence that such drugs may increase the likelihood of metabolic disturbances (leading to diabetes) and cardiovascular disease. There are also sexual functioning side effects, but that is common to many psychotropic meds...Note that slow titration of dosing of Clozaril significantly decreases the likelihood of orthostatic hypotension, so the switch is right on the money for this mrs. s....... I would say the switch from thorazine to clozaril is not a bad idea. I have no idea what you mean by "knowledge deficit" and "nursing diagnosis", I'm coming from a clinical psych perspective, but hope this helps! Answered by Shemeka Rippelmeyer 1 year ago.


What is thorazine used for?
Asked by Edwina Laizure 1 year ago.

Thorazine is used for the treatment of schizophrenia (severe disruptions in thought and perception). It is also prescribed for the short-term treatment of severe behavioral disorders in children, including explosive hyperactivity and combativeness; and for the hyperenergetic phase of manic-depressive illness (severely exaggerated moods). Thorazine is also used to control nausea and vomiting, and to relieve restlessness and apprehension before surgery. It is used as an aid in the treatment of tetanus, and is prescribed for uncontrollable hiccups and acute intermittent porphyria (attacks of severe abdominal pain sometimes accompanied by psychiatric disturbances, cramps in the arms and legs, and muscle weakness). Answered by Anderson Statzer 1 year ago.

Thorazine Uses Answered by Richard Ollison 1 year ago.

I don't know all of its uses, but I was given Thorazine for migraines. Answered by Darlena Iwanyszyn 1 year ago.

It is a old anti-psychotic. They use to use it a lot in psychiatric hospitals to calm down patients. It is also used for migraines at times. Answered by Frances Bugg 1 year ago.

To mess with kids minds! Answered by Alisa Scarborough 1 year ago.

PAIN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!... Answered by Royce Berlingeri 1 year ago.

Chlorpromazine was the first antipsychotic drug, used during the 1950s and 1960s. Used as chlorpromazine hydrochloride and sold under the tradenames Largactil® and Thorazine®, it has sedative, hypotensive and antiemetic properties as well as anticholinergic and antidopaminergic effects. It has also anxiolytic (alleviation of anxiety) properties. Today, chlorpromazine is considered a typical antipsychotic. Chlorpromazine acts as an antagonist (blocking agent) on different postsynaptic receptors: on dopaminergic-receptors (subtypes D1, D2, D3 and D4, different antipsychotic properties on productive and unproductive symptoms), on serotonergic-receptors (5-HT1 and 5-HT2, with anxiolytic, antidepressive and antiaggressive properties as well as an attenuation of extrapypramidal side effects, but also leading to weight gain, fall in blood pressure, sedation and ejaculation difficulties), on histaminergic-receptors (H1-receptors, sedation, antiemesis, vertigo, fall in blood pressure and weight gain), on alpha1/alpha2-receptors (antisympathomimetic properties, lowering of blood pressure, reflex tachycardia, vertigo, sedation, hypersalivation and incontinence as well as sexual dysfunction, but may also attenuate pseudoparkinsonism—controversial), and on muscarinic (cholinergic) M1/M2-receptors (causing anticholinergic symptoms like dry mouth, blurred vision, obstipation, difficulty/inability to urinate, sinus tachycardia, ECG-changes and loss of memory, but the anticholinergic action may attenuate extrapyramidal side effects). Additionally, chlorpromazine is a weak presynaptic inhibitor of dopamine reuptake, which may lead to (mild) antidepressive and antiparkinsonian effects. This action could also account for psychomotor agitation and amplification of psychosis (very rarely noted in clinical use). [edit] Peripheral Antagonist to H1 receptors (antiallergic effects), H2 receptors (reduction of forming of gastric juice), M1/M2-receptors (dry mouth, reduction in forming of gastric juice) and some 5-HT receptors (different anti-allergic/gastrointestinal actions). Because it acts on so many receptors, chlorpromazine is often referred to as "dirty drug", whereas the atypical neuroleptic amisulpride for example acts only on central D2/D3-receptors and is therefore a "clean drug". This distinction is not a positive or negative value judgment on the drug, rather it is a neutral term which merely describes the agent's relative pharmacology. [edit] History The drug had been developed by Laboratoires Rhône-Poulenc in 1950 but they sold the rights in 1952 to Smith-Kline & French (today's GlaxoSmithKline). The drug was being sold as an antiemetic when its other use was noted. Smith-Kline was quick to encourage clinical trials and in 1954 the drug was approved in the US for psychiatric treatment. Over 100 million people were treated but the popularity of the drug fell from the late 1960s as the severe extrapyramidal side effects and tardive dyskinesia became more of a concern. From chlorpromazine a number of other similar neuroleptics were developed (e.g. triflupromazine, trifluoperazine). Previously used as an antihistamine and antiemetic its effects on mental state were first reported by the French doctor Henri Laborit in 1951 or 1952 (different sources) as sedation without narcosis. It became possible to cause 'artificial hibernation' in patients, if used as a cocktail together with pethidine and hydergine. Patients with shock, severe trauma or burns, become, if treated so, sedated, without anxiety and unreponsive/indifferent to painful external stimuli like minor surgical interventions. It was first used for psychiatric patients by Pierre Deniker and Jean Delay in 1953. Drug treatment with chlorpromazine went beyond simple sedation with patients showing improvements in thinking and emotional behaviour. Ironically, the antipsychotic properties of chlorpromazine appear to be unrelated to its sedative properties. During long term therapy some tolerance to the sedation effect develops. Chlorpromazine substituted and eclipsed the old therapies of electro- and insulin shocks and other methods such as psychosurgical means (lobotomy) causing permanent brain injury. Chlorpromazine has given approximately 70% of all schizophrenic patients a complete remission or near so and a normal, gainful human life. Before the era of neuroleptics, starting with chlorpromazine, positive long-term results for psychotic patients were only 20%. [edit] Side effects Side effects of chlorpromazine are typical of early generation neuroleptics. They include extrapyramidal side effects such as tardive dyskinesia and akathisia. A particularly severe side effect is the neuroleptic malignant syndrome which occurs in approximately 0.05% and can be fatal. Also, chlorpromazine may lower seizure threshold. Additional side effects include dry mouth, increased appetite with weight gain, constipation and urinary retention. Glucose tolerance may be impaired. An allergic skin rash and photosensitivity may occur. Other important and severe side effects are a strong reduction in the number of white blood cells, referred to as leukopenia, or, in extreme cases, even agranulocytosis may result, which may lead to death via uncontrollable infections and/or sepsis. Chlorpromazine is the neuroleptic drug with the highest rates (0.5% to 1%) of liver toxicity of the cholestatic type. The sedation effect combined with indifference to physical stimuli, anecdotally known as the "thorazine shuffle," has long been associated with the drug. The image of psychiatric patients staggering mute around a padded cell has earned those particular side effects a place in mainstream pop culture. [edit] Interactions Chlorpromazine intensifies the central depressive action of drugs with such activity (tranquilizers, barbiturates, narcotics, antihistamines, OTC-antiemetics etc.). A dose reduction of chlorpromazine or the other drug may be necessary. Chlorpromazine also intensifies the actions and undesired side effects of antihypertensive medications and anticholinergic drugs. The combination of chlorpromazine with other antipsychotics may result in increased central depression, hypotension and extrapyramidal side effects, but may sometimes enhance the clinical results of therapy. The anti-worm drug (antihelminthic) piperazine may intensify extrapyramidal side effects. In general, all neuroleptics may lead to seizures in combination with tramadol (Ultram). Chlorpromazine may increase the insulin needs of diabetic patients. Drugs like SSRIs, St. John's Wort and barbiturates can inhibit various CYP-isoenzymes such as CYP2D6, needed for metabolization of chlorpromazine and/or its metabolites. Theoretically, this should increase the half-lives of chlorpromazine and possibly its metabolites, dosing changes necessary. The exact clinical significance of this enzyme induction and its therapeutic consequences are unknown at present time and remain to be evaluated. [edit] Uses [edit] Common uses [edit] As an antipsychotic The use of chlorpromazine has been primarily replaced by newer generation of atypical antipsychotics which have an improved side effect profile. Chlorpromazine is classified as a low- to moderate-potency antipsychotic and in the past was used in the treatment of both acute and chronic psychoses, including schizophrenia and the manic phase of manic depression as well as amphetamine-induced psychoses. Chlorpromazine formerly was the drug of choice to treat LSD (and other psychedelic/hallucinogen) intoxication in a hospital setting, resulting in it gaining an erroneous reputation as the LSD "antidote". Now haloperidol is more commonly used in such situations. [edit] Other uses It has also been used in porphyria, as part of tetanus treatment and for behavioral problems in children. It still is well recommended for short term management of severe anxiety and aggressive episodes. Resistant and severe hiccups, severe nausea/emesis and preanesthetic conditioning have been other indications in the past. It can be used to treat amphetamine overdose. [1] [edit] Off-label and controversial uses Chlorpromazine is occasionally used off-label for treatment of severe migraine. Sometimes it is used in small doses to improve nausea/emesis opioid-treated cancer patients encounter and to intensify and prolong the analgesic action of the opioids given. Interestingly, it remains controversial whether or not chlorpromazine has its own analgesic properties. Analgesic properties may result from a central action on the hypothalamus; the patient may feel the pain much less than before. Other mechanisms may be an interaction with opioid receptors centrally and/or in the spinal cord. Some experts on the contrary say that chlorpromazine, like other phenothiazines, may even have antianalgesic properties. Chlorpromazine has been proposed as useful in newborns for the treatment of opioid withdrawal, if the mother was opioid-dependent. The latter indication remains highly controversial. Chlorpromazine, as well as other neuroleptics, may also be used to alleviate the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal (chlorpromazine may lower the seizure-threshold in alcoholics). It has a unique action in cholera, reducing the loss of water by approximately 30%. In Germany, the brand of chlorpromazine drug Propaphenin® has additional indications for insomnia and itching skin disease. [edit] Veterinary uses Chlorpromazine is primarily used as an antiemetic in dogs and cats. It is also sometimes used as a preanesthetic and muscle relaxant in cattle, swine, sheep, and goats. It is generally contraindicated for use with horses, due to a high incidence of ataxia and altered mentation. [edit] Dosage In any case, use is determined by an attending physician. The following information is intended to serve as a guideline: A wide range is covered from 25 mg oral or intramuscular for mild sedation, every 8 hours, up to 100 mg every 6 hours for severely disturbed patients. Different qualified sources give 800 mg/day to 1,200 mg/day as highest dose. At least there is one small clinical trial in treatment-resistant patients with a daily dose of 1,200 mg chlorpromazine (and 4 mg Benztropine to counteract early extrapyramidal side effects, which were anticipated with this unusual high chlorpromazine dose). Initial doses should be low and be increased gradually. It is recommended that most of the daily dose (e.g. 2/3) is given at bedtime for maximum hypnotic activity and minimal daytime sedation and hypotension. In the USA there are controlled release forms of Thorazine (e.g. 300 mg). After the individual dose is well established, such a CR capsule can be given with the evening meal as a single dose, covering the next 24 hours. The lowest dosage compatible with good therapeutic effect should be given. Dosage in ambulatory patients should be particularly low (minimizing sedation and hypotension). The direct i.v.-injection of undiluted solution is contraindicated (massive fall in blood pressure, cardiovascular collapse), for i.v.-infusion of dilutions the (hospitalized) patient should be lying and the infusion rate should be as slow as possible. Afterwards the patient should rest in the lying position for at least 30 minutes. [edit] Necessary examinations and laboratory checks during treatment All patients treated with chlorpromazine on a long-term-basis should have regularly checked their blood-pressure, pulse rate, laboratory-tests (liver function tests, kidney-values, blood cell counts including differenciated white blood counts, counts of red blood cells and thrombocytes), ECG and EEG. The frequency of all checks should be determined for the individual patient and may be done in shorter intervals during the first 3 months of treatment and less often afterwards. Some side effects seem to appear more frequently during the first months of therapy (sedation, hypotension, liver damage) while others do not (e.g. tardive dyskinesia). [edit] Discontinuation of treatment Also, in regular intervals the treating physician should evaluate whether continued treatment is needed. If not, the drug should never be stopped suddenly, due to very unpleasant 'withdrawal-symptoms', such as agitation, sleeplessness, states of anxiety, etc. However, these symptoms definitely do not indicate psychological or physical dependence. The dose should rather be slowly tapered down at a rate of approximately 20–25% per week or even slower to avoid the aforementioned bothersome symptoms. Chlorpromazine is derived from phenothiazine, and has an aliphatic side chain, typical for low to middle potency neuroleptics. The oral bioavailability is estimated to be 30–50% due to extensive first pass metabolization in the liver. Its elimination-halflife is 16–30 hours. It has many active metabolites (approx. 75 different ones) with greatly varying halflives and own pharmacological profiles. The CYP-450 isoenzymes 1A2 and 2D6 are needed for metabolization of chlorpromazine and the subtype 2D6 is inhibited by chlorpromazine (NB: possible interactions with other drugs). Answered by Tawny Unick 1 year ago.


