Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 019574/001.

Names and composition

"THALITONE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of CHLORTHALIDONE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019574/001 THALITONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 15MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019574/002 THALITONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
088051/001 THALITONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
012283/003 HYGROTON CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
012283/004 HYGROTON CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019574/001 THALITONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 15MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019574/002 THALITONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
086831/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
086831/002 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087029/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087050/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087082/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087100/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087118/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087176/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087247/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087292/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087293/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087296/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087311/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087312/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087364/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087380/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087381/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087384/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087450/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087451/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087473/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087515/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087516/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087521/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087555/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087689/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087698/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087699/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087706/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087947/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
088012/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
088051/001 THALITONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
088073/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
088139/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
088140/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
088164/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
088651/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
088902/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
088903/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
089051/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
089052/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
089285/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
089286/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
089286/002 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
089591/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
089738/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
089739/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
206904/001 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
206904/002 CHLORTHALIDONE CHLORTHALIDONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG

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Answered questions

Is there any over the counter medicine for high blood pressure?
Asked by Jessica Delatrinidad 1 year ago.

There are 8 types of over-the-counter medicine, available by a doctor's prescription, to treat high blood pressure: Diuretics (water pills) helps your body to get rid of extra sodium (salt) and water so your blood vessels don't have to hold too much fluid. Some examples of diuretics include chlorthalidone (brand name: Thalitone), furosemide (brand name: Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (brand name: Esidrix) and indapamide (brand name: Lozol). Your doctor may also prescribe a combination of diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide combined with triamterene (brand names: Dyazide, Maxzide). Beta-blockers makes the heart beat slower so that blood passes through your blood vessels with less force. Some examples of beta-blockers include acebutolol (brand name: Sectral), atenolol (brand name: Tenormin), carvedilol (brand name: Coreg), metoprolol (brand names: Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (brand name: Corgard), propranolol (brand name: Inderal) and timolol (brand name: Blocadren). Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also called ACE inhibitors) keeps your body from making angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ACE inhibitors include benazepril (brand name: Lotensin), enalapril (brand name: Vasotec), lisinopril (brand names: Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (brand name: Accupril), ramipril (brand name: Altace) and trandolapril (brand name: Mavik). Angiotensin II receptor blockers (also called ARBs) protects your blood vessels from the effects of angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ARBs include candesartan (brand name: Atacand), irbesartan (brand name: Avapro), losartan (brand name: Cozaar), olmesartan (brand name: Benicar), telmisartan (brand name: Micardis) and valsartan (brand name: Diovan). Calcium channel blockers (also called CCBs) helps to keep your blood vessels from constricting (becoming narrow) by blocking calcium from entering your cells. Some examples of CCBs include amlodipine (brand name: Norvasc), diltiazem (brand names: Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, Tiazac), felodipine (brand name: Plendil), nicardipine (brand name: Cardene), nifedipine (brand names: Adalat, Procardia) and verapamil (some brand names: Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan). Alpha-blockers helps to relax your blood vessels by reducing nerve impulses. This allows your blood to pass through more easily. Some examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin (brand name: Cardura), prazosin (brand name: Minipress) and terazosin (brand name: Hytrin). Centrally acting drugs may affect your brain and central nervous system to reduce the nerve impulses that can cause your blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of centrally acting drugs include clonidine (brand name: Catapres) and methyldopa. Direct vasodilators relaxes the muscles in the blood vessel walls. This causes the blood vessels to widen. Some examples of vasodilators include hydralazine (brand name: Apresoline) and minoxidil (brand name: Loniten). Good Luck ! Answered by Jennifer Reh 1 year ago.

Drop Blood Pressure Below 120/80 Answered by Melaine Wesby 1 year ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Setsuko Eliezrie 1 year ago.

Hey I'm here for the first time. I found this question and I find the answers really helpful. I am hoping to give something back and assist others too. Answered by Sally Dillen 1 year ago.

Not for that particular purpose. Some drugs may lower blood pressure as a side effect. To control high blood pressure without drugs, one can exercise, watch your weight, and avoid salty foods. DK Answered by Jesus Bothwell 1 year ago.

I have heard that garlic can lower blood pressure, which is why you should tell your Dr. if you are taking any herbal, or natural remedies. They may either assist or combat the effects of the medicine they prescribe for you. I hear that you should not drink grapefruit juice if you are taking hypertension medicine as well. Answered by Adrian Strysko 1 year ago.

