TELMISARTAN AND AMLODIPINE Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 201586/001.

Names and composition

"TELMISARTAN AND AMLODIPINE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of AMLODIPINE BESYLATE and TELMISARTAN.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
201586/001 TELMISARTAN AND AMLODIPINE AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE and 40MG
201586/002 TELMISARTAN AND AMLODIPINE AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE and 40MG
201586/003 TELMISARTAN AND AMLODIPINE AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE and 80MG
201586/004 TELMISARTAN AND AMLODIPINE AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE and 80MG
202516/001 TELMISARTAN AND AMLODIPINE AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE and 40MG
202516/002 TELMISARTAN AND AMLODIPINE AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE and 40MG
202516/003 TELMISARTAN AND AMLODIPINE AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE and 80MG
202516/004 TELMISARTAN AND AMLODIPINE AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE and 80MG
202517/001 TELMISARTAN AND AMLODIPINE AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE and 40MG
202517/002 TELMISARTAN AND AMLODIPINE AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE and 40MG
202517/003 TELMISARTAN AND AMLODIPINE AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE and 80MG
202517/004 TELMISARTAN AND AMLODIPINE AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE and 80MG
205234/001 TELMISARTAN AND AMLODIPINE AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE and 40MG
205234/002 TELMISARTAN AND AMLODIPINE AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE and 40MG
205234/003 TELMISARTAN AND AMLODIPINE AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE and 80MG
205234/004 TELMISARTAN AND AMLODIPINE AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE and 80MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
022401/004 TWYNSTA AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE and 80MG
022401/003 TWYNSTA AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE and 80MG
022401/001 TWYNSTA AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE and 40MG
022401/002 TWYNSTA AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE and 40MG
201586/001 TELMISARTAN AND AMLODIPINE AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE and 40MG
201586/002 TELMISARTAN AND AMLODIPINE AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE and 40MG
201586/003 TELMISARTAN AND AMLODIPINE AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE and 80MG
201586/004 TELMISARTAN AND AMLODIPINE AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE and 80MG
202516/001 TELMISARTAN AND AMLODIPINE AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE and 40MG
202516/002 TELMISARTAN AND AMLODIPINE AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE and 40MG
202516/003 TELMISARTAN AND AMLODIPINE AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE and 80MG
202516/004 TELMISARTAN AND AMLODIPINE AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE and 80MG
202517/001 TELMISARTAN AND AMLODIPINE AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE and 40MG
202517/002 TELMISARTAN AND AMLODIPINE AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE and 40MG
202517/003 TELMISARTAN AND AMLODIPINE AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE and 80MG
202517/004 TELMISARTAN AND AMLODIPINE AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE and 80MG
205234/001 TELMISARTAN AND AMLODIPINE AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE and 40MG
205234/002 TELMISARTAN AND AMLODIPINE AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE and 40MG
205234/003 TELMISARTAN AND AMLODIPINE AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE and 80MG
205234/004 TELMISARTAN AND AMLODIPINE AMLODIPINE BESYLATE; TELMISARTAN TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE and 80MG

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Answered questions

Blood pressure medicine and side effects?
I am on Tazloc-40-trio for the last three months. Earlier I was taking Telma-H for two years. Marginal increase in glucose level caused increase in my bp and the doctor advise the combination of three madicines(tazloc-40 trio). since the telma-h 40 was not controlling my bp for the last two years, I would like to... Asked by Burton Karagiannes 1 month ago.

I am on Tazloc-40-trio for the last three months. Earlier I was taking Telma-H for two years. Marginal increase in glucose level caused increase in my bp and the doctor advise the combination of three madicines(tazloc-40 trio). since the telma-h 40 was not controlling my bp for the last two years, I would like to take only CCB i.e Amlopres-2.5mg. Is it alright..please respond. I am afraid of taking BP medicine continuously because of their side effects like kidney issues. Answered by Wai Sumler 1 month ago.

