TEGRETOL Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 016608/001.

Names and composition

"TEGRETOL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of CARBAMAZEPINE.
It belongs to the class Other antimanic drugs and is used in Psychosis, mania (Central Nervous System)

Answered questions

Side Effects of Tegretol?
I am taking Tegretol for seizures and have noticed that I am experiencing a lot of hair loss for about 2 months now. I've now realized that my hair is thinning and it's making me worried. I was wondering if this is one of the side effects of Tegretol? Asked by Heide Mcduffee 4 months ago.

Tegretol has a number of side effects, some lethal. If you experience a rash while on Tegretol, discontinue it immediately and see your physician ASAP. See adverse Reactions below from the Tegretol Package Insert/ ADVERSE REACTIONS If adverse reactions are of such severity that the drug must be discontinued, the physician must be aware that abrupt discontinuation of any anticonvulsant drug in a responsive epileptic patient may lead to seizures or even status epilepticus with its life-threatening hazards. The most severe adverse reactions have been observed in the hemopoietic system and skin (see BOXED WARNING), the liver, and the cardiovascular system. The most frequently observed adverse reactions, particularly during the initial phases of therapy, are dizziness, drowsiness, unsteadiness, nausea, and vomiting. To minimize the possibility of such reactions, therapy should be initiated at the low dosage recommended. The following additional adverse reactions have been reported: Hemopoietic System: Aplastic anemia, agranulocytosis, pancytopenia, bone marrow depression, thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, leukocytosis, eosinophilia, anemia, acute intermittent porphyria, variegate porphyria, porphyria cutanea tarda. Skin: Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) and Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) (see BOXED WARNING), pruritic and erythematous rashes, urticaria, photosensitivity reactions, alterations in skin pigmentation, exfoliative dermatitis, erythema multiforme and nodosum, purpura, aggravation of disseminated lupus erythematosus, alopecia, and diaphoresis. In certain cases, discontinuation of therapy may be necessary. Isolated cases of hirsutism have been reported, but a causal relationship is not clear. Cardiovascular System: Congestive heart failure, edema, aggravation of hypertension, hypotension, syncope and collapse, aggravation of coronary artery disease, arrhythmias and AV block, thrombophlebitis, thromboembolism (e.g., pulmonary embolism), and adenopathy or lymphadenopathy. Some of these cardiovascular complications have resulted in fatalities. Myocardial infarction has been associated with other tricyclic compounds. Liver: Abnormalities in liver function tests, cholestatic and hepatocellular jaundice, hepatitis; very rare cases of hepatic failure. Pancreatic: Pancreatitis. Respiratory System: Pulmonary hypersensitivity characterized by fever, dyspnea, pneumonitis, or pneumonia. Genitourinary System: Urinary frequency, acute urinary retention, oliguria with elevated blood pressure, azotemia, renal failure, and impotence. Albuminuria, glycosuria, elevated BUN, and microscopic deposits in the urine have also been reported. There have been very rare reports of impaired male fertility and/or abnormal spermatogenesis. Testicular atrophy occurred in rats receiving Tegretol orally from 4-52 weeks at dosage levels of 50-400 mg/kg/day. Additionally, rats receiving Tegretol in the diet for 2 years at dosage levels of 25, 75, and 250 mg/kg/day had a dose-related incidence of testicular atrophy and aspermatogenesis. In dogs, it produced a brownish discoloration, presumably a metabolite, in the urinary bladder at dosage levels of 50 mg/kg and higher. Relevance of these findings to humans is unknown. Nervous System: Dizziness, drowsiness, disturbances of coordination, confusion, headache, fatigue, blurred vision, visual hallucinations, transient diplopia, oculomotor disturbances, nystagmus, speech disturbances, abnormal involuntary movements, peripheral neuritis and paresthesias, depression with agitation, talkativeness, tinnitus, hyperacusis, neuroleptic malignant syndrome. There have been reports of associated paralysis and other symptoms of cerebral arterial insufficiency, but the exact relationship of these reactions to the drug has not been established. Isolated cases of neuroleptic malignant syndrome have been reported both with and without concomitant use of psychotropic drugs. Digestive System: Nausea, vomiting, gastric distress and abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, anorexia, and dryness of the mouth and pharynx, including glossitis and stomatitis. Eyes: Scattered punctate cortical lens opacities, increased intraocular pressure as well as conjunctivitis, have been reported. Although a direct causal relationship has not been established, many phenothiazines and related drugs have been shown to cause eye changes. Musculoskeletal System: Aching joints and muscles, and leg cramps. Metabolism: Fever and chills. Inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (ADH) secretion syndrome has been reported. Cases of frank water intoxication, with decreased serum sodium (hyponatremia) and confusion, have been reported in association with Tegretol use (see PRECAUTIONS, Laboratory Tests). Decreased levels of plasma calcium leading to osteoporosis have been reported. Other: Multiorgan hypersensitivity reactions occurring days to weeks or months after initiating treatment have been reported in rare cases. S Answered by Donnie Settlemyre 4 months ago.


