Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 020785/001.

Names and composition

"THALOMID" is the commercial name of a drug composed of THALIDOMIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020785/001 THALOMID THALIDOMIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
020785/002 THALOMID THALIDOMIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG
020785/003 THALOMID THALIDOMIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 200MG
020785/004 THALOMID THALIDOMIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 150MG
021430/001 THALOMID THALIDOMIDE CAPSULE/ ORAL 50MG
021430/002 THALOMID THALIDOMIDE CAPSULE/ ORAL 100MG
021430/003 THALOMID THALIDOMIDE CAPSULE/ ORAL 200MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020785/001 THALOMID THALIDOMIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
020785/002 THALOMID THALIDOMIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG
020785/003 THALOMID THALIDOMIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 200MG
020785/004 THALOMID THALIDOMIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 150MG
021430/001 THALOMID THALIDOMIDE CAPSULE/ ORAL 50MG
021430/002 THALOMID THALIDOMIDE CAPSULE/ ORAL 100MG
021430/003 THALOMID THALIDOMIDE CAPSULE/ ORAL 200MG

Ask a doctor

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

Has anyone received treatment for Hepato Cellular Carcinoma (Liver Cancer) that has spread to the lungs?
Has anyone been on Thalomid or Nexavar? Any suggestion for an "alternatives therapy" physician in the NY/NJ/CT area? Asked by Daniela Fitterer 1 year ago.

There are no alternative therapies that are effective for this stage IV malignancy. The treatment you have listed may buy time - but not a cure. My parents live in NJ. I am from Pennsylvania - now live in North Carolina. Cancer specialist doctor for twenty years. There is no proven effective alternative therapy anywhere for this situation. Many people waste money and hope on unproven ineffective treatments. The key is to maximize the quality of the time that may be left. Answered by Roland Knickman 1 year ago.


Can multiple myeloma be treated and cured?
Asked by Vance Holdvogt 1 year ago.

Standard treatment options include: Bortezomib (Velcade). Bortezomib was the first approved drug in a new class of medications called proteasome inhibitors. It is administered intravenously. It causes cancer cells to die by blocking the action of proteasomes. It is approved for people with newly diagnosed and previously treated myeloma. Thalidomide (Thalomid). Thalidomide, a drug originally used as a sedative and to treat morning sickness during pregnancy in the 1950s, was removed from the market after it was found to cause severe birth defects. However, the drug received approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) again in 1998, first as a treatment for skin lesions caused by leprosy. Today thalidomide is FDA approved for the treatment of newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. This drug is given orally. Lenalidomide (Revlimid). Lenalidomide is chemically similar to thalidomide, but because it appears to be more potent and cause fewer side effects, it is currently used more often than thalidomide. Lenalidomide is given orally. It is approved for people with previously treated myeloma, but is also often used in people with newly diagnosed disease. Chemotherapy. Chemotherapy involves using medicines — taken orally as a pill or given through an intravenous (IV) injection — to kill myeloma cells. Chemotherapy is often given in cycles over a period of months, followed by a rest period. Often chemotherapy is discontinued during what is called a plateau phase or remission, during which your M protein level remains stable. You may need chemotherapy again if your M protein level begins to rise. Common chemotherapy drugs used to treat myeloma are melphalan (Alkeran), cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan), vincristine, doxorubicin (Adriamycin) and liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil). Corticosteroids. Corticosteroids, such as prednisone and dexamethasone, have been used for decades to treat multiple myeloma. They are typically given in pill form. Stem cell transplantation. This treatment involves using high-dose chemotherapy — usually high doses of melphalan — along with transfusion of previously collected immature blood cells (stem cells) to replace diseased or damaged marrow. The stem cells can come from you or from a donor, and they may be from either blood or bone marrow. Radiation therapy. This treatment uses high-energy penetrating waves to damage myeloma cells and stop their growth. Radiation therapy may be used to quickly shrink myeloma cells in a specific area — for instance, when a collection of abnormal plasma cells form a tumor (plasmacytoma) that's causing pain or destroying a bone. ***Source Mayo Clinic Answered by Kerry Matter 1 year ago.

It can be treated but not cured. Answered by Liane Kesselring 1 year ago.


What can be done to help heal prurigo nodularis?
Prurigo Nodularis is a non-contagious skin disorder and very painful. Asked by Annita Justino 1 year ago.

Drug Category: Immunologic agents -- These agents have immunomodulatory effects. Drug Name Thalidomide (Thalomid) -- Immunomodulatory agent that may suppress excessive production of TNF-alpha and may down-regulate selected cell surface adhesion molecules involved in leukocyte migration. If <50 kg (110 lb), start at low end of dose regimen. Adult Dose 100-300 mg/d with water, preferably hs and at least 1 h pc; may be combined with narrowband UV-B (TL-01) irradiation Pediatric Dose Not established Contraindications Documented hypersensitivity; pregnancy Interactions May increase sedation of alcohol, barbiturates, chlorpromazine, and reserpine; because of teratogenic effects, women must use 2 additional methods of contraception or abstain from intercourse Pregnancy X - Contraindicated in pregnancy Precautions Perform pregnancy test within 24-h period prior to initiating therapy (weekly during the first mo, followed by monthly tests in women with regular menstrual cycles or q2wk in women with irregular menstrual cycles); bradycardia may occur; use protective measures (eg, sunscreens, protective clothing) against exposure to sunlight or UV light (eg, tanning beds) Answered by Victoria Bardis 1 year ago.

What a remarkably interesting question! If you take those who came before you to mean your ancestors, then I don't think so. They have their own Karma and only they can fulfill it. But if you take 'those who came before you' to mean your own previous incarnations, then I would certainly say yes. We can be experiencing now the consequences of problems layed down in past lives. By willingly paying off such Karmic debt we clear the whole Karmic stream, which implies that we heal ourselves both now and then. Does that sound right d'you think? Answered by Billie Kukielka 1 year ago.

Is Prurigo Nodularis Contagious Answered by Rosalva Schuchart 1 year ago.

Try Noni by Morinda Answered by Jose Ziebart 1 year ago.


Average cost of 1 chemo treatment?
I have multi. myealoma cancer am advised to take chemo therapy? Asked by Jimmy Kaczor 1 year ago.

If you don't have insurance, chemo is extremely expensive. There are organizations out there that can help you pay the bills, and most hospitals have financial assistance for people who qualify, but the drugs are expensive. I have liposarcoma, so my chemo drugs are probably going to be different than yours, but my drugs alone, not counting the cost of the hospital stay, were $27,000/month. Twenty Seven Thousand Dollars. And no, that is not a typo. Fortunately, I have insurance. If you don't, you won't be able to afford it unless you are wealthy or you get help. I hate to tell you that, but it is what it is. If you don't have insurance, you really need to speak with your hospital and oncologist about financial assistance programs. Answered by Genevieve Domingo 1 year ago.