Tazloc trio 40 (brand name) is a combination of Amlodipine 5 mg and Telmisartan 40 mg. Amlodipine is used alone or in combination with other medications to treat high blood pressure and chest pain (angina). Amlodipine is in a class of medications called calcium channel blockers. It lowers blood pressure by relaxing the blood vessels so the heart does not have to pump as hard. It controls chest pain by increasing the supply of blood to the heart. If taken regularly, amlodipine controls chest pain, but it does not stop chest pain once it starts. Your doctor may prescribe a different medication to take when you have chest pain. The main side effects of Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) include constipation, swelling (edema), and a slow heart rate (only with the non-dihydropyridine types). Telmisartan is used alone or in combination with other medications to treat high blood pressure. Telmisartan is also used to decrease the chance of heart attack, stroke, or death in people 55 years of age or older who are at high risk for cardiovascular disease. Telmisartan is in a class of medications called angiotensin II receptor antagonists. It works by blocking the action of certain natural substances that tighten the blood vessels, allowing the blood to flow more smoothly and the heart to pump more efficiently. Angiotensin II receptor antagonist: Common adverse drug reactions (ADRs) include: dizziness, headache, and/or hyperkalemia. Infrequent ADRs associated with therapy include: first dose orthostatic hypotension, rash, diarrhea, dyspepsia, abnormal liver function, muscle cramp, myalgia, back pain, insomnia, decreased hemoglobin levels, renal impairment, pharyngitis, and/or nasal congestion. Telma H 40 (brand name) is a combination of Telmisartan 40mg, Hydrochlorothiazide 12.5mg. Hydrochlorothiazide, a 'water pill,' is used to treat high blood pressure and fluid retention caused by various conditions, including heart disease. It causes the kidneys to get rid of unneeded water and salt from the body into the urine. The objective of treatment is to reduce the blood pressure and associated metabolic abnormalities sufficiently to reduce the risk of cardiovascular events and end-stage renal disease without compromising the patient quality of life. Consult your doctor. Answered by Neal Vierthaler 1 month ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Orpha Onley 1 month ago.

Stay away from meds for insomnia, there are natural solutions. The herb valerian works superbly, take the maximum dose listed on the label about an hour before you go to bed. Use sublingual (under the tongue) tablets of melatonin which you can also buy over-the-counter. In fact I buy both of these supplements made by Nature's Way Herbs. They are sold at my grocery store and I also buy them over the Internet. Take that melatonin and you should go to sleep in 5 or 10 minutes. There is a homeopathic remedy called Calms Forte that is for sleeping problems, try that too. Answered by Alison Slomski 1 month ago.


Telma H 40 and amlopine 2.5mg.?
Dear Sir, I am patient of high blood pressure for the last 25 years and have been taking different medicines which are causing different side effects like erectile dysfunction..Presently i have been prescribed Telma H 40 and amlopine 2.5 mg. daily...I would like to know what are the side effect of these... Asked by Darron Sharma 1 month ago.

Dear Sir, I am patient of high blood pressure for the last 25 years and have been taking different medicines which are causing different side effects like erectile dysfunction..Presently i have been prescribed Telma H 40 and amlopine 2.5 mg. daily...I would like to know what are the side effect of these medicines or whether they are beta blocker to cause erectile dysfunction,,please advise Answered by Apryl Feintuch 1 month ago.

Im all good thanx. I got a Cherry chapstick. Very nice! Ow! that hurt! But the sun screen is wicked! *Looks around then steals the chap stick* Ugh i see people on the streets with chaped lips all the time and i have to say it isnt nice. Poll: What food that you've seen on an anime looked appetizing? (I like it when there's STEAK XD) >>I like the food that the hot girls serve when the main character goes to some resturant or something like steak i guess ^_^ Boo-ness: Who's the most annoying person in your life right now? >>Thats easy..My sister LoL Answered by Hedwig Cappelli 1 month ago.

does this drug cause ED Answered by Reatha Sonterre 1 month ago.


Can i sue sildenafil when i am using nifedipine?
For BP i am using Telmisartan 40 mg, and amlodipine 5 mg. Recently my doctor added nifedipine 10 mg. For ED i am using Sildenfil 50 mg once in a week. Today i would like to use sildinafil. I got a doubt whether i take it along with the newly added nifedipine 10 mg. If any one is using please tell me. Thanks. Asked by Shari Sanmarco 1 month ago.

