Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 012285/001.

Names and composition

"SYNTOCINON" is the commercial name of a drug composed of OXYTOCIN.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
012285/001 SYNTOCINON OXYTOCIN SOLUTION/NASAL 40USP UNITS per ML
018245/001 SYNTOCINON OXYTOCIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10USP UNITS per ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
012285/001 SYNTOCINON OXYTOCIN SOLUTION/NASAL 40USP UNITS per ML
018243/001 OXYTOCIN OXYTOCIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10USP UNITS per ML (10USP UNITS per ML)
018243/002 OXYTOCIN OXYTOCIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100USP UNITS per 10ML (10USP UNITS per ML)
018245/001 SYNTOCINON OXYTOCIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10USP UNITS per ML
018248/001 OXYTOCIN OXYTOCIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10USP UNITS per ML (10USP UNITS per ML)
018248/002 OXYTOCIN OXYTOCIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100USP UNITS per 10ML (10USP UNITS per ML)
018248/003 OXYTOCIN OXYTOCIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 300USP UNITS per 30ML (10USP UNITS per ML)
018261/001 PITOCIN OXYTOCIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10USP UNITS per ML (10USP UNITS per ML)
018261/002 PITOCIN OXYTOCIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100USP UNITS per 10ML (10USP UNITS per ML)
018261/003 PITOCIN OXYTOCIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500USP UNITS per 50ML (10USP UNITS per ML)
019185/001 OXYTOCIN 5 USP UNITS IN DEXTROSE 5% OXYTOCIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1USP UNITS per 100ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019185/002 OXYTOCIN 20 USP UNITS IN DEXTROSE 5% OXYTOCIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2USP UNITS per 100ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019185/003 OXYTOCIN 10 USP UNITS IN DEXTROSE 5% OXYTOCIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2USP UNITS per 100ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019185/004 OXYTOCIN 10 USP UNITS IN DEXTROSE 5% OXYTOCIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1USP UNITS per 100ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
077453/001 OXYTOCIN OXYTOCIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10USP UNITS per ML (10USP UNITS per ML)
077453/002 OXYTOCIN OXYTOCIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100USP UNITS per 10ML (10USP UNITS per ML)
200219/001 OXYTOCIN OXYTOCIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10USP UNITS per ML (10USP UNITS per ML)

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Answered questions

Have you had an induction for labor? What was it like?
Thanks for all of your answers and as many of you have suggested I have asked a LOT of questions. My doctor has been great about explaining everything but I guess since it is my first child I am still nervous and just don't really know exactly what to do. Asked by Jule Tickle 1 year ago.

I am 40 weeks and 3 days pregnant. I have not had a lot of labor symptoms or anything other than some Braxton Hicks. My doctor says everything is looking good and the baby is fine. He has also said that if she is not here by 41 weeks and 1 day he will do induction if we want to. The thought of induction scares me. I have heard stories about how great it was and about how horrible it was. If she will come on her own that would be great! If not I would rather be induced than have a c-section. So what are your own personal experiences with induction and are there some methods that are safer than others? Answered by Myrtice Schear 1 year ago.

Induction by chemicals (prostaglandin, syntocinon etc) does have a higher rate of intervention (forceps/ventouse delivery or caesarian section) than going into labour naturally. This is because the baby is often in not a great position for birth. I had a c-section after 24 hours on prostaglandin and 16 hours on syntocinon as my baby was 'brow presentation' and not coming out. Also, in the UK they often suggest you have an epidural for syntocinon because it is famously far more painful that natural labour - rather than the gradual build up from 1-10 in terms of pain of natural labour, syntocinon punches you in at about 7/10 - which comes as a horrible shock! It is perfectly safe (unless you or your baby have medical issues you haven't mentioned) to hold out until 42 weeks for an induction, particularly if your baby isn't in a gtreat position for birth - and your baby may come in the meantime. Acupuncture is REALLY good for inducing labour naturally, as are (apparently, they didn't work for me!) chillis and spicy food, sex and exercise. Castor oil is also supposed to be very helpful, but it's very nasty stuff and will make you very sick so I don't recommend it. Don't wait longer than 42 weeks as, after that time, your placenta can start to deteriorate and can harm your baby. Of course when I say 'more likely to' and this 'can' happen, it doesn't mean it'll happen to you. Lots of people have a great experience of being induced, and there is every chance you'll be one of them. However, like I said, statistically induction does have a higher rate of intervention and the c. I had a pretty miserable birth experience, and you know what? The moment my daughter was put in my arms, I didn't care. Honestly, it'll all be ok in the end. Good luck! Answered by Juan Siedel 1 year ago.

Me, my sister and my mom have all been induced. My mom was induced because her doctor was going out of town and wanted to be there for the birth (my mom was "high risk" at the time because she was 36, this was 20 years ago). She hated being induced and has since said that it is nothing like a real labor and that it takes you "from 0 to 60 in no time". She wound up having an epidural because she couldnt take it (this was after having two kids, both of those labors natural and almost 2 days long each). My sister had to be induced because her water broke and she wasnt having contractions. She got through it without any pain medication (her labor only lasted 5 hours). She hasnt ever mentioned having ill feelings about being induced. I was induced for fetal stress (which looking back, I dont think she was stressed, I think she was laying on a nerve in my back which caused us to have problems). I was induced on a Monday and had her on a Thursday. After 2 1/2 days of labor, I opted for an epidural because I couldnt take it anymore. I wish I had known I was only 2 hours away from having her because I wouldnt have gotten it, but oh well. Nothing I can do about it now. In the future, I will not be induced unless it is a last resort. If I were you, I would wait until the 42 week mark before going ahead on the induction. The baby will come when it is the right time for them to come. Good luck and Congrats! Answered by Shasta Vbiles 1 year ago.

My induction ended with an emergency c-section, but I was induced because of Preeclampsia and I was not favorable for induction (closed and hard cervix). If you are going to have an induction educate yourself. Find out your hospitals procedures so you can better inform yourself. The main this is to never feel stupid about asking a TON of questions. I went with the flow, didn't ask any questions, didn't know any better really. Try and hold out on the epidural as long as you can and just remember that there are several...hundreds..THOUSANDS of successful inductions with no complications, so don't let a few people's stories scare you. :) Good luck momma! Answered by Melani Lamonte 1 year ago.

I have 4 children and all but one was induced. It really is no difference than having them naturally. They give you pitocen (unsure about spelling) through your IV and that will cause you to have labor pains and go into labor and if your sack does not break when they give that to you then they will take a plastic stick and puncture the back and break it for you. This does not hurt at all. Labor pains are very painful but the inducing is not. If the pain is too much you can always have an epidural and you will not feel the labor pains. I hope this helps you. Answered by Minna Quercioli 1 year ago.

My induction ended with me having an emergency c-section after 27hr of labor - I was miserable for 10 of those hours - my induction really didn't go well I have to disagree that it was equal pain - my induction contractions came hard, fast and way more painful than that of my natural labor - Answered by Mammie Janowiec 1 year ago.

No different than the baby coming on it's own. The meds simply start the labor process. Equal pain for both methods. Answered by Hyman Lehne 1 year ago.

For a few men and women, bodily endeavor. But if you're particularly pre-eclamptic they've you on bedrest. So, you might do nipple stimulation. The different well likelihood is an enema. Or, simply attempt to loosen up and leisure till the truly factor occurs. Good success. Answered by Doria Semone 1 year ago.