Tegretol for bipolar?
does it work? is it as good as seroquel? thanx for the opinions! Asked by Hunter Shih 4 months ago.

Tegretol (carbamazepine) is an anticonvulsant not an antipsychotic like Seroquel (quetiapine fumarate). But Tegretol and most other anticonvulsants are used and approved for the treatment of bipolar. Tegretol along with Depakote (valproate semisodium) are commonly used anticonvulsants for the treatment of bipolar. Lithium, Depakote, and Tegretol are the most used drugs (not including antipsychotics) for Bipolar. Lithium and Depakote are typically reserved for use only in bipolar I but Tegretol is often used for bipolar I and II. The drug of choice for bipolar II is Lamictal (Lamotrigine), also an anticonvulsant. Several studies have shown Tegretol to be equally as effective as Lithium, the golden standard. And Tegretol has the advantage of having a better side effect profile compared to Lithium and Depakote. But Tegretol is known to rarely have some very serious side effects for some people. So it is HIGHLY recommended that you have blood work done before taking Tegretol and after you start. There is a newer drug called Trileptal (Oxcarbazepine) that is derived from Tegretol but has fewer side effects. But large scale testing on its effectiveness with bipolar has not been done. And some of the studies that have been done on Trileptal have shown it to be less useful than Tegretol. Often bipolar patients will take anticonvulsants (or Lithium) and atypical antispychotics like Seroquel. But antipsychotics tend to be sedating and atypicals often have a significant risk of weight gain. Determining if a drug will work is hard to say. If I were bipolar I would rather take an anticonvulsant rather than an antipsychotic. But some people need to take antipsychotics alone or with anticonvulsants. And antipsychotics have proven to be excellent drugs for bipolar (especially people with a more manic aspect). So it does work. It is a great medication for many people and could be very helpful to you. But it is hard to compare it to Seroquel and they can be taken together if that proves to be more effective. Answered by Temeka Doering 4 months ago.

Its not in the same category as seroquel however it will work albeit in a different manner!! It is mainly used for epilepsy but can be used for various psychiatric conditions also but it is not classified as an anti-psychotic!!!! Answered by Theo Franzman 4 months ago.

It isn't my field, but if memory serves, carbamazepine is used not for the mainstream treatment of bipolar disorder but to treat "rapid cycling." Answered by Dallas Deringer 4 months ago.


Why is Tegretol sometimes used for headaches?
Isn't this an anti-seziure medication? Also, I just had a shot of this for a headache, and now I feel REALLY sick, and my arms HURTS! Anything else I should expect in the next couple of hours? (I just had the shot about 45 minutes ago) Asked by Tesha Balis 4 months ago.