Sildinafil is not a good idea if you have uncontrolled hypertension. Please talk to your doctor before using. Answered by Shakita Habrock 1 month ago.

I would strongly recommend you have this discussion with your doctor. It sounds like you have uncontrolled hypertension, so anything that efects your pressure should be reviewed with a professional. Answered by Darlena Gimlin 1 month ago.

Call your pharmacist. They would be glad to field your question and would know for sure. Answered by Tessa Bakey 1 month ago.


My uncle has got stroke and suffering from Brain Hemorrhage. This stroke affect his half body right side?
But now 4 days passed doctors discharged him with food pipe on 2nd day of stroke, He can move his arm and leg but not with full strength. He is talking to family members but voice is not clear. I am very much worried about this can anyone help me out with this doctors prescribed atorvastatin, amlodipine and... Asked by Cecelia Greenlun 1 month ago.

But now 4 days passed doctors discharged him with food pipe on 2nd day of stroke, He can move his arm and leg but not with full strength. He is talking to family members but voice is not clear. I am very much worried about this can anyone help me out with this doctors prescribed atorvastatin, amlodipine and telmisartan tablet , plz help Answered by Efrain Seedorf 1 month ago.

Normally the patients suffering from hypertension have this problem. They forget the medicine, and B P increases. Brain Hemorrhage occurs and paralysis follows. These medicines do not cure the disease completely. But help the patient by engaging some physiotherapist. also build up his confidence. but take care when he is doing exercise, should not fall down, else will loose confidence and become permanent bed ridden. Answered by Faith Ulysse 1 month ago.

Dear Jo I am Dr.Soloman from Egypt and I invented the first invention in the world to treat difficult brain Injury that cannot be treated any place in the world such as : Brain stroke , Brain hemorrhage , Brain atrophy , Epilepsy , Brain damage caused by accident and more brain diseases. and I can treat your uncle and he will be fine. YOU CAN VISIT MY WEBSITE : WWW.ALBAHY.NET EMAIL : [email protected] TEL : 00201145377444 Answered by Yvone Wison 1 month ago.


BP Medicines and Erection?
I am having BP from the last 10 years. It is in 120/80 with Atenolol 50 mg, Amlodipine 5 mg and Telma-H (Combination of Telmisartan 40 mg + Hydrochlorothiazide 12.5 mg). From the last 6 years i am suffering with Sinus problem and erection problem. Do I have to chnage these medicines? Which BP medicine is best ?? Asked by Elda Heird 1 month ago.

Some medications can very well interfere with sexual erections. Check with your doctor to see what he can prescribe that has little or no side effects. Also, you should not smoke, drink beer/ale, booze or do ANY drugs. Any of these can cause erectile dysfunction and/or impotence. Answered by Caroline Buren 1 month ago.

Get your testosterone levels checked. They start decling after 40. Also, try a different blood pressure medication that dilates the blood vessels. If you are on a diuretic or betablocker, you will have a harder time getting an erection. Ask to switch to an ace inhibitor or a calcium channel blocker. Last thing, excercise everyday. It's all about circulation. Answered by Marquerite Godwyn 1 month ago.

I dont know what BP is for, you for erection problems try kamagra tablets Answered by Eliza Colville 1 month ago.


Blood pressure meds stopped working,why?
My grandmothers high blood pressure meds stopped working. She has already had 2 strokes. Why does the medicine stop working and should she try another? Will the strokes eventualy lead to her death since she is 89? Asked by Jesus Purwin 1 month ago.

There are many different kinds of High Blood Pressure medications with a whole lot of different range of generics of them. For example: - Diuretics; chlorthalidone, furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide and indapamide. - Beta-blockers; acebutolol, atenolol, carvedilol, metoprolol, nadolol, propranolol and timolol. - Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also called ACE inhibitors); benazepril, enalapril, lisinopril, quinapril, ramipril and trandolapril. - Angiotensin II receptor blockers (also called ARBs); candesartan, irbesartan, losartan, olmesartan, telmisartan and valsartan. - Calcium channel blockers (also called CCBs); amlodipine, diltiazem, felodipine, nicardipine, nifedipine and verapamil. - Alpha-blockers; doxazosin, prazosin and terazosin. - Centrally acting drugs; clonidine and methyldopa. - Direct vasodilators; hydralazine and minoxidil. Your grandmother must be given the suitable medication (or combination of some drugs as listed above) which will work for her. It is important that She be receiving and remain taking these high blood pressure medicine in order to avoid any stroke from taking place. Please discuss some of the medications mentioned with Her specialist. Good Health ! Answered by Casandra Fouyer 1 month ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Trula Caruso 1 month ago.