No; certainly nothing safe and effective. High blood pressure is serious business, to be managed by real prescription medications under a doctor's care. Answered by Sharee Liddy 1 year ago.

"Over the Counter" means without doctor s prescription, if anybody didn t know. Answered by Verlene Bockhorn 1 year ago.


Hypertension problem?
I'm 23 years old anyways. Asked by Paola Ottaway 1 year ago.

Well it's been like this, I have been treated for hypertension for like 4-5 months with sotalol 40mg morning, diuretic in mid day, and 40mg at night sotalol (2 x half tablet). It helped me to take off some symtpoms, I had chest pain, was feeling faint, and etc. My blood pressure even with medicine never got down under 140, mostly 150 and so. But recently I woke up one morning and my heart was pounding so much, and i measured 190/110. And later again i started to feel faint somehow, and out of streght, this all preceded 3-4 day headache, which i still have to some bit. Now what I'm wondering. Even I drink medicine. Why doesn't my blood pressure go to normal count? I will tomorrow settle appointment with my cardilogist. Should my blood pressure be under 140/95, considering i had surgery (tetralogiae fallot) and have mild regurgitation which isn't making problem. Could it be that I'm not taking enough medicine for my condition? Any experiences or answers are welcome! Thanks Answered by Sibyl Trager 1 year ago.

Hypertension can be classified either essential (primary) or secondary. Essential hypertension indicates that no specific medical cause can be found to explain a patient's condition. Secondary hypertension indicates that the high blood pressure is a result of (i.e., secondary to) another condition, such as kidney disease or tumours (pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma). Persistent hypertension is one of the risk factors for strokes, heart attacks, heart failure and arterial aneurysm, and is a leading cause of chronic renal failure. In terms of medications for this medical condition; there are several types: - Diuretics (water pills) helps your body to get rid of extra sodium (salt) and water so your blood vessels don't have to hold too much fluid. Some examples of diuretics include chlorthalidone (brand name: Thalitone), furosemide (brand name: Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (brand name: Esidrix) and indapamide (brand name: Lozol). Your doctor may also prescribe a combination of diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide combined with triamterene (brand names: Dyazide, Maxzide). - Beta-blockers makes the heart beat slower so that blood passes through your blood vessels with less force. Some examples of beta-blockers include acebutolol (brand name: Sectral), atenolol (brand name: Tenormin), carvedilol (brand name: Coreg), metoprolol (brand names: Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (brand name: Corgard), propranolol (brand name: Inderal) and timolol (brand name: Blocadren). - Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also called ACE inhibitors) keeps your body from making angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ACE inhibitors include benazepril (brand name: Lotensin), enalapril (brand name: Vasotec), lisinopril (brand names: Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (brand name: Accupril), ramipril (brand name: Altace) and trandolapril (brand name: Mavik). - Angiotensin II receptor blockers (also called ARBs) protects your blood vessels from the effects of angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ARBs include candesartan (brand name: Atacand), irbesartan (brand name: Avapro), losartan (brand name: Cozaar), olmesartan (brand name: Benicar), telmisartan (brand name: Micardis) and valsartan (brand name: Diovan). - Calcium channel blockers (also called CCBs) helps to keep your blood vessels from constricting (becoming narrow) by blocking calcium from entering your cells. Some examples of CCBs include amlodipine (brand name: Norvasc), diltiazem (brand names: Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, Tiazac), felodipine (brand name: Plendil), nicardipine (brand name: Cardene), nifedipine (brand names: Adalat, Procardia) and verapamil (some brand names: Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan). - Alpha-blockers helps to relax your blood vessels by reducing nerve impulses. This allows your blood to pass through more easily. Some examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin (brand name: Cardura), prazosin (brand name: Minipress) and terazosin (brand name: Hytrin). - Centrally acting drugs may affect your brain and central nervous system to reduce the nerve impulses that can cause your blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of centrally acting drugs include clonidine (brand name: Catapres) and methyldopa. - Direct vasodilators relaxes the muscles in the blood vessel walls. This causes the blood vessels to widen. Some examples of vasodilators include hydralazine (brand name: Apresoline) and minoxidil (brand name: Loniten). I will personally suggest that You get an Echocardiogram scan done. You must also get your cholesterol, fat and sugar levels of your body tested. A good result will reflect the following normal results: - The Total Cholesterol level should remain below 200 mg/dL all the time; HDL's typical normal level is considered to be at 40 mg/dL and above. However, the higher your HDL level be the better it is for your health. Some natural ways to maintain and raise your HDL level are by aerobic exercising and excluding trans fatty acids from your diet; The normal ratio of Total Cholesterol to HDL is considered at 5:1 or below; a desirable LDL-cholesterol level must always be below 140 mg/dL to be considered normal. - Triglycerides level is also important and must remain below 150 mg/dL. - Glucose level. Normal is about 90mg/100ml, or 5mM/L. Overall, You should be getting regular check-ups, following a healthy diet, taking your medications as prescript, rest and other instructions from your specialist/s and general physician. Good Health To You ! Answered by Charise Govoni 1 year ago.

