Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 012486/001.

Names and composition

"TARACTAN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of CHLORPROTHIXENE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
012486/001 TARACTAN CHLORPROTHIXENE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
012486/003 TARACTAN CHLORPROTHIXENE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
012486/004 TARACTAN CHLORPROTHIXENE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
012486/005 TARACTAN CHLORPROTHIXENE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
012487/001 TARACTAN CHLORPROTHIXENE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12.5MG per ML
016149/002 TARACTAN CHLORPROTHIXENE CONCENTRATE/ORAL 100MG per 5ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
012486/001 TARACTAN CHLORPROTHIXENE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
012486/003 TARACTAN CHLORPROTHIXENE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
012486/004 TARACTAN CHLORPROTHIXENE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
012486/005 TARACTAN CHLORPROTHIXENE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
012487/001 TARACTAN CHLORPROTHIXENE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 12.5MG per ML
016149/002 TARACTAN CHLORPROTHIXENE CONCENTRATE/ORAL 100MG per 5ML

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Answered questions

What meds are prescribed for schizophrenia?
Asked by Ralph Elk 1 year ago.

ANTIPSYCHOTIC. List of Antipsychotic Medications chlorpromazine -Thorazine chlorprothixene -Taractan clozapine -Clozaril fluphenazine -Permitil, Prolixin haloperidol- Haldol loxapine- Loxitane mesoridazine -Serentil molindone Lidone, -Moban olanzapine -Zyprexa perphenazine -Trilafon quetiapine -Seroquel risperidone -Risperdal thioridazine- Mellaril thiothixene -Navane trifluoperazine -Stelazine trifluopromazine -Vesprin ziprasidone -Geodon paliperidone- Invega Answered by Kaleigh Barthen 1 year ago.

All the antipsychotics can be used for schizophenia, I take chlorpromazine at night and proclorperazine during the day, but the doctor at the hospital does not like me taking 2 antipsychotics. Answered by Francesca Acothley 1 year ago.

I've heard a lot of people talking about abilify recently Answered by Fletcher Tua 1 year ago.

Risperidal Sereoquel ( i take this one ) Haldol Answered by Brendan Barthe 1 year ago.

well i only know respiradal lol cause im on it they use it for that too. Answered by Laverne Figge 1 year ago.


What is harder for you to control: positive or negative symptoms?
Does your medication clear up even the negative symptoms? Asked by Shantae Gierke 1 year ago.

Depends on the symptoms you're talking about. I have a psychology degree and I'm pretty familiar with the effects of medications. I'm assuming that you mean positive and negative in the psychological sense, where positive symptoms (Type I symptoms) are the PRESENCE of a symptom of the illness (like hallucinations in schizophrenia), and negative symptoms (Type II symptoms) are when a normal response is ABSENT (like a flat affect in schizophrenia, where you don't display normal emotional responses). Negative symptoms are almost always harder to control than positive symptoms. Generally speaking, it's much easier to make a positive symptom go away than it is to make a person start generating a "normal" behavior to compensate for a negative symptom. Almost all neuroleptic medications such as thorazine, prolixin, mellaril, stelazine, haldol, taractan, navane, loxitane, moban, and orap are much more effective in treating positive symptoms. 1/4 of schizophrenics don't respond to these drugs at all for either kind of symptom, but the people who DO respond usually only see reduction of the positive symptoms. This means that they may not have any active psychotic symptoms, but they will still have problems with lack of motivation and building positive interpersonal relationships. Atypical antipsychotics work better at reducing BOTH positive and negative symptoms. These drugs include clozaril, risperdal, zyprexa, seroquel, and geodon. Both neuroleptics and atypical antipsychotics have side effects, but neuroleptics tend to have side effects that are more severe. Most physicians use the newer atypical antipsychotics because patients tolerate them better, they have fewer severe side effects, and they help treat the negative symptoms. These symptoms may not clear up entirely, but many patients do see significant improvement. Hope this answers your question. =) Answered by Gerda Fisanick 1 year ago.

