TAZAROTENE Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 208258/001.

Names and composition

"TAZAROTENE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of TAZAROTENE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
208258/001 TAZAROTENE TAZAROTENE CREAM/TOPICAL 0.1%

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
021184/003 AVAGE TAZAROTENE CREAM/TOPICAL 0.1%
202428/001 FABIOR TAZAROTENE AEROSOL, FOAM/TOPICAL 0.1%
208258/001 TAZAROTENE TAZAROTENE CREAM/TOPICAL 0.1%
020600/001 TAZORAC TAZAROTENE GEL/TOPICAL 0.05%
020600/002 TAZORAC TAZAROTENE GEL/TOPICAL 0.1%
021184/001 TAZORAC TAZAROTENE CREAM/TOPICAL 0.05%
021184/002 TAZORAC TAZAROTENE CREAM/TOPICAL 0.1%

Ask a question

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question as quickly as possible.

Answered questions

Will Tazorac Cream (Tazarotene Cream) help me with acne scars?
ive been on treatment for about 4 months and my acne is clear thanks to retin a and pills and other creams and i do not break out anymore.My dermotalogist told me to use tazorac cream for acne scars now will it work?cause ive heard it causes breakouts and it doesn't work. But he says its the best thing for... Asked by Kareen Barino 1 month ago.

ive been on treatment for about 4 months and my acne is clear thanks to retin a and pills and other creams and i do not break out anymore. My dermotalogist told me to use tazorac cream for acne scars now will it work? cause ive heard it causes breakouts and it doesn't work. But he says its the best thing for scars. and i dont want to break out anymore. Answered by Donella Alar 1 month ago.

It would be weird for your doctor to recommend it if he is also helping treat your current acne. All you can do is try it and find out. If it causes more break-outs, just stop using it. Hope it works! Answered by Joshua Sagehorn 1 month ago.

I haven't heard great things about Tazorac. There's a cream that actually DOES work and it works really well. If you're going to get a cream you might as well get one that works. (and doesn't cause more breakouts) They have a money back guarantee so if it doesn't work for you, you can always return it...its called revitol and the scarhelpcenter has a coupon for it I think. The key is consistency...you have to do it every day until you see results...and if you're consistent you will see results. Answered by Mila Yunker 1 month ago.

While it took little less than two months for me to really see a difference, my acne, blackheads and whole lot of other skin problems I had such as eczema had completely cleared! It was totally amazing... Get Rid Of Acne Permanently? Answered by Maile Davila 1 month ago.

Try the product Seacret. It works really well for acne and many other skin problems. Your parents would love it too, my mom uses it and she loves it cause the have age defying products too. check it out you will see results in one use! Answered by Ivey Herald 1 month ago.


Has anyone else been on a medication called tazorac?
okay i just got off of a medication called accutane a.k.a isotetrinoin and i have to get on this other medication called tazorac, it's a topical gel. has anyone used it before. why is it so expensive? Asked by Minh Esnard 1 month ago.

Tazarotene belongs to a group of medications called retinoids. It is used to treat plaque psoriasis and acne vulgaris. The cream form is also used to treat the signs and symptoms (appearance and texture) of premature aging of the skin caused by overexposure to the sun (photodamage). Tazarotene helps psoriasis by reducing inflammation and keeping skin cell growth down to a normal rate. It appears to help acne partly by keeping skin pores clear. You will begin to see improvement about 1 to 4 weeks after starting the medication, depending on what you are using it for. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to use this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it. For psoriasis, apply a thin film of tazarotene cream or gel once daily in the evening only to the affected areas. The skin should be dry before applying the medication. If emollient or moisturizing creams are also being used, apply these first and allow them to absorb into the skin before applying the tazarotene cream or gel. For acne, gently cleanse and dry the skin. Apply a thin film of cream or gel to the entire face (everything between the hairline, jawline, and ears) once a day in the evening. For photodamage, remove makeup before applying the cream. Apply a pea-sized amount of cream to the entire face, including a careful application to the eyelids if desired. Take special care to minimize contact with the eyes, lips, and mucous-producing areas. Make sure the skin is dry before application. If you apply a moisturizer before this medication, allow it to absorb into the skin before applying the tazarotene cream. This medication may cause increased sensitivity of the skin to sunlight. Sunscreen (minimum SPF 30) and protective clothing should be used when the skin is exposed to sunlight. Avoid getting the medication in your eyes, and do not take the medication by mouth. Do not cover the treatment areas with dressings or bandages. Do not apply to skin that is broken or severely inflamed. Many things can affect the dose of medication that a person needs, such as body weight, other medical conditions, and other medications. If your doctor has recommended a dose different from the ones listed here, do not change the way that you are using the medication without consulting your doctor. It is important to use this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. If you miss a dose of this medication, do not apply the missed dose but return to your regular schedule as soon as possible. Do not apply a double dose to make up for a missed one. If you are not sure what to do after missing a dose, contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice. Store this medication at room temperature and keep it out of reach of children. Do not dispose of medications in wastewater (e.g. down the sink or in the toilet) or in household garbage. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medications that are no longer needed or have expired. Answered by Kayleen Fornier 1 month ago.