I had an induction with my 3rd child, and i agree that the contractions were more intense than any of my other children. they gave me pitocin,and after that, it was pretty quick, even though they still had to break my water. Good luck!! Answered by Lashandra Kamrowski 1 year ago.

my dr. broke my water at 40 weeks and 5 hours later i had my baby girl labor went great. Answered by Melodee Curington 1 year ago.


Im so scared of birth, how did yours goes?
I know everyone is different, and their pain and symptoms vary, but I'm literally freaking out. I do not want to throw up! How soon can I get an epi? Does it help with vomiting if your vomiting from pain? I'm just interested in your story! Asked by Willie Metevier 1 year ago.

Honestly, I was just like you. I had my son 6 weeks ago and I was terrified. And yes, it hurt a lot but once your contractions set in you stop really being scared and worrying about what's going to happen to you and you just go with it. I was just concerned about getting my baby into the world safely. So my story goes: My water broke at 9.30am on a Wednesday, spent about 3 hours at the hospital being monitored and making sure baby wasn't distressed, got sent home at about 4 and was told I'd most likely go into labour by that night and to let nature take it's course. Went home and contractions started at 5.30pm. They were 4 minutes apart by 8.30 pm and I was at the hospital at 9.30. I was examined at 10 past 10 when my midwife arrived and got my epidural at 10.30. I was also hooked up to syntocinon (Or however you spell it) just to add to the effectiveness of contractions. The epidural was magic until about 2am when (We found out later this is what it was) baby was grinding so badly down through the birth canal and going so fast (Last we'd checked at 1.30 I was only 2cms!) that the grinding was causing me pain. Because the pubic bit/vagina has a different nerve tract than where the epidural affects, I felt that part of the pain and it felt like my vagina was being split in half and set on fire at the same time. I was seriously in so much pain I was writhing around on the table screaming. The midwife made sure my epidural was working which it was and said the only thing she could do was give me gas which she did. That made everything PERFECT. I was able to suck so much that I got to sort of go into that half asleep place which I needed because I'd had no sleep since I'd woken up that morning and this was now 3.30am. Anyway, the midwife checked me again at 10 past 4 and I was only 3 at that point which made me want to cry. Since I'd arrived at the hospital I'd been hooked up to a monitor to check baby's heartbeat and monitor my contractions and I'd been hearing my son's heartbeat all night. But when I had a contraction his heartbeat sped up so I always knew when the pain was going to set in even with the gas, so I ended up sucking in so much that I couldn't hear it so I wouldn't feel it. My mum was with me and at 4.40 she asked what was going on with baby's heart since she couldn't hear it. She tried to adjust the monitor on my belly because it had moved a few times through the night and we always got the heart beat back when we moved it but this time we didn't. I was pretty out of it so mum called in the midwife who could not find it. That is until she opened my legs and saw baby's head. I'd gone from 3 to 10cms in 40 minutes. Anyway, she attatched the head probes to his scalp to monitor his heart and told me it was time to push. I was still pretty off my face at that point so after my mum pulled the gas away from me (I was NOT happy about that!) I sort of came to my senses and pushed. I didn't feel anything while pushing so I was quite surprised when they lay this baby I'd apparrently pushed out on my chest and told me it was my son. Of course I was ecstatic so I didn't care that I'd also not felt a second degree tear that was right next to my clitoris and urethra and went to my perenium. But either way, my son was born at 4.51am exactly 6 weeks ago today. They left my epidural running until they stitched me (the delivery ward was a madhouse so that night so it took 5 hours for them to get to me) and they gave my son and I an hour of skin to skin contact. Then a midwife weighed and dressed him for me and I fed him and he went off to sleep until 4pm that afternoon! After I was stitched and I got feeling back in my legs (The epidural numbs them) I got up and had a shower and changed into a nightie and had something to eat. They gave me the forms I needed to fill out for centrelink and to get his birth certificate and they transfered me to the maternity ward. And that was that. I was there for 2 more days after that and went home on the saturday afternoon. So I hoped I've helped a bit by telling you all that. I asked a similar question at about 35 weeks after freaking out and I didn't get an answer that was informative that answered my questions properly so I hope by telling my birth story you feel somewhat at ease knowing what to expect. Just know not every woman tears and not every woman feels the grinding pain like I did. It all varies from woman to woman. Good luck with your birth and please don't freak out. No matter what it is going to happen so if you try to stay as calm as possible it'll be so much easier. Good luck again :) I'm sure it'll all go fine. Just take whatever drugs you feel you need to and focus on getting through. Giving birth is hard and painful but I promise you It is so worth it. I'd do it a million times over for my little boy. Answered by Arnoldo Hagler 1 year ago.

Does anyone vomit because of pain? I don't vomit almost never, didn't vomit at the begining of my pregnancies, so I don't know about it. Anyway, you will get epi once you start to open, i.e. you will have to experience some pain. But, once you get it, I suppose it will be great. I gave birth to both of my babies naturally (vaginal birth, no pain killers). It hurts all right, but the pain stops as soon as the baby is out. I would recomment that you try not to think about it, you are just building up the pressure, and it must happen, one way or another. Answered by Alonso Delbusto 1 year ago.

Well I had a very quick labour, less than 4 hours for the entire process. I didn`t have contractions just back labour which just felt like an intense period. I went into the hospital and they checked me and I was already 7 cms. They didn`t have time to give me meds seeing as how I went from7-10cms in 40 minutes. I threw up, but it was because I honestly felt sick, it wasn`t from the pain. Actually I threw up all over my mom`s car door as we were pulling into the hospital parking lot. It actually makes you feel better after you throw up. Also, my water didn't break (beleive me they tried breaking it) until I was fully dialted and pushing. I think it was my 6th push or so when my water broke. That's when they found out we had a problem. Since my baby was 3 days overdue, it had pooped in the placenta, it was going to be all over it and if it breathed in any of the poop, it would get into its lungs and cause some breathing problems or pnemonia. Luckily when baby came out, there was no poop around its mouth and nose. Actually I wasn`t really in alot of pain until the baby was crowing...that burns, but once the baby and placenta are out I felt no pain. Oh as for pushing, you suddenly fell like you have to go poop, and you have to use those muscles to push the baby out. Don't worry little to no poop will come out and those nurses have seen everything! What was the best thing? Having the nurse tell my husband that my baby was a boy, then the doctor telling her she needed Anatomy classes because I had a little girl. My advice to you is instead of timing contractions, go to the hospital when a shot of morphine sounds really good and you think you will be more comfortable there than at home. Answered by Madlyn Symons 1 year ago.

With my son, I was induced. My labor lasted 23 hours, and by the end he started getting stressed and his heart rate was jumping up. It is obviously painful. VERY PAINFUL. From what I know they allow epidurals as soon as your contractions are regular or you're at 4cms. They let me get an epidural about 5 hours into it, because it hurt too much to get checked so they actually couldn't tell how far dilated I was, turns out I was only at 2 cms. The epidural can actually cause vomiting from the sudden drop in blood pressure from not beinin pain anymore. I got nauseous towards the end cause the epidual stopped working for me, and they gave me medicine to help it, and I managed to never throw up. All the discomfort of labor is totally worth it once they put that sweet baby on your chest, it's like it never happened! Answered by Claud Marton 1 year ago.

