Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 017693/001.

Names and composition

"TECHNETIUM TC 99M GENERATOR" is the commercial name of a drug composed of TECHNETIUM TC-99M SODIUM PERTECHNETATE GENERATOR.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017693/001 TECHNETIUM TC 99M GENERATOR TECHNETIUM TC-99M SODIUM PERTECHNETATE GENERATOR SOLUTION/INTRAVENOUS, ORAL 830-16600mCi per GENERATOR
017693/002 TECHNETIUM TC 99M GENERATOR TECHNETIUM TC-99M SODIUM PERTECHNETATE GENERATOR SOLUTION/INTRAVENOUS, ORAL 68-2703mCi per GENERATOR

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017243/002 ULTRA-TECHNEKOW FM TECHNETIUM TC-99M SODIUM PERTECHNETATE GENERATOR SOLUTION/INTRAVENOUS 0.25-3 CI per GENERATOR
017243/003 ULTRA-TECHNEKOW FM TECHNETIUM TC-99M SODIUM PERTECHNETATE GENERATOR SOLUTION/INTRAVENOUS 1-19 CI per GENERATOR
017339/001 MINITEC TECHNETIUM TC-99M SODIUM PERTECHNETATE GENERATOR SOLUTION/INJECTION, ORAL 0.22-2.22 CI per GENERATOR
017693/001 TECHNETIUM TC 99M GENERATOR TECHNETIUM TC-99M SODIUM PERTECHNETATE GENERATOR SOLUTION/INTRAVENOUS, ORAL 830-16600mCi per GENERATOR
017693/002 TECHNETIUM TC 99M GENERATOR TECHNETIUM TC-99M SODIUM PERTECHNETATE GENERATOR SOLUTION/INTRAVENOUS, ORAL 68-2703mCi per GENERATOR
017771/001 TECHNELITE TECHNETIUM TC-99M SODIUM PERTECHNETATE GENERATOR SOLUTION/INTRAVENOUS 0.0083-2.7 CI per GENERATOR
017771/002 TECHNELITE TECHNETIUM TC-99M SODIUM PERTECHNETATE GENERATOR SOLUTION/INTRAVENOUS 1-20 CI per GENERATOR

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Answered questions

What are some of the characteristics that make technetium-99m such a useful radioisotope for diagnostic purpos?
What are some of the characteristics that make technetium-99m such a useful radioisotope for diagnostic purposes in the medical field? Asked by Bambi Shabazz 1 year ago.

Technetium-99m is a metastable isotope, so you can consider it as a pure gamma-emitting isotope, which is good for diagnostic use due to the low absorbed dose it releases in the human body. The gamma rays have an energy of 140 KeV, optimal to be detected by the gamma-camera (the detector used in nuclear medicine) and quite easy to be shielded to avoid useless irradiation. Technetium-99m's half-life is 6.01h: this amount of time allows to obtain diagnostic information but doesn't cause radioactivity to persist for too much time. It can be obtain easily by a Mo-99/Tc-99m generator, which consist in a chromatographic column that can be eluated with saline solution and produces sodium pertechnetate that can be used to label molecules with simple labeling reactions. Answered by Erline Reano 1 year ago.


What is technetium 99m?
in words i can understand please. Asked by Leigh Berkbigler 1 year ago.