Dermatologists~!! What does T.R 0.1% cream stand for ? This cream is used for Rashes.?
its very light and thin, not thick.. looks as if its just white powder mixed with water.. Asked by Leia Boissy 1 month ago.

tazarotene? Answered by Evelyn Mcclendon 1 month ago.


I have a question about neutrogena and tazorac?
I'm the kind of girl who used to think "if it's expensive it HAS to work!" After WASTING money on crappy facial cleansers and prescriptions I took a chance and bought neutrogena's new acne stress control power clear scrub (the one with micro clear), anyways I was really excited to try it and... Asked by Vonnie Kubley 1 month ago.

I'm the kind of girl who used to think "if it's expensive it HAS to work!" After WASTING money on crappy facial cleansers and prescriptions I took a chance and bought neutrogena's new acne stress control power clear scrub (the one with micro clear), anyways I was really excited to try it and I'm currently using tazorac 0.1%. I was just about the use the face wash when I noticed the that the tube read "please consult a doctor before use if you are using other topical acne medications" which I fully intend to do, but it's 11:00pm right now and not many people are open. I was just wondering if anyone has had any bad experiences like that, or if anyone has used this new neutrogena face wash? Thanks! Answered by Tommy Goeke 1 month ago.

Generic Name: tazarotene topical Avoid exposure to sunlight or artificial UV rays (e.g., sunlamps). Use a sunscreen (minimum SPF 15) and wear protective clothing during the day when being treated with tazarotene topical. Do not use tazarotene topical on skin that is sunburned, windburned, dry, chapped, or irritated. Also avoid using this medication in wounds or on areas of eczema. Wait until these conditions have fully healed before using tazarotene topical. Avoid as much as possible other topical products with a strong drying effect, products with high concentrations of alcohol, astringents, spices, peel of lime, medicated soaps or shampoos, permanent wave solutions, electrolysis, chemical hair removers or waxes, or other products that might dry or irritate the skin unless instructed otherwise by your doctor. Answered by Jaclyn Sebastian 1 month ago.


Tazorac...?
so i been using this stuff for 3 weeks now and i do infact see a change... but.... i feel like my breaks out are more severe now.. so its reduced how much of my skin is breaking out but its amplifying it... is this normal... and if it is... about how many more weeks will i have to endure this -.- its rather... Asked by Harris Zagroba 1 month ago.

so i been using this stuff for 3 weeks now and i do infact see a change... but.... i feel like my breaks out are more severe now.. so its reduced how much of my skin is breaking out but its amplifying it... is this normal... and if it is... about how many more weeks will i have to endure this -.- its rather annoying. anyone thats used it perhaps shed some light eh? Answered by Carmel Branine 1 month ago.

Tazorac has tazarotene which is a retinoid. a retinoid is a different chemical compound from vitamin A. so what it does is normalize skin shedding and sebum production so it keeps your pores from clogging up. it works really slowly and it takes 3-4 months for you to see signigicant results. at first it is normal for acne to become more severe bacause the reinoid is "renewing" your skin and it's pulling up to the surface the pimples that were already forming. it takes 3-5 weeks for a pimple to form. so don't be discouraged i'm using it right now for 6 weeks and my moderately to severe acne has cleared by 50 percent. just stay on it for 12 weeks and you'll be surprised by it's results. Answered by Santa Lavista 1 month ago.


Does anyone know if there are any new treatments coming out for Psoriasis?
Asked by Yen Balcos 1 month ago.

Tazarotene. Clinical tests, improved symptoms in 70% of those who had psoriasis on as much as 20% of their bodies. Check this site out! Answered by Trish Kulback 1 month ago.

We have a friend in Washington that had it all over his body and his wife told me just last week that they have found something that works for him. He has been using it about a year now. It's a shot that he takes once a week it was originally for another disease and then they found out it also works for psoriasis. I am so happy for him he was suffering so much with it. Hope your doctor can find out what it is called. If not email me and I will ask her what its' called. Answered by Beulah Connors 1 month ago.

hey man i got it too i take a drug called enbrel but i also have arthrtis from it too also RA so yea Answered by Emily Krys 1 month ago.