sorry but you should never just cease your medication like this. you should go back to your health professional and see where you go from here. depending on your age and many other factors of your life you need to keep your BP under control and often you it can take some time to find the right medication to keep you in a stable condition. never never never muck about with hypertension. Answered by Madaline Aldrete 1 year ago.

Eat less animal fat & lose weight. Answered by Wilda Speros 1 year ago.


Bipolar and meds combo?
What other meds combos are apart from old stand by lithium? Asked by Josue Hauptmann 1 year ago.

you don't need combos for bipolar disorder because if you have one...it doesn't work, the dosage can be upped and it'll end up working. Lithium is pretty dangerous considering most medications can affect you and make the lithium not work... * acetazolamide (Diamox); * aminophylline (Truphylline) or theophylline (Elixophyllin, Respbid, Theo-Bid, Theo-Dur, Uniphyl); * sodium bicarbonate (Alka-Seltzer, Bicitra, Polycitra, or baking soda home remedy antacid); * carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); * fluoxetine (Prozac); * metronidazole (Flagyl); * potassium iodide thyroid medication (Pima); * an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik); * a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Tiazac, Cartia, Cardizem) or verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan); * a diuretic (water pill) such as amiloride (Midamor, Moduretic), bumetanide (Bumex), chlorthalidone (Hygroton, Thalitone), ethacrynic acid (Edecrin), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Hyzaar, Vasoretic,Zestoretic), indapamide (Lozol), metolazone (Mykrox, Zaroxolyn), spironolactone (Aldactazide, Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium, Maxzide, Dyazide), torsemide (Demadex), and others; * medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, such as haloperidol (Haldol), aripiprazole (Abilify), chlorpromazine (Thorazine), clozapine (Clozaril, Fazaclo), olanzapine (Zyprexa), quetiapine (Seroquel), pimozide (Orap), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon); or * celecoxib (Celebrex) or an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), diflunisal (Dolobid), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), ketorolac (Toradol), mefenamic acid (Ponstel), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. that's all that you couldn't take with Lithium. plus, it's recommended to have your blood drawn every so often while on it. and it causes weight gain....yeah, not good. BUT. Lamictal is probably the newest drug on the market for BP. i take it and have been for 2 years now since i was diagnosed with type II bipolar disorder....it's a 5 week process, but it's worth the wait. i think it's a miracle drug and doesn't cause all the side effects other drugs have. in rare cases a body rash can happen, to some people. but even with that, it's not even life threatening. i've only had to up my dosage from 100mg [stayed at that for a year and a half] to 150mg. and now...after my struggles with BP for all of high school...i'm a senior and happy 85% of the time. to the point where people wouldn't even figure somethings wrong with me. so my advice...talk to your doc about switching Lamictal. it doesn't cause weight gain. in my experience, along with my adderall i lost the 30 pounds i gained when i was depressed. back at 160 at 6'2'. research the drug...really it's probably the best. i asked my psych why he didn't put me on lithium, and told me that even though lithium is the most popular drug, he's found in that nearly 2/3 of his bipolar patients of his patients [who was put on that at first or other mood stabilizers didn't work] since the drug came out has worked very well for them. Answered by Reina Brittian 1 year ago.

Lithium, is by far the best for True Bipolar. You must get your blood tests regular to check your lithium levels, but it is known to work the best. My son took this for many years and he did the best on it. He now refuses and his life is a mess because of it. Answered by Whitley Bubier 1 year ago.