Try to relax as much as you can! I was a complete mess for the last two weeks before giving birth to my first. The birthing classes did nothing for me except freak me out even more. I was very lucky and started dialating early so my doctor agreed in induce me a week early and I'm glad she did. My baby ended up being over 9 pounds! I had an epi as soon as I asked for it (I was about 5 cm when I got it) and it did wonders for me. I relaxed until I had to push, which I only pushed for about 25 minutes, and I was done and holding my new baby. When it was all over I remember thinking I had worked myself up for almost my entire pregnancy for no reason. Don't get me wrong, it was work and it was hard, but nothing like I had made it out to be. I don't think I'll be rushing to have another one anytime soon, but if it happens again I will be a lot less stressed! Deep breaths and good luck to you!! Answered by Grant Crisanti 1 year ago.

Like you i was freaked out about birth and i ended up being induced due to preeclampsia and was on pitocin for 5 days before they ended up doing a c section. When i got contractions they felt like really bad menstrual cramps and honestly and i know it sounds gross, but felt like my butt was going to rip in half. When i started feeling a little discomfort they gave me demerol and fetenol which were safe to have with baby inside. Then when i asked for it i got the epidural which i was terrified of and honestly it didnt hurt at all! The contractions were what hurt however my epidural didnt work so when it was time for the c section i got a spinal which also didnt hurt! It just felt like a pinch! And honestly the c section during you dont feel a thing and afterwards as long as you take the pain medication like youre suppose to it doesnt hurt. You do feel sore but not a painful type sore. That was my experience at least and next time i have a baby ill be scheduling another c section! Answered by Jordan Mcclintic 1 year ago.

When I had my son I didn't have much pain to be honest. My contractions were kind of painful but the gas and air helped A LOT with that and I had Diamorphine (instead of epidural) and the only really bad pain I had was when I was pushing the head out. I'm also quite proud of myself for only screaming once and that was when the head was coming out. I didn't find it as hard or painful as most people told me it was but it wasn't a breeze either. It didn't, however, put me off having kids again so it couldn't have been that bad. I didn't feel sick at all but I did feel sleepy because of the gas and air. One thing I found to be really handy was lucozade glucose tablets. You can't eat anything once you've gone into labour incase you have to go for an emergency c-section so I bought a few packs of those to give me an energy boost and they actually did work, I highly recommend them to anyone in labour. Good luck and I hope it goes really well for you :) x Answered by Charles Skewis 1 year ago.

I felt the same way with my first pregnancy. I couldn't sleep well during my last term. I was freaking out too. My labor was 50 freaking hours =( I didn't get my epi right away. I got my morphines, they helped me greatly. I needed my sleep soooo badly. The nurses gave me morphine to let me sleep. Whirl bath helped me greatly too. I don't remember when I got my epi...I believe it was half way through? I just didn't care how big the needle was. I just wanted to get over with it. I remember how exhausted I was =( The pushing part? took me 1 hour. My girl was 8lbs and I only got 1 stich done (that was the best part) I thought I would get 100 stitches done! lol She was vaccumed b/c she couldn't get out...my pelvic bones were not big enough. I remember a sharp pain when the doctor pulled her out with a vaccum. It was *bam sharp but quickly done. After? I was just very happy to be done. It was all blurry for me. I love my little girl to death :o) She is a carbon copy of me and the best thing in my life!! Answered by Youlanda Hammett 1 year ago.

I'm in the same boat with you, just 5 days from my due date with baby #3 and having anxiety about the pain. I can tell you I've never experienced vomiting in my labor, so I hope that you don't have to either :/ The best thing you can do when you go into labor is to take the effort and time to stay stress free and as calm as possible, for you and your baby. Take a bath, take the time to think and reflect on the baby and how exciting it will be to finally meet him/her. I love to go and look at all the tiniest baby clothes I have and think of how soon little Baby will be wearing them :) Best of luck to you. Answered by Loyce Bach 1 year ago.

My birth was awesome. I actually enjoyed it. I used the Bradley method and I practiced daily for over two months. It made a tremendous difference. I learned how to completely relax during contractions so I never got uterine cramps. The pain was a moderate, dull ache. I was allowed to eat and drink during labor. I never felt queasy at all. My husband took a picture of me during a contraction in transition. It looked just like I was sleeping. My births were one of the best experiences of my life. Answered by Lorita Lawerence 1 year ago.

When I went into labor (I was induced with Pitocin) they let me have the epidural as soon as I requested it, no questions asked :) Although some hospitals may operate differently, their main concern will be to keep you as comfortable as possible during labor. As far as throwing up, I did not have any sort of nausea during the acutal labor, but it is true every pregnancy is very different and will positively vary from person to person. Best of luck to you with your pregnancy and labor!! Answered by Hedwig Matusiewicz 1 year ago.


What drugs are not good to take while in labor?
what i mean is are there any drugs that can be given during labor that can have side affects on the baby? This is my first pregnancy and i would like to know from a mothers experiance what to stay away from. Asked by Dane Hackley 1 year ago.

All drugs can potentially affect your baby, even those routinely given in hospital. Some of the "safe" drugs given in hospital you might want to reconsider are: * Piticon/syntocinon - often given to "speed up" a slow labour, or for an induction (e.g. due to post-dates pregnancy). This drug gives the mother very intense and often very painful contractions, without much of a rest in between contractions. The baby doesn't like being squeezed so much either - can raise the chance of fetal distress, often leading to a c-section. * Epidural - This is where you get a needle in your spine to inject the drugs. Very common following an induction, due to the aforementioned extra-painful contractions leading the mother to be desperate for heavy duty pain relief. The lower half of your body is numbed, but the baby is still feeling the contractions! As above, tends to raise the odds of fetal distress (esp. low heartrate). Baby may also be a bit groggy, and slow to start breastfeeding after birth. The labouring position the mother is restricted to (usually flat on her back or semi-reclining) is also not ideal for labouring, as the mother has to work against gravity to get the baby out - a ventouse/forceps birth (often with an episiotomy) is more likely. An upright/squatting/sitting position will widen the capacity of your pelvic outlet by about 30%! I would recommend pethedine or gas and air as your lowest-risk options for pain relief. Though you and your baby can both still be affected by these. (Many women vomit with gas & air, for example.) Personally, I went both my births drug-free, with mental calming techniques, and hot water, as my only pain relief. A hot water bottle is your best friend during labour! Make sure you get one, and a cloth or fuzzy cover for it. (Or a wheat pack to heat in the microwave, or similar.) It feels blissful on your sore back or belly. A warm bath or shower can also feel great. Remember, there's gaps between contractions. The pain isn't constant during labour, there's peaks and troughs. And in between contractions you get a great (though brief) chance to rest and gather your strength. Good luck! Answered by Kris Delonais 1 year ago.

pretty much anything is going to affect the baby in SOME way. If you can tolerate the pain, I'd try to avoid the epidural. Only because it can have lasting effects in some women that make dealing with a new baby difficult at first. Nothing is neccesarily BAD for the baby, though. It wouldn't be an option if the benefits did not outweigh the negative. Answered by Leeann Hendon 1 year ago.

I'll reply for him, rationale he is nonetheless in a Vegetative state! He hasn't stopped consuming~ that's his drug of alternative. and that used to be over 33 years in the past <~lol continuously, Ladyitch p.s. I will upload, he is in a apartment of three Women!<~OMG! what a LUCKY GUY!! Answered by Farah Ringenberg 1 year ago.

all of them Answered by Kelly Dekok 1 year ago.


Induced labor! HELP!?
I want to know every little detail about what's going on when you get induced! I'm getting induced for medical reasons and i want to all the information possible GOOD & BAD! lol i just want to know what to expect! Asked by Meagan Walman 1 year ago.