This could mean that the medication stopped working or that she is developing some other problem to raise her bp. Aspirin is not reccomende for a stroke unless you are 100% positive the stroke is not hemmorhagic. In other words if she is ahving a bleed in her brain and you give her aspirin you will make it worse. Answered by Ivey Hovermale 1 month ago.

I am so sorry to say yes it could. I have very high BP and take several different types of meds. Sometimes when your body gets use to the medication and you will either need to add something else or increase what she is already taking. Do you have any idea what her BP is running? Do you have a BP machine? Interested to know what it runs. I hope she takes asprin or something to thin her blood..... Answered by Myrtice Ragonese 1 month ago.


Is there any over the counter medicine for high blood pressure?
Asked by Charisse Haskell 1 month ago.

There are 8 types of over-the-counter medicine, available by a doctor's prescription, to treat high blood pressure: Diuretics (water pills) helps your body to get rid of extra sodium (salt) and water so your blood vessels don't have to hold too much fluid. Some examples of diuretics include chlorthalidone (brand name: Thalitone), furosemide (brand name: Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (brand name: Esidrix) and indapamide (brand name: Lozol). Your doctor may also prescribe a combination of diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide combined with triamterene (brand names: Dyazide, Maxzide). Beta-blockers makes the heart beat slower so that blood passes through your blood vessels with less force. Some examples of beta-blockers include acebutolol (brand name: Sectral), atenolol (brand name: Tenormin), carvedilol (brand name: Coreg), metoprolol (brand names: Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (brand name: Corgard), propranolol (brand name: Inderal) and timolol (brand name: Blocadren). Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also called ACE inhibitors) keeps your body from making angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ACE inhibitors include benazepril (brand name: Lotensin), enalapril (brand name: Vasotec), lisinopril (brand names: Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (brand name: Accupril), ramipril (brand name: Altace) and trandolapril (brand name: Mavik). Angiotensin II receptor blockers (also called ARBs) protects your blood vessels from the effects of angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ARBs include candesartan (brand name: Atacand), irbesartan (brand name: Avapro), losartan (brand name: Cozaar), olmesartan (brand name: Benicar), telmisartan (brand name: Micardis) and valsartan (brand name: Diovan). Calcium channel blockers (also called CCBs) helps to keep your blood vessels from constricting (becoming narrow) by blocking calcium from entering your cells. Some examples of CCBs include amlodipine (brand name: Norvasc), diltiazem (brand names: Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, Tiazac), felodipine (brand name: Plendil), nicardipine (brand name: Cardene), nifedipine (brand names: Adalat, Procardia) and verapamil (some brand names: Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan). Alpha-blockers helps to relax your blood vessels by reducing nerve impulses. This allows your blood to pass through more easily. Some examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin (brand name: Cardura), prazosin (brand name: Minipress) and terazosin (brand name: Hytrin). Centrally acting drugs may affect your brain and central nervous system to reduce the nerve impulses that can cause your blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of centrally acting drugs include clonidine (brand name: Catapres) and methyldopa. Direct vasodilators relaxes the muscles in the blood vessel walls. This causes the blood vessels to widen. Some examples of vasodilators include hydralazine (brand name: Apresoline) and minoxidil (brand name: Loniten). Good Luck ! Answered by Judie Stoett 1 month ago.

Drop Blood Pressure Below 120/80 Answered by Margeret Zentgraf 1 month ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Margy Nickodem 1 month ago.

Hey I'm here for the first time. I found this question and I find the answers really helpful. I am hoping to give something back and assist others too. Answered by Joanie Unsworth 1 month ago.

Not for that particular purpose. Some drugs may lower blood pressure as a side effect. To control high blood pressure without drugs, one can exercise, watch your weight, and avoid salty foods. DK Answered by Marcie Cull 1 month ago.