For mood stabilizers, there is Depakote, Topamax, Lamitcal, Abilify... There are more, can't think of them all. Anti-depressants, Prozac, Zoloft, Effexor, Wellbutrin, Cymbalta, Lexapro, etc etc. There are also mixes like Symbyax, which is Prozac with and antipsychotic. There are a whole bunch of things... Answered by Angel Werling 1 year ago.

There are more choice's in bi-polar meds now, like, depecote, seroquel, limictal, closeril and a host of others, only your health care provider can accurately know which combinations are safe and effective for you, the best to you, Mercee. Answered by Olevia Twait 1 year ago.

Oh damn, please ask a doctor or pharmacist on this one. Do not trust Yahoo Answers, or anyone online for that matter, on this question. It's a really bad idea to mix similar medications, usually. Answered by Phung Gwenn 1 year ago.

i take a whole bevy of medication- lithium, lamictal, paxil and wellbutrin........some sleepers if needed.....usually trazadone....... Answered by Leilani Digrazia 1 year ago.


How do you raise your blood Sugar level?
What medicines bring your blood sugar levels up? Asked by Sirena Kishbaugh 1 year ago.

Blood sugar also known as Glucose , the only safe "medicine" is sweetened water , just a few days ago a patient developed cardiac arrest while being given a Glucose increasing medication during an Glucose evaluation test anyway here is a list of medicines that can cause HYPERGLYCEMIA (High Blood Sugar) Abacavir (Ziagen®) Abacavir + lamivudine, zidovudine (Trizivir®) Acetazolamide (Diamox®) Acitretin (Soriatane®) Albuterol (Ventolin®, Proventil®) Albuterol + ipratropium (Combivent®) Ammonium chloride Amphotericin B (Amphocin®, Fungizone®) Amphotericin B lipid formulations IV (Abelcet®) Amprenavir (Agenerase®) Anidulafungin (Eraxis®) Aripiprazole (Abilify®) Arsenic trioxide (Trisenox®) Asparaginase (Elspar®) Atazanavir (Reyataz ®) Atenolol + chlorthalidone (Tenoretic®) Atorvastatin (Lipitor®) Atovaquone (Mepron®) Baclofen (Lioresal®) Benazepril + hydrochlorothiazide (Lotension®) Betamethasone topical (Alphatrex®, Betatrex®, Beta-Val®, Diprolene®, Diprolene® AF, Diprolene® Lotion, Luxiq®, Maxivate®) Betamethasone +clotrimazole (Lotrisone® topical) Betaxolol Betoptic® eyedrops, (Kerlone® oral) Bexarotene (Targretin®) Bicalutamide (Casodex®) Bisoprolol + hydrochlorothiazide (Ziac®) Bumetanide (Bumex®) Caffeine (Caffeine in moderation may actually be beneficial in diabetes but in large amounts can raise blood sugar.) Candesartan + hydrochlorothiazide (Atacand HCT®) Captopril + hydrochlorothiazide (Capozide®) Carteolol (Cartrol® oral, Occupress® eyedrops) Carvedilol (Coreg®) Chlorothiazide (Diuril®) Chlorthalidone (Chlorthalidone Tablets®, Clorpres®, Tenoretic®, Thalitone®) Choline salicylate (Numerous tradenames of aspirin formulations: check label.) Choline salicylate + magnesium salicylate (CMT®, Tricosal®, Trilisate®) Clobetasol (Clobevate®, Cormax®, Cormax® Scalp Application, Embeline® E, Olux®, Temovate®, Temovate® E, Temovate® Scalp Application) Clozapine (Clozaril®, FazaClo®) Conjugated estrogens (Estrace®, Estring®, Femring®, Premarin®, Vagifem®, Cenestin®, Enjuvia®, Estrace®, Femtrace®, Gynodiol®, Menest®, Ogen®) Conjugated estrogens + medroxyprogesterone (Premphase®, Prempro®) Corticosteroids (Numerous tradenames: check label.) Corticotropin Cortisone (Numerous tradenames: check label.) Cyclosporine (Sandimmune®, Neoral®, Gengraf®) Daclizumab (Zenapax®) Decitabine (Dacogen®) Desonide (DesOwen®, Tridesilon®) Desoximetasone (Topicort®) DO NOT TAKE ANY OF THESE MEDICATIONS WITHOUT AN PRESCRIPTION Answered by Nicholle Wiatrak 1 year ago.