Membrane sweep What is it? A membrane sweep often helps to stimulate labour and is now offered routinely to women who are overdue. They are also offered when you are 40 weeks pregnant if this is your first baby. What happens if I have a membrane sweep? The membranes that surround your baby are gently separated from your cervix. A midwife or doctor can carry out this procedure during an internal examination. You may be offered two or three membrane sweeps before moving onto other methods of induction. Risks It can be uncomfortable if your cervix is difficult to reach. You should be given a chance to ask questions or read information about the procedure before it's carried out. You may need to have several membrane sweeps before you know whether or not it has been successful. Prostaglandin What is it? Prostaglandin is a hormone-like substance, which helps stimulate uterine contractions. What happens if I am given prostaglandin? Your midwife or doctor will insert a tablet, pessary or gel containing prostaglandin into your vagina to ripen your cervix. You may need a second dose of the tablet or gel after six hours, if labour hasn't started. Pessaries release the prostaglandin slowly over 24 hours, so only one dose is needed. Risks Vaginal prostaglandin is the most commonly recommended method to induce labour because it often works better and has fewer disadvantages than other methods There is a very small risk that using or vaginal prostaglandins, or Syntocinon (see below), may cause your uterus to become overstimulated or hyperstimulated Hyperstimulation of the uterus seriously reduces the oxygen supply to your baby. Drugs can be used to stop or slow down the contractions if this happens In a worst-case scenario, hyperstimulation can cause your uterus to rupture (tear). This is more likely to happen if you are having a "trial of labour" following a previous caesarean section (Read more about vaginal birth after a caesarean, also known as VBAC.) Artificially rupturing the membranes (ARM) What is it? ARM is sometimes called "breaking the waters". Breaking your waters is no longer recommended as a method of induction (unless vaginal prostaglandins cannot be used for some reason) but some doctors or midwives may use it to speed labour up if it's not progressing. What happens if my waters are broken? This procedure can be done during an internal examination. A midwife or doctor makes a small break in the membranes around your baby using either an amniohook (a long thin probe which looks a little like a fine crochet hook) or an amnicot (a medical glove with a pricked end on one of the fingers). This procedure often works when the cervix feels soft and ready for labour to start. Risks Artificial rupture of the membranes (ARM) does not always work, and, once your waters have been broken, your baby could be at risk of infection. This is why it's no longer recommended as a method of induction on its own. If your midwife or doctor suspects an infection, she will give you antibiotics. Syntocinon What is it? Syntocinon is a synthetic form of the hormone oxytocin. You would only be offered Syntocinon if your labour hasn't started following a membrane sweep or prostoglandin, or if your contractions are not very effective. Syntocinon has several disadvantages over other methods of induction. If other methods of induction have not worked for you, you may be offered a caesarean as an alternative to trying again later or moving on to Syntocinon. What happens if I am given Syntocinon? You will be given the Syntocinon through an intravenous "drip", allowing the hormone to go straight into your bloodstream through a tiny tube into a vein in your arm. Once contractions have begun, the rate of the drip can be adjusted so that contractions happen often enough to make your cervix dilate, without becoming too powerful. Risks Syntocinon can cause strong contractions and put your baby under stress, so you will need to be monitored continuously. Some women also say that the contractions brought on by Syntocinon are more painful than natural ones, so you may choose to have an epidural for pain relief. There is also a very small risk that using Syntocinon may cause your uterus to become overstimulated or hyperstimulated. See prostoglandin risks above. Answered by Nelia Grotelueschen 1 year ago.


How can I raise my level of the chemical oxytocin?
How can I raise that level of the chemical that helps relieves stress in women I would appreciate your sincere input :) Asked by Daysi Hainline 1 year ago.

Synthetic oxytocin is sold as medication under the trade names Pitocin and Syntocinon and also as generic oxytocin. It is destroyed in the gastrointestinal tract, and therefore must be administered by injection or as nasal spray. It has a half-life of typically about three minutes in the blood. Oxytocin is relatively safe when used at recommended doses. But I seriously don't recommend taking it for social anxieties or mood disorders. Answered by Cordell Plantier 1 year ago.


What triggers labor? sex, spicy food, etc?
What are things women do to make themselves go into labor? Asked by Clarita Monkowski 1 year ago.

There isn't any home remedy that starts labor. All old wives tales. (*The female body naturally produces the hormone oxytocin to stimulate contractions. Pitocin and Syntocinon are brand name medications that are forms(man made) of oxytocin that can be given through an IV at low doses to stimulate contractions. This is what a doctor would use if you needed an induction if baby did not come on his own. If you're already in labor. Walking can help move things along such as regulating and speeding up the frequency of your contractions. Thus the past popularity of the walking Epidural. Though not done now a days as much. Because of the fear the mother might fall and injure herself. The hospital I had my daughter at did not do those. Once you were given an Epidural you are confined to your bed for the duration of labor and delivery. Which is fine by me. I wanted the time to rest! Answered by Eloise Conorich 1 year ago.

walk, no seriously, it softens your cervix and helps with your muscles for when you do go into labor. It could also put you into labor! Ya, sex, some say spicy food or that castrol oil or whatever it's called. You can try slowly squatting too, some say that works. Ive heard that getting into a warm bath with your legs spread and gently pushing can make you dilate as well as putting you into labor. Good luck! Answered by Sherril Arrand 1 year ago.

The only thing that will trigger labor is when the hormone oxytocin is released in the body. All the walking and sex in the world won't bring on labor if baby isn't ready. Answered by Agatha Firebaugh 1 year ago.

I walked a lot ( a few miles a day) before hand and I also did a lot of squats (weed picking). I remember reading that sex helps but I was too big and uncomfortable to think about sex. My walking helped me because I delivered almost a week before my due date. Answered by Philomena Codilla 1 year ago.

final area is stressful yet toddler will in undemanding terms come while waiting. warm baths, eating gin or cod liver oil or driving on bumpy roads will in undemanding terms harm mum no longer start up hard artwork. eating rasberry tea might yet I doubt it. Seeing many pregnancys that is in undemanding terms a rely of waiting and doing it in as friendly a fashion as attainable for mum to help time bypass. Sorry! Answered by Nickolas Macneal 1 year ago.

well it all depends, like if ur due date is really close, u could try to be lot more active. My mom also told me thatshe tried to do tthat getting heavy staff, like idk picking up all the food bags u can get etc.......but if someone does that when the baby still is too small then is reeeeeally dangerous to do that. In my opinion, i wouldnt do that, ill rather wait for my baby to be ready to be born. Remember that when the baby is born u will have the rest of ur life to tace care of him or her, why wont we wait couple of more days or weeks? Answered by Ashlyn Zahran 1 year ago.

I tried that and pineapple, walking, and squats and still was a week overdue. If baby isn't ready you're just going to make yourself suffer. Those spicy chicken sandwiches and the hearburn that followed damn near killed me. :) ETA I tried nipple stimulation too. Answered by Christina Pensick 1 year ago.

Wish I could tell ya!! I'm due in 8 days.. apparently sex helps a lot and esepecially if your partner "does their business in you" its said to soften your cervix.. Answered by Junko Delapenha 1 year ago.

i havent given birth yet lol not til february but my sister who gave birth 3 months ago was doing alot of walking and went into labour 3 weeks earlier!! good luck... Answered by Chance Hirano 1 year ago.


Does induction increase the risk for having a medical intervention during the birth of your baby?
hi im 41+5 and being induced this morning!.. please tell me what happened to you when u was induced?.. or anything u know on the matter!? Asked by Bradford Rutherford 1 year ago.