I'm guessing you're referring to schizophrenia? Generally, in schizophrenia, the positive symptoms are easier to control with medication. Some of the antipsychotics are supposed to help with the negative symptoms, but generally do not work as well as the medicines that primarily control positive symptoms. I recently read a few papers that showed maintaining a job, even if it's part time for a couple of hours a day, helps improve the negative symptoms. Also if you need to live in a group home, trying to stay active with the other residents also tends to help. I realize this is very difficult, but it does seem to help. Answered by Rufina Shadfar 1 year ago.


What are some up to date names of some types of Anti-psychotic medications?
Asked by Yasmin Trusler 1 year ago.

Actual drugs names with the retail names in brackets: Haloperidol (Haldol, Serenace) Droperidol (Droleptan) Chlorpromazine (Thorazine, Largactil) Fluphenazine (Prolixin) - Available in decanoate (long-acting) form Perphenazine (Trilafon) Prochlorperazine (Compazine) Thioridazine (Mellaril, Melleril) Trifluoperazine (Stelazine) Mesoridazine Periciazine Promazine Triflupromazine (Vesprin) Levomepromazine (Nozinan) Promethazine (Phenergan) Pimozide (Orap) Chlorprothixene (Cloxan, Taractan, Truxal) Clopenthixol (Sordinol) Flupenthixol (Depixol, Fluanxol) Thiothixene (Navane) Zuclopenthixol (Cisordinol, Clopixol, Acuphase) Answered by Leilani Aimone 1 year ago.


What meds are prescribed for schizophrenia?
Asked by Henriette Stanclift 1 year ago.

ANTIPSYCHOTIC. List of Antipsychotic Medications chlorpromazine -Thorazine chlorprothixene -Taractan clozapine -Clozaril fluphenazine -Permitil, Prolixin haloperidol- Haldol loxapine- Loxitane mesoridazine -Serentil molindone Lidone, -Moban olanzapine -Zyprexa perphenazine -Trilafon quetiapine -Seroquel risperidone -Risperdal thioridazine- Mellaril thiothixene -Navane trifluoperazine -Stelazine trifluopromazine -Vesprin ziprasidone -Geodon paliperidone- Invega Answered by Tawanna Hant 1 year ago.

All the antipsychotics can be used for schizophenia, I take chlorpromazine at night and proclorperazine during the day, but the doctor at the hospital does not like me taking 2 antipsychotics. Answered by Paulene Koko 1 year ago.

I've heard a lot of people talking about abilify recently Answered by Lucio Bracht 1 year ago.

Risperidal Sereoquel ( i take this one ) Haldol Answered by Bobby Oatney 1 year ago.

well i only know respiradal lol cause im on it they use it for that too. Answered by Marilee Blasengame 1 year ago.


What is harder for you to control: positive or negative symptoms?
Does your medication clear up even the negative symptoms? Asked by Chet Kysar 1 year ago.

Depends on the symptoms you're talking about. I have a psychology degree and I'm pretty familiar with the effects of medications. I'm assuming that you mean positive and negative in the psychological sense, where positive symptoms (Type I symptoms) are the PRESENCE of a symptom of the illness (like hallucinations in schizophrenia), and negative symptoms (Type II symptoms) are when a normal response is ABSENT (like a flat affect in schizophrenia, where you don't display normal emotional responses). Negative symptoms are almost always harder to control than positive symptoms. Generally speaking, it's much easier to make a positive symptom go away than it is to make a person start generating a "normal" behavior to compensate for a negative symptom. Almost all neuroleptic medications such as thorazine, prolixin, mellaril, stelazine, haldol, taractan, navane, loxitane, moban, and orap are much more effective in treating positive symptoms. 1/4 of schizophrenics don't respond to these drugs at all for either kind of symptom, but the people who DO respond usually only see reduction of the positive symptoms. This means that they may not have any active psychotic symptoms, but they will still have problems with lack of motivation and building positive interpersonal relationships. Atypical antipsychotics work better at reducing BOTH positive and negative symptoms. These drugs include clozaril, risperdal, zyprexa, seroquel, and geodon. Both neuroleptics and atypical antipsychotics have side effects, but neuroleptics tend to have side effects that are more severe. Most physicians use the newer atypical antipsychotics because patients tolerate them better, they have fewer severe side effects, and they help treat the negative symptoms. These symptoms may not clear up entirely, but many patients do see significant improvement. Hope this answers your question. =) Answered by Leena Zbranek 1 year ago.