Consume pure carbohydrates or sugar, whether it is fruit juice, honey, sucrose, etc. Blood suger level is a transient condition and is directly impacted on what you eat and how quickly your body metabolizes it. Answered by Loida Poyneer 1 year ago.

Anything you eat that has protein, carbs, or fats will raise it. Answered by Michal Kupchinsky 1 year ago.


Is there any over the counter medicine for high blood pressure?
Asked by Marco Dragich 1 year ago.

There are 8 types of over-the-counter medicine, available by a doctor's prescription, to treat high blood pressure: Diuretics (water pills) helps your body to get rid of extra sodium (salt) and water so your blood vessels don't have to hold too much fluid. Some examples of diuretics include chlorthalidone (brand name: Thalitone), furosemide (brand name: Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (brand name: Esidrix) and indapamide (brand name: Lozol). Your doctor may also prescribe a combination of diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide combined with triamterene (brand names: Dyazide, Maxzide). Beta-blockers makes the heart beat slower so that blood passes through your blood vessels with less force. Some examples of beta-blockers include acebutolol (brand name: Sectral), atenolol (brand name: Tenormin), carvedilol (brand name: Coreg), metoprolol (brand names: Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (brand name: Corgard), propranolol (brand name: Inderal) and timolol (brand name: Blocadren). Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also called ACE inhibitors) keeps your body from making angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ACE inhibitors include benazepril (brand name: Lotensin), enalapril (brand name: Vasotec), lisinopril (brand names: Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (brand name: Accupril), ramipril (brand name: Altace) and trandolapril (brand name: Mavik). Angiotensin II receptor blockers (also called ARBs) protects your blood vessels from the effects of angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ARBs include candesartan (brand name: Atacand), irbesartan (brand name: Avapro), losartan (brand name: Cozaar), olmesartan (brand name: Benicar), telmisartan (brand name: Micardis) and valsartan (brand name: Diovan). Calcium channel blockers (also called CCBs) helps to keep your blood vessels from constricting (becoming narrow) by blocking calcium from entering your cells. Some examples of CCBs include amlodipine (brand name: Norvasc), diltiazem (brand names: Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, Tiazac), felodipine (brand name: Plendil), nicardipine (brand name: Cardene), nifedipine (brand names: Adalat, Procardia) and verapamil (some brand names: Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan). Alpha-blockers helps to relax your blood vessels by reducing nerve impulses. This allows your blood to pass through more easily. Some examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin (brand name: Cardura), prazosin (brand name: Minipress) and terazosin (brand name: Hytrin). Centrally acting drugs may affect your brain and central nervous system to reduce the nerve impulses that can cause your blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of centrally acting drugs include clonidine (brand name: Catapres) and methyldopa. Direct vasodilators relaxes the muscles in the blood vessel walls. This causes the blood vessels to widen. Some examples of vasodilators include hydralazine (brand name: Apresoline) and minoxidil (brand name: Loniten). Good Luck ! Answered by Charlie Vanderheide 1 year ago.

Drop Blood Pressure Below 120/80 Answered by Twila Broch 1 year ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Flor Greenberg 1 year ago.

Hey I'm here for the first time. I found this question and I find the answers really helpful. I am hoping to give something back and assist others too. Answered by Alfreda Furfey 1 year ago.

Not for that particular purpose. Some drugs may lower blood pressure as a side effect. To control high blood pressure without drugs, one can exercise, watch your weight, and avoid salty foods. DK Answered by Layne Rundahl 1 year ago.

I have heard that garlic can lower blood pressure, which is why you should tell your Dr. if you are taking any herbal, or natural remedies. They may either assist or combat the effects of the medicine they prescribe for you. I hear that you should not drink grapefruit juice if you are taking hypertension medicine as well. Answered by Vashti Kooy 1 year ago.

No; certainly nothing safe and effective. High blood pressure is serious business, to be managed by real prescription medications under a doctor's care. Answered by Clorinda Tanaka 1 year ago.

"Over the Counter" means without doctor s prescription, if anybody didn t know. Answered by Monnie Noecker 1 year ago.


Hypertension problem?
I'm 23 years old anyways. Asked by Garfield Huntoon 1 year ago.