I used to work at a birth centre and were told by midwives that if you have any sort of intervention than the chances of having more are higher (like a snowball effect). Because you are being induced - (which at 41.5 I would be too!) and will need to have IV syntocinon to help build up your contractions or maybe pg gel to help with dialation then instead of getting the gradual build up as you do with a non-induced labour the contraction can be a bit more full on as your endorfins in your body haven't had a chance to catch up with the pain yet, therefore you may be more likely to need an epidural which could mean (unless they turn it down for the pushing part) that you may need to have a ventouse or forceps to help deliver baby, if this doesn't work then a caesarian. Of course this isn't necessarily what might happen but chances are higher if this is your first baby and/or you have a long labour. Just go in with and open mind, and remember the end result is a healthy baby even if the delivery may not have been part of your birth plan. Congratulations and all the best! Answered by Chantelle Todd 1 year ago.

i was induced with my daughter i only had the drip it was more to build my contractions up when they reached the highest level on the drip it was only 50min of full painfull labour i had no intreventions or complications i hope your labour goes as well as mine did good luck Answered by Melina Rossetto 1 year ago.


Have you had an induction for labor? What was it like?
Thanks for all of your answers and as many of you have suggested I have asked a LOT of questions. My doctor has been great about explaining everything but I guess since it is my first child I am still nervous and just don't really know exactly what to do. Asked by Lavenia Kloster 1 year ago.

I am 40 weeks and 3 days pregnant. I have not had a lot of labor symptoms or anything other than some Braxton Hicks. My doctor says everything is looking good and the baby is fine. He has also said that if she is not here by 41 weeks and 1 day he will do induction if we want to. The thought of induction scares me. I have heard stories about how great it was and about how horrible it was. If she will come on her own that would be great! If not I would rather be induced than have a c-section. So what are your own personal experiences with induction and are there some methods that are safer than others? Answered by Hassie Bloschichak 1 year ago.

Induction by chemicals (prostaglandin, syntocinon etc) does have a higher rate of intervention (forceps/ventouse delivery or caesarian section) than going into labour naturally. This is because the baby is often in not a great position for birth. I had a c-section after 24 hours on prostaglandin and 16 hours on syntocinon as my baby was 'brow presentation' and not coming out. Also, in the UK they often suggest you have an epidural for syntocinon because it is famously far more painful that natural labour - rather than the gradual build up from 1-10 in terms of pain of natural labour, syntocinon punches you in at about 7/10 - which comes as a horrible shock! It is perfectly safe (unless you or your baby have medical issues you haven't mentioned) to hold out until 42 weeks for an induction, particularly if your baby isn't in a gtreat position for birth - and your baby may come in the meantime. Acupuncture is REALLY good for inducing labour naturally, as are (apparently, they didn't work for me!) chillis and spicy food, sex and exercise. Castor oil is also supposed to be very helpful, but it's very nasty stuff and will make you very sick so I don't recommend it. Don't wait longer than 42 weeks as, after that time, your placenta can start to deteriorate and can harm your baby. Of course when I say 'more likely to' and this 'can' happen, it doesn't mean it'll happen to you. Lots of people have a great experience of being induced, and there is every chance you'll be one of them. However, like I said, statistically induction does have a higher rate of intervention and the c. I had a pretty miserable birth experience, and you know what? The moment my daughter was put in my arms, I didn't care. Honestly, it'll all be ok in the end. Good luck! Answered by Izola Humiston 1 year ago.

Me, my sister and my mom have all been induced. My mom was induced because her doctor was going out of town and wanted to be there for the birth (my mom was "high risk" at the time because she was 36, this was 20 years ago). She hated being induced and has since said that it is nothing like a real labor and that it takes you "from 0 to 60 in no time". She wound up having an epidural because she couldnt take it (this was after having two kids, both of those labors natural and almost 2 days long each). My sister had to be induced because her water broke and she wasnt having contractions. She got through it without any pain medication (her labor only lasted 5 hours). She hasnt ever mentioned having ill feelings about being induced. I was induced for fetal stress (which looking back, I dont think she was stressed, I think she was laying on a nerve in my back which caused us to have problems). I was induced on a Monday and had her on a Thursday. After 2 1/2 days of labor, I opted for an epidural because I couldnt take it anymore. I wish I had known I was only 2 hours away from having her because I wouldnt have gotten it, but oh well. Nothing I can do about it now. In the future, I will not be induced unless it is a last resort. If I were you, I would wait until the 42 week mark before going ahead on the induction. The baby will come when it is the right time for them to come. Good luck and Congrats! Answered by Sergio Szitar 1 year ago.

My induction ended with an emergency c-section, but I was induced because of Preeclampsia and I was not favorable for induction (closed and hard cervix). If you are going to have an induction educate yourself. Find out your hospitals procedures so you can better inform yourself. The main this is to never feel stupid about asking a TON of questions. I went with the flow, didn't ask any questions, didn't know any better really. Try and hold out on the epidural as long as you can and just remember that there are several...hundreds..THOUSANDS of successful inductions with no complications, so don't let a few people's stories scare you. :) Good luck momma! Answered by Luke Shirar 1 year ago.

I have 4 children and all but one was induced. It really is no difference than having them naturally. They give you pitocen (unsure about spelling) through your IV and that will cause you to have labor pains and go into labor and if your sack does not break when they give that to you then they will take a plastic stick and puncture the back and break it for you. This does not hurt at all. Labor pains are very painful but the inducing is not. If the pain is too much you can always have an epidural and you will not feel the labor pains. I hope this helps you. Answered by Corrinne Forcell 1 year ago.

My induction ended with me having an emergency c-section after 27hr of labor - I was miserable for 10 of those hours - my induction really didn't go well I have to disagree that it was equal pain - my induction contractions came hard, fast and way more painful than that of my natural labor - Answered by Albert Altomonte 1 year ago.

No different than the baby coming on it's own. The meds simply start the labor process. Equal pain for both methods. Answered by Marguerita Seacrest 1 year ago.

For a few men and women, bodily endeavor. But if you're particularly pre-eclamptic they've you on bedrest. So, you might do nipple stimulation. The different well likelihood is an enema. Or, simply attempt to loosen up and leisure till the truly factor occurs. Good success. Answered by Timothy Yaroch 1 year ago.

I had an induction with my 3rd child, and i agree that the contractions were more intense than any of my other children. they gave me pitocin,and after that, it was pretty quick, even though they still had to break my water. Good luck!! Answered by Edwardo Kahuhu 1 year ago.

my dr. broke my water at 40 weeks and 5 hours later i had my baby girl labor went great. Answered by Daina Boshell 1 year ago.


Im so scared of birth, how did yours goes?
I know everyone is different, and their pain and symptoms vary, but I'm literally freaking out. I do not want to throw up! How soon can I get an epi? Does it help with vomiting if your vomiting from pain? I'm just interested in your story! Asked by Lisette Fenoglio 1 year ago.