Technetium-99m is a metastable nuclear isomer of technetium-99, symbolized as 99mTc. The "m" indicates that this is a metastable nuclear isomer, i.e., that its half life is considerably longer (by several orders of magnitude, at least) than most nuclear isomers which undergo gamma decay. As in all gamma decay reactions, a metastable nuclear isomer does not change into another element (transmute) upon its isomeric transition or "decay". The life-time of technetium-99m is very long in terms of average gamma-decay half-lives, though short in comparison with half-lives for other kinds of radioactive decay, and in comparison with radionuclides used in many kinds of nuclear medicine tests. Technetium-99m is used as a radioactive tracer that medical equipment can detect in the body. It is well suited to the role because it emits readily detectable 140 keV gamma rays (these are about the same wavelength emitted by conventional X-ray diagnostic equipment), and its half-life for gamma emission is 6.0058 hours (meaning that 93.7% of it decays to 99Tc in 24 hours). The "short" half life of the isotope (in terms of human-activity and metabolism) allows for scanning procedures which collect data rapidly, but keep total patient radiation exposure low. Technetium-99m decays to technetium-99 (Tc-99, the ground state of the same isotope) by rearrangement of nucleons in its nucleus. Technetium-99 then decays to stable ruthenium-99 with a half life of 211,000 years. It emits soft beta particles (electrons) in this process, but no gamma rays (photons). All of these characteristics ensure that the technetium-99 produced from technetium-99m produces very little extra radiation burden on the body. Due to its short half life, technetium-99m for nuclear medicine purposes is usually extracted from technetium-99m generators which contain molybdenum-99 (Mo-99, half life 2.75 days), which is the usual parent nuclide for this isotope. The majority of Mo-99 produced for Tc-99m medical use comes from fission of HEU (highly enriched uranium) from only five reactors around the world: NRU, Canada; BR2, Belgium; SAFARI-1, South Africa; HFR (Petten), the Netherlands; and the OSIRIS reactor in Saclay, France. Production from LEU (low-enriched uranium) is possible, and is produced at the new OPAL reactor, Australia, as well as other sites. Activation of Mo-98 is another, currently smaller, route of production Answered by Jonell Skultety 1 year ago.

Technetium 99 has 43 protons and 56 neutrons. Technetium 99m has the same amount, but it also has some extra energy stored in the nucleus, in a similar way to how energy can be stored by electrons in higher energy levels. Over time nuclei lose this energy by emitting a high energy photon and leave behind a regular Technetium 99 nucleus. It has a half-life of 6 hours, which means that if you take a sample of pure Technetium 99m, after 6 hours you have half of it left, and the other half will be Technetium 99. After another 6 hours you will only have a quarter left, and the remaining three quarters will be Technetium 99, and so on. Answered by Pat Goodfriend 1 year ago.

Production Of Technetium 99m Answered by Graham Przybyla 1 year ago.


What are some uses of Molybdenum-99 (Mo-99)?
All I really know is that it is often used for medical procedures but I don't know what kind of procedures or any other uses it may have. Thanks =) Asked by Georgene Revel 1 year ago.