I have heard that garlic can lower blood pressure, which is why you should tell your Dr. if you are taking any herbal, or natural remedies. They may either assist or combat the effects of the medicine they prescribe for you. I hear that you should not drink grapefruit juice if you are taking hypertension medicine as well. Answered by Casimira Gigliotti 1 month ago.

No; certainly nothing safe and effective. High blood pressure is serious business, to be managed by real prescription medications under a doctor's care. Answered by Minh Estill 1 month ago.

"Over the Counter" means without doctor s prescription, if anybody didn t know. Answered by Aleshia Parduhn 1 month ago.


Medical question - High Diastolic pressure?
II am aged 59.Not diabetic or any other illness found. On medical check up it is found my BP 105-165. Doctor prescribed Amlodipine- 2.5mg /day After 10 days it is found that no considerable decrees in the BP and Doctor advised 10 mg per day. My average Diastolic pressure for the next 20 days was 90-100. I... Asked by Ma Utt 1 month ago.

II am aged 59.Not diabetic or any other illness found. On medical check up it is found my BP 105-165. Doctor prescribed Amlodipine- 2.5mg /day After 10 days it is found that no considerable decrees in the BP and Doctor advised 10 mg per day. My average Diastolic pressure for the next 20 days was 90-100. I consulted a cardiologist, after examination like TMT, Creatine, cholesterol etc. Cardiologist suggested Ertel – AM (Telmisartan 40mg + Amlodipine 5mg) per day. Now my average BP is 70-110. When I wake up I checked my BP at that time and found an average 90-118. My doubts are: 1.Why my Diastolic pressure is high when I wake up? 2.I was using Amlodopine 5mg. Instead of this Telmisartan 40 mg additionally included . What is for? 3.Purpose of Telmisartan is not to known. Is Continuous use of this Telmisartan making any side effect or other illness? 4.Does this quantity have to be continued life long? 5.Why I am suffering only diastolic pressure? [email protected] Answered by Dania Shyne 1 month ago.

might call and ask the drug store or your doctor which could answer this better i think Answered by Denna Flammang 1 month ago.


Hypertension problem?
I'm 23 years old anyways. Asked by Anh Kilts 1 month ago.

Well it's been like this, I have been treated for hypertension for like 4-5 months with sotalol 40mg morning, diuretic in mid day, and 40mg at night sotalol (2 x half tablet). It helped me to take off some symtpoms, I had chest pain, was feeling faint, and etc. My blood pressure even with medicine never got down under 140, mostly 150 and so. But recently I woke up one morning and my heart was pounding so much, and i measured 190/110. And later again i started to feel faint somehow, and out of streght, this all preceded 3-4 day headache, which i still have to some bit. Now what I'm wondering. Even I drink medicine. Why doesn't my blood pressure go to normal count? I will tomorrow settle appointment with my cardilogist. Should my blood pressure be under 140/95, considering i had surgery (tetralogiae fallot) and have mild regurgitation which isn't making problem. Could it be that I'm not taking enough medicine for my condition? Any experiences or answers are welcome! Thanks Answered by Britt Mane 1 month ago.