Honestly, I was just like you. I had my son 6 weeks ago and I was terrified. And yes, it hurt a lot but once your contractions set in you stop really being scared and worrying about what's going to happen to you and you just go with it. I was just concerned about getting my baby into the world safely. So my story goes: My water broke at 9.30am on a Wednesday, spent about 3 hours at the hospital being monitored and making sure baby wasn't distressed, got sent home at about 4 and was told I'd most likely go into labour by that night and to let nature take it's course. Went home and contractions started at 5.30pm. They were 4 minutes apart by 8.30 pm and I was at the hospital at 9.30. I was examined at 10 past 10 when my midwife arrived and got my epidural at 10.30. I was also hooked up to syntocinon (Or however you spell it) just to add to the effectiveness of contractions. The epidural was magic until about 2am when (We found out later this is what it was) baby was grinding so badly down through the birth canal and going so fast (Last we'd checked at 1.30 I was only 2cms!) that the grinding was causing me pain. Because the pubic bit/vagina has a different nerve tract than where the epidural affects, I felt that part of the pain and it felt like my vagina was being split in half and set on fire at the same time. I was seriously in so much pain I was writhing around on the table screaming. The midwife made sure my epidural was working which it was and said the only thing she could do was give me gas which she did. That made everything PERFECT. I was able to suck so much that I got to sort of go into that half asleep place which I needed because I'd had no sleep since I'd woken up that morning and this was now 3.30am. Anyway, the midwife checked me again at 10 past 4 and I was only 3 at that point which made me want to cry. Since I'd arrived at the hospital I'd been hooked up to a monitor to check baby's heartbeat and monitor my contractions and I'd been hearing my son's heartbeat all night. But when I had a contraction his heartbeat sped up so I always knew when the pain was going to set in even with the gas, so I ended up sucking in so much that I couldn't hear it so I wouldn't feel it. My mum was with me and at 4.40 she asked what was going on with baby's heart since she couldn't hear it. She tried to adjust the monitor on my belly because it had moved a few times through the night and we always got the heart beat back when we moved it but this time we didn't. I was pretty out of it so mum called in the midwife who could not find it. That is until she opened my legs and saw baby's head. I'd gone from 3 to 10cms in 40 minutes. Anyway, she attatched the head probes to his scalp to monitor his heart and told me it was time to push. I was still pretty off my face at that point so after my mum pulled the gas away from me (I was NOT happy about that!) I sort of came to my senses and pushed. I didn't feel anything while pushing so I was quite surprised when they lay this baby I'd apparrently pushed out on my chest and told me it was my son. Of course I was ecstatic so I didn't care that I'd also not felt a second degree tear that was right next to my clitoris and urethra and went to my perenium. But either way, my son was born at 4.51am exactly 6 weeks ago today. They left my epidural running until they stitched me (the delivery ward was a madhouse so that night so it took 5 hours for them to get to me) and they gave my son and I an hour of skin to skin contact. Then a midwife weighed and dressed him for me and I fed him and he went off to sleep until 4pm that afternoon! After I was stitched and I got feeling back in my legs (The epidural numbs them) I got up and had a shower and changed into a nightie and had something to eat. They gave me the forms I needed to fill out for centrelink and to get his birth certificate and they transfered me to the maternity ward. And that was that. I was there for 2 more days after that and went home on the saturday afternoon. So I hoped I've helped a bit by telling you all that. I asked a similar question at about 35 weeks after freaking out and I didn't get an answer that was informative that answered my questions properly so I hope by telling my birth story you feel somewhat at ease knowing what to expect. Just know not every woman tears and not every woman feels the grinding pain like I did. It all varies from woman to woman. Good luck with your birth and please don't freak out. No matter what it is going to happen so if you try to stay as calm as possible it'll be so much easier. Good luck again :) I'm sure it'll all go fine. Just take whatever drugs you feel you need to and focus on getting through. Giving birth is hard and painful but I promise you It is so worth it. I'd do it a million times over for my little boy. Answered by Mira Surrette 1 year ago.

Does anyone vomit because of pain? I don't vomit almost never, didn't vomit at the begining of my pregnancies, so I don't know about it. Anyway, you will get epi once you start to open, i.e. you will have to experience some pain. But, once you get it, I suppose it will be great. I gave birth to both of my babies naturally (vaginal birth, no pain killers). It hurts all right, but the pain stops as soon as the baby is out. I would recomment that you try not to think about it, you are just building up the pressure, and it must happen, one way or another. Answered by Kent Popple 1 year ago.

Well I had a very quick labour, less than 4 hours for the entire process. I didn`t have contractions just back labour which just felt like an intense period. I went into the hospital and they checked me and I was already 7 cms. They didn`t have time to give me meds seeing as how I went from7-10cms in 40 minutes. I threw up, but it was because I honestly felt sick, it wasn`t from the pain. Actually I threw up all over my mom`s car door as we were pulling into the hospital parking lot. It actually makes you feel better after you throw up. Also, my water didn't break (beleive me they tried breaking it) until I was fully dialted and pushing. I think it was my 6th push or so when my water broke. That's when they found out we had a problem. Since my baby was 3 days overdue, it had pooped in the placenta, it was going to be all over it and if it breathed in any of the poop, it would get into its lungs and cause some breathing problems or pnemonia. Luckily when baby came out, there was no poop around its mouth and nose. Actually I wasn`t really in alot of pain until the baby was crowing...that burns, but once the baby and placenta are out I felt no pain. Oh as for pushing, you suddenly fell like you have to go poop, and you have to use those muscles to push the baby out. Don't worry little to no poop will come out and those nurses have seen everything! What was the best thing? Having the nurse tell my husband that my baby was a boy, then the doctor telling her she needed Anatomy classes because I had a little girl. My advice to you is instead of timing contractions, go to the hospital when a shot of morphine sounds really good and you think you will be more comfortable there than at home. Answered by Lida Gajica 1 year ago.

With my son, I was induced. My labor lasted 23 hours, and by the end he started getting stressed and his heart rate was jumping up. It is obviously painful. VERY PAINFUL. From what I know they allow epidurals as soon as your contractions are regular or you're at 4cms. They let me get an epidural about 5 hours into it, because it hurt too much to get checked so they actually couldn't tell how far dilated I was, turns out I was only at 2 cms. The epidural can actually cause vomiting from the sudden drop in blood pressure from not beinin pain anymore. I got nauseous towards the end cause the epidual stopped working for me, and they gave me medicine to help it, and I managed to never throw up. All the discomfort of labor is totally worth it once they put that sweet baby on your chest, it's like it never happened! Answered by Taryn Larabell 1 year ago.

Try to relax as much as you can! I was a complete mess for the last two weeks before giving birth to my first. The birthing classes did nothing for me except freak me out even more. I was very lucky and started dialating early so my doctor agreed in induce me a week early and I'm glad she did. My baby ended up being over 9 pounds! I had an epi as soon as I asked for it (I was about 5 cm when I got it) and it did wonders for me. I relaxed until I had to push, which I only pushed for about 25 minutes, and I was done and holding my new baby. When it was all over I remember thinking I had worked myself up for almost my entire pregnancy for no reason. Don't get me wrong, it was work and it was hard, but nothing like I had made it out to be. I don't think I'll be rushing to have another one anytime soon, but if it happens again I will be a lot less stressed! Deep breaths and good luck to you!! Answered by Nicky Lemon 1 year ago.

Like you i was freaked out about birth and i ended up being induced due to preeclampsia and was on pitocin for 5 days before they ended up doing a c section. When i got contractions they felt like really bad menstrual cramps and honestly and i know it sounds gross, but felt like my butt was going to rip in half. When i started feeling a little discomfort they gave me demerol and fetenol which were safe to have with baby inside. Then when i asked for it i got the epidural which i was terrified of and honestly it didnt hurt at all! The contractions were what hurt however my epidural didnt work so when it was time for the c section i got a spinal which also didnt hurt! It just felt like a pinch! And honestly the c section during you dont feel a thing and afterwards as long as you take the pain medication like youre suppose to it doesnt hurt. You do feel sore but not a painful type sore. That was my experience at least and next time i have a baby ill be scheduling another c section! Answered by Meridith Celeya 1 year ago.