Tegretol is used in the treatment of seizure disorders, including certain types of epilepsy. It is also prescribed for trigeminal neuralgia (severe pain in the jaws) and pain in the tongue and throat. In addition, some doctors use Tegretol to treat alcohol withdrawal, cocaine addiction, and emotional disorders such as depression and abnormally aggressive behavior. The drug is also used to treat migraine headache and "restless legs." There are potentially dangerous side effects associated with the use of Tegretol. If you experience symptoms such as fever, sore throat, rash, ulcers in the mouth, easy bruising, or reddish or purplish spots on the skin, you should notify your doctor immediately. These symptoms could be signs of a blood disorder brought on by the drug. Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Tegretol. More common side effects, especially at the start of treatment, may include: Dizziness, drowsiness, nausea, unsteadiness, vomiting Other side effects may include: Abdominal pain, abnormal heartbeat and rhythm, abnormal involuntary movements, abnormal sensitivity to sound, aching joints and muscles, agitation, anemia, blood clots, blurred vision, chills, confusion, congestive heart failure, constipation, depression, diarrhea, double vision, dry mouth and throat, fainting and collapse, fatigue, fever, fluid retention, frequent urination, hair loss, hallucinations, headache, hepatitis, hives, impotence, inability to urinate, inflammation of the mouth and tongue, inflamed eyes, involuntary movements of the eyeball, itching, kidney failure, labored breathing, leg cramps, liver disorders, loss of appetite, loss of coordination, low blood pressure, pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), pneumonia, reddened skin, reddish or purplish spots on the skin, reduced urine volume, ringing in the ears, sensitivity to light, skin inflammation and scaling, skin peeling, skin rashes, skin pigmentation changes, speech difficulties, stomach problems, sweating, talkativeness, tingling sensation, worsening of high blood pressure, yellow eyes and skin Answered by Grayce Schmier 4 months ago.

Fast To Relieve Your Headache. Answered by Jessia Tamporello 4 months ago.

some headaches are cause by, well, think of them as tiny electrical storms in your brain. the tegretol can interrupt that. And if one has Temporal lobe epilepsy ( complex partial seizures) one has headaches, pretty much all the time. It is an anti-seizure med, but they have been finding it also works for some forms of depression. One of it's early uses was in stopping the pain of TMJ. Answered by Jonas Bengtson 4 months ago.

What Is Tegretol Used For Answered by Jake Schmier 4 months ago.


Is it ok to drink beer when you are on tegretol?
I am on tegretol for nerve pain, and like to go out drinking on the weekends and have a couple over dinner during the week. Can tegretol and booze really be that bad together? Asked by Keturah Dowe 4 months ago.

I've been on Carbamapezine (Tegretol is the brand) for about 2 years. It can exacerbate whatever problem it is trying to fix. Also, I'm not sure if you are aware, but Tegretol also treats seizures, and bipolar disorder. So it deals with brain chemistry, Don't mix alcohol with it. If you must, make sure it is only a few drinks and about in the middle of when you take it. (People told me " Drink right before you take it" but the doctor said if you do that its just like drinking first but still mixing) Answered by Brenda Hunsberger 4 months ago.

GENERALLY AVOID: Alcohol may potentiate some of the pharmacologic effects of CNS-active agents. Use in combination may result in additive central nervous system depression and impairment of judgment, thinking, and psychomotor skills. Nope, not safe! But on a side note, I'd think 1 or 2 should be fine. Drink water also and PACE yourself Answered by Elfriede Georgeson 4 months ago.


Question about tegretol?
I have 3000mg of tegretol; 200mg pills. is this lethal enough? Asked by Despina Skender 4 months ago.

Sorry. Pl. excuse me. I have no idea. According to Google:- "Tegretol (carbamazepine) is an anticonvulsant. It works by decreasing nerve impulses that cause seizures and pain. Tegretol is used to treat seizures and nerve pain such as trigeminal neuralgia and diabetic neuropathy. Carbamazepine is also used to treat bipolar disorder. Tegretol may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Important information about Tegretol You should not take Tegretol if you have a history of bone marrow suppression, if you are also taking nefazodone, or if you are allergic to an antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Vanatrip, Limbitrol), desipramine (Norpramin), imipramine (Tofranil), or nortriptyline (Pamelor). Besides all the above, my best suggestion is on all such genuine doubts pertaining to mental health, you should strictly follow the good words of advice of a professionally qualified doctor. Other unqualified and non-professional may misguide you or mislead you. Don't believe their words. Answered by Yasmin Kahre 4 months ago.


Has anyone been on Tegretol? What side effects or experiences have you had while on this medication?
My doctor has recently changed my medication to Tegretol (for Bipolar) due to problems with other medications! I understand that medication isn't the complete answer so see a Life coach/councilor regularly, which is really helpful but I'd like to find out what experiences or side effects other people have... Asked by Meaghan Imaino 4 months ago.