I'm guessing you're referring to schizophrenia? Generally, in schizophrenia, the positive symptoms are easier to control with medication. Some of the antipsychotics are supposed to help with the negative symptoms, but generally do not work as well as the medicines that primarily control positive symptoms. I recently read a few papers that showed maintaining a job, even if it's part time for a couple of hours a day, helps improve the negative symptoms. Also if you need to live in a group home, trying to stay active with the other residents also tends to help. I realize this is very difficult, but it does seem to help. Answered by Cyrstal Baudry 1 year ago.


What are some up to date names of some types of Anti-psychotic medications?
Asked by Giselle Ao 1 year ago.

Actual drugs names with the retail names in brackets: Haloperidol (Haldol, Serenace) Droperidol (Droleptan) Chlorpromazine (Thorazine, Largactil) Fluphenazine (Prolixin) - Available in decanoate (long-acting) form Perphenazine (Trilafon) Prochlorperazine (Compazine) Thioridazine (Mellaril, Melleril) Trifluoperazine (Stelazine) Mesoridazine Periciazine Promazine Triflupromazine (Vesprin) Levomepromazine (Nozinan) Promethazine (Phenergan) Pimozide (Orap) Chlorprothixene (Cloxan, Taractan, Truxal) Clopenthixol (Sordinol) Flupenthixol (Depixol, Fluanxol) Thiothixene (Navane) Zuclopenthixol (Cisordinol, Clopixol, Acuphase) Answered by Talisha Zettler 1 year ago.


What meds are prescribed for schizophrenia?
Asked by Adrian Uptgraft 1 year ago.

ANTIPSYCHOTIC. List of Antipsychotic Medications chlorpromazine -Thorazine chlorprothixene -Taractan clozapine -Clozaril fluphenazine -Permitil, Prolixin haloperidol- Haldol loxapine- Loxitane mesoridazine -Serentil molindone Lidone, -Moban olanzapine -Zyprexa perphenazine -Trilafon quetiapine -Seroquel risperidone -Risperdal thioridazine- Mellaril thiothixene -Navane trifluoperazine -Stelazine trifluopromazine -Vesprin ziprasidone -Geodon paliperidone- Invega Answered by Elvis Breck 1 year ago.

All the antipsychotics can be used for schizophenia, I take chlorpromazine at night and proclorperazine during the day, but the doctor at the hospital does not like me taking 2 antipsychotics. Answered by Fletcher Szeto 1 year ago.

I've heard a lot of people talking about abilify recently Answered by Adriene Mongan 1 year ago.

Risperidal Sereoquel ( i take this one ) Haldol Answered by Reda Hardi 1 year ago.

well i only know respiradal lol cause im on it they use it for that too. Answered by Imelda Janiszewski 1 year ago.


What is harder for you to control: positive or negative symptoms?
Does your medication clear up even the negative symptoms? Asked by Rocco Yavorsky 1 year ago.