the most common isotopic molybdenum application involves molybdenum-99, which is a fission product. It is a parent radioisotope to the short-lived gamma-emitting daughter radioisotope technetium-99m, a nuclear isomer which is used in various imaging applications in medicine.[9] A reactor-produced radioisotope of molybdenum with a half-life of 2.7476 days, used in radionuclide generators for the production of technetium-99m. 3-D scanning technique: SPECT Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a nuclear medicine imaging technique using gamma rays. It may be used with any gamma-emitting isotope, including Tc-99m. In the use of technetium-99m, the radioisotope is administered to the patient and the escaping gamma rays are incident upon a moving gamma camera which computes and processes the image. To acquire SPECT images, the gamma camera is rotated around the patient. Projections are acquired at defined points during the rotation, typically every 3-6 degrees. In most cases, a full 360 degree rotation is used to obtain an optimal reconstruction. The time taken to obtain each projection is also variable, but 15–20 seconds is typical. This gives a total scan time of 15–20 minutes. The technetium-99m radioisotope is used predominantly in both bone and brain scans to check for any irregularities.[clarification needed] Although Tc-99m is used for diagnostic nuclear medicine imaging procedures, it is not used for any therapeutic procedures. [edit] Common nuclear medicine techniques using technetium-99m [edit] Bone scan The nuclear medicine technique commonly called the bone scan usually uses Tc-99m. It is not to be confused with the different "bone density scan," DEXA, which is a low exposure X-ray test measuring bone density to look for osteoporosis and other diseases where bones lose mass without re-building activity. The nuclear medicine technique in sensitive to areas of unusual bone re-building activity, since the radiopharmaceutical is taken up by osteoblast cells which build bone. The technique therefore is sensitive to fractures and bone reaction to bone tumors, including metastases. For a bone scan, the patient is injected with a small amount of radioactive material such as 20-30 mCi of technetium-99m-MDP and then scanned with a gamma camera. In order to view small lesions (less than 1 cm) especially in the spine, the SPECT imaging technique may be required, but currently in the United States, most insurance companies require separate authorization for SPECT imaging. [edit] Myocardial perfusion imaging Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is a form of functional cardiac imaging, used for the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease. The underlying principle is that under conditions of stress, diseased myocardium receives less blood flow than normal myocardium. MPI is one of several types of cardiac stress test. Several radiopharmaceuticals and radionuclides may be used for this, each giving different information. In the myocardial perfusion scans using Tc-99m, the radiopharmaceuticals 99mTc-tetrofosmin (Myoview®, GE Healthcare) or 99mTc-sestamibi (Cardiolite®, Bristol-Myers Squibb) are used. Following this, the heart rate is raised to induce myocardial stress, either by exercise or pharmacologically with adenosine, dobutamine or dipyridamole (aminophylline can be used to reverse the effects of dipyridamole). Scanning may then be performed with a conventional gamma camera, or with SPECT. [edit] Cardiac ventriculography In cardiac ventriculography, a radionuclide, which usually is 99mTc, is injected, and the heart is imaged to evaluate the flow through it. This test is done to evaluate coronary artery disease (CAD), valvular heart disease, congenital heart diseases, cardiomyopathy, and other cardiac disorders.[13] It exposes patients to less radiation than do comparable chest x-ray studies.[13] [edit] Functional brain imaging Usually the gamma-emitting tracer used in functional brain imaging is 99mTc-HMPAO (hexamethylpropylene amine oxime, exametazime). The similar 99mTc-EC tracer may also be used. These molecules are preferentially distributed to regions of high brain blood flow, and act to assess brain metabolism regionally, in an attempt to diagnose and differentiate the different causal pathologies of dementia. When used with the 3-D SPECT technique, they compete with brain FDG-PET scans and fMRI brain scans as techniques to map the regional metabolic rate of brain tissue. [edit] Immunoscintigraphy Immunoscintigraphy incorporates 99mTc into a monoclonal antibody, an immune system protein, capable of binding to cancer cells. A few hours after injection, medical equipment is used to detect the gamma rays emitted by the 99mTc; higher concentrations indicate where the tumor is. This technique is particularly useful for detecting hard-to-find cancers Answered by Alexandria Galway 1 year ago.

Uses Of Molybdenum Answered by Yoshie Kalafarski 1 year ago.

Molybdenum Uses Answered by Alaine Oviedo 1 year ago.

this could be a waste of time, this could be in video games (for infants). Flaccinaucinihilification F - 19 (2) l. a. - 138.ninety one (a million) O - sixteen (2) C - 12 (4) i - 126.9 (6) N - 14 (3) Au - 196.ninety seven (a million) H - a million (a million) Li - 6.ninety 4 (a million) At - 209.00 (a million) = a million,474.21 lol too undesirable its spelt Floccinaucinihilification :) Answered by Signe Kanatzar 1 year ago.


What are some of the characteristics that make technetium-99m such a useful radioisotope for diagnostic purpos?
What are some of the characteristics that make technetium-99m such a useful radioisotope for diagnostic purposes in the medical field? Asked by Josphine Sininger 1 year ago.

Technetium-99m is a metastable isotope, so you can consider it as a pure gamma-emitting isotope, which is good for diagnostic use due to the low absorbed dose it releases in the human body. The gamma rays have an energy of 140 KeV, optimal to be detected by the gamma-camera (the detector used in nuclear medicine) and quite easy to be shielded to avoid useless irradiation. Technetium-99m's half-life is 6.01h: this amount of time allows to obtain diagnostic information but doesn't cause radioactivity to persist for too much time. It can be obtain easily by a Mo-99/Tc-99m generator, which consist in a chromatographic column that can be eluated with saline solution and produces sodium pertechnetate that can be used to label molecules with simple labeling reactions. Answered by Beatris Roers 1 year ago.