What are some reasons why a person might be prescribed 200 mg of thorazine?
...from a medical prospective. Asked by Ayanna Zangari 1 year ago.

Thorazine is used for the treatment of schizophrenia (severe disruptions in thought and perception). It is also prescribed for the short-term treatment of severe behavioral disorders in children, including explosive hyperactivity and combativeness; and for the hyperenergetic phase of manic-depressive illness (severely exaggerated moods). Thorazine is also used to control nausea and vomiting, and to relieve restlessness and apprehension before surgery. It is used as an aid in the treatment of tetanus, and is prescribed for uncontrollable hiccups and acute intermittent porphyria (attacks of severe abdominal pain sometimes accompanied by psychiatric disturbances, cramps in the arms and legs, and muscle weakness). Answered by Lesley Griglen 1 year ago.

The warding off man or woman will have angry through a comment the have shyed away from man or woman made. The warding off man or woman will have a few prejudice towards the have shyed away from man or woman. The have shyed away from man or woman might remind the warding off man or woman of an ex-boyfriend or ex-female friend or different man or woman who the warding off man or woman desires to omit. Maybe anybody instructed the warding off man or woman that the have shyed away from man or woman does not like him/her. But the object is, why do you care? Answered by Stephenie Clizbe 1 year ago.

It's an anti-psychotic, for bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. Answered by Stanford Deakyne 1 year ago.


What is Thorazine, Lorazepam and Compazine? What are they used for?
Asked by Windy Malabe 1 year ago.

Chlorpromazine is classified as a low-potency typical antipsychotic and in the past was used in the treatment of both acute and chronic psychoses, including schizophrenia and the manic phase of bipolar disorder, as well as amphetamine-induced psychoses. Low-potency antipsychotics have more anticholinergic side effects, such as dry mouth, sedation, and constipation, and lower rates of extrapyramidal side effects, while high-potency antipsychotics (such as haloperidol) have the reverse profile. Chlorpromazine has also been used in porphyria and as part of tetanus treatment. It still is recommended for short-term management of severe anxiety and psychotic aggression. Resistant and severe hiccups, severe nausea/emesis, and preanesthetic conditioning are other uses. Symptoms of delirium in medically-hospitalized AIDS patients have been effectively treated with low doses of chlorpromazine Answered by Torri Daub 1 year ago.

They are antipsycotic drugs used to treat manic depression, schizophrenia Answered by Tamika Lobingier 1 year ago.


Is 25 mg of Thorazine safe to take for anxiety?
Asked by Katherin Strandberg 1 year ago.

Thorazine, at 25 mg, is used for chronic hiccups, nausea and vomitting, sedation before surgery, and sometimes anxiety. However, it is anti-psychotic, a tranquilizer, and very old school, so if it was not prescribed to you, don't tske it. This may just be a question of general curiosity, but if you need meds for anxiety, there are more suitable ones than thorazine. See the doc. to get the right one for you! Answered by Tina Haigwood 1 year ago.

Thorazine is not an anti-anxiety drug. It is an antipsychotic drug. Please do not take ANY prescription medication unless under the direction of your personal physician. Answered by Dagmar Ester 1 year ago.

I think I would speak to a Pharmacist before listening to someone on Yahoo answers. Answered by Chastity Lowder 1 year ago.

The potential for causing chronic movement disorders makes it far from ideal. Answered by Irma Brazel 1 year ago.

It has more potential side effects than newer drugs. For example, seizures, heat exhaustion, drowsiness. Answered by Ignacio Yokum 1 year ago.


Is it true that Thorazine is as dangerous and the Psychiatric critics say it is?
From Psychiatric critics they criticize Thorazine a lot and say it messes people up like Lobotomy. Here is an example website criticizing Thorazine: http://www.sntp.net/drugs/thorazine.htm Asked by Blake Rygalski 1 year ago.

Thorazine is no more dangerous than the others. Staying on it for too long can lead to specific complications, which is true with other anti-psychotics. It isn't used as much these days, but it is still a consideration for some people. It's OK to critisize thorazine, but no more so than for other such drugs. Answered by Jesusa Villalouos 1 year ago.

Wow! Normally, I don't answer questions that want to learn more and more detail. As in your case, because they require a long process, and it is the risk of not solve all of yours problems. I would suggest to proceed analytically with the help of keywords to be included in Yahoo! From what you climb, narrowing the field with new keywords, until you will be fully satisfied. good luck! Answered by Aretha Summars 1 year ago.


Is Thorazine(Chlorpromazine) an older anti-psychotic?
I was prescribed this recently for Bipolar Disorder. Is it an older anti-psychotic?Thanks Asked by Daisy Parkman 1 year ago.

Thorazine was one of the first anti-psychotics, created in 1950. It is still occasionally used in the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, but not as often as it was a few decades ago. It's a low potency anti-psychotic, so there is a lower chance of experiencing unwanted side effects. Answered by Dorthea Roback 1 year ago.


How long will thorazine take to get in my urine stream?
i want to take a thorazine but i have a drug test at 10:00am and dont know what time yo take it so i can pass the drug test and still take it tonight Asked by Lincoln Jalonen 1 year ago.

To my understanding, Thorazine is an anti-psychotic medication. It's not typically screened for on a drug test. However, if you do register with a false positive in another drug category as a result of this medication, all you have to do is show proof of a prescription and you're in the clear. Thorazine is excreted primarily through the urine and has a half-life from 10 to 40 hours. Answered by Darnell Susan 1 year ago.

You can't wait until after the test to take it - just to be on the safe side? Answered by Chad Artale 1 year ago.


About Thorazine/Largactil?
I have read alot about this drug, but I would like to hear from somone that has actually used it, or someone who knows someone who has used it.How sedating/tranquilizing is it? What are the main side-effects, and what pills do I need to counteract these side-effects? Asked by Van Trojahn 1 year ago.

About counteraction - I'm not sure. You'd have to take it to know if you'd have any counteractions, first. I took Thorazine for about a month for sleep. It never made me tired. It would, however, keep me asleep for 8-12 hrs once I laid down and fell asleep. Not a good drug if you need to be knocked out (in my opinion). I'm sure you've heard it called 'the chemical lobotomy'. I didn't feel like it erased too much of my personality, and I was still heavily addicted to drugs and it never made me seek/want drugs less. I really don't remember much from taking it. I snorted it once, and it burned like a SOB, but it knocked me out right away. Answered by Luella Shellhaas 1 year ago.


Mrs S. has been taking Thorazine for about 1 year?
She has been having problems with orthostatic hypotension and akathisia, and has needed to take Cogentin to avoid dystonic reactions. The physician has decided to change her to Clozaril. The patient asks the nurse about the advantages and disadvantages of the new drug. The nurse has chosen Knowledge Deficit as the... Asked by Apolonia Mcconnal 1 year ago.