When I had my son I didn't have much pain to be honest. My contractions were kind of painful but the gas and air helped A LOT with that and I had Diamorphine (instead of epidural) and the only really bad pain I had was when I was pushing the head out. I'm also quite proud of myself for only screaming once and that was when the head was coming out. I didn't find it as hard or painful as most people told me it was but it wasn't a breeze either. It didn't, however, put me off having kids again so it couldn't have been that bad. I didn't feel sick at all but I did feel sleepy because of the gas and air. One thing I found to be really handy was lucozade glucose tablets. You can't eat anything once you've gone into labour incase you have to go for an emergency c-section so I bought a few packs of those to give me an energy boost and they actually did work, I highly recommend them to anyone in labour. Good luck and I hope it goes really well for you :) x Answered by Derrick Beynon 1 year ago.

I felt the same way with my first pregnancy. I couldn't sleep well during my last term. I was freaking out too. My labor was 50 freaking hours =( I didn't get my epi right away. I got my morphines, they helped me greatly. I needed my sleep soooo badly. The nurses gave me morphine to let me sleep. Whirl bath helped me greatly too. I don't remember when I got my epi...I believe it was half way through? I just didn't care how big the needle was. I just wanted to get over with it. I remember how exhausted I was =( The pushing part? took me 1 hour. My girl was 8lbs and I only got 1 stich done (that was the best part) I thought I would get 100 stitches done! lol She was vaccumed b/c she couldn't get out...my pelvic bones were not big enough. I remember a sharp pain when the doctor pulled her out with a vaccum. It was *bam sharp but quickly done. After? I was just very happy to be done. It was all blurry for me. I love my little girl to death :o) She is a carbon copy of me and the best thing in my life!! Answered by Pablo Goodlett 1 year ago.

I'm in the same boat with you, just 5 days from my due date with baby #3 and having anxiety about the pain. I can tell you I've never experienced vomiting in my labor, so I hope that you don't have to either :/ The best thing you can do when you go into labor is to take the effort and time to stay stress free and as calm as possible, for you and your baby. Take a bath, take the time to think and reflect on the baby and how exciting it will be to finally meet him/her. I love to go and look at all the tiniest baby clothes I have and think of how soon little Baby will be wearing them :) Best of luck to you. Answered by Estefana Luczkowiak 1 year ago.

My birth was awesome. I actually enjoyed it. I used the Bradley method and I practiced daily for over two months. It made a tremendous difference. I learned how to completely relax during contractions so I never got uterine cramps. The pain was a moderate, dull ache. I was allowed to eat and drink during labor. I never felt queasy at all. My husband took a picture of me during a contraction in transition. It looked just like I was sleeping. My births were one of the best experiences of my life. Answered by Shu Bogacki 1 year ago.

When I went into labor (I was induced with Pitocin) they let me have the epidural as soon as I requested it, no questions asked :) Although some hospitals may operate differently, their main concern will be to keep you as comfortable as possible during labor. As far as throwing up, I did not have any sort of nausea during the acutal labor, but it is true every pregnancy is very different and will positively vary from person to person. Best of luck to you with your pregnancy and labor!! Answered by Kip Samii 1 year ago.


What drugs are not good to take while in labor?
what i mean is are there any drugs that can be given during labor that can have side affects on the baby? This is my first pregnancy and i would like to know from a mothers experiance what to stay away from. Asked by Erma Height 1 year ago.

All drugs can potentially affect your baby, even those routinely given in hospital. Some of the "safe" drugs given in hospital you might want to reconsider are: * Piticon/syntocinon - often given to "speed up" a slow labour, or for an induction (e.g. due to post-dates pregnancy). This drug gives the mother very intense and often very painful contractions, without much of a rest in between contractions. The baby doesn't like being squeezed so much either - can raise the chance of fetal distress, often leading to a c-section. * Epidural - This is where you get a needle in your spine to inject the drugs. Very common following an induction, due to the aforementioned extra-painful contractions leading the mother to be desperate for heavy duty pain relief. The lower half of your body is numbed, but the baby is still feeling the contractions! As above, tends to raise the odds of fetal distress (esp. low heartrate). Baby may also be a bit groggy, and slow to start breastfeeding after birth. The labouring position the mother is restricted to (usually flat on her back or semi-reclining) is also not ideal for labouring, as the mother has to work against gravity to get the baby out - a ventouse/forceps birth (often with an episiotomy) is more likely. An upright/squatting/sitting position will widen the capacity of your pelvic outlet by about 30%! I would recommend pethedine or gas and air as your lowest-risk options for pain relief. Though you and your baby can both still be affected by these. (Many women vomit with gas & air, for example.) Personally, I went both my births drug-free, with mental calming techniques, and hot water, as my only pain relief. A hot water bottle is your best friend during labour! Make sure you get one, and a cloth or fuzzy cover for it. (Or a wheat pack to heat in the microwave, or similar.) It feels blissful on your sore back or belly. A warm bath or shower can also feel great. Remember, there's gaps between contractions. The pain isn't constant during labour, there's peaks and troughs. And in between contractions you get a great (though brief) chance to rest and gather your strength. Good luck! Answered by Kylee Steffel 1 year ago.

pretty much anything is going to affect the baby in SOME way. If you can tolerate the pain, I'd try to avoid the epidural. Only because it can have lasting effects in some women that make dealing with a new baby difficult at first. Nothing is neccesarily BAD for the baby, though. It wouldn't be an option if the benefits did not outweigh the negative. Answered by Elza Ronhaar 1 year ago.

I'll reply for him, rationale he is nonetheless in a Vegetative state! He hasn't stopped consuming~ that's his drug of alternative. and that used to be over 33 years in the past <~lol continuously, Ladyitch p.s. I will upload, he is in a apartment of three Women!<~OMG! what a LUCKY GUY!! Answered by Geralyn Kornblatt 1 year ago.

all of them Answered by Janine Cecchi 1 year ago.


Induced labor! HELP!?
I want to know every little detail about what's going on when you get induced! I'm getting induced for medical reasons and i want to all the information possible GOOD & BAD! lol i just want to know what to expect! Asked by Jong Jabaut 1 year ago.