What is technetium 99m?
in words i can understand please. Asked by Alesia Shannon 1 year ago.

Technetium-99m is a metastable nuclear isomer of technetium-99, symbolized as 99mTc. The "m" indicates that this is a metastable nuclear isomer, i.e., that its half life is considerably longer (by several orders of magnitude, at least) than most nuclear isomers which undergo gamma decay. As in all gamma decay reactions, a metastable nuclear isomer does not change into another element (transmute) upon its isomeric transition or "decay". The life-time of technetium-99m is very long in terms of average gamma-decay half-lives, though short in comparison with half-lives for other kinds of radioactive decay, and in comparison with radionuclides used in many kinds of nuclear medicine tests. Technetium-99m is used as a radioactive tracer that medical equipment can detect in the body. It is well suited to the role because it emits readily detectable 140 keV gamma rays (these are about the same wavelength emitted by conventional X-ray diagnostic equipment), and its half-life for gamma emission is 6.0058 hours (meaning that 93.7% of it decays to 99Tc in 24 hours). The "short" half life of the isotope (in terms of human-activity and metabolism) allows for scanning procedures which collect data rapidly, but keep total patient radiation exposure low. Technetium-99m decays to technetium-99 (Tc-99, the ground state of the same isotope) by rearrangement of nucleons in its nucleus. Technetium-99 then decays to stable ruthenium-99 with a half life of 211,000 years. It emits soft beta particles (electrons) in this process, but no gamma rays (photons). All of these characteristics ensure that the technetium-99 produced from technetium-99m produces very little extra radiation burden on the body. Due to its short half life, technetium-99m for nuclear medicine purposes is usually extracted from technetium-99m generators which contain molybdenum-99 (Mo-99, half life 2.75 days), which is the usual parent nuclide for this isotope. The majority of Mo-99 produced for Tc-99m medical use comes from fission of HEU (highly enriched uranium) from only five reactors around the world: NRU, Canada; BR2, Belgium; SAFARI-1, South Africa; HFR (Petten), the Netherlands; and the OSIRIS reactor in Saclay, France. Production from LEU (low-enriched uranium) is possible, and is produced at the new OPAL reactor, Australia, as well as other sites. Activation of Mo-98 is another, currently smaller, route of production Answered by Jaimee Traner 1 year ago.

Technetium 99 has 43 protons and 56 neutrons. Technetium 99m has the same amount, but it also has some extra energy stored in the nucleus, in a similar way to how energy can be stored by electrons in higher energy levels. Over time nuclei lose this energy by emitting a high energy photon and leave behind a regular Technetium 99 nucleus. It has a half-life of 6 hours, which means that if you take a sample of pure Technetium 99m, after 6 hours you have half of it left, and the other half will be Technetium 99. After another 6 hours you will only have a quarter left, and the remaining three quarters will be Technetium 99, and so on. Answered by Lily Ferrari 1 year ago.

Production Of Technetium 99m Answered by Gilbert Kurter 1 year ago.


What are some uses of Molybdenum-99 (Mo-99)?
All I really know is that it is often used for medical procedures but I don't know what kind of procedures or any other uses it may have. Thanks =) Asked by Bret Molnar 1 year ago.

