Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 007959/001.

Names and composition

"TENSILON" is the commercial name of a drug composed of EDROPHONIUM CHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
007959/001 TENSILON EDROPHONIUM CHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
007959/001 TENSILON EDROPHONIUM CHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
007959/002 TENSILON PRESERVATIVE FREE EDROPHONIUM CHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
040043/001 EDROPHONIUM CHLORIDE PRESERVATIVE FREE EDROPHONIUM CHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
040044/001 EDROPHONIUM CHLORIDE EDROPHONIUM CHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
040131/001 EDROPHONIUM CHLORIDE EDROPHONIUM CHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
088873/001 ENLON EDROPHONIUM CHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
089624/001 REVERSOL EDROPHONIUM CHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML

Ask a doctor

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

Is tensilon test still done?
it is a test for myasthenia Asked by Claudia Peiffer 1 year ago.

Yes. I have seen it done recently. Answered by Delora Gutenson 1 year ago.


Scared I have MS!!!?
Well First of all before I explain anything, I had an MRI last year and it came clear. So it starts with muscle weakness, especially in my legs, since September my legs have been so much better- I even started exercising and such again! Although, since October my arms go through long phases of being super tired,... Asked by Margret Luckner 1 year ago.

Well First of all before I explain anything, I had an MRI last year and it came clear. So it starts with muscle weakness, especially in my legs, since September my legs have been so much better- I even started exercising and such again! Although, since October my arms go through long phases of being super tired, normally starting a week before my period. Overall I feel so much better, but new symptoms have come up. First of all, sometimes right under my neck it gets really tired when I chew or talk- I do have tmj and lots of tension which I'm sure adds to it. Then Last semester right before finals, I got in a fight with a friend one night and my legs started trembling like crazy, if I focused really hard I could control it though. Occasionally it would get like that, otherwise there have been many occasions where they kinda shaked and stuff then got better quick, a few weeks ago I felt like whenever I laughed they would shake, overall, that symptom has dramatically decreased though in severity since the first few weeks of it. Next, I was wondering if anyone thought this was anxiety. So I read that story about the high school cross country runner this last weekend. Her legs would go numb whenever she ran because she has ms. Ever since then I have been worried about that happening to me, and since Tuesday I've been getting tingles and prickly sensations sometimes after I walked a lot. I am very nervous! I've had almost any blood test and such and nothing has shown wrong. I think its a slow process, but I personally think its chronic fatigue syndrome, however these newer symptoms are freaking me out and maybe because its midterms right now everything seems worse! I'm really worried I have MS and it just didn't show up on the mri... Do these new symptoms seems to be anxiety?? Or should I be worried and get another MRI????? I hate going to the doctors after all the visits I've been too, because nothing ever shows up... Thanks so much for reading all of this :)!! Answered by Markus Console 1 year ago.

It is possible it's from stress but if you are really worried I would ask for a tensilon test for Myasthenia Gravis. I had sort of similar symptoms and stress makes it act up. It's muscle weakness, especially with repetitive movements like cleaning/wiping. I don't have it bad but I did have the recommended surgery. I also get double vision, so they did think it was MS at first. It's rare. Hope all goes well and once out of school it just goes away. Answered by Kristal Lindemann 1 year ago.

My brother in law is a police officer assigned to the gang unit from he tell me these bad as# are really just sugar foots they rat out each other all the time He tells me they take a picture of their leader with the guys girl friend ''you know he is doing her'' Answered by Silva Kushnir 1 year ago.


Does my dad have primary lateral sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Mya Gravis ?
In late 2007 my dad started having muscle weakness & leg stiffness but was still able to walk. As the weakness got worse he developed a small studder which also became progressivly worse (The studder happened over night) He went to speach therapy because he became hard to understand, After awhile the studder went... Asked by Mauricio Lazares 1 year ago.

In late 2007 my dad started having muscle weakness & leg stiffness but was still able to walk. As the weakness got worse he developed a small studder which also became progressivly worse (The studder happened over night) He went to speach therapy because he became hard to understand, After awhile the studder went away & he just talked really slowly. The muscle weakness progressed, he was falling almost everyday, once even down a flight of 15 stairs. More problems started appearing & in late 2008 is when the problems he already had became worse. As of right now he can't barley talk at all, (he has to write down what he says), he can't walk without a walker, & even with the walker he still falls, he's broken his nose 4 times from the falls. He has trouble swollowing & chokes on food/liquids. He can't breath ... That may just be from the breaking of the nose. My dad went from a 5'5 200 pound muscular man, to a 130 pound man that can't do anything on his own. He was tested for PLS & ALS .. He was positive for PLS & negitive for ALS but PLS is not fatal, ALS is. I heard PLS could turn into ALS? True or false? We don't think he is going to make it much longer :( he is in the hospital right now because his legs were so swollen they were turning colors, & back pain from a recent fall. My dad discovered a disorder called MG which has some of his symptons but the doctor doesn't think that's the case. But my dad beleives that's what he has even tho he was positive for PLS. Proboly because You can recover 50+ % with MG. Anyways my dad is in critical condition and even though he is + for PLS, that doesn't fit his symptons. My dad is only 50 years old, he had to shut down his concrete buisness he had for 30 years because of this. & before he goes I wan't to know what the hell is going on, so I can't atleast try to help ... I don't know. Just if you know of any other disorders, if PLS can turn into ALS, or anything else that can help me PLEASE SEND AN ANSWER ! Thank you so much. -Hayley Answered by Doug Permann 1 year ago.