She has been having problems with orthostatic hypotension and akathisia, and has needed to take Cogentin to avoid dystonic reactions. The physician has decided to change her to Clozaril. The patient asks the nurse about the advantages and disadvantages of the new drug. The nurse has chosen Knowledge Deficit as the nursing diagnosis for this patient. a) What interventions would be used for this diagnosis? b) How would the nurse evaluate the outcome of the interventions? Answered by Sarah Clesca 1 year ago.

thorazine is bound to have more severe side effects.. clozaril is an atypical antipsychotic drug, so it will be LESS likely to cause tardive dyskenesia and akathisia and other similarly devastating side effects (thanks to its anticholinergic properties). However, there is recent evidence that such drugs may increase the likelihood of metabolic disturbances (leading to diabetes) and cardiovascular disease. There are also sexual functioning side effects, but that is common to many psychotropic meds...Note that slow titration of dosing of Clozaril significantly decreases the likelihood of orthostatic hypotension, so the switch is right on the money for this mrs. s....... I would say the switch from thorazine to clozaril is not a bad idea. I have no idea what you mean by "knowledge deficit" and "nursing diagnosis", I'm coming from a clinical psych perspective, but hope this helps! Answered by Dudley Halgrimson 1 year ago.


What is thorazine used for?
Asked by Napoleon Scoggan 1 year ago.

Thorazine is used for the treatment of schizophrenia (severe disruptions in thought and perception). It is also prescribed for the short-term treatment of severe behavioral disorders in children, including explosive hyperactivity and combativeness; and for the hyperenergetic phase of manic-depressive illness (severely exaggerated moods). Thorazine is also used to control nausea and vomiting, and to relieve restlessness and apprehension before surgery. It is used as an aid in the treatment of tetanus, and is prescribed for uncontrollable hiccups and acute intermittent porphyria (attacks of severe abdominal pain sometimes accompanied by psychiatric disturbances, cramps in the arms and legs, and muscle weakness). Answered by Camille Ragsdale 1 year ago.

Thorazine Uses Answered by Noel Frederic 1 year ago.

I don't know all of its uses, but I was given Thorazine for migraines. Answered by Jefferson Ollig 1 year ago.

It is a old anti-psychotic. They use to use it a lot in psychiatric hospitals to calm down patients. It is also used for migraines at times. Answered by Carman Weyker 1 year ago.

To mess with kids minds! Answered by Miriam Ichikawa 1 year ago.

PAIN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!... Answered by Corrina Apa 1 year ago.

Chlorpromazine was the first antipsychotic drug, used during the 1950s and 1960s. Used as chlorpromazine hydrochloride and sold under the tradenames Largactil® and Thorazine®, it has sedative, hypotensive and antiemetic properties as well as anticholinergic and antidopaminergic effects. It has also anxiolytic (alleviation of anxiety) properties. Today, chlorpromazine is considered a typical antipsychotic. Chlorpromazine acts as an antagonist (blocking agent) on different postsynaptic receptors: on dopaminergic-receptors (subtypes D1, D2, D3 and D4, different antipsychotic properties on productive and unproductive symptoms), on serotonergic-receptors (5-HT1 and 5-HT2, with anxiolytic, antidepressive and antiaggressive properties as well as an attenuation of extrapypramidal side effects, but also leading to weight gain, fall in blood pressure, sedation and ejaculation difficulties), on histaminergic-receptors (H1-receptors, sedation, antiemesis, vertigo, fall in blood pressure and weight gain), on alpha1/alpha2-receptors (antisympathomimetic properties, lowering of blood pressure, reflex tachycardia, vertigo, sedation, hypersalivation and incontinence as well as sexual dysfunction, but may also attenuate pseudoparkinsonism—controversial), and on muscarinic (cholinergic) M1/M2-receptors (causing anticholinergic symptoms like dry mouth, blurred vision, obstipation, difficulty/inability to urinate, sinus tachycardia, ECG-changes and loss of memory, but the anticholinergic action may attenuate extrapyramidal side effects). Additionally, chlorpromazine is a weak presynaptic inhibitor of dopamine reuptake, which may lead to (mild) antidepressive and antiparkinsonian effects. This action could also account for psychomotor agitation and amplification of psychosis (very rarely noted in clinical use). [edit] Peripheral Antagonist to H1 receptors (antiallergic effects), H2 receptors (reduction of forming of gastric juice), M1/M2-receptors (dry mouth, reduction in forming of gastric juice) and some 5-HT receptors (different anti-allergic/gastrointestinal actions). Because it acts on so many receptors, chlorpromazine is often referred to as "dirty drug", whereas the atypical neuroleptic amisulpride for example acts only on central D2/D3-receptors and is therefore a "clean drug". This distinction is not a positive or negative value judgment on the drug, rather it is a neutral term which merely describes the agent's relative pharmacology. [edit] History The drug had been developed by Laboratoires Rhône-Poulenc in 1950 but they sold the rights in 1952 to Smith-Kline & French (today's GlaxoSmithKline). The drug was being sold as an antiemetic when its other use was noted. Smith-Kline was quick to encourage clinical trials and in 1954 the drug was approved in the US for psychiatric treatment. Over 100 million people were treated but the popularity of the drug fell from the late 1960s as the severe extrapyramidal side effects and tardive dyskinesia became more of a concern. From chlorpromazine a number of other similar neuroleptics were developed (e.g. triflupromazine, trifluoperazine). Previously used as an antihistamine and antiemetic its effects on mental state were first reported by the French doctor Henri Laborit in 1951 or 1952 (different sources) as sedation without narcosis. It became possible to cause 'artificial hibernation' in patients, if used as a cocktail together with pethidine and hydergine. Patients with shock, severe trauma or burns, become, if treated so, sedated, without anxiety and unreponsive/indifferent to painful external stimuli like minor surgical interventions. It was first used for psychiatric patients by Pierre Deniker and Jean Delay in 1953. Drug treatment with chlorpromazine went beyond simple sedation with patients showing improvements in thinking and emotional behaviour. Ironically, the antipsychotic properties of chlorpromazine appear to be unrelated to its sedative properties. During long term therapy some tolerance to the sedation effect develops. Chlorpromazine substituted and eclipsed the old therapies of electro- and insulin shocks and other methods such as psychosurgical means (lobotomy) causing permanent brain injury. Chlorpromazine has given approximately 70% of all schizophrenic patients a complete remission or near so and a normal, gainful human life. Before the era of neuroleptics, starting with chlorpromazine, positive long-term results for psychotic patients were only 20%. [edit] Side effects Side effects of chlorpromazine are typical of early generation neuroleptics. They include extrapyramidal side effects such as tardive dyskinesia and akathisia. A particularly severe side effect is the neuroleptic malignant syndrome which occurs in approximately 0.05% and can be fatal. Also, chlorpromazine may lower seizure threshold. Additional side effects include dry mouth, increased appetite with weight gain, constipation and urinary retention. Glucose tolerance may be impaired. An allergic skin rash and photosensitivity may occur. Other important and severe side effects are a strong reduction in the number of white blood cells, referred to as leukopenia, or, in extreme cases, even agranulocytosis may result, which may lead to death via uncontrollable infections and/or sepsis. Chlorpromazine is the neuroleptic drug with the highest rates (0.5% to 1%) of liver toxicity of the cholestatic type. The sedation effect combined with indifference to physical stimuli, anecdotally known as the "thorazine shuffle," has long been associated with the drug. The image of psychiatric patients staggering mute around a padded cell has earned those particular side effects a place in mainstream pop culture. [edit] Interactions Chlorpromazine intensifies the central depressive action of drugs with such activity (tranquilizers, barbiturates, narcotics, antihistamines, OTC-antiemetics etc.). A dose reduction of chlorpromazine or the other drug may be necessary. Chlorpromazine also intensifies the actions and undesired side effects of antihypertensive medications and anticholinergic drugs. The combination of chlorpromazine with other antipsychotics may result in increased central depression, hypotension and extrapyramidal side effects, but may sometimes enhance the clinical results of therapy. The anti-worm drug (antihelminthic) piperazine may intensify extrapyramidal side effects. In general, all neuroleptics may lead to seizures in combination with tramadol (Ultram). Chlorpromazine may increase the insulin needs of diabetic patients. Drugs like SSRIs, St. John's Wort and barbiturates can inhibit various CYP-isoenzymes such as CYP2D6, needed for metabolization of chlorpromazine and/or its metabolites. Theoretically, this should increase the half-lives of chlorpromazine and possibly its metabolites, dosing changes necessary. The exact clinical significance of this enzyme induction and its therapeutic consequences are unknown at present time and remain to be evaluated. [edit] Uses [edit] Common uses [edit] As an antipsychotic The use of chlorpromazine has been primarily replaced by newer generation of atypical antipsychotics which have an improved side effect profile. Chlorpromazine is classified as a low- to moderate-potency antipsychotic and in the past was used in the treatment of both acute and chronic psychoses, including schizophrenia and the manic phase of manic depression as well as amphetamine-induced psychoses. Chlorpromazine formerly was the drug of choice to treat LSD (and other psychedelic/hallucinogen) intoxication in a hospital setting, resulting in it gaining an erroneous reputation as the LSD "antidote". Now haloperidol is more commonly used in such situations. [edit] Other uses It has also been used in porphyria, as part of tetanus treatment and for behavioral problems in children. It still is well recommended for short term management of severe anxiety and aggressive episodes. Resistant and severe hiccups, severe nausea/emesis and preanesthetic conditioning have been other indications in the past. It can be used to treat amphetamine overdose. [1] [edit] Off-label and controversial uses Chlorpromazine is occasionally used off-label for treatment of severe migraine. Sometimes it is used in small doses to improve nausea/emesis opioid-treated cancer patients encounter and to intensify and prolong the analgesic action of the opioids given. Interestingly, it remains controversial whether or not chlorpromazine has its own analgesic properties. Analgesic properties may result from a central action on the hypothalamus; the patient may feel the pain much less than before. Other mechanisms may be an interaction with opioid receptors centrally and/or in the spinal cord. Some experts on the contrary say that chlorpromazine, like other phenothiazines, may even have antianalgesic properties. Chlorpromazine has been proposed as useful in newborns for the treatment of opioid withdrawal, if the mother was opioid-dependent. The latter indication remains highly controversial. Chlorpromazine, as well as other neuroleptics, may also be used to alleviate the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal (chlorpromazine may lower the seizure-threshold in alcoholics). It has a unique action in cholera, reducing the loss of water by approximately 30%. In Germany, the brand of chlorpromazine drug Propaphenin® has additional indications for insomnia and itching skin disease. [edit] Veterinary uses Chlorpromazine is primarily used as an antiemetic in dogs and cats. It is also sometimes used as a preanesthetic and muscle relaxant in cattle, swine, sheep, and goats. It is generally contraindicated for use with horses, due to a high incidence of ataxia and altered mentation. [edit] Dosage In any case, use is determined by an attending physician. The following information is intended to serve as a guideline: A wide range is covered from 25 mg oral or intramuscular for mild sedation, every 8 hours, up to 100 mg every 6 hours for severely disturbed patients. Different qualified sources give 800 mg/day to 1,200 mg/day as highest dose. At least there is one small clinical trial in treatment-resistant patients with a daily dose of 1,200 mg chlorpromazine (and 4 mg Benztropine to counteract early extrapyramidal side effects, which were anticipated with this unusual high chlorpromazine dose). Initial doses should be low and be increased gradually. It is recommended that most of the daily dose (e.g. 2/3) is given at bedtime for maximum hypnotic activity and minimal daytime sedation and hypotension. In the USA there are controlled release forms of Thorazine (e.g. 300 mg). After the individual dose is well established, such a CR capsule can be given with the evening meal as a single dose, covering the next 24 hours. The lowest dosage compatible with good therapeutic effect should be given. Dosage in ambulatory patients should be particularly low (minimizing sedation and hypotension). The direct i.v.-injection of undiluted solution is contraindicated (massive fall in blood pressure, cardiovascular collapse), for i.v.-infusion of dilutions the (hospitalized) patient should be lying and the infusion rate should be as slow as possible. Afterwards the patient should rest in the lying position for at least 30 minutes. [edit] Necessary examinations and laboratory checks during treatment All patients treated with chlorpromazine on a long-term-basis should have regularly checked their blood-pressure, pulse rate, laboratory-tests (liver function tests, kidney-values, blood cell counts including differenciated white blood counts, counts of red blood cells and thrombocytes), ECG and EEG. The frequency of all checks should be determined for the individual patient and may be done in shorter intervals during the first 3 months of treatment and less often afterwards. Some side effects seem to appear more frequently during the first months of therapy (sedation, hypotension, liver damage) while others do not (e.g. tardive dyskinesia). [edit] Discontinuation of treatment Also, in regular intervals the treating physician should evaluate whether continued treatment is needed. If not, the drug should never be stopped suddenly, due to very unpleasant 'withdrawal-symptoms', such as agitation, sleeplessness, states of anxiety, etc. However, these symptoms definitely do not indicate psychological or physical dependence. The dose should rather be slowly tapered down at a rate of approximately 20–25% per week or even slower to avoid the aforementioned bothersome symptoms. Chlorpromazine is derived from phenothiazine, and has an aliphatic side chain, typical for low to middle potency neuroleptics. The oral bioavailability is estimated to be 30–50% due to extensive first pass metabolization in the liver. Its elimination-halflife is 16–30 hours. It has many active metabolites (approx. 75 different ones) with greatly varying halflives and own pharmacological profiles. The CYP-450 isoenzymes 1A2 and 2D6 are needed for metabolization of chlorpromazine and the subtype 2D6 is inhibited by chlorpromazine (NB: possible interactions with other drugs). Answered by Leonie Wingeier 1 year ago.