Depends on the symptoms you're talking about. I have a psychology degree and I'm pretty familiar with the effects of medications. I'm assuming that you mean positive and negative in the psychological sense, where positive symptoms (Type I symptoms) are the PRESENCE of a symptom of the illness (like hallucinations in schizophrenia), and negative symptoms (Type II symptoms) are when a normal response is ABSENT (like a flat affect in schizophrenia, where you don't display normal emotional responses). Negative symptoms are almost always harder to control than positive symptoms. Generally speaking, it's much easier to make a positive symptom go away than it is to make a person start generating a "normal" behavior to compensate for a negative symptom. Almost all neuroleptic medications such as thorazine, prolixin, mellaril, stelazine, haldol, taractan, navane, loxitane, moban, and orap are much more effective in treating positive symptoms. 1/4 of schizophrenics don't respond to these drugs at all for either kind of symptom, but the people who DO respond usually only see reduction of the positive symptoms. This means that they may not have any active psychotic symptoms, but they will still have problems with lack of motivation and building positive interpersonal relationships. Atypical antipsychotics work better at reducing BOTH positive and negative symptoms. These drugs include clozaril, risperdal, zyprexa, seroquel, and geodon. Both neuroleptics and atypical antipsychotics have side effects, but neuroleptics tend to have side effects that are more severe. Most physicians use the newer atypical antipsychotics because patients tolerate them better, they have fewer severe side effects, and they help treat the negative symptoms. These symptoms may not clear up entirely, but many patients do see significant improvement. Hope this answers your question. =) Answered by Merideth Fetters 1 year ago.

I'm guessing you're referring to schizophrenia? Generally, in schizophrenia, the positive symptoms are easier to control with medication. Some of the antipsychotics are supposed to help with the negative symptoms, but generally do not work as well as the medicines that primarily control positive symptoms. I recently read a few papers that showed maintaining a job, even if it's part time for a couple of hours a day, helps improve the negative symptoms. Also if you need to live in a group home, trying to stay active with the other residents also tends to help. I realize this is very difficult, but it does seem to help. Answered by Scarlett Bolton 1 year ago.


What are some up to date names of some types of Anti-psychotic medications?
Asked by Broderick Filosa 1 year ago.

Actual drugs names with the retail names in brackets: Haloperidol (Haldol, Serenace) Droperidol (Droleptan) Chlorpromazine (Thorazine, Largactil) Fluphenazine (Prolixin) - Available in decanoate (long-acting) form Perphenazine (Trilafon) Prochlorperazine (Compazine) Thioridazine (Mellaril, Melleril) Trifluoperazine (Stelazine) Mesoridazine Periciazine Promazine Triflupromazine (Vesprin) Levomepromazine (Nozinan) Promethazine (Phenergan) Pimozide (Orap) Chlorprothixene (Cloxan, Taractan, Truxal) Clopenthixol (Sordinol) Flupenthixol (Depixol, Fluanxol) Thiothixene (Navane) Zuclopenthixol (Cisordinol, Clopixol, Acuphase) Answered by Clorinda Lagadinos 1 year ago.


What meds are prescribed for schizophrenia?
Asked by Viola June 1 year ago.

ANTIPSYCHOTIC. List of Antipsychotic Medications chlorpromazine -Thorazine chlorprothixene -Taractan clozapine -Clozaril fluphenazine -Permitil, Prolixin haloperidol- Haldol loxapine- Loxitane mesoridazine -Serentil molindone Lidone, -Moban olanzapine -Zyprexa perphenazine -Trilafon quetiapine -Seroquel risperidone -Risperdal thioridazine- Mellaril thiothixene -Navane trifluoperazine -Stelazine trifluopromazine -Vesprin ziprasidone -Geodon paliperidone- Invega Answered by Timothy Jernigan 1 year ago.

All the antipsychotics can be used for schizophenia, I take chlorpromazine at night and proclorperazine during the day, but the doctor at the hospital does not like me taking 2 antipsychotics. Answered by Gertrudis Ratigan 1 year ago.

I've heard a lot of people talking about abilify recently Answered by Chantel Grosby 1 year ago.

Risperidal Sereoquel ( i take this one ) Haldol Answered by Hermila Athy 1 year ago.

well i only know respiradal lol cause im on it they use it for that too. Answered by Lael Piner 1 year ago.


What is harder for you to control: positive or negative symptoms?
Does your medication clear up even the negative symptoms? Asked by Shelba Leys 1 year ago.