Is any of these medications a type of viagra?
i have cigna insurance.my insurance might cover part or all of the cost for viagra pills.under miscellanious,in the cigna website,it has these names listed,is any of these other medications a type of viagra(other than viagra)is it the ones with(pa) on the side of the... Asked by Bong Lipke 1 year ago.

i have cigna insurance.my insurance might cover part or all of the cost for viagra pills.under miscellanious,in the cigna website,it has these names listed,is any of these other medications a type of viagra(other than viagra)is it the ones with(pa) on the side of the name? MISCELLANEOUS: allopurinol amylase/lipase/protease azathioprine balsalazide cabergoline (QL) calcitriol desmopressin folic acid leucovorin methotrexate mycophenolate naltrexone (QL) tizanidine zaleplon Ambien CR Asacol Asacol HD Canasa Cellcept Colazal Dipentum Epipen (QL) Epipen Jr. (QL) Fosrenol Lialda Megace ES Pentasa Prefera-OB Pulmozyme (PA) Renvela Revatio (PA) Spiriva Synarel (PA, QL) Thalomid Trexall Tussionex Viagra (PA) Zemplar Adrenaclick Ambien Apriso Arava (PA) Coartem (QL) Edluar (ST) Lariam (PA, QL) Malarone (PA) Nimotop Nuvigil Orap Phoslo Priftin Provigil Sonata Sucraid Answered by Tamala Waldecker 1 year ago.

No. Viagra is the only one. I'm not sure what the PA means, but it is probably the only ED oral medication covered. You know there are several oral ED treatments and my guess is that Viagra is the preferred one, meaning it will have the lowest co-pay and if the Dr. writes for another med, they will substitute Viagra for it. Call the insurance co to make sure. They will typically only allow 6-8 tablets a month. Answered by Trish Levinson 1 year ago.

There are possible choices to this drug however they do not have the identical dramatic outcome. Your pal demands to don't forget why there's a drawback with ED. The drug is not a treatment, it is a banded. When the blood waft is blocked or bogged down it'll final result the role of the frame to get an erection. Advise your pal to don't forget the reason of the drawback first. This would possibly contain a difference in nutrition, cleaning and dietary supplements. Also your pal is also taking an excessive amount of of the drug. Answered by Nestor Knop 1 year ago.

None of the rest of them are (other than Viagra). These are probably the medications that are on the formulary (allowed list) for your insurance. Answered by Nadia Jebb 1 year ago.


My sister was diagnosed with multiple myeloma IdG.?
My sister was diagnosed with multiple myeloma IdG they said its in 99% of her bones. She starts chemo (velcade) monday. what can she expect and what about the other meds. she needs.dexamethasone and Thalidomide and are very expensive she has no insurance any suggestions is greatly appreciated. Asked by Chanel Napp 1 year ago.

She should apply for emergency Medicaid to help with the costs. This is from Mayo Clinic literature: Standard treatments for myeloma Though there's no cure for multiple myeloma, with good treatment results you can usually return to near-normal activity. The appropriate multiple myeloma treatment depends on your needs, medical status and general health. You may also wish to consider approved clinical trials as an option. Standard treatment options include: Chemotherapy. Chemotherapy involves using medicines — taken orally as a pill or given through an intravenous (IV) injection — to kill myeloma cells. Chemotherapy is often given in cycles over a period of months, followed by a rest period. Often chemotherapy is discontinued during what is called a plateau phase or remission, during which your M protein level remains stable. You may need chemotherapy again if your M protein level begins to rise. Common chemotherapy drugs used to treat myeloma are melphalan (Alkeran), cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan), vincristine (Oncovin), doxorubicin (Adriamycin) and liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil). Corticosteroids. Corticosteroids such as prednisone and dexamethasone (Decadron) have been used for decades to treat multiple myeloma. They are typically given as pills. Some research suggests that high doses of steroids may not be needed, and that lower doses may be safer and more effective. Stem cell transplantation. This treatment involves using high-dose chemotherapy — usually high doses of melphalan — along with transfusion of previously collected immature blood cells (stem cells) to replace diseased or damaged marrow. The stem cells can come from you or from a donor, and they may be from either blood or bone marrow. Thalidomide (Thalomid). Thalidomide, a drug originally used as a sedative and to treat morning sickness in the 1950s, was removed from the market after it was found to cause severe birth defects. However, the drug received approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) again in 1998, first as a treatment for skin lesions caused by leprosy. Thalidomide is currently FDA-approved in conjunction with the corticosteroid called dexamethasone for the treatment of newly diagnosed cases of multiple myeloma. This drug is given orally. Bortezomib (Velcade). Velcade was the first approved drug in a new class of medications called proteasome inhibitors. It is administered intravenously. It works by blocking the action of proteasomes, which causes cancer cells to die. One study showed that bortezomib had more than twice the response rate of a commonly used drug, dexamethasone. Bortezomib is approved by the FDA for use in a treatment for people with multiple myeloma who have received at least one prior therapy. Lenalidomide (Revlimid). Lenalidomide is chemically similar to thalidomide, but appears to be more potent and cause fewer side effects. It is given orally. Lenalidomide is FDA-approved for use in combination with dexamethasone as a treatment for people who have received at least one prior therapy for multiple myeloma. Radiation therapy. This treatment uses high-energy penetrating waves to damage myeloma cells and stop their growth. Radiation therapy may be used to target myeloma cells in a specific area — for instance, to more quickly shrink a tumor that's causing pain or destroying a bone. Initial therapy for myeloma The initial chemotherapy used to treat multiple myeloma depends on whether you're considered a candidate for stem cell transplantation. Factors such as the risk of your disease progressing, your age and your general health play a part in determining whether stem cell transplantation may be right for you. If you're considered a candidate for stem cell transplantation: Your initial therapy will likely exclude melphalan because this drug can have a toxic effect on stem cells, making it impossible to collect enough of them. You may begin treatment with the most common initial myeloma therapy in the United States, thalidomide plus dexamethasone. Or your doctor may instead recommend a newer regimen, lenalidomide plus low-dose dexamethasone. Your stem cells will likely be collected after you've undergone three to four months of treatment with these initial agents. Your doctor may recommend undergoing the stem cell transplant soon after your cells are collected or delaying the transplant until after a relapse, if it occurs. Your age and your personal preference are important factors that will help your doctor make his or her recommendation. If you're not considered a candidate for stem cell transplantation: Your initial therapy is likely to be a combination of melphalan, prednisone and thalidomide (MPT). If the side effects are intolerable, melphalan plus prednisone is another option (MP). This type of therapy is typically given for about 12 to 18 months. Treatments for relapsed or treatment-resistant multiple myeloma Most people who are treated for multiple myeloma eventually experience a relapse of the disease. And in some cases, none of the currently available, first-line therapies slow the cancer cells from multiplying. If you experience a relapse of multiple myeloma, your doctor may recommend repeating another course of the treatment that initially helped you. Another option is trying one or more of the other treatments typically used as first-line therapy, either alone or in combination. Research on a number of promising new treatment options is ongoing, and these drugs offer important options for those with multiple myeloma. Talk to your doctor about what clinical trials may be available to you. Treating complications Because multiple myeloma can cause a number of complications, you may also need treatment for those specific conditions. For example: Back pain. Taking pain medication or wearing a back brace can help relieve the back pain you might experience with multiple myeloma. Kidney complications. People with severe kidney damage may need dialysis. Infections. Antibiotics may be necessary to help treat infections or to help reduce your risk of them. Bone loss. You may take medications called bisphosphonates, such as pamidronate (Aredia) or zoledronic acid (Zometa), which bind to the surface of your bones and help prevent bone loss. Treatment with these drugs is associated with the risk of harm to the jawbone. If you're taking these medications, don't have dental procedures done without consulting your doctor first. Anemia. If you have persistent anemia, your doctor may prescribe erythropoietin injections. Erythropoietin is a naturally occurring hormone made in the kidneys that stimulates the production of red blood cells. Research suggests that the use of erythropoietin may increase the risk of blood clots in some people with myeloma. Answered by Arlette Sow 1 year ago.