Multiple sclerosis is without doubt one of the such a lot debilitating and discouraging stipulations any individual may have. Waking up day by day figuring out you're troubled with MS that step by step drags you, healthful younger individual, in the direction of power sickness and probably shorter existence. Suddenly you now not count on to experience a lot of existence's finest reports. The within tale on Dr. Gary amazing Multiple Sclerosis remedy Read directly to notice what fairly motives your more than one sclerosis! Answered by Brande Wanvig 1 year ago.

I am sorry to hear about your father. Being a father of 3 girls I am encouraged by your interest in helping him. I have PLS since 2003. First there is no test for PLS. They have to rule out everything and then they say PLS. PLS is rare..maybe 50 people/year get it in the US. In general, PLS progresses slowly. I started with speech problems and it took almost 5years to get to my legs. However, the speed of progression varies a lot. The median age to get it is 50 years old. I got it then. They thought I might have MG at the beginning so they tried IVIG treatment for 4 months. It did nothing so they ruled it PLS. PLS affects the upper motor neurons. These are the nerves from the brain and they connect to the lower motor neurons. ALS affects the upper and lower motor neurons. They can test the lower motor neurons with an EMG. They basically shock the nerves and observe the nerve response. If you have no lower motor neuron involvement then they say it is PLS. PLS and ALS are hard to distinguish in the early years. It took almost 3 years to get a confirmed PLS diagnosis. Basically they told me I would be dead or near death if I had ALS. PLS does not turn into ALS. However, I have heard of cases of ALS that progress slowly and look like PLS in the early years. I go to the MDA/ALS Clinic in Dallas. They are very good at diagnosing these diseases. PLS is covered by MDA. You may be able to get a referral to an MDA clinic. PLS is so rare that doctors normally know nothing about it. In your Dad's case he seems to have progressed quickly. I am worried on the breathing problems. Breathing is generally not a symptom of PLS. It is with ALS. He should be showing other symptoms like emotional issues (laughter/crying) or some dexterity issues in his hands. The other diseases they ruled out in my case was Wilson's disease and Kennedy's disease. They also ruled out Lyme disease. Answered by Katrina Breiten 1 year ago.

Multiple sclerosis is one of the most debilitating and discouraging conditions anyone can have. Waking up day after day knowing you are stricken with MS that gradually drags you, healthy young person, toward chronic illness and maybe shorter life. Suddenly you no longer expect to enjoy many of life's greatest experiences. The inside story on Dr. Gary remarkable Multiple Sclerosis cure Read on to discover what really causes your multiple sclerosis! Answered by Maisha Glauberman 1 year ago.


Pharmacology help please thank you?
Cholinergic Agents•How does a cholinergic agent work? What response do you see?•What are cholinergic agents used for? (Drug specific)•What SE are seen with adrenergic blockers?•List the cholinergic agents. Know what each is used for.Anticholinergics•How does an anticholinergic work? What response... Asked by Dorian Merola 1 year ago.

Cholinergic Agents •How does a cholinergic agent work? What response do you see? •What are cholinergic agents used for? (Drug specific) •What SE are seen with adrenergic blockers? •List the cholinergic agents. Know what each is used for. Anticholinergics •How does an anticholinergic work? What response do you see? •What are anticholinergics used for? •What SE are seen with anticholinergics? •List the anticholinergics. Know what each is used for. Answered by Alfonzo Jessup 1 year ago.

Cholinergic: These drugs contract the bladder, thus allowing complete emptying (muscle stimulant) What they do to the body/how it works: Salivation, Lacrimination, Urinary Incontinence, Diarrhea, Gastrointestional cramps, and Emesis Used for/simmilar drugs:*A cholinergic enhances parasympathetic responses*. The cholinergic muscle stimulants are used to diagnose and treat myasthenia gravis, a disease that causes severe muscle weakness. This class of drugs includes ambenonium chloride (Mytelase), edrophonium chloride (Tensilon), neostigmine (Prostigmine), and piridogstimina (Mestinœn). These drugs are also widely used in surgery, both to reduce the risk of urinary retention, and to reverse the effects of the muscle relaxant drugs that are used in surgery. Cholinergic drugs are also used in control of glaucoma, a disease that is caused by increased pressure inside the eye. The most common drugs used for this purpose are demecarium (Humorsol) and echthiophate (Phospholine iodide). Side effects: Cholinergic drugs may cause vomiting, diarrhea, watery eyes, headache, dizziness, irregular heartbeat, wheezing, and/or breathing problems. Anticholinergics How it works/What it's used for: Anticholinergic drugs are another group of bronchodilators that are different from the beta-agonists. While the beta-agonists affect the bronchioles (small airways), anticholinergics affect the muscles around the bronchi (large airways). When the lungs are irritated, these bands of muscle can tighten, making the bronchi narrower. Anticholinergics work by stopping the muscles from tightening. Side effects: The side-effects that are experienced include dry mouth, blurred vision (if spray comes in contact with the eyes), worsening glaucoma and dry cough. Men with prostate problems may find more difficulty urinating. Answered by Awilda Bisanz 1 year ago.