Well it's been like this, I have been treated for hypertension for like 4-5 months with sotalol 40mg morning, diuretic in mid day, and 40mg at night sotalol (2 x half tablet). It helped me to take off some symtpoms, I had chest pain, was feeling faint, and etc. My blood pressure even with medicine never got down under 140, mostly 150 and so. But recently I woke up one morning and my heart was pounding so much, and i measured 190/110. And later again i started to feel faint somehow, and out of streght, this all preceded 3-4 day headache, which i still have to some bit. Now what I'm wondering. Even I drink medicine. Why doesn't my blood pressure go to normal count? I will tomorrow settle appointment with my cardilogist. Should my blood pressure be under 140/95, considering i had surgery (tetralogiae fallot) and have mild regurgitation which isn't making problem. Could it be that I'm not taking enough medicine for my condition? Any experiences or answers are welcome! Thanks Answered by Blanca Woodgate 1 year ago.

Hypertension can be classified either essential (primary) or secondary. Essential hypertension indicates that no specific medical cause can be found to explain a patient's condition. Secondary hypertension indicates that the high blood pressure is a result of (i.e., secondary to) another condition, such as kidney disease or tumours (pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma). Persistent hypertension is one of the risk factors for strokes, heart attacks, heart failure and arterial aneurysm, and is a leading cause of chronic renal failure. In terms of medications for this medical condition; there are several types: - Diuretics (water pills) helps your body to get rid of extra sodium (salt) and water so your blood vessels don't have to hold too much fluid. Some examples of diuretics include chlorthalidone (brand name: Thalitone), furosemide (brand name: Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (brand name: Esidrix) and indapamide (brand name: Lozol). Your doctor may also prescribe a combination of diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide combined with triamterene (brand names: Dyazide, Maxzide). - Beta-blockers makes the heart beat slower so that blood passes through your blood vessels with less force. Some examples of beta-blockers include acebutolol (brand name: Sectral), atenolol (brand name: Tenormin), carvedilol (brand name: Coreg), metoprolol (brand names: Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (brand name: Corgard), propranolol (brand name: Inderal) and timolol (brand name: Blocadren). - Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also called ACE inhibitors) keeps your body from making angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ACE inhibitors include benazepril (brand name: Lotensin), enalapril (brand name: Vasotec), lisinopril (brand names: Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (brand name: Accupril), ramipril (brand name: Altace) and trandolapril (brand name: Mavik). - Angiotensin II receptor blockers (also called ARBs) protects your blood vessels from the effects of angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ARBs include candesartan (brand name: Atacand), irbesartan (brand name: Avapro), losartan (brand name: Cozaar), olmesartan (brand name: Benicar), telmisartan (brand name: Micardis) and valsartan (brand name: Diovan). - Calcium channel blockers (also called CCBs) helps to keep your blood vessels from constricting (becoming narrow) by blocking calcium from entering your cells. Some examples of CCBs include amlodipine (brand name: Norvasc), diltiazem (brand names: Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, Tiazac), felodipine (brand name: Plendil), nicardipine (brand name: Cardene), nifedipine (brand names: Adalat, Procardia) and verapamil (some brand names: Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan). - Alpha-blockers helps to relax your blood vessels by reducing nerve impulses. This allows your blood to pass through more easily. Some examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin (brand name: Cardura), prazosin (brand name: Minipress) and terazosin (brand name: Hytrin). - Centrally acting drugs may affect your brain and central nervous system to reduce the nerve impulses that can cause your blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of centrally acting drugs include clonidine (brand name: Catapres) and methyldopa. - Direct vasodilators relaxes the muscles in the blood vessel walls. This causes the blood vessels to widen. Some examples of vasodilators include hydralazine (brand name: Apresoline) and minoxidil (brand name: Loniten). I will personally suggest that You get an Echocardiogram scan done. You must also get your cholesterol, fat and sugar levels of your body tested. A good result will reflect the following normal results: - The Total Cholesterol level should remain below 200 mg/dL all the time; HDL's typical normal level is considered to be at 40 mg/dL and above. However, the higher your HDL level be the better it is for your health. Some natural ways to maintain and raise your HDL level are by aerobic exercising and excluding trans fatty acids from your diet; The normal ratio of Total Cholesterol to HDL is considered at 5:1 or below; a desirable LDL-cholesterol level must always be below 140 mg/dL to be considered normal. - Triglycerides level is also important and must remain below 150 mg/dL. - Glucose level. Normal is about 90mg/100ml, or 5mM/L. Overall, You should be getting regular check-ups, following a healthy diet, taking your medications as prescript, rest and other instructions from your specialist/s and general physician. Good Health To You ! Answered by Zoe Calin 1 year ago.