the most common isotopic molybdenum application involves molybdenum-99, which is a fission product. It is a parent radioisotope to the short-lived gamma-emitting daughter radioisotope technetium-99m, a nuclear isomer which is used in various imaging applications in medicine.[9] A reactor-produced radioisotope of molybdenum with a half-life of 2.7476 days, used in radionuclide generators for the production of technetium-99m. 3-D scanning technique: SPECT Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a nuclear medicine imaging technique using gamma rays. It may be used with any gamma-emitting isotope, including Tc-99m. In the use of technetium-99m, the radioisotope is administered to the patient and the escaping gamma rays are incident upon a moving gamma camera which computes and processes the image. To acquire SPECT images, the gamma camera is rotated around the patient. Projections are acquired at defined points during the rotation, typically every 3-6 degrees. In most cases, a full 360 degree rotation is used to obtain an optimal reconstruction. The time taken to obtain each projection is also variable, but 15–20 seconds is typical. This gives a total scan time of 15–20 minutes. The technetium-99m radioisotope is used predominantly in both bone and brain scans to check for any irregularities.[clarification needed] Although Tc-99m is used for diagnostic nuclear medicine imaging procedures, it is not used for any therapeutic procedures. [edit] Common nuclear medicine techniques using technetium-99m [edit] Bone scan The nuclear medicine technique commonly called the bone scan usually uses Tc-99m. It is not to be confused with the different "bone density scan," DEXA, which is a low exposure X-ray test measuring bone density to look for osteoporosis and other diseases where bones lose mass without re-building activity. The nuclear medicine technique in sensitive to areas of unusual bone re-building activity, since the radiopharmaceutical is taken up by osteoblast cells which build bone. The technique therefore is sensitive to fractures and bone reaction to bone tumors, including metastases. For a bone scan, the patient is injected with a small amount of radioactive material such as 20-30 mCi of technetium-99m-MDP and then scanned with a gamma camera. In order to view small lesions (less than 1 cm) especially in the spine, the SPECT imaging technique may be required, but currently in the United States, most insurance companies require separate authorization for SPECT imaging. [edit] Myocardial perfusion imaging Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is a form of functional cardiac imaging, used for the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease. The underlying principle is that under conditions of stress, diseased myocardium receives less blood flow than normal myocardium. MPI is one of several types of cardiac stress test. Several radiopharmaceuticals and radionuclides may be used for this, each giving different information. In the myocardial perfusion scans using Tc-99m, the radiopharmaceuticals 99mTc-tetrofosmin (Myoview®, GE Healthcare) or 99mTc-sestamibi (Cardiolite®, Bristol-Myers Squibb) are used. Following this, the heart rate is raised to induce myocardial stress, either by exercise or pharmacologically with adenosine, dobutamine or dipyridamole (aminophylline can be used to reverse the effects of dipyridamole). Scanning may then be performed with a conventional gamma camera, or with SPECT. [edit] Cardiac ventriculography In cardiac ventriculography, a radionuclide, which usually is 99mTc, is injected, and the heart is imaged to evaluate the flow through it. This test is done to evaluate coronary artery disease (CAD), valvular heart disease, congenital heart diseases, cardiomyopathy, and other cardiac disorders.[13] It exposes patients to less radiation than do comparable chest x-ray studies.[13] [edit] Functional brain imaging Usually the gamma-emitting tracer used in functional brain imaging is 99mTc-HMPAO (hexamethylpropylene amine oxime, exametazime). The similar 99mTc-EC tracer may also be used. These molecules are preferentially distributed to regions of high brain blood flow, and act to assess brain metabolism regionally, in an attempt to diagnose and differentiate the different causal pathologies of dementia. When used with the 3-D SPECT technique, they compete with brain FDG-PET scans and fMRI brain scans as techniques to map the regional metabolic rate of brain tissue. [edit] Immunoscintigraphy Immunoscintigraphy incorporates 99mTc into a monoclonal antibody, an immune system protein, capable of binding to cancer cells. A few hours after injection, medical equipment is used to detect the gamma rays emitted by the 99mTc; higher concentrations indicate where the tumor is. This technique is particularly useful for detecting hard-to-find cancers Answered by Oscar Pandola 1 year ago.

Uses Of Molybdenum Answered by Susy Garnow 1 year ago.

Molybdenum Uses Answered by Flora Hollowell 1 year ago.

this could be a waste of time, this could be in video games (for infants). Flaccinaucinihilification F - 19 (2) l. a. - 138.ninety one (a million) O - sixteen (2) C - 12 (4) i - 126.9 (6) N - 14 (3) Au - 196.ninety seven (a million) H - a million (a million) Li - 6.ninety 4 (a million) At - 209.00 (a million) = a million,474.21 lol too undesirable its spelt Floccinaucinihilification :) Answered by Alice Lonergan 1 year ago.


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