What is a good treatment for keratosis pilaris (red bumps)?
I know what it is, I just was hoping I could get some tips on good treatment so, to avoid trying lots of money/time wasters. thanks XOooOXo Asked by Donita Hawley 1 month ago.

I was given Tazorac (Tazarotene) and it seemed to help. I wish I could just have keratosis pilaris. I recently developed psoriasis, so jump for joy if this is the worst skin issue you have! Answered by Madison Willet 1 month ago.


Does anyone know if there is any way to get Tazorac without a prescription or if there are any OTC equals?
Asked by Maryanne Freiser 1 month ago.

Please see the web page for more details on Tazarotene (generic name) Tazorac (brand name). Answered by Masako Graughard 1 month ago.

u must have the doctor prescription Answered by Antonette Kort 1 month ago.


How do I heal chemically-damaged facial skin?
Due to a persistent acne problem, I started on Tazorac (tazarotene). However, after only three days of nightly use, I found my skin to be extremely red, stinging, and mildly peeling in some places. I then stopped the treatment. It is very warm to the touch. It has now been two days since I stopped the drug, and my... Asked by Roseanna Yazzle 1 month ago.

Due to a persistent acne problem, I started on Tazorac (tazarotene). However, after only three days of nightly use, I found my skin to be extremely red, stinging, and mildly peeling in some places. I then stopped the treatment. It is very warm to the touch. It has now been two days since I stopped the drug, and my face is still just as red and painful as it was before. I have an important business conference in a week and a half, and I would rather my face not be flushed red at the conference. Is there something I should do (like moisturizers, etc.) to heal the skin on my face ASAP? Please be specific, like name the best brands of moisturizer or whatever product. Thanks a ton! Answered by Marketta Papitto 1 month ago.

Use pure aloe and neosporin Answered by Mike Mohs 1 month ago.

water water and more water do not use a moisturizer...read the lables...!! that drug is supposed to burn and peel you put to much on just a tad does it without the disater. splash water or use a spray bottle filled with ice cold water and let your face dry naturally... repeat often could take a week...dont use any more of that stuff till after the buisness thing. oh and it is doing its job the stinging and burning is actually killing the bacteria on your skin ya just used to much i had serious acne i know. wait to the burn and redness subsides and just put it on once a week Answered by Aletha Pollen 1 month ago.

go to walmart down the cooking oil isle and there you will find virgin coconut oil, its fabulous you can use it all over and if you wanna learn more check out coconut oil on you tube. Answered by Mandy Zobell 1 month ago.


Is my skin supposed to peel while using medications for rosacea?
I've had my dentist and my hair stylist both tell me my skin shouldn't peel since it's already sensitive as it is, even though the side effects of the medication include burning sensation, peeling, etc. I'm worried that the dermatologist might be prescribing me those medications just to get me to... Asked by Blake Larrier 1 month ago.

I've had my dentist and my hair stylist both tell me my skin shouldn't peel since it's already sensitive as it is, even though the side effects of the medication include burning sensation, peeling, etc. I'm worried that the dermatologist might be prescribing me those medications just to get me to come back when things get worse. Should I continue treatment, or seek help elsewhere? He gave me a 5% benzoyl peroxide wash, and prescribed me Aczone as well as Tazorac. Any help is appreciated :) Answered by Bailey Merrion 1 month ago.

Your skin is peeling because you are using Tazorac. Tazorac is a topical retinoid medication. "The mechanism of tazarotene action in acne vulgaris is not defined. However, the basis of tazarotene’s therapeutic effect in acne may be due to its anti-hyperproliferative, normalizing-of-differentiation and anti-inflammatory effects. Tazarotene inhibited corneocyte accumulation in rhino mouse skin and cross-linked envelope formation in cultured human keratinocytes. The clinical significance of these findings is unknown."- from Tazorac insert. I use Tazorac and I had peeling going on for a couple of weeks (2-4 weeks). After that, my skin looked absolutely flawless. Please make sure the use sunscreen because your skin will be very photosensitive. I would be very cautious on using Aczone. Aczone is an antibiotic and should be used carefully. You definitely don't want to develop any drug resistant strains of p. acnes. Good luck! *Disclaimer* The author is not a medical professional, and this information should not be considered medical advice. This information should NOT be used to replace consultation with or treatment by a trained medical professional, therapist, or any other qualified expert.The author has made considerable efforts to present accurate and reliable information. However, the author does not take any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of the information herein. Answered by Millicent Sporysz 1 month ago.


Related

Browse by letter
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

© Medications.li 2015-2017 - Blog - All rights reserved