I know Thalidomide has a patient assistance program to help with the cost. Her doctor can give her all the information. But you can check out this website also. Thalomid.com. I don't think dex is that expensive. Answered by Harland Crader 1 year ago.


My Grandmother has been diagnosed with Amyloidosis, what does this mean for her and my family?
After going to hospital numerous times due to kidney failure, heart problems and inflamed stomachs. Doctors have said that my Nan has Amyloidosis. I've become a bit upset as from what I have read she may not have long to live.What also worries me from reading on the Internet is that it might be genetic, and... Asked by Vaughn Coss 1 year ago.

After going to hospital numerous times due to kidney failure, heart problems and inflamed stomachs. Doctors have said that my Nan has Amyloidosis. I've become a bit upset as from what I have read she may not have long to live. What also worries me from reading on the Internet is that it might be genetic, and I fear it may be passed on to me. Answered by Dayna Litmanowicz 1 year ago.

*Some cases of amyloidosis are inherited. Primary amyloidosis. This most common form of amyloidosis can affect many areas, including your heart, kidneys, liver, spleen, nerves, intestines, skin, tongue and blood vessels. Primary amyloidosis isn't associated with other diseases — except for multiple myeloma, a form of bone marrow cancer, in a minority of cases. The exact cause of primary amyloidosis is unknown, but doctors do know that the disease begins in your bone marrow. In addition to producing red and white blood cells and platelets, your bone marrow makes antibodies — proteins that protect you against infection and disease. After antibodies serve their function, your body breaks them down and recycles them. Amyloidosis occurs when cells in the bone marrow produce antibodies that can't be broken down. These antibodies then build up in your bloodstream. Ultimately, they leave your bloodstream and can deposit in your tissues as amyloid, interfering with normal function. * Secondary amyloidosis. This form occurs in association with chronic infectious or inflammatory diseases, such as tuberculosis, rheumatoid arthritis or osteomyelitis, a bone infection. It primarily affects your kidneys, spleen, liver and lymph nodes, though other organs may be involved. Treatment of the underlying disease may help stop progression of this form of amyloidosis. * Hereditary (familial) amyloidosis. As the name implies, this form of amyloidosis is inherited. This type often affects the liver, nerves, heart and kidneys. * Medicines. Therapies include melphalan (Alkeran), a chemotherapy agent also used to treat certain types of cancer, and dexamethasone, a corticosteroid used for its anti-inflammatory effects. Researchers are investigating other types of chemotherapy regimens for amyloidosis. Several medications that are used in the treatment of multiple myeloma are being tested to see if they're effective in treating amyloidosis. These include bortezomib (Velcade), thalidomide (Thalomid), and a thalidomide derivative called lenalidomide (Revlimid). These drugs may be used alone or in combination with dexamethasone. Ask your doctor what clinical trials may be available to you. Anyone undergoing chemotherapy for amyloidosis may experience side effects similar to those of chemotherapy for cancer treatment, such as nausea, vomiting, hair loss and extreme fatigue. * Peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. Peripheral blood stem cell transplantation involves using high-dose chemotherapy and transfusion of previously collected immature blood cells (stem cells) to replace diseased or damaged marrow. These cells may be your own (autologous transplant) or from a donor (allogeneic transplant). Autologous transplant is the preferred approach. Not everyone is a candidate for this aggressive treatment, and it has serious risks, including death. In some research, results from stem cell transplants have been promising, although more recent research suggests that overall survival rates are better for those given chemotherapy compared with stem cell transplantation. Discuss the potential risks and benefits of this treatment with your doctor. Treating secondary amyloidosis If you have secondary amyloidosis, the primary goal of therapy is to treat the underlying condition — for example, taking an anti-inflammatory medication for rheumatoid arthritis. Treating hereditary amyloidosis For hereditary amyloidosis, one possible therapy may be liver transplantation because the protein that causes this form of amyloidosis is made in the liver. Treating complications Because amyloidosis can cause a number of complications, you may also need treatment for those specific conditions, based on your signs and symptoms and affected organs. For example, if amyloidosis affects your heart or kidneys, you may be asked to follow a low-salt diet to control fluid retention. Or your doctor may prescribe diuretics and other medications. In some cases, your doctor might prescribe medication for pain control. If any of your organs are severely damaged from amyloid deposits, you may need an organ transplant. Although such a transplant won't cure you because amyloid deposits will likely collect in the new organ as well, a transplant could prolong your life. Answered by Shera Klingberg 1 year ago.


Has anyone received treatment for Hepato Cellular Carcinoma (Liver Cancer) that has spread to the lungs?
Has anyone been on Thalomid or Nexavar? Any suggestion for an "alternatives therapy" physician in the NY/NJ/CT area? Asked by Josphine Kaschmitter 1 year ago.

There are no alternative therapies that are effective for this stage IV malignancy. The treatment you have listed may buy time - but not a cure. My parents live in NJ. I am from Pennsylvania - now live in North Carolina. Cancer specialist doctor for twenty years. There is no proven effective alternative therapy anywhere for this situation. Many people waste money and hope on unproven ineffective treatments. The key is to maximize the quality of the time that may be left. Answered by Joelle Chui 1 year ago.


Can multiple myeloma be treated and cured?
Asked by Leesa Keator 1 year ago.