Membrane sweep What is it? A membrane sweep often helps to stimulate labour and is now offered routinely to women who are overdue. They are also offered when you are 40 weeks pregnant if this is your first baby. What happens if I have a membrane sweep? The membranes that surround your baby are gently separated from your cervix. A midwife or doctor can carry out this procedure during an internal examination. You may be offered two or three membrane sweeps before moving onto other methods of induction. Risks It can be uncomfortable if your cervix is difficult to reach. You should be given a chance to ask questions or read information about the procedure before it's carried out. You may need to have several membrane sweeps before you know whether or not it has been successful. Prostaglandin What is it? Prostaglandin is a hormone-like substance, which helps stimulate uterine contractions. What happens if I am given prostaglandin? Your midwife or doctor will insert a tablet, pessary or gel containing prostaglandin into your vagina to ripen your cervix. You may need a second dose of the tablet or gel after six hours, if labour hasn't started. Pessaries release the prostaglandin slowly over 24 hours, so only one dose is needed. Risks Vaginal prostaglandin is the most commonly recommended method to induce labour because it often works better and has fewer disadvantages than other methods There is a very small risk that using or vaginal prostaglandins, or Syntocinon (see below), may cause your uterus to become overstimulated or hyperstimulated Hyperstimulation of the uterus seriously reduces the oxygen supply to your baby. Drugs can be used to stop or slow down the contractions if this happens In a worst-case scenario, hyperstimulation can cause your uterus to rupture (tear). This is more likely to happen if you are having a "trial of labour" following a previous caesarean section (Read more about vaginal birth after a caesarean, also known as VBAC.) Artificially rupturing the membranes (ARM) What is it? ARM is sometimes called "breaking the waters". Breaking your waters is no longer recommended as a method of induction (unless vaginal prostaglandins cannot be used for some reason) but some doctors or midwives may use it to speed labour up if it's not progressing. What happens if my waters are broken? This procedure can be done during an internal examination. A midwife or doctor makes a small break in the membranes around your baby using either an amniohook (a long thin probe which looks a little like a fine crochet hook) or an amnicot (a medical glove with a pricked end on one of the fingers). This procedure often works when the cervix feels soft and ready for labour to start. Risks Artificial rupture of the membranes (ARM) does not always work, and, once your waters have been broken, your baby could be at risk of infection. This is why it's no longer recommended as a method of induction on its own. If your midwife or doctor suspects an infection, she will give you antibiotics. Syntocinon What is it? Syntocinon is a synthetic form of the hormone oxytocin. You would only be offered Syntocinon if your labour hasn't started following a membrane sweep or prostoglandin, or if your contractions are not very effective. Syntocinon has several disadvantages over other methods of induction. If other methods of induction have not worked for you, you may be offered a caesarean as an alternative to trying again later or moving on to Syntocinon. What happens if I am given Syntocinon? You will be given the Syntocinon through an intravenous "drip", allowing the hormone to go straight into your bloodstream through a tiny tube into a vein in your arm. Once contractions have begun, the rate of the drip can be adjusted so that contractions happen often enough to make your cervix dilate, without becoming too powerful. Risks Syntocinon can cause strong contractions and put your baby under stress, so you will need to be monitored continuously. Some women also say that the contractions brought on by Syntocinon are more painful than natural ones, so you may choose to have an epidural for pain relief. There is also a very small risk that using Syntocinon may cause your uterus to become overstimulated or hyperstimulated. See prostoglandin risks above. Answered by Cherri Buscarino 1 year ago.


How can I raise my level of the chemical oxytocin?
How can I raise that level of the chemical that helps relieves stress in women I would appreciate your sincere input :) Asked by Willetta Termeer 1 year ago.

Synthetic oxytocin is sold as medication under the trade names Pitocin and Syntocinon and also as generic oxytocin. It is destroyed in the gastrointestinal tract, and therefore must be administered by injection or as nasal spray. It has a half-life of typically about three minutes in the blood. Oxytocin is relatively safe when used at recommended doses. But I seriously don't recommend taking it for social anxieties or mood disorders. Answered by Marie Jakes 1 year ago.


What triggers labor? sex, spicy food, etc?
What are things women do to make themselves go into labor? Asked by Trula Jagger 1 year ago.

There isn't any home remedy that starts labor. All old wives tales. (*The female body naturally produces the hormone oxytocin to stimulate contractions. Pitocin and Syntocinon are brand name medications that are forms(man made) of oxytocin that can be given through an IV at low doses to stimulate contractions. This is what a doctor would use if you needed an induction if baby did not come on his own. If you're already in labor. Walking can help move things along such as regulating and speeding up the frequency of your contractions. Thus the past popularity of the walking Epidural. Though not done now a days as much. Because of the fear the mother might fall and injure herself. The hospital I had my daughter at did not do those. Once you were given an Epidural you are confined to your bed for the duration of labor and delivery. Which is fine by me. I wanted the time to rest! Answered by Sherley Risinger 1 year ago.

walk, no seriously, it softens your cervix and helps with your muscles for when you do go into labor. It could also put you into labor! Ya, sex, some say spicy food or that castrol oil or whatever it's called. You can try slowly squatting too, some say that works. Ive heard that getting into a warm bath with your legs spread and gently pushing can make you dilate as well as putting you into labor. Good luck! Answered by Sarai Kopf 1 year ago.

The only thing that will trigger labor is when the hormone oxytocin is released in the body. All the walking and sex in the world won't bring on labor if baby isn't ready. Answered by Lieselotte Viola 1 year ago.

I walked a lot ( a few miles a day) before hand and I also did a lot of squats (weed picking). I remember reading that sex helps but I was too big and uncomfortable to think about sex. My walking helped me because I delivered almost a week before my due date. Answered by Lucretia Steffey 1 year ago.

final area is stressful yet toddler will in undemanding terms come while waiting. warm baths, eating gin or cod liver oil or driving on bumpy roads will in undemanding terms harm mum no longer start up hard artwork. eating rasberry tea might yet I doubt it. Seeing many pregnancys that is in undemanding terms a rely of waiting and doing it in as friendly a fashion as attainable for mum to help time bypass. Sorry! Answered by Karleen Littlejohn 1 year ago.

well it all depends, like if ur due date is really close, u could try to be lot more active. My mom also told me thatshe tried to do tthat getting heavy staff, like idk picking up all the food bags u can get etc.......but if someone does that when the baby still is too small then is reeeeeally dangerous to do that. In my opinion, i wouldnt do that, ill rather wait for my baby to be ready to be born. Remember that when the baby is born u will have the rest of ur life to tace care of him or her, why wont we wait couple of more days or weeks? Answered by Carlie Kirchmeier 1 year ago.

I tried that and pineapple, walking, and squats and still was a week overdue. If baby isn't ready you're just going to make yourself suffer. Those spicy chicken sandwiches and the hearburn that followed damn near killed me. :) ETA I tried nipple stimulation too. Answered by Dominga Concannon 1 year ago.

Wish I could tell ya!! I'm due in 8 days.. apparently sex helps a lot and esepecially if your partner "does their business in you" its said to soften your cervix.. Answered by Kimber Shammaa 1 year ago.

i havent given birth yet lol not til february but my sister who gave birth 3 months ago was doing alot of walking and went into labour 3 weeks earlier!! good luck... Answered by Christal Keach 1 year ago.


Does induction increase the risk for having a medical intervention during the birth of your baby?
hi im 41+5 and being induced this morning!.. please tell me what happened to you when u was induced?.. or anything u know on the matter!? Asked by Valene Perman 1 year ago.

I used to work at a birth centre and were told by midwives that if you have any sort of intervention than the chances of having more are higher (like a snowball effect). Because you are being induced - (which at 41.5 I would be too!) and will need to have IV syntocinon to help build up your contractions or maybe pg gel to help with dialation then instead of getting the gradual build up as you do with a non-induced labour the contraction can be a bit more full on as your endorfins in your body haven't had a chance to catch up with the pain yet, therefore you may be more likely to need an epidural which could mean (unless they turn it down for the pushing part) that you may need to have a ventouse or forceps to help deliver baby, if this doesn't work then a caesarian. Of course this isn't necessarily what might happen but chances are higher if this is your first baby and/or you have a long labour. Just go in with and open mind, and remember the end result is a healthy baby even if the delivery may not have been part of your birth plan. Congratulations and all the best! Answered by Celestina Figures 1 year ago.

i was induced with my daughter i only had the drip it was more to build my contractions up when they reached the highest level on the drip it was only 50min of full painfull labour i had no intreventions or complications i hope your labour goes as well as mine did good luck Answered by Marisha Bruder 1 year ago.


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