Hypertension can be classified either essential (primary) or secondary. Essential hypertension indicates that no specific medical cause can be found to explain a patient's condition. Secondary hypertension indicates that the high blood pressure is a result of (i.e., secondary to) another condition, such as kidney disease or tumours (pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma). Persistent hypertension is one of the risk factors for strokes, heart attacks, heart failure and arterial aneurysm, and is a leading cause of chronic renal failure. In terms of medications for this medical condition; there are several types: - Diuretics (water pills) helps your body to get rid of extra sodium (salt) and water so your blood vessels don't have to hold too much fluid. Some examples of diuretics include chlorthalidone (brand name: Thalitone), furosemide (brand name: Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (brand name: Esidrix) and indapamide (brand name: Lozol). Your doctor may also prescribe a combination of diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide combined with triamterene (brand names: Dyazide, Maxzide). - Beta-blockers makes the heart beat slower so that blood passes through your blood vessels with less force. Some examples of beta-blockers include acebutolol (brand name: Sectral), atenolol (brand name: Tenormin), carvedilol (brand name: Coreg), metoprolol (brand names: Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (brand name: Corgard), propranolol (brand name: Inderal) and timolol (brand name: Blocadren). - Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also called ACE inhibitors) keeps your body from making angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ACE inhibitors include benazepril (brand name: Lotensin), enalapril (brand name: Vasotec), lisinopril (brand names: Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (brand name: Accupril), ramipril (brand name: Altace) and trandolapril (brand name: Mavik). - Angiotensin II receptor blockers (also called ARBs) protects your blood vessels from the effects of angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ARBs include candesartan (brand name: Atacand), irbesartan (brand name: Avapro), losartan (brand name: Cozaar), olmesartan (brand name: Benicar), telmisartan (brand name: Micardis) and valsartan (brand name: Diovan). - Calcium channel blockers (also called CCBs) helps to keep your blood vessels from constricting (becoming narrow) by blocking calcium from entering your cells. Some examples of CCBs include amlodipine (brand name: Norvasc), diltiazem (brand names: Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, Tiazac), felodipine (brand name: Plendil), nicardipine (brand name: Cardene), nifedipine (brand names: Adalat, Procardia) and verapamil (some brand names: Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan). - Alpha-blockers helps to relax your blood vessels by reducing nerve impulses. This allows your blood to pass through more easily. Some examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin (brand name: Cardura), prazosin (brand name: Minipress) and terazosin (brand name: Hytrin). - Centrally acting drugs may affect your brain and central nervous system to reduce the nerve impulses that can cause your blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of centrally acting drugs include clonidine (brand name: Catapres) and methyldopa. - Direct vasodilators relaxes the muscles in the blood vessel walls. This causes the blood vessels to widen. Some examples of vasodilators include hydralazine (brand name: Apresoline) and minoxidil (brand name: Loniten). I will personally suggest that You get an Echocardiogram scan done. You must also get your cholesterol, fat and sugar levels of your body tested. A good result will reflect the following normal results: - The Total Cholesterol level should remain below 200 mg/dL all the time; HDL's typical normal level is considered to be at 40 mg/dL and above. However, the higher your HDL level be the better it is for your health. Some natural ways to maintain and raise your HDL level are by aerobic exercising and excluding trans fatty acids from your diet; The normal ratio of Total Cholesterol to HDL is considered at 5:1 or below; a desirable LDL-cholesterol level must always be below 140 mg/dL to be considered normal. - Triglycerides level is also important and must remain below 150 mg/dL. - Glucose level. Normal is about 90mg/100ml, or 5mM/L. Overall, You should be getting regular check-ups, following a healthy diet, taking your medications as prescript, rest and other instructions from your specialist/s and general physician. Good Health To You ! Answered by Vada Ahlman 1 month ago.

sorry but you should never just cease your medication like this. you should go back to your health professional and see where you go from here. depending on your age and many other factors of your life you need to keep your BP under control and often you it can take some time to find the right medication to keep you in a stable condition. never never never muck about with hypertension. Answered by Verlene Nauss 1 month ago.

Eat less animal fat & lose weight. Answered by Gidget Saetteurn 1 month ago.


Is bp 168/88 bad for a 35yr old male?
Asked by Rona Benet 1 month ago.