My doctor has recently changed my medication to Tegretol (for Bipolar) due to problems with other medications! I understand that medication isn't the complete answer so see a Life coach/councilor regularly, which is really helpful but I'd like to find out what experiences or side effects other people have gone through being on this medication!? Thank you, any info is much appreciated! Answered by Roxanne Cruser 4 months ago.

Hi! I was prescribed Tegretol for seizures after allergic reactions to both Lamictal and Topamax. I am EXTREMELY sensitive to any medication whether it is prescription or over-the-counter. My doctor has to start me off very cautiously because of side effects, which she had to do on the others as well. For me, it was hard at first because I did experience nausea, light-headedness, and muscle weakness, plus extreme fatigue. Although it did cure my insomnia! I have also had some hair loss, but nothing too drastic. I have only had 3 seizures and the cause is unknown. There were days when I really wanted to go off of it in the beginning, but my family encouraged me to stick with it because of the risk otherwise. I am one of those that can stop breathing during a seizure. My husband rarely talks about the seizures, but when he does he has told me how terrified he is of them and of me dying. When put like that, I can suffer a few side effects to give this man some peace and comfort. I've been on Tegretol for 6 months now and I am so happy that my family convinced me to stick with it. I did have one break-through seizure early on, but since then I have been fine. Thank God! The side effects are gone. Sometimes when I get rundown from a cold or something I may experience a few side effects, but nothing like the beginning. For me, the good news is that after almost a year, DMV is approving me for a physical driving test. Woohoo! I've gotten the all-clear from my doc, and DMV just wants to see for themselves that I'm okay behind the wheel. This is a big step in re-gaining my independence and I am sure you can imagine how happy I am! If Tegretol can help you get your life back--- then it is worth it. P.S. I go in for routine blood work every 3 months to check my blood levels and my kidneys/liver. So far everything has been just fine and I find the blood tests comforting because it lets me know everything is going the way it should and there is no damage being done. Answered by Cristina Navarrete 4 months ago.

Watch for low sodium. My husband went through hell with hyponatremia and the doctors didn't figure it was the tegretol for ages. Also, tegretol can make birth control pills less effective. YOu should use an additional method like condoms. Also you have to get your blood levels checked regularly because sometimes you'll be doing well and then all of a sudden your levels will change for no reason when you're taking the same amount of tegretol. Answered by Yolanda Bortignon 4 months ago.

When I was trying to get pregnant I tried to go off Depakote and use Tegretol for my seizures. The doctor kept boosting my dosage up due to seizure activity. I finally reached a toxic level before getting seizures under control. I was throwing up all the time. Tegretol is suppose to be one of the more easier meds on your system. Unfortunately it didn't work for me. Went back to Depakote. Answered by Steven Layton 4 months ago.


I'm on keppra and tegretol for epilepsy?
I take 200 milligrams of tegretol and 400 keppra in the morning. Then again in the evening I take the same dose of each. There have been a few times where I have missed a dose and I get an enormous, wonderful burst of energy. Today, there was a screw up at the pharmacy and I wont have my tegretol until tomorrow. So... Asked by Lashon Foulkes 4 months ago.

I take 200 milligrams of tegretol and 400 keppra in the morning. Then again in the evening I take the same dose of each. There have been a few times where I have missed a dose and I get an enormous, wonderful burst of energy. Today, there was a screw up at the pharmacy and I wont have my tegretol until tomorrow. So I took the Keppra but not my tegretol. It's almost 3 am and I'm still wide awake. I know that anti convulsants can be used to treat bipolar disorder. This makes me wonder if I'm bipolar or if suddenly coming off of a medicine like that just causes mania. Or maybe I just have extra energy since im not drugged...lol... Also, Isnt that a lot of medicine? My doctor put me on the keppra to wean me off the tegretol. He said it was bad for my liver but keppra is safer. I weaned off of the tegretol and the keppra didnt work on its own so he said to just keep taking both. This doesnt make sense to me. Why not just take tegretol then instead of both? do doctors get a cut if they prescribe a certain kind? Im not sure why he insists on me taking so much when previously I took 200 miligrams of tegretol a day and it worked fine. Answered by Dorthea Lippincott 4 months ago.