What are some reasons why a person might be prescribed 200 mg of thorazine?
...from a medical prospective. Asked by Berniece Wegleitner 1 year ago.

Thorazine is used for the treatment of schizophrenia (severe disruptions in thought and perception). It is also prescribed for the short-term treatment of severe behavioral disorders in children, including explosive hyperactivity and combativeness; and for the hyperenergetic phase of manic-depressive illness (severely exaggerated moods). Thorazine is also used to control nausea and vomiting, and to relieve restlessness and apprehension before surgery. It is used as an aid in the treatment of tetanus, and is prescribed for uncontrollable hiccups and acute intermittent porphyria (attacks of severe abdominal pain sometimes accompanied by psychiatric disturbances, cramps in the arms and legs, and muscle weakness). Answered by Ludie Becwar 1 year ago.

The warding off man or woman will have angry through a comment the have shyed away from man or woman made. The warding off man or woman will have a few prejudice towards the have shyed away from man or woman. The have shyed away from man or woman might remind the warding off man or woman of an ex-boyfriend or ex-female friend or different man or woman who the warding off man or woman desires to omit. Maybe anybody instructed the warding off man or woman that the have shyed away from man or woman does not like him/her. But the object is, why do you care? Answered by Clare Bronsky 1 year ago.

It's an anti-psychotic, for bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. Answered by Magan Dobes 1 year ago.


What is Thorazine, Lorazepam and Compazine? What are they used for?
Asked by Patrick Dees 1 year ago.

Chlorpromazine is classified as a low-potency typical antipsychotic and in the past was used in the treatment of both acute and chronic psychoses, including schizophrenia and the manic phase of bipolar disorder, as well as amphetamine-induced psychoses. Low-potency antipsychotics have more anticholinergic side effects, such as dry mouth, sedation, and constipation, and lower rates of extrapyramidal side effects, while high-potency antipsychotics (such as haloperidol) have the reverse profile. Chlorpromazine has also been used in porphyria and as part of tetanus treatment. It still is recommended for short-term management of severe anxiety and psychotic aggression. Resistant and severe hiccups, severe nausea/emesis, and preanesthetic conditioning are other uses. Symptoms of delirium in medically-hospitalized AIDS patients have been effectively treated with low doses of chlorpromazine Answered by Yon Henzel 1 year ago.

They are antipsycotic drugs used to treat manic depression, schizophrenia Answered by Nellie Lessly 1 year ago.


Is 25 mg of Thorazine safe to take for anxiety?
Asked by Amanda Beckles 1 year ago.

Thorazine, at 25 mg, is used for chronic hiccups, nausea and vomitting, sedation before surgery, and sometimes anxiety. However, it is anti-psychotic, a tranquilizer, and very old school, so if it was not prescribed to you, don't tske it. This may just be a question of general curiosity, but if you need meds for anxiety, there are more suitable ones than thorazine. See the doc. to get the right one for you! Answered by Lashunda Hirschberg 1 year ago.

Thorazine is not an anti-anxiety drug. It is an antipsychotic drug. Please do not take ANY prescription medication unless under the direction of your personal physician. Answered by Chana Wewerka 1 year ago.

I think I would speak to a Pharmacist before listening to someone on Yahoo answers. Answered by Melani Palay 1 year ago.

The potential for causing chronic movement disorders makes it far from ideal. Answered by Gilberte Evinger 1 year ago.

It has more potential side effects than newer drugs. For example, seizures, heat exhaustion, drowsiness. Answered by Isreal Kaluna 1 year ago.


Is it true that Thorazine is as dangerous and the Psychiatric critics say it is?
From Psychiatric critics they criticize Thorazine a lot and say it messes people up like Lobotomy. Here is an example website criticizing Thorazine: http://www.sntp.net/drugs/thorazine.htm Asked by Greta Squillace 1 year ago.

Thorazine is no more dangerous than the others. Staying on it for too long can lead to specific complications, which is true with other anti-psychotics. It isn't used as much these days, but it is still a consideration for some people. It's OK to critisize thorazine, but no more so than for other such drugs. Answered by Hwa Castleman 1 year ago.

Wow! Normally, I don't answer questions that want to learn more and more detail. As in your case, because they require a long process, and it is the risk of not solve all of yours problems. I would suggest to proceed analytically with the help of keywords to be included in Yahoo! From what you climb, narrowing the field with new keywords, until you will be fully satisfied. good luck! Answered by Ann Cantella 1 year ago.


Is Thorazine(Chlorpromazine) an older anti-psychotic?
I was prescribed this recently for Bipolar Disorder. Is it an older anti-psychotic?Thanks Asked by Gena Canon 1 year ago.

Thorazine was one of the first anti-psychotics, created in 1950. It is still occasionally used in the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, but not as often as it was a few decades ago. It's a low potency anti-psychotic, so there is a lower chance of experiencing unwanted side effects. Answered by Marion Mendizabal 1 year ago.


How long will thorazine take to get in my urine stream?
i want to take a thorazine but i have a drug test at 10:00am and dont know what time yo take it so i can pass the drug test and still take it tonight Asked by Dot Fredericksen 1 year ago.

To my understanding, Thorazine is an anti-psychotic medication. It's not typically screened for on a drug test. However, if you do register with a false positive in another drug category as a result of this medication, all you have to do is show proof of a prescription and you're in the clear. Thorazine is excreted primarily through the urine and has a half-life from 10 to 40 hours. Answered by Arnulfo Ferderer 1 year ago.

You can't wait until after the test to take it - just to be on the safe side? Answered by Porter Walkes 1 year ago.


About Thorazine/Largactil?
I have read alot about this drug, but I would like to hear from somone that has actually used it, or someone who knows someone who has used it.How sedating/tranquilizing is it? What are the main side-effects, and what pills do I need to counteract these side-effects? Asked by Kandi Loukidis 1 year ago.

About counteraction - I'm not sure. You'd have to take it to know if you'd have any counteractions, first. I took Thorazine for about a month for sleep. It never made me tired. It would, however, keep me asleep for 8-12 hrs once I laid down and fell asleep. Not a good drug if you need to be knocked out (in my opinion). I'm sure you've heard it called 'the chemical lobotomy'. I didn't feel like it erased too much of my personality, and I was still heavily addicted to drugs and it never made me seek/want drugs less. I really don't remember much from taking it. I snorted it once, and it burned like a SOB, but it knocked me out right away. Answered by Deon Condry 1 year ago.


Mrs S. has been taking Thorazine for about 1 year?
She has been having problems with orthostatic hypotension and akathisia, and has needed to take Cogentin to avoid dystonic reactions. The physician has decided to change her to Clozaril. The patient asks the nurse about the advantages and disadvantages of the new drug. The nurse has chosen Knowledge Deficit as the... Asked by Lorna Mcgirr 1 year ago.