Beginning at 115/75 mmHg, cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk doubles for each increment of 20/10 mmHg. For most people, the goal blood pressure is <140/90 mmHg, but it will be lower (<130/80) if you have diabetes or chronic kidney disease. For most patients, the cause is unknown, but in 5-10% of the cases, hypertension is caused by another condition such as chronic kidney disease, Cushing’s syndrome, sleep apnea, hyperthyroidism, hyperparathyroidism, hyperaldosteronism, or pheochromocytoma.1,2 Diagnosis is not just made on one high level, because your blood pressure can fluctuate greatly during the day, and is affected by exercise, stress, caffeine intake, medications, or herbal supplements. Blood pressure readings should be taken in both arms, and both sitting and standing. The average of two or more measurements taken during two or more clinical encounters are often used for diagnosis. Blood pressures are classified into four groups: normal, prehypertension, stage 1 hypertension, and stage 2 hypertension.1,2 Classification: Systolic Blood Pressure / Diastolic Blood Pressure Normal: <120 / <180 Prehypertension: 120-139/ 80-89 Stage 1 Hypertension: 140-159/ 90-99 Stage 2 Hypertension: >160 / >100 If you do smoke, quitting is the absolute best thing you can do for yourself. Other ways to reduce your blood pressure are through lifestyle modifications. The chart below shows the recommendations and the estimated amount of blood pressure reduction you should see.1,2 Lifestyle Modification: Recommendation (Approx. SBP reduction) Weight reduction:Maintain a normal body weight [BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m2] (5-20 per 10 kg weight loss) DASH diet: Consume a diet rich in fruits, nuts, vegetables, and low-fat dairy products with a reduced content of saturated and total fat; avoid processed foods(3-7) Decrease sodium intake: Reduce sodium to no more than 2.4 g/day (2-8) Physical activity:Engage in regular aerobic physical activity, such as brisk walking at least 30 min a day most days of the week(4-9) Moderate alcohol consumption:No more than 1 drink/day for women, 2 drinks/day for men [1 drink = 12 oz. beer, 5 oz. wine, 1.5 oz. of 80 proof liquor] (2-4) If your doctor does diagnose you with hypertension, drug therapy will be added to the lifestyle modifications mentioned above. The five most frequently used classes of medications are diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs), angiotensin 2 receptor blockers (ARBs), beta blockers, and calcium channel blockers. If blood pressure is >20/10 mmHg above goal, two medications are usually used, one of which will most likely be a thiazide diuretic. In general, the following are the most commonly used medications for treatment of hypertension:1,2 Thiazide diuretics •Hydrochlorothiazide, chlorthalidone ACEIs •Benazepril, captopril, enalapril, lisinopril, quinapril, ramipril ARBs •Losartan, valsartan, olmesartan, telmisartan, irbesartan, candesartan Beta blockers •Atenolol, bisoprolol, metoprolol, propranolol, carvedilol, labetalol Calcium channel blockers •Amlodipine, nifedipine, felodipine, verapamil, diltiazem Choices of medications can depend on your race or concurrent disease states. For example, thiazide diuretics are preferred in African Americans, because they usually respond poorly to beta blockers, ACE inhibitors, and ARBs. Dual therapy is also recommended at a more stringent level (>15/10 mmHg above goal) in African Americans. In patients with heart failure, beta blockers, ACEIs, and aldosterone antagonists are most commonly used; after experiencing a heart attack, beta blockers and ACEIs are most common; diabetes and chronic kidney disease, ACEIs and ARBs; and for recurrent stroke prevention, diuretics and ACEIs are usually used.1,2,3,4 Getting back to your original question, it depends if your blood pressure was just high that one time or if it consistently has been in those high numbers. Other factors that could contribute to high blood pressure are your race/ethnicity, concurrent disease states, and lifestyle. Again, “normal” blood pressure is <120/80. If you are diagnosed with hypertension, your goal blood pressure will be <140/90, or <130/80 if you have diabetes or CKD. It is always a good idea for you to monitor your pressure on a consistent basis, and bring these readings with you to your physician. This will help him or her have a better idea of where your blood pressures are typically running, and could help you attain better control of your condition, further decreasing your risk of experiencing a cardiovascular event. 1,2 Answered by Stephen Kosmatka 1 month ago.

Normal blood pressure is 120/80, but it's normal for this to be lower in younger, healthy individuals. Anything above 140/85 is getting high, and should be checked out. Normal pulse is 60-100 beats per minute. The pressures and pulses that you reported are fine. Answered by Carmen Murga 1 month ago.

the 168 part is horrible, the 88 part is great. im 35 and mine is 150over 110 my doc said my 150/110 was terribly bad. so your 168 is even worse., well, the 88 isnt GREAT, but it aint bad. what do you weigh? im 35, 5'8" 240lbs. i just went last week and doc told me to limit my calories to 2400 per day and try to bring my weight under 200 lbs. i dont know what your story is but thats mine. watch your salt intake/ sodium. Answered by Bree Slaughter 1 month ago.


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