If the Tegretol worked on its own but you were getting elevated liver enzymes, you should probably be trying something other than Tegretol but not Keppra (since you say it didn't work, which I assume means you had seizures). Keppra technically isn't supposed to be used as monotherapy but a lot of people do prescribe it that way, and it does work for some people. If you weren't actually getting liver damage but you find it decreases your energy to an unacceptable amount, that is also a reason to try something else. Just the fact that you feel more energetic when you don't take it doesn't mean you're bipolar. You should also be taking the lowest dose that controls your seizures. Suggesting anything concrete in the way of therapy is a little too close to treatment over the internet for me, so I'll just say that there are other choices of medication. Only a doctor who is treating you can know enough about your medical situation to help you decide what the best choice is--all anti-convulsive medications have side effects and you have to try to get the seizures under control with the lowest possible side effects. If the doctor who is prescribing these medications is not actually a neurologist/epileptologist, it would probably be worthwhile going to a specialist. And no, we don't get a cut for prescribing certain medications. Answered by Jay Seats 4 months ago.

Keppra Bipolar Answered by Selina Galeazzi 4 months ago.


Does the "drowsiness" ever go away on Tegretol?
I've taken Tegretol before, but have always stopped early on because it makes me so drowsy and dizzy. If I were to take it again (yes, with doctor supervision--we're working to find a cocktail that works)--is this a side effect that goes away? Personal experiences (or experiences of your family or... Asked by Christian Livigni 4 months ago.

I've taken Tegretol before, but have always stopped early on because it makes me so drowsy and dizzy. If I were to take it again (yes, with doctor supervision--we're working to find a cocktail that works)--is this a side effect that goes away? Personal experiences (or experiences of your family or friends) only please. Answered by Josiah Lopriore 4 months ago.

I currently take Tegretol; the side effect I had when I first started taking it was some nausea. It went away. I currently take it in the morning and at night. When I first started it the dose was at night, after a while a bit was added in the morning, after a few more days more was added at night, and then a few more days more was added in the morning to the dosage I am taking now. I think one of the keys is to do it slow and to trust what your body is telling you- that is what my doctor always tells me. Generally, after you are on a drug for a bit most initial side effects should go away. However, each person reacts differently with each drug and perhaps it may not go away. I was on lithium a number of years ago for a short while and I felt way worse taking it that I did not taking it- so we worked to find something else. But do remember it does take 4-6 weeks often for a full effect of a drug to take effect. Anyways, the key is to trust what your body says, know what you are willing to deal with and can handle and accept, and of course have supervision like you acknowledged. Answered by Darby Grace 4 months ago.

Just started Tegretol, first and second day was great, I actually got out of bed, I am on this massive depression spree, and somewhat suicidal. Then started falling asleep within in about an hour of my doses, so it was sleep all day, up all night, sucks. Actually, that is STILL the routine, I am hanging in there in hopes it will make me feel better eventually without all the sleeping, what do I have to lose? I don't think anyone could work on all this cocktail mess. Also, it causes a lot of dreaming, they are all good, but then that also depresses me a little when I wake up, because I am coming out of a "better" scenario in my dream world, then my horrible REAL LIFE! Answered by Pasty Lucken 4 months ago.


Clozaril works with tegretol?
can you take clozaril with tegretol? Asked by Tom Biler 4 months ago.