Depends on the symptoms you're talking about. I have a psychology degree and I'm pretty familiar with the effects of medications. I'm assuming that you mean positive and negative in the psychological sense, where positive symptoms (Type I symptoms) are the PRESENCE of a symptom of the illness (like hallucinations in schizophrenia), and negative symptoms (Type II symptoms) are when a normal response is ABSENT (like a flat affect in schizophrenia, where you don't display normal emotional responses). Negative symptoms are almost always harder to control than positive symptoms. Generally speaking, it's much easier to make a positive symptom go away than it is to make a person start generating a "normal" behavior to compensate for a negative symptom. Almost all neuroleptic medications such as thorazine, prolixin, mellaril, stelazine, haldol, taractan, navane, loxitane, moban, and orap are much more effective in treating positive symptoms. 1/4 of schizophrenics don't respond to these drugs at all for either kind of symptom, but the people who DO respond usually only see reduction of the positive symptoms. This means that they may not have any active psychotic symptoms, but they will still have problems with lack of motivation and building positive interpersonal relationships. Atypical antipsychotics work better at reducing BOTH positive and negative symptoms. These drugs include clozaril, risperdal, zyprexa, seroquel, and geodon. Both neuroleptics and atypical antipsychotics have side effects, but neuroleptics tend to have side effects that are more severe. Most physicians use the newer atypical antipsychotics because patients tolerate them better, they have fewer severe side effects, and they help treat the negative symptoms. These symptoms may not clear up entirely, but many patients do see significant improvement. Hope this answers your question. =) Answered by Katharina Youssef 1 year ago.

I'm guessing you're referring to schizophrenia? Generally, in schizophrenia, the positive symptoms are easier to control with medication. Some of the antipsychotics are supposed to help with the negative symptoms, but generally do not work as well as the medicines that primarily control positive symptoms. I recently read a few papers that showed maintaining a job, even if it's part time for a couple of hours a day, helps improve the negative symptoms. Also if you need to live in a group home, trying to stay active with the other residents also tends to help. I realize this is very difficult, but it does seem to help. Answered by Adalberto Goolman 1 year ago.


What are some up to date names of some types of Anti-psychotic medications?
Asked by Candance Larmer 1 year ago.

Actual drugs names with the retail names in brackets: Haloperidol (Haldol, Serenace) Droperidol (Droleptan) Chlorpromazine (Thorazine, Largactil) Fluphenazine (Prolixin) - Available in decanoate (long-acting) form Perphenazine (Trilafon) Prochlorperazine (Compazine) Thioridazine (Mellaril, Melleril) Trifluoperazine (Stelazine) Mesoridazine Periciazine Promazine Triflupromazine (Vesprin) Levomepromazine (Nozinan) Promethazine (Phenergan) Pimozide (Orap) Chlorprothixene (Cloxan, Taractan, Truxal) Clopenthixol (Sordinol) Flupenthixol (Depixol, Fluanxol) Thiothixene (Navane) Zuclopenthixol (Cisordinol, Clopixol, Acuphase) Answered by Raul Hackethal 1 year ago.


What meds are prescribed for schizophrenia?
Asked by Jonnie Bridgewater 1 year ago.

ANTIPSYCHOTIC. List of Antipsychotic Medications chlorpromazine -Thorazine chlorprothixene -Taractan clozapine -Clozaril fluphenazine -Permitil, Prolixin haloperidol- Haldol loxapine- Loxitane mesoridazine -Serentil molindone Lidone, -Moban olanzapine -Zyprexa perphenazine -Trilafon quetiapine -Seroquel risperidone -Risperdal thioridazine- Mellaril thiothixene -Navane trifluoperazine -Stelazine trifluopromazine -Vesprin ziprasidone -Geodon paliperidone- Invega Answered by Damaris Romberg 1 year ago.

All the antipsychotics can be used for schizophenia, I take chlorpromazine at night and proclorperazine during the day, but the doctor at the hospital does not like me taking 2 antipsychotics. Answered by Marian Dygert 1 year ago.