Standard treatment options include: Bortezomib (Velcade). Bortezomib was the first approved drug in a new class of medications called proteasome inhibitors. It is administered intravenously. It causes cancer cells to die by blocking the action of proteasomes. It is approved for people with newly diagnosed and previously treated myeloma. Thalidomide (Thalomid). Thalidomide, a drug originally used as a sedative and to treat morning sickness during pregnancy in the 1950s, was removed from the market after it was found to cause severe birth defects. However, the drug received approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) again in 1998, first as a treatment for skin lesions caused by leprosy. Today thalidomide is FDA approved for the treatment of newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. This drug is given orally. Lenalidomide (Revlimid). Lenalidomide is chemically similar to thalidomide, but because it appears to be more potent and cause fewer side effects, it is currently used more often than thalidomide. Lenalidomide is given orally. It is approved for people with previously treated myeloma, but is also often used in people with newly diagnosed disease. Chemotherapy. Chemotherapy involves using medicines — taken orally as a pill or given through an intravenous (IV) injection — to kill myeloma cells. Chemotherapy is often given in cycles over a period of months, followed by a rest period. Often chemotherapy is discontinued during what is called a plateau phase or remission, during which your M protein level remains stable. You may need chemotherapy again if your M protein level begins to rise. Common chemotherapy drugs used to treat myeloma are melphalan (Alkeran), cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan), vincristine, doxorubicin (Adriamycin) and liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil). Corticosteroids. Corticosteroids, such as prednisone and dexamethasone, have been used for decades to treat multiple myeloma. They are typically given in pill form. Stem cell transplantation. This treatment involves using high-dose chemotherapy — usually high doses of melphalan — along with transfusion of previously collected immature blood cells (stem cells) to replace diseased or damaged marrow. The stem cells can come from you or from a donor, and they may be from either blood or bone marrow. Radiation therapy. This treatment uses high-energy penetrating waves to damage myeloma cells and stop their growth. Radiation therapy may be used to quickly shrink myeloma cells in a specific area — for instance, when a collection of abnormal plasma cells form a tumor (plasmacytoma) that's causing pain or destroying a bone. ***Source Mayo Clinic Answered by Cara Sicinski 1 year ago.

It can be treated but not cured. Answered by Thresa Pottle 1 year ago.


What can be done to help heal prurigo nodularis?
Prurigo Nodularis is a non-contagious skin disorder and very painful. Asked by Delpha Savageau 1 year ago.

Drug Category: Immunologic agents -- These agents have immunomodulatory effects. Drug Name Thalidomide (Thalomid) -- Immunomodulatory agent that may suppress excessive production of TNF-alpha and may down-regulate selected cell surface adhesion molecules involved in leukocyte migration. If <50 kg (110 lb), start at low end of dose regimen. Adult Dose 100-300 mg/d with water, preferably hs and at least 1 h pc; may be combined with narrowband UV-B (TL-01) irradiation Pediatric Dose Not established Contraindications Documented hypersensitivity; pregnancy Interactions May increase sedation of alcohol, barbiturates, chlorpromazine, and reserpine; because of teratogenic effects, women must use 2 additional methods of contraception or abstain from intercourse Pregnancy X - Contraindicated in pregnancy Precautions Perform pregnancy test within 24-h period prior to initiating therapy (weekly during the first mo, followed by monthly tests in women with regular menstrual cycles or q2wk in women with irregular menstrual cycles); bradycardia may occur; use protective measures (eg, sunscreens, protective clothing) against exposure to sunlight or UV light (eg, tanning beds) Answered by Piper Vanmeter 1 year ago.

What a remarkably interesting question! If you take those who came before you to mean your ancestors, then I don't think so. They have their own Karma and only they can fulfill it. But if you take 'those who came before you' to mean your own previous incarnations, then I would certainly say yes. We can be experiencing now the consequences of problems layed down in past lives. By willingly paying off such Karmic debt we clear the whole Karmic stream, which implies that we heal ourselves both now and then. Does that sound right d'you think? Answered by Gerardo Hosek 1 year ago.

Is Prurigo Nodularis Contagious Answered by Bruna Platzer 1 year ago.

Try Noni by Morinda Answered by Tod Krake 1 year ago.


Average cost of 1 chemo treatment?
I have multi. myealoma cancer am advised to take chemo therapy? Asked by Kris Pociask 1 year ago.

If you don't have insurance, chemo is extremely expensive. There are organizations out there that can help you pay the bills, and most hospitals have financial assistance for people who qualify, but the drugs are expensive. I have liposarcoma, so my chemo drugs are probably going to be different than yours, but my drugs alone, not counting the cost of the hospital stay, were $27,000/month. Twenty Seven Thousand Dollars. And no, that is not a typo. Fortunately, I have insurance. If you don't, you won't be able to afford it unless you are wealthy or you get help. I hate to tell you that, but it is what it is. If you don't have insurance, you really need to speak with your hospital and oncologist about financial assistance programs. Answered by Jody Donnelley 1 year ago.


Is any of these medications a type of viagra?
i have cigna insurance.my insurance might cover part or all of the cost for viagra pills.under miscellanious,in the cigna website,it has these names listed,is any of these other medications a type of viagra(other than viagra)is it the ones with(pa) on the side of the... Asked by Jude Hopton 1 year ago.

i have cigna insurance.my insurance might cover part or all of the cost for viagra pills.under miscellanious,in the cigna website,it has these names listed,is any of these other medications a type of viagra(other than viagra)is it the ones with(pa) on the side of the name? MISCELLANEOUS: allopurinol amylase/lipase/protease azathioprine balsalazide cabergoline (QL) calcitriol desmopressin folic acid leucovorin methotrexate mycophenolate naltrexone (QL) tizanidine zaleplon Ambien CR Asacol Asacol HD Canasa Cellcept Colazal Dipentum Epipen (QL) Epipen Jr. (QL) Fosrenol Lialda Megace ES Pentasa Prefera-OB Pulmozyme (PA) Renvela Revatio (PA) Spiriva Synarel (PA, QL) Thalomid Trexall Tussionex Viagra (PA) Zemplar Adrenaclick Ambien Apriso Arava (PA) Coartem (QL) Edluar (ST) Lariam (PA, QL) Malarone (PA) Nimotop Nuvigil Orap Phoslo Priftin Provigil Sonata Sucraid Answered by Dara Simmons 1 year ago.

No. Viagra is the only one. I'm not sure what the PA means, but it is probably the only ED oral medication covered. You know there are several oral ED treatments and my guess is that Viagra is the preferred one, meaning it will have the lowest co-pay and if the Dr. writes for another med, they will substitute Viagra for it. Call the insurance co to make sure. They will typically only allow 6-8 tablets a month. Answered by Marcella Riddlebarger 1 year ago.

There are possible choices to this drug however they do not have the identical dramatic outcome. Your pal demands to don't forget why there's a drawback with ED. The drug is not a treatment, it is a banded. When the blood waft is blocked or bogged down it'll final result the role of the frame to get an erection. Advise your pal to don't forget the reason of the drawback first. This would possibly contain a difference in nutrition, cleaning and dietary supplements. Also your pal is also taking an excessive amount of of the drug. Answered by Viki Freehoffer 1 year ago.

None of the rest of them are (other than Viagra). These are probably the medications that are on the formulary (allowed list) for your insurance. Answered by Carmella Beierschmitt 1 year ago.


My sister was diagnosed with multiple myeloma IdG.?
My sister was diagnosed with multiple myeloma IdG they said its in 99% of her bones. She starts chemo (velcade) monday. what can she expect and what about the other meds. she needs.dexamethasone and Thalidomide and are very expensive she has no insurance any suggestions is greatly appreciated. Asked by Henriette Norals 1 year ago.