She has been having problems with orthostatic hypotension and akathisia, and has needed to take Cogentin to avoid dystonic reactions. The physician has decided to change her to Clozaril. The patient asks the nurse about the advantages and disadvantages of the new drug. The nurse has chosen Knowledge Deficit as the nursing diagnosis for this patient. a) What interventions would be used for this diagnosis? b) How would the nurse evaluate the outcome of the interventions? Answered by Dominic Coray 1 year ago.

thorazine is bound to have more severe side effects.. clozaril is an atypical antipsychotic drug, so it will be LESS likely to cause tardive dyskenesia and akathisia and other similarly devastating side effects (thanks to its anticholinergic properties). However, there is recent evidence that such drugs may increase the likelihood of metabolic disturbances (leading to diabetes) and cardiovascular disease. There are also sexual functioning side effects, but that is common to many psychotropic meds...Note that slow titration of dosing of Clozaril significantly decreases the likelihood of orthostatic hypotension, so the switch is right on the money for this mrs. s....... I would say the switch from thorazine to clozaril is not a bad idea. I have no idea what you mean by "knowledge deficit" and "nursing diagnosis", I'm coming from a clinical psych perspective, but hope this helps! Answered by Deanna Lett 1 year ago.


What is thorazine used for?
Asked by Lynda Detillion 1 year ago.

Thorazine is used for the treatment of schizophrenia (severe disruptions in thought and perception). It is also prescribed for the short-term treatment of severe behavioral disorders in children, including explosive hyperactivity and combativeness; and for the hyperenergetic phase of manic-depressive illness (severely exaggerated moods). Thorazine is also used to control nausea and vomiting, and to relieve restlessness and apprehension before surgery. It is used as an aid in the treatment of tetanus, and is prescribed for uncontrollable hiccups and acute intermittent porphyria (attacks of severe abdominal pain sometimes accompanied by psychiatric disturbances, cramps in the arms and legs, and muscle weakness). Answered by Toi Gosling 1 year ago.

Thorazine Uses Answered by Tory Merone 1 year ago.

I don't know all of its uses, but I was given Thorazine for migraines. Answered by Darci Hora 1 year ago.

It is a old anti-psychotic. They use to use it a lot in psychiatric hospitals to calm down patients. It is also used for migraines at times. Answered by Tonja Tatsapaugh 1 year ago.

To mess with kids minds! Answered by Natividad Emigholz 1 year ago.

PAIN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!... Answered by Maria Lambert 1 year ago.

Chlorpromazine was the first antipsychotic drug, used during the 1950s and 1960s. Used as chlorpromazine hydrochloride and sold under the tradenames Largactil® and Thorazine®, it has sedative, hypotensive and antiemetic properties as well as anticholinergic and antidopaminergic effects. It has also anxiolytic (alleviation of anxiety) properties. Today, chlorpromazine is considered a typical antipsychotic. Chlorpromazine acts as an antagonist (blocking agent) on different postsynaptic receptors: on dopaminergic-receptors (subtypes D1, D2, D3 and D4, different antipsychotic properties on productive and unproductive symptoms), on serotonergic-receptors (5-HT1 and 5-HT2, with anxiolytic, antidepressive and antiaggressive properties as well as an attenuation of extrapypramidal side effects, but also leading to weight gain, fall in blood pressure, sedation and ejaculation difficulties), on histaminergic-receptors (H1-receptors, sedation, antiemesis, vertigo, fall in blood pressure and weight gain), on alpha1/alpha2-receptors (antisympathomimetic properties, lowering of blood pressure, reflex tachycardia, vertigo, sedation, hypersalivation and incontinence as well as sexual dysfunction, but may also attenuate pseudoparkinsonism—controversial), and on muscarinic (cholinergic) M1/M2-receptors (causing anticholinergic symptoms like dry mouth, blurred vision, obstipation, difficulty/inability to urinate, sinus tachycardia, ECG-changes and loss of memory, but the anticholinergic action may attenuate extrapyramidal side effects). Additionally, chlorpromazine is a weak presynaptic inhibitor of dopamine reuptake, which may lead to (mild) antidepressive and antiparkinsonian effects. This action could also account for psychomotor agitation and amplification of psychosis (very rarely noted in clinical use). [edit] Peripheral Antagonist to H1 receptors (antiallergic effects), H2 receptors (reduction of forming of gastric juice), M1/M2-receptors (dry mouth, reduction in forming of gastric juice) and some 5-HT receptors (different anti-allergic/gastrointestinal actions). Because it acts on so many receptors, chlorpromazine is often referred to as "dirty drug", whereas the atypical neuroleptic amisulpride for example acts only on central D2/D3-receptors and is therefore a "clean drug". This distinction is not a positive or negative value judgment on the drug, rather it is a neutral term which merely describes the agent's relative pharmacology. [edit] History The drug had been developed by Laboratoires Rhône-Poulenc in 1950 but they sold the rights in 1952 to Smith-Kline & French (today's GlaxoSmithKline). The drug was being sold as an antiemetic when its other use was noted. Smith-Kline was quick to encourage clinical trials and in 1954 the drug was approved in the US for psychiatric treatment. Over 100 million people were treated but the popularity of the drug fell from the late 1960s as the severe extrapyramidal side effects and tardive dyskinesia became more of a concern. From chlorpromazine a number of other similar neuroleptics were developed (e.g. triflupromazine, trifluoperazine). Previously used as an antihistamine and antiemetic its effects on mental state were first reported by the French doctor Henri Laborit in 1951 or 1952 (different sources) as sedation without narcosis. It became possible to cause 'artificial hibernation' in patients, if used as a cocktail together with pethidine and hydergine. Patients with shock, severe trauma or burns, become, if treated so, sedated, without anxiety and unreponsive/indifferent to painful external stimuli like minor surgical interventions. It was first used for psychiatric patients by Pierre Deniker and Jean Delay in 1953. Drug treatment with chlorpromazine went beyond simple sedation with patients showing improvements in thinking and emotional behaviour. Ironically, the antipsychotic properties of chlorpromazine appear to be unrelated to its sedative properties. During long term therapy some tolerance to the sedation effect develops. Chlorpromazine substituted and eclipsed the old therapies of electro- and insulin shocks and other methods such as psychosurgical means (lobotomy) causing permanent brain injury. Chlorpromazine has given approximately 70% of all schizophrenic patients a complete remission or near so and a normal, gainful human life. Before the era of neuroleptics, starting with chlorpromazine, positive long-term results for psychotic patients were only 20%. [edit] Side effects Side effects of chlorpromazine are typical of early generation neuroleptics. They include extrapyramidal side effects such as tardive dyskinesia and akathisia. A particularly severe side effect is the neuroleptic malignant syndrome which occurs in approximately 0.05% and can be fatal. Also, chlorpromazine may lower seizure threshold. Additional side effects include dry mouth, increased appetite with weight gain, constipation and urinary retention. Glucose tolerance may be impaired. An allergic skin rash and photosensitivity may occur. Other important and severe side effects are a strong reduction in the number of white blood cells, referred to as leukopenia, or, in extreme cases, even agranulocytosis may result, which may lead to death via uncontrollable infections and/or sepsis. Chlorpromazine is the neuroleptic drug with the highest rates (0.5% to 1%) of liver toxicity of the cholestatic type. The sedation effect combined with indifference to physical stimuli, anecdotally known as the "thorazine shuffle," has long been associated with the drug. The image of psychiatric patients staggering mute around a padded cell has earned those particular side effects a place in mainstream pop culture. [edit] Interactions Chlorpromazine intensifies the central depressive action of drugs with such activity (tranquilizers, barbiturates, narcotics, antihistamines, OTC-antiemetics etc.). A dose reduction of chlorpromazine or the other drug may be necessary. Chlorpromazine also intensifies the actions and undesired side effects of antihypertensive medications and anticholinergic drugs. The combination of chlorpromazine with other antipsychotics may result in increased central depression, hypotension and extrapyramidal side effects, but may sometimes enhance the clinical results of therapy. The anti-worm drug (antihelminthic) piperazine may intensify extrapyramidal side effects. In general, all neuroleptics may lead to seizures in combination with tramadol (Ultram). Chlorpromazine may increase the insulin needs of diabetic patients. Drugs like SSRIs, St. John's Wort and barbiturates can inhibit various CYP-isoenzymes such as CYP2D6, needed for metabolization of chlorpromazine and/or its metabolites. Theoretically, this should increase the half-lives of chlorpromazine and possibly its metabolites, dosing changes necessary. The exact clinical significance of this enzyme induction and its therapeutic consequences are unknown at present time and remain to be evaluated. [edit] Uses [edit] Common uses [edit] As an antipsychotic The use of chlorpromazine has been primarily replaced by newer generation of atypical antipsychotics which have an improved side effect profile. Chlorpromazine is classified as a low- to moderate-potency antipsychotic and in the past was used in the treatment of both acute and chronic psychoses, including schizophrenia and the manic phase of manic depression as well as amphetamine-induced psychoses. Chlorpromazine formerly was the drug of choice to treat LSD (and other psychedelic/hallucinogen) intoxication in a hospital setting, resulting in it gaining an erroneous reputation as the LSD "antidote". Now haloperidol is more commonly used in such situations. [edit] Other uses It has also been used in porphyria, as part of tetanus treatment and for behavioral problems in children. It still is well recommended for short term management of severe anxiety and aggressive episodes. Resistant and severe hiccups, severe nausea/emesis and preanesthetic conditioning have been other indications in the past. It can be used to treat amphetamine overdose. [1] [edit] Off-label and controversial uses Chlorpromazine is occasionally used off-label for treatment of severe migraine. Sometimes it is used in small doses to improve nausea/emesis opioid-treated cancer patients encounter and to intensify and prolong the analgesic action of the opioids given. Interestingly, it remains controversial whether or not chlorpromazine has its own analgesic properties. Analgesic properties may result from a central action on the hypothalamus; the patient may feel the pain much less than before. Other mechanisms may be an interaction with opioid receptors centrally and/or in the spinal cord. Some experts on the contrary say that chlorpromazine, like other phenothiazines, may even have antianalgesic properties. Chlorpromazine has been proposed as useful in newborns for the treatment of opioid withdrawal, if the mother was opioid-dependent. The latter indication remains highly controversial. Chlorpromazine, as well as other neuroleptics, may also be used to alleviate the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal (chlorpromazine may lower the seizure-threshold in alcoholics). It has a unique action in cholera, reducing the loss of water by approximately 30%. In Germany, the brand of chlorpromazine drug Propaphenin® has additional indications for insomnia and itching skin disease. [edit] Veterinary uses Chlorpromazine is primarily used as an antiemetic in dogs and cats. It is also sometimes used as a preanesthetic and muscle relaxant in cattle, swine, sheep, and goats. It is generally contraindicated for use with horses, due to a high incidence of ataxia and altered mentation. [edit] Dosage In any case, use is determined by an attending physician. The following information is intended to serve as a guideline: A wide range is covered from 25 mg oral or intramuscular for mild sedation, every 8 hours, up to 100 mg every 6 hours for severely disturbed patients. Different qualified sources give 800 mg/day to 1,200 mg/day as highest dose. At least there is one small clinical trial in treatment-resistant patients with a daily dose of 1,200 mg chlorpromazine (and 4 mg Benztropine to counteract early extrapyramidal side effects, which were anticipated with this unusual high chlorpromazine dose). Initial doses should be low and be increased gradually. It is recommended that most of the daily dose (e.g. 2/3) is given at bedtime for maximum hypnotic activity and minimal daytime sedation and hypotension. In the USA there are controlled release forms of Thorazine (e.g. 300 mg). After the individual dose is well established, such a CR capsule can be given with the evening meal as a single dose, covering the next 24 hours. The lowest dosage compatible with good therapeutic effect should be given. Dosage in ambulatory patients should be particularly low (minimizing sedation and hypotension). The direct i.v.-injection of undiluted solution is contraindicated (massive fall in blood pressure, cardiovascular collapse), for i.v.-infusion of dilutions the (hospitalized) patient should be lying and the infusion rate should be as slow as possible. Afterwards the patient should rest in the lying position for at least 30 minutes. [edit] Necessary examinations and laboratory checks during treatment All patients treated with chlorpromazine on a long-term-basis should have regularly checked their blood-pressure, pulse rate, laboratory-tests (liver function tests, kidney-values, blood cell counts including differenciated white blood counts, counts of red blood cells and thrombocytes), ECG and EEG. The frequency of all checks should be determined for the individual patient and may be done in shorter intervals during the first 3 months of treatment and less often afterwards. Some side effects seem to appear more frequently during the first months of therapy (sedation, hypotension, liver damage) while others do not (e.g. tardive dyskinesia). [edit] Discontinuation of treatment Also, in regular intervals the treating physician should evaluate whether continued treatment is needed. If not, the drug should never be stopped suddenly, due to very unpleasant 'withdrawal-symptoms', such as agitation, sleeplessness, states of anxiety, etc. However, these symptoms definitely do not indicate psychological or physical dependence. The dose should rather be slowly tapered down at a rate of approximately 20–25% per week or even slower to avoid the aforementioned bothersome symptoms. Chlorpromazine is derived from phenothiazine, and has an aliphatic side chain, typical for low to middle potency neuroleptics. The oral bioavailability is estimated to be 30–50% due to extensive first pass metabolization in the liver. Its elimination-halflife is 16–30 hours. It has many active metabolites (approx. 75 different ones) with greatly varying halflives and own pharmacological profiles. The CYP-450 isoenzymes 1A2 and 2D6 are needed for metabolization of chlorpromazine and the subtype 2D6 is inhibited by chlorpromazine (NB: possible interactions with other drugs). Answered by Monte Wojtas 1 year ago.