It isn't recommended because carbamazepine (tegretol) can reduce the white blood cell count and thereby increase the risk of agranulocytosis, a potentially serious side effect. Clozaril itself can lower the seizure threshhold so if you are taking tegretol for seizures, it would be a serious risk to consider as well. Clozaril is only used when other anti-psychotics fail, so if you are in this situation it may be a necessary risk, but discuss this with your psychiatrist. Perhaps another anti-convulsant can be tried for seizures or mood stabilization if Clozaril is deemed necessary. I will say I have seen some truly astounding positive results with Clozaril. Answered by Martha How 4 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016608/001 TEGRETOL CARBAMAZEPINE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
018281/001 TEGRETOL CARBAMAZEPINE TABLET, CHEWABLE/ORAL 100MG
018927/001 TEGRETOL CARBAMAZEPINE SUSPENSION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016608/001 TEGRETOL CARBAMAZEPINE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
018281/001 TEGRETOL CARBAMAZEPINE TABLET, CHEWABLE/ORAL 100MG
018927/001 TEGRETOL CARBAMAZEPINE SUSPENSION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML
020234/001 TEGRETOL-XR CARBAMAZEPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
020234/002 TEGRETOL-XR CARBAMAZEPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
020234/003 TEGRETOL-XR CARBAMAZEPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 400MG
020712/001 CARBATROL CARBAMAZEPINE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
020712/002 CARBATROL CARBAMAZEPINE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
020712/003 CARBATROL CARBAMAZEPINE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
021710/001 EQUETRO CARBAMAZEPINE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
021710/002 EQUETRO CARBAMAZEPINE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
021710/003 EQUETRO CARBAMAZEPINE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
070231/001 CARBAMAZEPINE CARBAMAZEPINE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
070300/001 CARBAMAZEPINE CARBAMAZEPINE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
070429/001 CARBAMAZEPINE CARBAMAZEPINE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
070541/001 EPITOL CARBAMAZEPINE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
071479/001 CARBAMAZEPINE CARBAMAZEPINE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
071696/001 CARBAMAZEPINE CARBAMAZEPINE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
071940/001 CARBAMAZEPINE CARBAMAZEPINE TABLET, CHEWABLE/ORAL 100MG
073524/001 EPITOL CARBAMAZEPINE TABLET, CHEWABLE/ORAL 100MG
074649/001 CARBAMAZEPINE CARBAMAZEPINE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
075687/001 CARBAMAZEPINE CARBAMAZEPINE TABLET, CHEWABLE/ORAL 100MG
075687/002 CARBAMAZEPINE CARBAMAZEPINE TABLET, CHEWABLE/ORAL 200MG
075712/001 CARBAMAZEPINE CARBAMAZEPINE TABLET, CHEWABLE/ORAL 100MG
075714/001 CARBAMAZEPINE CARBAMAZEPINE SUSPENSION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML
075875/001 CARBAMAZEPINE CARBAMAZEPINE SUSPENSION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML
075948/001 CARBAMAZEPINE CARBAMAZEPINE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
076525/001 TERIL CARBAMAZEPINE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
076697/001 CARBAMAZEPINE CARBAMAZEPINE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
076697/002 CARBAMAZEPINE CARBAMAZEPINE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
076697/003 CARBAMAZEPINE CARBAMAZEPINE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
076729/001 TERIL CARBAMAZEPINE SUSPENSION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML
077272/001 CARBAMAZEPINE CARBAMAZEPINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
077272/002 CARBAMAZEPINE CARBAMAZEPINE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
077272/003 CARBAMAZEPINE CARBAMAZEPINE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
077272/004 CARBAMAZEPINE CARBAMAZEPINE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
078115/001 CARBAMAZEPINE CARBAMAZEPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
078115/002 CARBAMAZEPINE CARBAMAZEPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
078115/003 CARBAMAZEPINE CARBAMAZEPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 400MG
078592/001 CARBAMAZEPINE CARBAMAZEPINE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
078592/002 CARBAMAZEPINE CARBAMAZEPINE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
078592/003 CARBAMAZEPINE CARBAMAZEPINE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
078746/001 CARBAMAZEPINE CARBAMAZEPINE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ ORAL 100MG
078746/002 CARBAMAZEPINE CARBAMAZEPINE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ ORAL 200MG
078746/003 CARBAMAZEPINE CARBAMAZEPINE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ ORAL 300MG
078986/001 CARBAMAZEPINE CARBAMAZEPINE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
078986/002 CARBAMAZEPINE CARBAMAZEPINE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
078986/003 CARBAMAZEPINE CARBAMAZEPINE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
201106/001 CARBAMAZEPINE CARBAMAZEPINE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
201106/002 CARBAMAZEPINE CARBAMAZEPINE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
201106/003 CARBAMAZEPINE CARBAMAZEPINE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
206030/001 CARNEXIV CARBAMAZEPINE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 200MG per 20ML (10MG per ML)

Manufacturers

Manufacturer name
Novartis Pharmaceuticals UK Ltd

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