She should apply for emergency Medicaid to help with the costs. This is from Mayo Clinic literature: Standard treatments for myeloma Though there's no cure for multiple myeloma, with good treatment results you can usually return to near-normal activity. The appropriate multiple myeloma treatment depends on your needs, medical status and general health. You may also wish to consider approved clinical trials as an option. Standard treatment options include: Chemotherapy. Chemotherapy involves using medicines — taken orally as a pill or given through an intravenous (IV) injection — to kill myeloma cells. Chemotherapy is often given in cycles over a period of months, followed by a rest period. Often chemotherapy is discontinued during what is called a plateau phase or remission, during which your M protein level remains stable. You may need chemotherapy again if your M protein level begins to rise. Common chemotherapy drugs used to treat myeloma are melphalan (Alkeran), cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan), vincristine (Oncovin), doxorubicin (Adriamycin) and liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil). Corticosteroids. Corticosteroids such as prednisone and dexamethasone (Decadron) have been used for decades to treat multiple myeloma. They are typically given as pills. Some research suggests that high doses of steroids may not be needed, and that lower doses may be safer and more effective. Stem cell transplantation. This treatment involves using high-dose chemotherapy — usually high doses of melphalan — along with transfusion of previously collected immature blood cells (stem cells) to replace diseased or damaged marrow. The stem cells can come from you or from a donor, and they may be from either blood or bone marrow. Thalidomide (Thalomid). Thalidomide, a drug originally used as a sedative and to treat morning sickness in the 1950s, was removed from the market after it was found to cause severe birth defects. However, the drug received approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) again in 1998, first as a treatment for skin lesions caused by leprosy. Thalidomide is currently FDA-approved in conjunction with the corticosteroid called dexamethasone for the treatment of newly diagnosed cases of multiple myeloma. This drug is given orally. Bortezomib (Velcade). Velcade was the first approved drug in a new class of medications called proteasome inhibitors. It is administered intravenously. It works by blocking the action of proteasomes, which causes cancer cells to die. One study showed that bortezomib had more than twice the response rate of a commonly used drug, dexamethasone. Bortezomib is approved by the FDA for use in a treatment for people with multiple myeloma who have received at least one prior therapy. Lenalidomide (Revlimid). Lenalidomide is chemically similar to thalidomide, but appears to be more potent and cause fewer side effects. It is given orally. Lenalidomide is FDA-approved for use in combination with dexamethasone as a treatment for people who have received at least one prior therapy for multiple myeloma. Radiation therapy. This treatment uses high-energy penetrating waves to damage myeloma cells and stop their growth. Radiation therapy may be used to target myeloma cells in a specific area — for instance, to more quickly shrink a tumor that's causing pain or destroying a bone. Initial therapy for myeloma The initial chemotherapy used to treat multiple myeloma depends on whether you're considered a candidate for stem cell transplantation. Factors such as the risk of your disease progressing, your age and your general health play a part in determining whether stem cell transplantation may be right for you. If you're considered a candidate for stem cell transplantation: Your initial therapy will likely exclude melphalan because this drug can have a toxic effect on stem cells, making it impossible to collect enough of them. You may begin treatment with the most common initial myeloma therapy in the United States, thalidomide plus dexamethasone. Or your doctor may instead recommend a newer regimen, lenalidomide plus low-dose dexamethasone. Your stem cells will likely be collected after you've undergone three to four months of treatment with these initial agents. Your doctor may recommend undergoing the stem cell transplant soon after your cells are collected or delaying the transplant until after a relapse, if it occurs. Your age and your personal preference are important factors that will help your doctor make his or her recommendation. If you're not considered a candidate for stem cell transplantation: Your initial therapy is likely to be a combination of melphalan, prednisone and thalidomide (MPT). If the side effects are intolerable, melphalan plus prednisone is another option (MP). This type of therapy is typically given for about 12 to 18 months. Treatments for relapsed or treatment-resistant multiple myeloma Most people who are treated for multiple myeloma eventually experience a relapse of the disease. And in some cases, none of the currently available, first-line therapies slow the cancer cells from multiplying. If you experience a relapse of multiple myeloma, your doctor may recommend repeating another course of the treatment that initially helped you. Another option is trying one or more of the other treatments typically used as first-line therapy, either alone or in combination. Research on a number of promising new treatment options is ongoing, and these drugs offer important options for those with multiple myeloma. Talk to your doctor about what clinical trials may be available to you. Treating complications Because multiple myeloma can cause a number of complications, you may also need treatment for those specific conditions. For example: Back pain. Taking pain medication or wearing a back brace can help relieve the back pain you might experience with multiple myeloma. Kidney complications. People with severe kidney damage may need dialysis. Infections. Antibiotics may be necessary to help treat infections or to help reduce your risk of them. Bone loss. You may take medications called bisphosphonates, such as pamidronate (Aredia) or zoledronic acid (Zometa), which bind to the surface of your bones and help prevent bone loss. Treatment with these drugs is associated with the risk of harm to the jawbone. If you're taking these medications, don't have dental procedures done without consulting your doctor first. Anemia. If you have persistent anemia, your doctor may prescribe erythropoietin injections. Erythropoietin is a naturally occurring hormone made in the kidneys that stimulates the production of red blood cells. Research suggests that the use of erythropoietin may increase the risk of blood clots in some people with myeloma. Answered by Lanelle Partain 1 year ago.

I know Thalidomide has a patient assistance program to help with the cost. Her doctor can give her all the information. But you can check out this website also. Thalomid.com. I don't think dex is that expensive. Answered by Hee Byes 1 year ago.


My Grandmother has been diagnosed with Amyloidosis, what does this mean for her and my family?
After going to hospital numerous times due to kidney failure, heart problems and inflamed stomachs. Doctors have said that my Nan has Amyloidosis. I've become a bit upset as from what I have read she may not have long to live.What also worries me from reading on the Internet is that it might be genetic, and... Asked by Barney Kanz 1 year ago.

After going to hospital numerous times due to kidney failure, heart problems and inflamed stomachs. Doctors have said that my Nan has Amyloidosis. I've become a bit upset as from what I have read she may not have long to live. What also worries me from reading on the Internet is that it might be genetic, and I fear it may be passed on to me. Answered by Sanora Steinbrook 1 year ago.