What are some reasons why a person might be prescribed 200 mg of thorazine?
...from a medical prospective. Asked by Leigh Tews 1 year ago.

Thorazine is used for the treatment of schizophrenia (severe disruptions in thought and perception). It is also prescribed for the short-term treatment of severe behavioral disorders in children, including explosive hyperactivity and combativeness; and for the hyperenergetic phase of manic-depressive illness (severely exaggerated moods). Thorazine is also used to control nausea and vomiting, and to relieve restlessness and apprehension before surgery. It is used as an aid in the treatment of tetanus, and is prescribed for uncontrollable hiccups and acute intermittent porphyria (attacks of severe abdominal pain sometimes accompanied by psychiatric disturbances, cramps in the arms and legs, and muscle weakness). Answered by Bruno Kahao 1 year ago.

The warding off man or woman will have angry through a comment the have shyed away from man or woman made. The warding off man or woman will have a few prejudice towards the have shyed away from man or woman. The have shyed away from man or woman might remind the warding off man or woman of an ex-boyfriend or ex-female friend or different man or woman who the warding off man or woman desires to omit. Maybe anybody instructed the warding off man or woman that the have shyed away from man or woman does not like him/her. But the object is, why do you care? Answered by Phillis Ater 1 year ago.

It's an anti-psychotic, for bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. Answered by Miguel Wekenborg 1 year ago.


What is Thorazine, Lorazepam and Compazine? What are they used for?
Asked by Devona Retherford 1 year ago.

Chlorpromazine is classified as a low-potency typical antipsychotic and in the past was used in the treatment of both acute and chronic psychoses, including schizophrenia and the manic phase of bipolar disorder, as well as amphetamine-induced psychoses. Low-potency antipsychotics have more anticholinergic side effects, such as dry mouth, sedation, and constipation, and lower rates of extrapyramidal side effects, while high-potency antipsychotics (such as haloperidol) have the reverse profile. Chlorpromazine has also been used in porphyria and as part of tetanus treatment. It still is recommended for short-term management of severe anxiety and psychotic aggression. Resistant and severe hiccups, severe nausea/emesis, and preanesthetic conditioning are other uses. Symptoms of delirium in medically-hospitalized AIDS patients have been effectively treated with low doses of chlorpromazine Answered by Ollie Brad 1 year ago.

They are antipsycotic drugs used to treat manic depression, schizophrenia Answered by Mai Ast 1 year ago.


Is 25 mg of Thorazine safe to take for anxiety?
Asked by Tawny Dirkson 1 year ago.

Thorazine, at 25 mg, is used for chronic hiccups, nausea and vomitting, sedation before surgery, and sometimes anxiety. However, it is anti-psychotic, a tranquilizer, and very old school, so if it was not prescribed to you, don't tske it. This may just be a question of general curiosity, but if you need meds for anxiety, there are more suitable ones than thorazine. See the doc. to get the right one for you! Answered by Yajaira Haskell 1 year ago.

Thorazine is not an anti-anxiety drug. It is an antipsychotic drug. Please do not take ANY prescription medication unless under the direction of your personal physician. Answered by Tera Bezanson 1 year ago.

I think I would speak to a Pharmacist before listening to someone on Yahoo answers. Answered by Hans Pavlas 1 year ago.

The potential for causing chronic movement disorders makes it far from ideal. Answered by Adrien Schnake 1 year ago.

It has more potential side effects than newer drugs. For example, seizures, heat exhaustion, drowsiness. Answered by Christene Maeda 1 year ago.


Is it true that Thorazine is as dangerous and the Psychiatric critics say it is?
From Psychiatric critics they criticize Thorazine a lot and say it messes people up like Lobotomy. Here is an example website criticizing Thorazine: http://www.sntp.net/drugs/thorazine.htm Asked by Precious Caristo 1 year ago.

Thorazine is no more dangerous than the others. Staying on it for too long can lead to specific complications, which is true with other anti-psychotics. It isn't used as much these days, but it is still a consideration for some people. It's OK to critisize thorazine, but no more so than for other such drugs. Answered by Yesenia Schechter 1 year ago.

Wow! Normally, I don't answer questions that want to learn more and more detail. As in your case, because they require a long process, and it is the risk of not solve all of yours problems. I would suggest to proceed analytically with the help of keywords to be included in Yahoo! From what you climb, narrowing the field with new keywords, until you will be fully satisfied. good luck! Answered by Melodie Lieurance 1 year ago.


Is Thorazine(Chlorpromazine) an older anti-psychotic?
I was prescribed this recently for Bipolar Disorder. Is it an older anti-psychotic?Thanks Asked by Whitney Haehn 1 year ago.

Thorazine was one of the first anti-psychotics, created in 1950. It is still occasionally used in the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, but not as often as it was a few decades ago. It's a low potency anti-psychotic, so there is a lower chance of experiencing unwanted side effects. Answered by Onie Hatherly 1 year ago.


How long will thorazine take to get in my urine stream?
i want to take a thorazine but i have a drug test at 10:00am and dont know what time yo take it so i can pass the drug test and still take it tonight Asked by Gordon Novikoff 1 year ago.

To my understanding, Thorazine is an anti-psychotic medication. It's not typically screened for on a drug test. However, if you do register with a false positive in another drug category as a result of this medication, all you have to do is show proof of a prescription and you're in the clear. Thorazine is excreted primarily through the urine and has a half-life from 10 to 40 hours. Answered by Neely Fabeck 1 year ago.

You can't wait until after the test to take it - just to be on the safe side? Answered by Jannie Nickols 1 year ago.


About Thorazine/Largactil?
I have read alot about this drug, but I would like to hear from somone that has actually used it, or someone who knows someone who has used it.How sedating/tranquilizing is it? What are the main side-effects, and what pills do I need to counteract these side-effects? Asked by Caroll Capas 1 year ago.

About counteraction - I'm not sure. You'd have to take it to know if you'd have any counteractions, first. I took Thorazine for about a month for sleep. It never made me tired. It would, however, keep me asleep for 8-12 hrs once I laid down and fell asleep. Not a good drug if you need to be knocked out (in my opinion). I'm sure you've heard it called 'the chemical lobotomy'. I didn't feel like it erased too much of my personality, and I was still heavily addicted to drugs and it never made me seek/want drugs less. I really don't remember much from taking it. I snorted it once, and it burned like a SOB, but it knocked me out right away. Answered by Raylene Hasley 1 year ago.


Mrs S. has been taking Thorazine for about 1 year?
She has been having problems with orthostatic hypotension and akathisia, and has needed to take Cogentin to avoid dystonic reactions. The physician has decided to change her to Clozaril. The patient asks the nurse about the advantages and disadvantages of the new drug. The nurse has chosen Knowledge Deficit as the... Asked by Clare Manske 1 year ago.