sorry but you should never just cease your medication like this. you should go back to your health professional and see where you go from here. depending on your age and many other factors of your life you need to keep your BP under control and often you it can take some time to find the right medication to keep you in a stable condition. never never never muck about with hypertension. Answered by Ignacia Bickle 1 year ago.

Eat less animal fat & lose weight. Answered by Clarita Hilger 1 year ago.


Bipolar and meds combo?
What other meds combos are apart from old stand by lithium? Asked by Laronda Levin 1 year ago.

you don't need combos for bipolar disorder because if you have one...it doesn't work, the dosage can be upped and it'll end up working. Lithium is pretty dangerous considering most medications can affect you and make the lithium not work... * acetazolamide (Diamox); * aminophylline (Truphylline) or theophylline (Elixophyllin, Respbid, Theo-Bid, Theo-Dur, Uniphyl); * sodium bicarbonate (Alka-Seltzer, Bicitra, Polycitra, or baking soda home remedy antacid); * carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); * fluoxetine (Prozac); * metronidazole (Flagyl); * potassium iodide thyroid medication (Pima); * an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik); * a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Tiazac, Cartia, Cardizem) or verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan); * a diuretic (water pill) such as amiloride (Midamor, Moduretic), bumetanide (Bumex), chlorthalidone (Hygroton, Thalitone), ethacrynic acid (Edecrin), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Hyzaar, Vasoretic,Zestoretic), indapamide (Lozol), metolazone (Mykrox, Zaroxolyn), spironolactone (Aldactazide, Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium, Maxzide, Dyazide), torsemide (Demadex), and others; * medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, such as haloperidol (Haldol), aripiprazole (Abilify), chlorpromazine (Thorazine), clozapine (Clozaril, Fazaclo), olanzapine (Zyprexa), quetiapine (Seroquel), pimozide (Orap), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon); or * celecoxib (Celebrex) or an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), diflunisal (Dolobid), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), ketorolac (Toradol), mefenamic acid (Ponstel), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. that's all that you couldn't take with Lithium. plus, it's recommended to have your blood drawn every so often while on it. and it causes weight gain....yeah, not good. BUT. Lamictal is probably the newest drug on the market for BP. i take it and have been for 2 years now since i was diagnosed with type II bipolar disorder....it's a 5 week process, but it's worth the wait. i think it's a miracle drug and doesn't cause all the side effects other drugs have. in rare cases a body rash can happen, to some people. but even with that, it's not even life threatening. i've only had to up my dosage from 100mg [stayed at that for a year and a half] to 150mg. and now...after my struggles with BP for all of high school...i'm a senior and happy 85% of the time. to the point where people wouldn't even figure somethings wrong with me. so my advice...talk to your doc about switching Lamictal. it doesn't cause weight gain. in my experience, along with my adderall i lost the 30 pounds i gained when i was depressed. back at 160 at 6'2'. research the drug...really it's probably the best. i asked my psych why he didn't put me on lithium, and told me that even though lithium is the most popular drug, he's found in that nearly 2/3 of his bipolar patients of his patients [who was put on that at first or other mood stabilizers didn't work] since the drug came out has worked very well for them. Answered by Aleta Wilhelmi 1 year ago.

Lithium, is by far the best for True Bipolar. You must get your blood tests regular to check your lithium levels, but it is known to work the best. My son took this for many years and he did the best on it. He now refuses and his life is a mess because of it. Answered by Lorita Urbanek 1 year ago.

For mood stabilizers, there is Depakote, Topamax, Lamitcal, Abilify... There are more, can't think of them all. Anti-depressants, Prozac, Zoloft, Effexor, Wellbutrin, Cymbalta, Lexapro, etc etc. There are also mixes like Symbyax, which is Prozac with and antipsychotic. There are a whole bunch of things... Answered by Hattie Bradfield 1 year ago.