*Some cases of amyloidosis are inherited. Primary amyloidosis. This most common form of amyloidosis can affect many areas, including your heart, kidneys, liver, spleen, nerves, intestines, skin, tongue and blood vessels. Primary amyloidosis isn't associated with other diseases — except for multiple myeloma, a form of bone marrow cancer, in a minority of cases. The exact cause of primary amyloidosis is unknown, but doctors do know that the disease begins in your bone marrow. In addition to producing red and white blood cells and platelets, your bone marrow makes antibodies — proteins that protect you against infection and disease. After antibodies serve their function, your body breaks them down and recycles them. Amyloidosis occurs when cells in the bone marrow produce antibodies that can't be broken down. These antibodies then build up in your bloodstream. Ultimately, they leave your bloodstream and can deposit in your tissues as amyloid, interfering with normal function. * Secondary amyloidosis. This form occurs in association with chronic infectious or inflammatory diseases, such as tuberculosis, rheumatoid arthritis or osteomyelitis, a bone infection. It primarily affects your kidneys, spleen, liver and lymph nodes, though other organs may be involved. Treatment of the underlying disease may help stop progression of this form of amyloidosis. * Hereditary (familial) amyloidosis. As the name implies, this form of amyloidosis is inherited. This type often affects the liver, nerves, heart and kidneys. * Medicines. Therapies include melphalan (Alkeran), a chemotherapy agent also used to treat certain types of cancer, and dexamethasone, a corticosteroid used for its anti-inflammatory effects. Researchers are investigating other types of chemotherapy regimens for amyloidosis. Several medications that are used in the treatment of multiple myeloma are being tested to see if they're effective in treating amyloidosis. These include bortezomib (Velcade), thalidomide (Thalomid), and a thalidomide derivative called lenalidomide (Revlimid). These drugs may be used alone or in combination with dexamethasone. Ask your doctor what clinical trials may be available to you. Anyone undergoing chemotherapy for amyloidosis may experience side effects similar to those of chemotherapy for cancer treatment, such as nausea, vomiting, hair loss and extreme fatigue. * Peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. Peripheral blood stem cell transplantation involves using high-dose chemotherapy and transfusion of previously collected immature blood cells (stem cells) to replace diseased or damaged marrow. These cells may be your own (autologous transplant) or from a donor (allogeneic transplant). Autologous transplant is the preferred approach. Not everyone is a candidate for this aggressive treatment, and it has serious risks, including death. In some research, results from stem cell transplants have been promising, although more recent research suggests that overall survival rates are better for those given chemotherapy compared with stem cell transplantation. Discuss the potential risks and benefits of this treatment with your doctor. Treating secondary amyloidosis If you have secondary amyloidosis, the primary goal of therapy is to treat the underlying condition — for example, taking an anti-inflammatory medication for rheumatoid arthritis. Treating hereditary amyloidosis For hereditary amyloidosis, one possible therapy may be liver transplantation because the protein that causes this form of amyloidosis is made in the liver. Treating complications Because amyloidosis can cause a number of complications, you may also need treatment for those specific conditions, based on your signs and symptoms and affected organs. For example, if amyloidosis affects your heart or kidneys, you may be asked to follow a low-salt diet to control fluid retention. Or your doctor may prescribe diuretics and other medications. In some cases, your doctor might prescribe medication for pain control. If any of your organs are severely damaged from amyloid deposits, you may need an organ transplant. Although such a transplant won't cure you because amyloid deposits will likely collect in the new organ as well, a transplant could prolong your life. Answered by Blondell Kriegel 1 year ago.


Has anyone received treatment for Hepato Cellular Carcinoma (Liver Cancer) that has spread to the lungs?
Has anyone been on Thalomid or Nexavar? Any suggestion for an "alternatives therapy" physician in the NY/NJ/CT area? Asked by Mark Cata 1 year ago.

There are no alternative therapies that are effective for this stage IV malignancy. The treatment you have listed may buy time - but not a cure. My parents live in NJ. I am from Pennsylvania - now live in North Carolina. Cancer specialist doctor for twenty years. There is no proven effective alternative therapy anywhere for this situation. Many people waste money and hope on unproven ineffective treatments. The key is to maximize the quality of the time that may be left. Answered by Soledad Baltrip 1 year ago.


Can multiple myeloma be treated and cured?
Asked by Rosina Scotten 1 year ago.

Standard treatment options include: Bortezomib (Velcade). Bortezomib was the first approved drug in a new class of medications called proteasome inhibitors. It is administered intravenously. It causes cancer cells to die by blocking the action of proteasomes. It is approved for people with newly diagnosed and previously treated myeloma. Thalidomide (Thalomid). Thalidomide, a drug originally used as a sedative and to treat morning sickness during pregnancy in the 1950s, was removed from the market after it was found to cause severe birth defects. However, the drug received approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) again in 1998, first as a treatment for skin lesions caused by leprosy. Today thalidomide is FDA approved for the treatment of newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. This drug is given orally. Lenalidomide (Revlimid). Lenalidomide is chemically similar to thalidomide, but because it appears to be more potent and cause fewer side effects, it is currently used more often than thalidomide. Lenalidomide is given orally. It is approved for people with previously treated myeloma, but is also often used in people with newly diagnosed disease. Chemotherapy. Chemotherapy involves using medicines — taken orally as a pill or given through an intravenous (IV) injection — to kill myeloma cells. Chemotherapy is often given in cycles over a period of months, followed by a rest period. Often chemotherapy is discontinued during what is called a plateau phase or remission, during which your M protein level remains stable. You may need chemotherapy again if your M protein level begins to rise. Common chemotherapy drugs used to treat myeloma are melphalan (Alkeran), cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan), vincristine, doxorubicin (Adriamycin) and liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil). Corticosteroids. Corticosteroids, such as prednisone and dexamethasone, have been used for decades to treat multiple myeloma. They are typically given in pill form. Stem cell transplantation. This treatment involves using high-dose chemotherapy — usually high doses of melphalan — along with transfusion of previously collected immature blood cells (stem cells) to replace diseased or damaged marrow. The stem cells can come from you or from a donor, and they may be from either blood or bone marrow. Radiation therapy. This treatment uses high-energy penetrating waves to damage myeloma cells and stop their growth. Radiation therapy may be used to quickly shrink myeloma cells in a specific area — for instance, when a collection of abnormal plasma cells form a tumor (plasmacytoma) that's causing pain or destroying a bone. ***Source Mayo Clinic Answered by Buster Theuret 1 year ago.

It can be treated but not cured. Answered by Audry Itani 1 year ago.


What can be done to help heal prurigo nodularis?
Prurigo Nodularis is a non-contagious skin disorder and very painful. Asked by Raeann Pestka 1 year ago.

Drug Category: Immunologic agents -- These agents have immunomodulatory effects. Drug Name Thalidomide (Thalomid) -- Immunomodulatory agent that may suppress excessive production of TNF-alpha and may down-regulate selected cell surface adhesion molecules involved in leukocyte migration. If <50 kg (110 lb), start at low end of dose regimen. Adult Dose 100-300 mg/d with water, preferably hs and at least 1 h pc; may be combined with narrowband UV-B (TL-01) irradiation Pediatric Dose Not established Contraindications Documented hypersensitivity; pregnancy Interactions May increase sedation of alcohol, barbiturates, chlorpromazine, and reserpine; because of teratogenic effects, women must use 2 additional methods of contraception or abstain from intercourse Pregnancy X - Contraindicated in pregnancy Precautions Perform pregnancy test within 24-h period prior to initiating therapy (weekly during the first mo, followed by monthly tests in women with regular menstrual cycles or q2wk in women with irregular menstrual cycles); bradycardia may occur; use protective measures (eg, sunscreens, protective clothing) against exposure to sunlight or UV light (eg, tanning beds) Answered by Retta Coombe 1 year ago.