She has been having problems with orthostatic hypotension and akathisia, and has needed to take Cogentin to avoid dystonic reactions. The physician has decided to change her to Clozaril. The patient asks the nurse about the advantages and disadvantages of the new drug. The nurse has chosen Knowledge Deficit as the nursing diagnosis for this patient. a) What interventions would be used for this diagnosis? b) How would the nurse evaluate the outcome of the interventions? Answered by Kymberly Suominen 1 year ago.

thorazine is bound to have more severe side effects.. clozaril is an atypical antipsychotic drug, so it will be LESS likely to cause tardive dyskenesia and akathisia and other similarly devastating side effects (thanks to its anticholinergic properties). However, there is recent evidence that such drugs may increase the likelihood of metabolic disturbances (leading to diabetes) and cardiovascular disease. There are also sexual functioning side effects, but that is common to many psychotropic meds...Note that slow titration of dosing of Clozaril significantly decreases the likelihood of orthostatic hypotension, so the switch is right on the money for this mrs. s....... I would say the switch from thorazine to clozaril is not a bad idea. I have no idea what you mean by "knowledge deficit" and "nursing diagnosis", I'm coming from a clinical psych perspective, but hope this helps! Answered by Mauro Sprowls 1 year ago.


What is thorazine used for?
Asked by Loreen Clattenburg 1 year ago.

Thorazine is used for the treatment of schizophrenia (severe disruptions in thought and perception). It is also prescribed for the short-term treatment of severe behavioral disorders in children, including explosive hyperactivity and combativeness; and for the hyperenergetic phase of manic-depressive illness (severely exaggerated moods). Thorazine is also used to control nausea and vomiting, and to relieve restlessness and apprehension before surgery. It is used as an aid in the treatment of tetanus, and is prescribed for uncontrollable hiccups and acute intermittent porphyria (attacks of severe abdominal pain sometimes accompanied by psychiatric disturbances, cramps in the arms and legs, and muscle weakness). Answered by Phillip Wytch 1 year ago.

Thorazine Uses Answered by Alexandria Gora 1 year ago.

I don't know all of its uses, but I was given Thorazine for migraines. Answered by Barb Bina 1 year ago.

It is a old anti-psychotic. They use to use it a lot in psychiatric hospitals to calm down patients. It is also used for migraines at times. Answered by Mildred Desnoyers 1 year ago.

To mess with kids minds! Answered by Kristofer Recore 1 year ago.

PAIN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!... Answered by Chanelle Laurel 1 year ago.

Chlorpromazine was the first antipsychotic drug, used during the 1950s and 1960s. Used as chlorpromazine hydrochloride and sold under the tradenames Largactil® and Thorazine®, it has sedative, hypotensive and antiemetic properties as well as anticholinergic and antidopaminergic effects. It has also anxiolytic (alleviation of anxiety) properties. Today, chlorpromazine is considered a typical antipsychotic. Chlorpromazine acts as an antagonist (blocking agent) on different postsynaptic receptors: on dopaminergic-receptors (subtypes D1, D2, D3 and D4, different antipsychotic properties on productive and unproductive symptoms), on serotonergic-receptors (5-HT1 and 5-HT2, with anxiolytic, antidepressive and antiaggressive properties as well as an attenuation of extrapypramidal side effects, but also leading to weight gain, fall in blood pressure, sedation and ejaculation difficulties), on histaminergic-receptors (H1-receptors, sedation, antiemesis, vertigo, fall in blood pressure and weight gain), on alpha1/alpha2-receptors (antisympathomimetic properties, lowering of blood pressure, reflex tachycardia, vertigo, sedation, hypersalivation and incontinence as well as sexual dysfunction, but may also attenuate pseudoparkinsonism—controversial), and on muscarinic (cholinergic) M1/M2-receptors (causing anticholinergic symptoms like dry mouth, blurred vision, obstipation, difficulty/inability to urinate, sinus tachycardia, ECG-changes and loss of memory, but the anticholinergic action may attenuate extrapyramidal side effects). Additionally, chlorpromazine is a weak presynaptic inhibitor of dopamine reuptake, which may lead to (mild) antidepressive and antiparkinsonian effects. This action could also account for psychomotor agitation and amplification of psychosis (very rarely noted in clinical use). [edit] Peripheral Antagonist to H1 receptors (antiallergic effects), H2 receptors (reduction of forming of gastric juice), M1/M2-receptors (dry mouth, reduction in forming of gastric juice) and some 5-HT receptors (different anti-allergic/gastrointestinal actions). Because it acts on so many receptors, chlorpromazine is often referred to as "dirty drug", whereas the atypical neuroleptic amisulpride for example acts only on central D2/D3-receptors and is therefore a "clean drug". This distinction is not a positive or negative value judgment on the drug, rather it is a neutral term which merely describes the agent's relative pharmacology. [edit] History The drug had been developed by Laboratoires Rhône-Poulenc in 1950 but they sold the rights in 1952 to Smith-Kline & French (today's GlaxoSmithKline). The drug was being sold as an antiemetic when its other use was noted. Smith-Kline was quick to encourage clinical trials and in 1954 the drug was approved in the US for psychiatric treatment. Over 100 million people were treated but the popularity of the drug fell from the late 1960s as the severe extrapyramidal side effects and tardive dyskinesia became more of a concern. From chlorpromazine a number of other similar neuroleptics were developed (e.g. triflupromazine, trifluoperazine). Previously used as an antihistamine and antiemetic its effects on mental state were first reported by the French doctor Henri Laborit in 1951 or 1952 (different sources) as sedation without narcosis. It became possible to cause 'artificial hibernation' in patients, if used as a cocktail together with pethidine and hydergine. Patients with shock, severe trauma or burns, become, if treated so, sedated, without anxiety and unreponsive/indifferent to painful external stimuli like minor surgical interventions. It was first used for psychiatric patients by Pierre Deniker and Jean Delay in 1953. Drug treatment with chlorpromazine went beyond simple sedation with patients showing improvements in thinking and emotional behaviour. Ironically, the antipsychotic properties of chlorpromazine appear to be unrelated to its sedative properties. During long term therapy some tolerance to the sedation effect develops. Chlorpromazine substituted and eclipsed the old therapies of electro- and insulin shocks and other methods such as psychosurgical means (lobotomy) causing permanent brain injury. Chlorpromazine has given approximately 70% of all schizophrenic patients a complete remission or near so and a normal, gainful human life. Before the era of neuroleptics, starting with chlorpromazine, positive long-term results for psychotic patients were only 20%. [edit] Side effects Side effects of chlorpromazine are typical of early generation neuroleptics. They include extrapyramidal side effects such as tardive dyskinesia and akathisia. A particularly severe side effect is the neuroleptic malignant syndrome which occurs in approximately 0.05% and can be fatal. Also, chlorpromazine may lower seizure threshold. Additional side effects include dry mouth, increased appetite with weight gain, constipation and urinary retention. Glucose tolerance may be impaired. An allergic skin rash and photosensitivity may occur. Other important and severe side effects are a strong reduction in the number of white blood cells, referred to as leukopenia, or, in extreme cases, even agranulocytosis may result, which may lead to death via uncontrollable infections and/or sepsis. Chlorpromazine is the neuroleptic drug with the highest rates (0.5% to 1%) of liver toxicity of the cholestatic type. The sedation effect combined with indifference to physical stimuli, anecdotally known as the "thorazine shuffle," has long been associated with the drug. The image of psychiatric patients staggering mute around a padded cell has earned those particular side effects a place in mainstream pop culture. [edit] Interactions Chlorpromazine intensifies the central depressive action of drugs with such activity (tranquilizers, barbiturates, narcotics, antihistamines, OTC-antiemetics etc.). A dose reduction of chlorpromazine or the other drug may be necessary. Chlorpromazine also intensifies the actions and undesired side effects of antihypertensive medications and anticholinergic drugs. The combination of chlorpromazine with other antipsychotics may result in increased central depression, hypotension and extrapyramidal side effects, but may sometimes enhance the clinical results of therapy. The anti-worm drug (antihelminthic) piperazine may intensify extrapyramidal side effects. In general, all neuroleptics may lead to seizures in combination with tramadol (Ultram). Chlorpromazine may increase the insulin needs of diabetic patients. Drugs like SSRIs, St. John's Wort and barbiturates can inhibit various CYP-isoenzymes such as CYP2D6, needed for metabolization of chlorpromazine and/or its metabolites. Theoretically, this should increase the half-lives of chlorpromazine and possibly its metabolites, dosing changes necessary. The exact clinical significance of this enzyme induction and its therapeutic consequences are unknown at present time and remain to be evaluated. [edit] Uses [edit] Common uses [edit] As an antipsychotic The use of chlorpromazine has been primarily replaced by newer generation of atypical antipsychotics which have an improved side effect profile. Chlorpromazine is classified as a low- to moderate-potency antipsychotic and in the past was used in the treatment of both acute and chronic psychoses, including schizophrenia and the manic phase of manic depression as well as amphetamine-induced psychoses. Chlorpromazine formerly was the drug of choice to treat LSD (and other psychedelic/hallucinogen) intoxication in a hospital setting, resulting in it gaining an erroneous reputation as the LSD "antidote". Now haloperidol is more commonly used in such situations. [edit] Other uses It has also been used in porphyria, as part of tetanus treatment and for behavioral problems in children. It still is well recommended for short term management of severe anxiety and aggressive episodes. Resistant and severe hiccups, severe nausea/emesis and preanesthetic conditioning have been other indications in the past. It can be used to treat amphetamine overdose. [1] [edit] Off-label and controversial uses Chlorpromazine is occasionally used off-label for treatment of severe migraine. Sometimes it is used in small doses to improve nausea/emesis opioid-treated cancer patients encounter and to intensify and prolong the analgesic action of the opioids given. Interestingly, it remains controversial whether or not chlorpromazine has its own analgesic properties. Analgesic properties may result from a central action on the hypothalamus; the patient may feel the pain much less than before. Other mechanisms may be an interaction with opioid receptors centrally and/or in the spinal cord. Some experts on the contrary say that chlorpromazine, like other phenothiazines, may even have antianalgesic properties. Chlorpromazine has been proposed as useful in newborns for the treatment of opioid withdrawal, if the mother was opioid-dependent. The latter indication remains highly controversial. Chlorpromazine, as well as other neuroleptics, may also be used to alleviate the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal (chlorpromazine may lower the seizure-threshold in alcoholics). It has a unique action in cholera, reducing the loss of water by approximately 30%. In Germany, the brand of chlorpromazine drug Propaphenin® has additional indications for insomnia and itching skin disease. [edit] Veterinary uses Chlorpromazine is primarily used as an antiemetic in dogs and cats. It is also sometimes used as a preanesthetic and muscle relaxant in cattle, swine, sheep, and goats. It is generally contraindicated for use with horses, due to a high incidence of ataxia and altered mentation. [edit] Dosage In any case, use is determined by an attending physician. The following information is intended to serve as a guideline: A wide range is covered from 25 mg oral or intramuscular for mild sedation, every 8 hours, up to 100 mg every 6 hours for severely disturbed patients. Different qualified sources give 800 mg/day to 1,200 mg/day as highest dose. At least there is one small clinical trial in treatment-resistant patients with a daily dose of 1,200 mg chlorpromazine (and 4 mg Benztropine to counteract early extrapyramidal side effects, which were anticipated with this unusual high chlorpromazine dose). Initial doses should be low and be increased gradually. It is recommended that most of the daily dose (e.g. 2/3) is given at bedtime for maximum hypnotic activity and minimal daytime sedation and hypotension. In the USA there are controlled release forms of Thorazine (e.g. 300 mg). After the individual dose is well established, such a CR capsule can be given with the evening meal as a single dose, covering the next 24 hours. The lowest dosage compatible with good therapeutic effect should be given. Dosage in ambulatory patients should be particularly low (minimizing sedation and hypotension). The direct i.v.-injection of undiluted solution is contraindicated (massive fall in blood pressure, cardiovascular collapse), for i.v.-infusion of dilutions the (hospitalized) patient should be lying and the infusion rate should be as slow as possible. Afterwards the patient should rest in the lying position for at least 30 minutes. [edit] Necessary examinations and laboratory checks during treatment All patients treated with chlorpromazine on a long-term-basis should have regularly checked their blood-pressure, pulse rate, laboratory-tests (liver function tests, kidney-values, blood cell counts including differenciated white blood counts, counts of red blood cells and thrombocytes), ECG and EEG. The frequency of all checks should be determined for the individual patient and may be done in shorter intervals during the first 3 months of treatment and less often afterwards. Some side effects seem to appear more frequently during the first months of therapy (sedation, hypotension, liver damage) while others do not (e.g. tardive dyskinesia). [edit] Discontinuation of treatment Also, in regular intervals the treating physician should evaluate whether continued treatment is needed. If not, the drug should never be stopped suddenly, due to very unpleasant 'withdrawal-symptoms', such as agitation, sleeplessness, states of anxiety, etc. However, these symptoms definitely do not indicate psychological or physical dependence. The dose should rather be slowly tapered down at a rate of approximately 20–25% per week or even slower to avoid the aforementioned bothersome symptoms. Chlorpromazine is derived from phenothiazine, and has an aliphatic side chain, typical for low to middle potency neuroleptics. The oral bioavailability is estimated to be 30–50% due to extensive first pass metabolization in the liver. Its elimination-halflife is 16–30 hours. It has many active metabolites (approx. 75 different ones) with greatly varying halflives and own pharmacological profiles. The CYP-450 isoenzymes 1A2 and 2D6 are needed for metabolization of chlorpromazine and the subtype 2D6 is inhibited by chlorpromazine (NB: possible interactions with other drugs). Answered by Erlinda Neuhart 1 year ago.