There are more choice's in bi-polar meds now, like, depecote, seroquel, limictal, closeril and a host of others, only your health care provider can accurately know which combinations are safe and effective for you, the best to you, Mercee. Answered by Laverne Schultens 1 year ago.

Oh damn, please ask a doctor or pharmacist on this one. Do not trust Yahoo Answers, or anyone online for that matter, on this question. It's a really bad idea to mix similar medications, usually. Answered by Valrie Iseman 1 year ago.

i take a whole bevy of medication- lithium, lamictal, paxil and wellbutrin........some sleepers if needed.....usually trazadone....... Answered by Albertina Liddie 1 year ago.


How do you raise your blood Sugar level?
What medicines bring your blood sugar levels up? Asked by Maud Askiew 1 year ago.

Blood sugar also known as Glucose , the only safe "medicine" is sweetened water , just a few days ago a patient developed cardiac arrest while being given a Glucose increasing medication during an Glucose evaluation test anyway here is a list of medicines that can cause HYPERGLYCEMIA (High Blood Sugar) Abacavir (Ziagen®) Abacavir + lamivudine, zidovudine (Trizivir®) Acetazolamide (Diamox®) Acitretin (Soriatane®) Albuterol (Ventolin®, Proventil®) Albuterol + ipratropium (Combivent®) Ammonium chloride Amphotericin B (Amphocin®, Fungizone®) Amphotericin B lipid formulations IV (Abelcet®) Amprenavir (Agenerase®) Anidulafungin (Eraxis®) Aripiprazole (Abilify®) Arsenic trioxide (Trisenox®) Asparaginase (Elspar®) Atazanavir (Reyataz ®) Atenolol + chlorthalidone (Tenoretic®) Atorvastatin (Lipitor®) Atovaquone (Mepron®) Baclofen (Lioresal®) Benazepril + hydrochlorothiazide (Lotension®) Betamethasone topical (Alphatrex®, Betatrex®, Beta-Val®, Diprolene®, Diprolene® AF, Diprolene® Lotion, Luxiq®, Maxivate®) Betamethasone +clotrimazole (Lotrisone® topical) Betaxolol Betoptic® eyedrops, (Kerlone® oral) Bexarotene (Targretin®) Bicalutamide (Casodex®) Bisoprolol + hydrochlorothiazide (Ziac®) Bumetanide (Bumex®) Caffeine (Caffeine in moderation may actually be beneficial in diabetes but in large amounts can raise blood sugar.) Candesartan + hydrochlorothiazide (Atacand HCT®) Captopril + hydrochlorothiazide (Capozide®) Carteolol (Cartrol® oral, Occupress® eyedrops) Carvedilol (Coreg®) Chlorothiazide (Diuril®) Chlorthalidone (Chlorthalidone Tablets®, Clorpres®, Tenoretic®, Thalitone®) Choline salicylate (Numerous tradenames of aspirin formulations: check label.) Choline salicylate + magnesium salicylate (CMT®, Tricosal®, Trilisate®) Clobetasol (Clobevate®, Cormax®, Cormax® Scalp Application, Embeline® E, Olux®, Temovate®, Temovate® E, Temovate® Scalp Application) Clozapine (Clozaril®, FazaClo®) Conjugated estrogens (Estrace®, Estring®, Femring®, Premarin®, Vagifem®, Cenestin®, Enjuvia®, Estrace®, Femtrace®, Gynodiol®, Menest®, Ogen®) Conjugated estrogens + medroxyprogesterone (Premphase®, Prempro®) Corticosteroids (Numerous tradenames: check label.) Corticotropin Cortisone (Numerous tradenames: check label.) Cyclosporine (Sandimmune®, Neoral®, Gengraf®) Daclizumab (Zenapax®) Decitabine (Dacogen®) Desonide (DesOwen®, Tridesilon®) Desoximetasone (Topicort®) DO NOT TAKE ANY OF THESE MEDICATIONS WITHOUT AN PRESCRIPTION Answered by Laurine Bobb 1 year ago.

Consume pure carbohydrates or sugar, whether it is fruit juice, honey, sucrose, etc. Blood suger level is a transient condition and is directly impacted on what you eat and how quickly your body metabolizes it. Answered by Johnie Imaizumi 1 year ago.

Anything you eat that has protein, carbs, or fats will raise it. Answered by Merlyn Kacprowski 1 year ago.


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