What a remarkably interesting question! If you take those who came before you to mean your ancestors, then I don't think so. They have their own Karma and only they can fulfill it. But if you take 'those who came before you' to mean your own previous incarnations, then I would certainly say yes. We can be experiencing now the consequences of problems layed down in past lives. By willingly paying off such Karmic debt we clear the whole Karmic stream, which implies that we heal ourselves both now and then. Does that sound right d'you think? Answered by Jonathan Acero 1 year ago.

Is Prurigo Nodularis Contagious Answered by Violeta Boyden 1 year ago.

Try Noni by Morinda Answered by Darryl Coreen 1 year ago.


Average cost of 1 chemo treatment?
I have multi. myealoma cancer am advised to take chemo therapy? Asked by Iraida Deacon 1 year ago.

If you don't have insurance, chemo is extremely expensive. There are organizations out there that can help you pay the bills, and most hospitals have financial assistance for people who qualify, but the drugs are expensive. I have liposarcoma, so my chemo drugs are probably going to be different than yours, but my drugs alone, not counting the cost of the hospital stay, were $27,000/month. Twenty Seven Thousand Dollars. And no, that is not a typo. Fortunately, I have insurance. If you don't, you won't be able to afford it unless you are wealthy or you get help. I hate to tell you that, but it is what it is. If you don't have insurance, you really need to speak with your hospital and oncologist about financial assistance programs. Answered by Herlinda Marchese 1 year ago.


Is any of these medications a type of viagra?
i have cigna insurance.my insurance might cover part or all of the cost for viagra pills.under miscellanious,in the cigna website,it has these names listed,is any of these other medications a type of viagra(other than viagra)is it the ones with(pa) on the side of the... Asked by Scotty Kamm 1 year ago.

i have cigna insurance.my insurance might cover part or all of the cost for viagra pills.under miscellanious,in the cigna website,it has these names listed,is any of these other medications a type of viagra(other than viagra)is it the ones with(pa) on the side of the name? MISCELLANEOUS: allopurinol amylase/lipase/protease azathioprine balsalazide cabergoline (QL) calcitriol desmopressin folic acid leucovorin methotrexate mycophenolate naltrexone (QL) tizanidine zaleplon Ambien CR Asacol Asacol HD Canasa Cellcept Colazal Dipentum Epipen (QL) Epipen Jr. (QL) Fosrenol Lialda Megace ES Pentasa Prefera-OB Pulmozyme (PA) Renvela Revatio (PA) Spiriva Synarel (PA, QL) Thalomid Trexall Tussionex Viagra (PA) Zemplar Adrenaclick Ambien Apriso Arava (PA) Coartem (QL) Edluar (ST) Lariam (PA, QL) Malarone (PA) Nimotop Nuvigil Orap Phoslo Priftin Provigil Sonata Sucraid Answered by Troy Gehri 1 year ago.

No. Viagra is the only one. I'm not sure what the PA means, but it is probably the only ED oral medication covered. You know there are several oral ED treatments and my guess is that Viagra is the preferred one, meaning it will have the lowest co-pay and if the Dr. writes for another med, they will substitute Viagra for it. Call the insurance co to make sure. They will typically only allow 6-8 tablets a month. Answered by Toni Heskett 1 year ago.

There are possible choices to this drug however they do not have the identical dramatic outcome. Your pal demands to don't forget why there's a drawback with ED. The drug is not a treatment, it is a banded. When the blood waft is blocked or bogged down it'll final result the role of the frame to get an erection. Advise your pal to don't forget the reason of the drawback first. This would possibly contain a difference in nutrition, cleaning and dietary supplements. Also your pal is also taking an excessive amount of of the drug. Answered by Love Danko 1 year ago.

None of the rest of them are (other than Viagra). These are probably the medications that are on the formulary (allowed list) for your insurance. Answered by Hyman Yaffe 1 year ago.


My sister was diagnosed with multiple myeloma IdG.?
My sister was diagnosed with multiple myeloma IdG they said its in 99% of her bones. She starts chemo (velcade) monday. what can she expect and what about the other meds. she needs.dexamethasone and Thalidomide and are very expensive she has no insurance any suggestions is greatly appreciated. Asked by Regina Cirino 1 year ago.

She should apply for emergency Medicaid to help with the costs. This is from Mayo Clinic literature: Standard treatments for myeloma Though there's no cure for multiple myeloma, with good treatment results you can usually return to near-normal activity. The appropriate multiple myeloma treatment depends on your needs, medical status and general health. You may also wish to consider approved clinical trials as an option. Standard treatment options include: Chemotherapy. Chemotherapy involves using medicines — taken orally as a pill or given through an intravenous (IV) injection — to kill myeloma cells. Chemotherapy is often given in cycles over a period of months, followed by a rest period. Often chemotherapy is discontinued during what is called a plateau phase or remission, during which your M protein level remains stable. You may need chemotherapy again if your M protein level begins to rise. Common chemotherapy drugs used to treat myeloma are melphalan (Alkeran), cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan), vincristine (Oncovin), doxorubicin (Adriamycin) and liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil). Corticosteroids. Corticosteroids such as prednisone and dexamethasone (Decadron) have been used for decades to treat multiple myeloma. They are typically given as pills. Some research suggests that high doses of steroids may not be needed, and that lower doses may be safer and more effective. Stem cell transplantation. This treatment involves using high-dose chemotherapy — usually high doses of melphalan — along with transfusion of previously collected immature blood cells (stem cells) to replace diseased or damaged marrow. The stem cells can come from you or from a donor, and they may be from either blood or bone marrow. Thalidomide (Thalomid). Thalidomide, a drug originally used as a sedative and to treat morning sickness in the 1950s, was removed from the market after it was found to cause severe birth defects. However, the drug received approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) again in 1998, first as a treatment for skin lesions caused by leprosy. Thalidomide is currently FDA-approved in conjunction with the corticosteroid called dexamethasone for the treatment of newly diagnosed cases of multiple myeloma. This drug is given orally. Bortezomib (Velcade). Velcade was the first approved drug in a new class of medications called proteasome inhibitors. It is administered intravenously. It works by blocking the action of proteasomes, which causes cancer cells to die. One study showed that bortezomib had more than twice the response rate of a commonly used drug, dexamethasone. Bortezomib is approved by the FDA for use in a treatment for people with multiple myeloma who have received at least one prior therapy. Lenalidomide (Revlimid). Lenalidomide is chemically similar to thalidomide, but appears to be more potent and cause fewer side effects. It is given orally. Lenalidomide is FDA-approved for use in combination with dexamethasone as a treatment for people who have received at least one prior therapy for multiple myeloma. Radiation therapy. This treatment uses high-energy penetrating waves to damage myeloma cells and stop their growth. Radiation therapy may be used to target myeloma cells in a specific area — for instance, to more quickly shrink a tumor that's causing pain or destroying a bone. Initial therapy for myeloma The initial chemotherapy used to treat multiple myeloma depends on whether you're considered a candidate for stem cell transplantation. Factors such as the risk of your disease progressing, your age and your general health play a part in determining whether stem cell transplantation may be right for you. If you're considered a candidate for stem cell transplantation: Your initial therapy will likely exclude melphalan because this drug can have a toxic effect on stem cells, making it impossible to collect enough of them. You may begin treatment with the most common initial myeloma therapy in the United States, thalidomide plus dexamethasone. Or your doctor may instead recommend a newer regimen, lenalidomide plus low-dose dexamethasone. Your stem cells will likely be collected after you've undergone three to four months of treatment with these initial agents. Your doctor may recommend undergoing the stem cell transplant soon after your cells are collected or delaying the transplant until after a relapse, if it occurs. Your age and your personal preference are important factors that will help your doctor make his or her recommendation. If you're not considered a candidate for stem cell transplantation: Your initial therapy is likely to be a combination of melphalan, prednisone and thalidomide (MPT). If the side effects are intolerable, melphalan plus prednisone is another option (MP). This type of therapy is typically given for about 12 to 18 months. Treatments for relapsed or treatment-resistant multiple myeloma Most people who are treated for multiple myeloma eventually experience a relapse of the disease. And in some cases, none of the currently available, first-line therapies slow the cancer cells from multiplying. If you experience a relapse of multiple myeloma, your doctor may recommend repeating another course of the treatment that initially helped you. Another option is trying one or more of the other treatments typically used as first-line therapy, either alone or in combination. Research on a number of promising new treatment options is ongoing, and these drugs offer important options for those with multiple myeloma. Talk to your doctor about what clinical trials may be available to you. Treating complications Because multiple myeloma can cause a number of complications, you may also need treatment for those specific conditions. For example: Back pain. Taking pain medication or wearing a back brace can help relieve the back pain you might experience with multiple myeloma. Kidney complications. People with severe kidney damage may need dialysis. Infections. Antibiotics may be necessary to help treat infections or to help reduce your risk of them. Bone loss. You may take medications called bisphosphonates, such as pamidronate (Aredia) or zoledronic acid (Zometa), which bind to the surface of your bones and help prevent bone loss. Treatment with these drugs is associated with the risk of harm to the jawbone. If you're taking these medications, don't have dental procedures done without consulting your doctor first. Anemia. If you have persistent anemia, your doctor may prescribe erythropoietin injections. Erythropoietin is a naturally occurring hormone made in the kidneys that stimulates the production of red blood cells. Research suggests that the use of erythropoietin may increase the risk of blood clots in some people with myeloma. Answered by Carolyn Hendeson 1 year ago.