I've heard a lot of people talking about abilify recently Answered by Branda Buchholtz 1 year ago.

Risperidal Sereoquel ( i take this one ) Haldol Answered by Edna Christler 1 year ago.

well i only know respiradal lol cause im on it they use it for that too. Answered by Skye Altomonte 1 year ago.


What is harder for you to control: positive or negative symptoms?
Does your medication clear up even the negative symptoms? Asked by Treva Wesselink 1 year ago.

Depends on the symptoms you're talking about. I have a psychology degree and I'm pretty familiar with the effects of medications. I'm assuming that you mean positive and negative in the psychological sense, where positive symptoms (Type I symptoms) are the PRESENCE of a symptom of the illness (like hallucinations in schizophrenia), and negative symptoms (Type II symptoms) are when a normal response is ABSENT (like a flat affect in schizophrenia, where you don't display normal emotional responses). Negative symptoms are almost always harder to control than positive symptoms. Generally speaking, it's much easier to make a positive symptom go away than it is to make a person start generating a "normal" behavior to compensate for a negative symptom. Almost all neuroleptic medications such as thorazine, prolixin, mellaril, stelazine, haldol, taractan, navane, loxitane, moban, and orap are much more effective in treating positive symptoms. 1/4 of schizophrenics don't respond to these drugs at all for either kind of symptom, but the people who DO respond usually only see reduction of the positive symptoms. This means that they may not have any active psychotic symptoms, but they will still have problems with lack of motivation and building positive interpersonal relationships. Atypical antipsychotics work better at reducing BOTH positive and negative symptoms. These drugs include clozaril, risperdal, zyprexa, seroquel, and geodon. Both neuroleptics and atypical antipsychotics have side effects, but neuroleptics tend to have side effects that are more severe. Most physicians use the newer atypical antipsychotics because patients tolerate them better, they have fewer severe side effects, and they help treat the negative symptoms. These symptoms may not clear up entirely, but many patients do see significant improvement. Hope this answers your question. =) Answered by Inell Gneiser 1 year ago.

I'm guessing you're referring to schizophrenia? Generally, in schizophrenia, the positive symptoms are easier to control with medication. Some of the antipsychotics are supposed to help with the negative symptoms, but generally do not work as well as the medicines that primarily control positive symptoms. I recently read a few papers that showed maintaining a job, even if it's part time for a couple of hours a day, helps improve the negative symptoms. Also if you need to live in a group home, trying to stay active with the other residents also tends to help. I realize this is very difficult, but it does seem to help. Answered by Shawanna Cruell 1 year ago.


What are some up to date names of some types of Anti-psychotic medications?
Asked by Felisha Ector 1 year ago.

Actual drugs names with the retail names in brackets: Haloperidol (Haldol, Serenace) Droperidol (Droleptan) Chlorpromazine (Thorazine, Largactil) Fluphenazine (Prolixin) - Available in decanoate (long-acting) form Perphenazine (Trilafon) Prochlorperazine (Compazine) Thioridazine (Mellaril, Melleril) Trifluoperazine (Stelazine) Mesoridazine Periciazine Promazine Triflupromazine (Vesprin) Levomepromazine (Nozinan) Promethazine (Phenergan) Pimozide (Orap) Chlorprothixene (Cloxan, Taractan, Truxal) Clopenthixol (Sordinol) Flupenthixol (Depixol, Fluanxol) Thiothixene (Navane) Zuclopenthixol (Cisordinol, Clopixol, Acuphase) Answered by Annabell Lennox 1 year ago.


What meds are prescribed for schizophrenia?
Asked by Kendall Clakley 1 year ago.

ANTIPSYCHOTIC. List of Antipsychotic Medications chlorpromazine -Thorazine chlorprothixene -Taractan clozapine -Clozaril fluphenazine -Permitil, Prolixin haloperidol- Haldol loxapine- Loxitane mesoridazine -Serentil molindone Lidone, -Moban olanzapine -Zyprexa perphenazine -Trilafon quetiapine -Seroquel risperidone -Risperdal thioridazine- Mellaril thiothixene -Navane trifluoperazine -Stelazine trifluopromazine -Vesprin ziprasidone -Geodon paliperidone- Invega Answered by Prudence Queros 1 year ago.