Is Normal Testosterone Now Seen as Abnormal?
John, I've Done it too, Usually Tensilon Pearls, I had a a guy (Drug Seeker) Complain About Ultram to the Hospital. Asked by Kiyoko Wassel 1 year ago.

One of Many Side Effects (From MDConsult): Prostate cancer as a secondary malignancy or prostatic hypertrophy can develop during prolonged therapy with testosterone and are more likely to occur in elderly male patients. Signs of acute epididymitis (e.g., fever, chills, pain in the inguinal region) and/or urinary urgency should prompt withdrawal of the drug and reevaluation of dosage. In 162 hypogonadal men receiving testosterone gel (AndroGel®) during a 3-year open-label extension trial, increases in serum PSA concentrations (defined as >= 2x baseline concentrations or any single absolute value >= 6 ng/ml) were seen in approximately 18% of patients (n=29). The majority of these increases were seen in the first year of therapy (23/29 or 79%). Four patients had a single value >= 6 ng/ml: two of these patients had prostate cancer detected upon biopsy. [Perhaps One Would Prefer to Age Normally.] Answered by Temeka Guarracino 1 year ago.

It's a shame that normal is being redefined by the pressures of our culture. But the profession itself is responsible for allowing this to happen to us. When our patients pressure us to prescribe something they shouldn't have, all we have to do is say no. I know I've caved on several occasions when I was pressured to prescribe something I didn't think was best (most often with pediatric "cold medicine"). And being hospital-based, I often have to chat with administrators who have the ridiculous business mindset of "the customer is always right" as if our professional obligations meant nothing. Answered by Veronique Kidder 1 year ago.


Anesthesia side effects ...?
I had a small surgery yesterday. they told me i would have a sore throat from the anesthesia. the sore throat started today but now my nose is really stuffy and runny. Is that caused an the anesthesia as well? or am i just getting sick? Asked by Alessandra Eagleman 1 year ago.

Yes. Often more drugs than simply the anesthetic are administered for surgeries. Any cholinergic stimulator, including ambenonium chloride (Mytelase), edrophonium chloride (Tensilon), neostigmine (Prostigmine), or piridogstimina (Mestinœn), may cause a stuffy or runny nose. Answered by Steve Matus 1 year ago.

the sore through is not caused due tot he anesthesia. its caused due to the breathing tube they put down your throat to secure your airway. the stuffy runny nose is also not due to the anesthesia. you must just be getting sick. Answered by Lynn Disharoon 1 year ago.


Is the vocal cords freezing in the closed position cutting off air to the patient a symptom of Myasthia Gravis
The paient suddenly could not breath. The doctors found that her vocal cord were frozen in the closed position cutting off her air. She became unconscious and her heart stop beating. Went into a coma. Had a silent stroke. Finally woke up with no idea what has happened to her. This has happen on a number of... Asked by Serena Mccaughey 1 year ago.

The paient suddenly could not breath. The doctors found that her vocal cord were frozen in the closed position cutting off her air. She became unconscious and her heart stop beating. Went into a coma. Had a silent stroke. Finally woke up with no idea what has happened to her. This has happen on a number of times. Each time with no warning and more sever. She is now being sent to the Mayo Clinic in Minnesaota for further study. She is placed on life support each time and has a permanent trek in her throat to help keep her breathing which they found does not stop these episodes. Answered by Shira Massey 1 year ago.

MG is an ascending disorder, meaning that it would start in her brain and SLOWLY work its way down. if the first thing that she experienced was the trachea closing off, then it's possible that it's not MG. For it to be classically symptomatic of MG she would have had to have had the trachea closing first THEN the heart ceasing to beat next followed by her lungs ceasing to inflate and deflate and so on. Usually there are signs that MG is a diagnosis for symptoms that include confusion and declining motor function first, as the brain controls this, and anything else after that. MG is completely diagnosable. The test is called the Tensilon Test, basically the drug Tensilon is given and if there is a positive response, ie, her throat opens back up and her heart beat returns to it's usual, she has MG and a more permanent treatment is started. All in all, good luck with everything, and if it is MG and not something else, be happy, it's a perfectly treatable disease! Answered by Melvin Bobowiec 1 year ago.

If it is truly MG, consider that paralysis of the diaphragm may be the actual cause for the cessation of breathing. Positive pressure O2 may be required. Answered by Loni Wiggains 1 year ago.


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