I know Thalidomide has a patient assistance program to help with the cost. Her doctor can give her all the information. But you can check out this website also. Thalomid.com. I don't think dex is that expensive. Answered by Toshiko Ruetz 1 year ago.


My Grandmother has been diagnosed with Amyloidosis, what does this mean for her and my family?
After going to hospital numerous times due to kidney failure, heart problems and inflamed stomachs. Doctors have said that my Nan has Amyloidosis. I've become a bit upset as from what I have read she may not have long to live.What also worries me from reading on the Internet is that it might be genetic, and... Asked by Vickie Musni 1 year ago.

After going to hospital numerous times due to kidney failure, heart problems and inflamed stomachs. Doctors have said that my Nan has Amyloidosis. I've become a bit upset as from what I have read she may not have long to live. What also worries me from reading on the Internet is that it might be genetic, and I fear it may be passed on to me. Answered by Ramonita Branum 1 year ago.

*Some cases of amyloidosis are inherited. Primary amyloidosis. This most common form of amyloidosis can affect many areas, including your heart, kidneys, liver, spleen, nerves, intestines, skin, tongue and blood vessels. Primary amyloidosis isn't associated with other diseases — except for multiple myeloma, a form of bone marrow cancer, in a minority of cases. The exact cause of primary amyloidosis is unknown, but doctors do know that the disease begins in your bone marrow. In addition to producing red and white blood cells and platelets, your bone marrow makes antibodies — proteins that protect you against infection and disease. After antibodies serve their function, your body breaks them down and recycles them. Amyloidosis occurs when cells in the bone marrow produce antibodies that can't be broken down. These antibodies then build up in your bloodstream. Ultimately, they leave your bloodstream and can deposit in your tissues as amyloid, interfering with normal function. * Secondary amyloidosis. This form occurs in association with chronic infectious or inflammatory diseases, such as tuberculosis, rheumatoid arthritis or osteomyelitis, a bone infection. It primarily affects your kidneys, spleen, liver and lymph nodes, though other organs may be involved. Treatment of the underlying disease may help stop progression of this form of amyloidosis. * Hereditary (familial) amyloidosis. As the name implies, this form of amyloidosis is inherited. This type often affects the liver, nerves, heart and kidneys. * Medicines. Therapies include melphalan (Alkeran), a chemotherapy agent also used to treat certain types of cancer, and dexamethasone, a corticosteroid used for its anti-inflammatory effects. Researchers are investigating other types of chemotherapy regimens for amyloidosis. Several medications that are used in the treatment of multiple myeloma are being tested to see if they're effective in treating amyloidosis. These include bortezomib (Velcade), thalidomide (Thalomid), and a thalidomide derivative called lenalidomide (Revlimid). These drugs may be used alone or in combination with dexamethasone. Ask your doctor what clinical trials may be available to you. Anyone undergoing chemotherapy for amyloidosis may experience side effects similar to those of chemotherapy for cancer treatment, such as nausea, vomiting, hair loss and extreme fatigue. * Peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. Peripheral blood stem cell transplantation involves using high-dose chemotherapy and transfusion of previously collected immature blood cells (stem cells) to replace diseased or damaged marrow. These cells may be your own (autologous transplant) or from a donor (allogeneic transplant). Autologous transplant is the preferred approach. Not everyone is a candidate for this aggressive treatment, and it has serious risks, including death. In some research, results from stem cell transplants have been promising, although more recent research suggests that overall survival rates are better for those given chemotherapy compared with stem cell transplantation. Discuss the potential risks and benefits of this treatment with your doctor. Treating secondary amyloidosis If you have secondary amyloidosis, the primary goal of therapy is to treat the underlying condition — for example, taking an anti-inflammatory medication for rheumatoid arthritis. Treating hereditary amyloidosis For hereditary amyloidosis, one possible therapy may be liver transplantation because the protein that causes this form of amyloidosis is made in the liver. Treating complications Because amyloidosis can cause a number of complications, you may also need treatment for those specific conditions, based on your signs and symptoms and affected organs. For example, if amyloidosis affects your heart or kidneys, you may be asked to follow a low-salt diet to control fluid retention. Or your doctor may prescribe diuretics and other medications. In some cases, your doctor might prescribe medication for pain control. If any of your organs are severely damaged from amyloid deposits, you may need an organ transplant. Although such a transplant won't cure you because amyloid deposits will likely collect in the new organ as well, a transplant could prolong your life. Answered by Marvella Auel 1 year ago.


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