All the antipsychotics can be used for schizophenia, I take chlorpromazine at night and proclorperazine during the day, but the doctor at the hospital does not like me taking 2 antipsychotics. Answered by Elaine Egan 1 year ago.

I've heard a lot of people talking about abilify recently Answered by Mauro Macha 1 year ago.

Risperidal Sereoquel ( i take this one ) Haldol Answered by Chantelle Theunissen 1 year ago.

well i only know respiradal lol cause im on it they use it for that too. Answered by Alan Pennypacker 1 year ago.


What is harder for you to control: positive or negative symptoms?
Does your medication clear up even the negative symptoms? Asked by Elizabet Mandelberg 1 year ago.

Depends on the symptoms you're talking about. I have a psychology degree and I'm pretty familiar with the effects of medications. I'm assuming that you mean positive and negative in the psychological sense, where positive symptoms (Type I symptoms) are the PRESENCE of a symptom of the illness (like hallucinations in schizophrenia), and negative symptoms (Type II symptoms) are when a normal response is ABSENT (like a flat affect in schizophrenia, where you don't display normal emotional responses). Negative symptoms are almost always harder to control than positive symptoms. Generally speaking, it's much easier to make a positive symptom go away than it is to make a person start generating a "normal" behavior to compensate for a negative symptom. Almost all neuroleptic medications such as thorazine, prolixin, mellaril, stelazine, haldol, taractan, navane, loxitane, moban, and orap are much more effective in treating positive symptoms. 1/4 of schizophrenics don't respond to these drugs at all for either kind of symptom, but the people who DO respond usually only see reduction of the positive symptoms. This means that they may not have any active psychotic symptoms, but they will still have problems with lack of motivation and building positive interpersonal relationships. Atypical antipsychotics work better at reducing BOTH positive and negative symptoms. These drugs include clozaril, risperdal, zyprexa, seroquel, and geodon. Both neuroleptics and atypical antipsychotics have side effects, but neuroleptics tend to have side effects that are more severe. Most physicians use the newer atypical antipsychotics because patients tolerate them better, they have fewer severe side effects, and they help treat the negative symptoms. These symptoms may not clear up entirely, but many patients do see significant improvement. Hope this answers your question. =) Answered by Jacquline Debarr 1 year ago.

I'm guessing you're referring to schizophrenia? Generally, in schizophrenia, the positive symptoms are easier to control with medication. Some of the antipsychotics are supposed to help with the negative symptoms, but generally do not work as well as the medicines that primarily control positive symptoms. I recently read a few papers that showed maintaining a job, even if it's part time for a couple of hours a day, helps improve the negative symptoms. Also if you need to live in a group home, trying to stay active with the other residents also tends to help. I realize this is very difficult, but it does seem to help. Answered by Karine Mizukami 1 year ago.


What are some up to date names of some types of Anti-psychotic medications?
Asked by Adrian Geres 1 year ago.

Actual drugs names with the retail names in brackets: Haloperidol (Haldol, Serenace) Droperidol (Droleptan) Chlorpromazine (Thorazine, Largactil) Fluphenazine (Prolixin) - Available in decanoate (long-acting) form Perphenazine (Trilafon) Prochlorperazine (Compazine) Thioridazine (Mellaril, Melleril) Trifluoperazine (Stelazine) Mesoridazine Periciazine Promazine Triflupromazine (Vesprin) Levomepromazine (Nozinan) Promethazine (Phenergan) Pimozide (Orap) Chlorprothixene (Cloxan, Taractan, Truxal) Clopenthixol (Sordinol) Flupenthixol (Depixol, Fluanxol) Thiothixene (Navane) Zuclopenthixol (Cisordinol, Clopixol, Acuphase) Answered by Margo Deloatch 1 year ago.


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