What are some reasons why a person might be prescribed 200 mg of thorazine?
...from a medical prospective. Asked by Lanelle Saeteun 1 year ago.

Thorazine is used for the treatment of schizophrenia (severe disruptions in thought and perception). It is also prescribed for the short-term treatment of severe behavioral disorders in children, including explosive hyperactivity and combativeness; and for the hyperenergetic phase of manic-depressive illness (severely exaggerated moods). Thorazine is also used to control nausea and vomiting, and to relieve restlessness and apprehension before surgery. It is used as an aid in the treatment of tetanus, and is prescribed for uncontrollable hiccups and acute intermittent porphyria (attacks of severe abdominal pain sometimes accompanied by psychiatric disturbances, cramps in the arms and legs, and muscle weakness). Answered by Dorothea Silvester 1 year ago.

The warding off man or woman will have angry through a comment the have shyed away from man or woman made. The warding off man or woman will have a few prejudice towards the have shyed away from man or woman. The have shyed away from man or woman might remind the warding off man or woman of an ex-boyfriend or ex-female friend or different man or woman who the warding off man or woman desires to omit. Maybe anybody instructed the warding off man or woman that the have shyed away from man or woman does not like him/her. But the object is, why do you care? Answered by Elouise Zinkievich 1 year ago.

It's an anti-psychotic, for bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. Answered by Loren Robuck 1 year ago.


What is Thorazine, Lorazepam and Compazine? What are they used for?
Asked by Meda Be 1 year ago.

Chlorpromazine is classified as a low-potency typical antipsychotic and in the past was used in the treatment of both acute and chronic psychoses, including schizophrenia and the manic phase of bipolar disorder, as well as amphetamine-induced psychoses. Low-potency antipsychotics have more anticholinergic side effects, such as dry mouth, sedation, and constipation, and lower rates of extrapyramidal side effects, while high-potency antipsychotics (such as haloperidol) have the reverse profile. Chlorpromazine has also been used in porphyria and as part of tetanus treatment. It still is recommended for short-term management of severe anxiety and psychotic aggression. Resistant and severe hiccups, severe nausea/emesis, and preanesthetic conditioning are other uses. Symptoms of delirium in medically-hospitalized AIDS patients have been effectively treated with low doses of chlorpromazine Answered by Carlotta Staelens 1 year ago.

They are antipsycotic drugs used to treat manic depression, schizophrenia Answered by Laronda Loo 1 year ago.


Is 25 mg of Thorazine safe to take for anxiety?
Asked by Williams Demorrett 1 year ago.

Thorazine, at 25 mg, is used for chronic hiccups, nausea and vomitting, sedation before surgery, and sometimes anxiety. However, it is anti-psychotic, a tranquilizer, and very old school, so if it was not prescribed to you, don't tske it. This may just be a question of general curiosity, but if you need meds for anxiety, there are more suitable ones than thorazine. See the doc. to get the right one for you! Answered by Keenan Dawahoya 1 year ago.

Thorazine is not an anti-anxiety drug. It is an antipsychotic drug. Please do not take ANY prescription medication unless under the direction of your personal physician. Answered by Neda Laramie 1 year ago.

I think I would speak to a Pharmacist before listening to someone on Yahoo answers. Answered by Arie Bolado 1 year ago.

The potential for causing chronic movement disorders makes it far from ideal. Answered by Ellamae Goudy 1 year ago.

It has more potential side effects than newer drugs. For example, seizures, heat exhaustion, drowsiness. Answered by Gertrudis Murrell 1 year ago.


Is it true that Thorazine is as dangerous and the Psychiatric critics say it is?
From Psychiatric critics they criticize Thorazine a lot and say it messes people up like Lobotomy. Here is an example website criticizing Thorazine: http://www.sntp.net/drugs/thorazine.htm Asked by Lilliana Hueftle 1 year ago.

Thorazine is no more dangerous than the others. Staying on it for too long can lead to specific complications, which is true with other anti-psychotics. It isn't used as much these days, but it is still a consideration for some people. It's OK to critisize thorazine, but no more so than for other such drugs. Answered by Lorita Riso 1 year ago.

Wow! Normally, I don't answer questions that want to learn more and more detail. As in your case, because they require a long process, and it is the risk of not solve all of yours problems. I would suggest to proceed analytically with the help of keywords to be included in Yahoo! From what you climb, narrowing the field with new keywords, until you will be fully satisfied. good luck! Answered by Laure Swire 1 year ago.


Is Thorazine(Chlorpromazine) an older anti-psychotic?
I was prescribed this recently for Bipolar Disorder. Is it an older anti-psychotic?Thanks Asked by Rudolph Mcclod 1 year ago.

Thorazine was one of the first anti-psychotics, created in 1950. It is still occasionally used in the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, but not as often as it was a few decades ago. It's a low potency anti-psychotic, so there is a lower chance of experiencing unwanted side effects. Answered by Sara Bishard 1 year ago.


How long will thorazine take to get in my urine stream?
i want to take a thorazine but i have a drug test at 10:00am and dont know what time yo take it so i can pass the drug test and still take it tonight Asked by Opal Muray 1 year ago.

To my understanding, Thorazine is an anti-psychotic medication. It's not typically screened for on a drug test. However, if you do register with a false positive in another drug category as a result of this medication, all you have to do is show proof of a prescription and you're in the clear. Thorazine is excreted primarily through the urine and has a half-life from 10 to 40 hours. Answered by Euna Finizio 1 year ago.

You can't wait until after the test to take it - just to be on the safe side? Answered by Jere Grauer 1 year ago.


About Thorazine/Largactil?
I have read alot about this drug, but I would like to hear from somone that has actually used it, or someone who knows someone who has used it.How sedating/tranquilizing is it? What are the main side-effects, and what pills do I need to counteract these side-effects? Asked by Yolanda Ozier 1 year ago.

About counteraction - I'm not sure. You'd have to take it to know if you'd have any counteractions, first. I took Thorazine for about a month for sleep. It never made me tired. It would, however, keep me asleep for 8-12 hrs once I laid down and fell asleep. Not a good drug if you need to be knocked out (in my opinion). I'm sure you've heard it called 'the chemical lobotomy'. I didn't feel like it erased too much of my personality, and I was still heavily addicted to drugs and it never made me seek/want drugs less. I really don't remember much from taking it. I snorted it once, and it burned like a SOB, but it knocked me out right away. Answered by Katina Bonsignore 1 year ago.


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