SYMMETREL Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 016020/001.

Names and composition

"SYMMETREL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016020/001 SYMMETREL AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
016023/002 SYMMETREL AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE SYRUP/ORAL 50MG per 5ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
017118/001 SYMMETREL AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE SYRUP/ ORAL 50MG per 5ML
018101/001 SYMMETREL AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016020/001 SYMMETREL AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
016023/002 SYMMETREL AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE SYRUP/ORAL 50MG per 5ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
017118/001 SYMMETREL AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE SYRUP/ ORAL 50MG per 5ML
018101/001 SYMMETREL AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
070589/001 AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG
071293/001 AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG
071382/001 AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG
072655/001 AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE SYRUP/ORAL 50MG per 5ML
073115/001 AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE SYRUP/ORAL 50MG per 5ML
074028/001 AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE SYRUP/ORAL 50MG per 5ML
074170/001 AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE SYRUP/ORAL 50MG per 5ML
074509/001 AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE SYRUP/ORAL 50MG per 5ML
075060/001 AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE SYRUP/ORAL 50MG per 5ML
075819/001 AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE SYRUP/ORAL 50MG per 5ML
076186/001 AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
076352/001 AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE SYRUP/ORAL 50MG per 5ML
077659/001 AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG
077992/001 AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE SYRUP/ORAL 50MG per 5ML
071000/001 SYMADINE AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG
078720/001 AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG
207570/001 AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG
207571/001 AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
208096/001 AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
208107/001 AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG
208278/001 AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG
208966/001 AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG
209035/001 AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
209047/001 AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG
209171/001 AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG
209221/001 AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE AMANTADINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG

Ask a question

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question as quickly as possible.

Answered questions

Does anybody know any thing about the drug amantadine OR symmetrel?
Asked by Luise Neufer 1 month ago.

This would be a good question for your doctor. He can explain why he feels that you need it, or don't as the case may be. Answered by Karry Kebe 1 month ago.


How do amantadine inhibit RNA replication?
Excuse me, but I would like to know the way by which amantadine inhibit the replication of Influenza A minus-RNA virus. Please help! Asked by Cameron Lanclos 1 month ago.

The mechanism by which amantadine (Symmetrel) exerts its antiviral activity is not clearly understood. It appears to mainly prevent the release of infectious viral nucleic acid into the host cell by interfering with the function of the transmembrane domain of the viral M2 protein. In certain cases, amantadine is also known to prevent virus assembly during virus replication. Answered by Johna Baadsgaard 1 month ago.


The Flu for 1 week and wont go away?
Sudafed i finished all 18 tablets and also ive been taken motrin and excedrin which didnt help amantadine to take 2 times a day for 7 days 3 tablets left Asked by Alberta Yorio 1 month ago.

Thanks for emailing me about the edits you made. Symmetrel (amantadine) treats influenza type A. Although type A is the most common, maybe yours is a type B or C. Still, the virus is self-limited and will resolve in time....if this is flu. But if it's not the flu, what else could it be? Keeping in mind the symptoms you've listed, sinusitis and allergy-related sinusitis come to mind. Drainage from sinuses irritates the throat, post-nasal drip from allergies also irritates the throat. Sinusitis can cause nasal congestion and eye pain. Sinusitis is either bacterial or viral. Antivirals like Symmetrel won't treat a bacterial infection. Ask for a referral to an ENT to rule out undiagnosed sinusitis. Answered by Lashunda Schmied 1 month ago.

hey if u r a muslim so kindly read ayaatal kursi Answered by Dillon Terlecki 1 month ago.


HELP ME!PLEASE!URGENT!?
May somebody help me find some new or recent discovered virus? It's name, it's symptoms, origin of it's name, or anything related to the virus. Please Help Me!!! Asked by Bethel Swaisgood 1 month ago.

why do you need a virus, are you planning on getting a virus and just need a new one to come up with. how about boredom. Answered by Lavonne Garfunkel 1 month ago.


MS will i have to take meds, will i be in a wheel chair????!?
Multiple sclerosis? Does everyone have to take medication?I am 16. I dont know if i have MS, but i have an "undiagnosed autoimmune disease." I have the symptoms, but like most know the symptoms mirror other disease. I Was wondering does everyone with MS take medications that they inject themselves. I know i... Asked by Eusebia Marandola 1 month ago.

Multiple sclerosis? Does everyone have to take medication? I am 16. I dont know if i have MS, but i have an "undiagnosed autoimmune disease." I have the symptoms, but like most know the symptoms mirror other disease. I Was wondering does everyone with MS take medications that they inject themselves. I know i shouldn't worry till i am diagnosed but i was just curious. One doctor thought maybe lupus, but i havent seen a specialist. My new doctor has to get my blood work b4 she can refer me. i had a ct yeasturday, thank goodness i didnt get a phone call today, i guess taht is a good things. so if anyone could please help me out that would be great. also i was wondering how would ms affect me in the future if i do have it. what will it do to my body. i dont know like ive said if it is ms but if it is i think it is affecting my hands? doesthat happen? it has been getting worse, they hurt everyday and i can harding move them oor use them, my legs (thought to be shin splits) hurt sooo bad after i walk fast for a short distance or if i walk a long period of time, i can barley lift them after and they hurt sooooo bad... Answered by Charline Thrun 1 month ago.

Until and unless you're diagnosed with MS, this answer to you is theoretical, okay? And, Rita, thanks for e-mailing me about the MS questions you posted. Not all MS meds are injected. Many used to treat the effects of MS can be taken orally - Symmetrel (for fatigue), baclofen (for muscle stiffness, spasms and tremors), Detrol (for urinary difficulty), Tylenol (for pain) and Prozac (for depression). You would find these helpful. No need to suffer more than you can help. It would have to determined which type of MS you have. There's benign, relapsing-remitting, primary progressive, secondary progressive and progressive-relapsing. You should know what to expect. For relapsing-remitting MS, Avonex, Betaseron, Copaxone and Rebif are generally self-injected either under the skin or into muscle but not everyday. Betaseron is every other day. Rebif is 3 times a week. Avonex is weekly. (One medication, Tysabri, is injected weekly at your doctor's office.) These 4 self-injected meds aren't really effective for other types of MS. Corticosteroids (Methylprednisolone, prednisone and Betamethasone) are used to suppress the immune system and thus cotrol the symptoms. As your symptoms are worsening, I would advise medication but I would also advise physical & occupational therapy to maintain function and independence for as long as possible. But whether or not you take meds is your decision and you have the right to refuse any and all forms of treatment. So, no, you don't HAVE to take medication. Most people do. And they inject the injectables themselves. They learn how and they get over any squeamishness about it. And how grand to be able to help yourself. It's hard to predict the course of MS although those people who have early symptoms of tremor, poor coordination, difficulty in walking, or who have frequent attacks with incomplete recoveries, early development of neurological abnormalities, or more lesions on MRI early on, tend to have a more progressive disease course. There can be intention tremors of the hands. I think it's premature to talk about wheelchairs or hospital beds. And as I said, it's hard to predict the course of MS. But, my friend, you have yet to find out just what the problem is. I'm truly sorry about what's happening to you and I hope you get some answers about it soon. Please try to keep up your spirits. I'll keep you in my prayers. Answered by Debrah Heffelfinger 1 month ago.

Please don't worry too much, I've had MS for more than 27 years and I'm not in a wheel chair and I don't plan in using it any time soon. To tell you the truth I was not as I am today, thank to my husband we found a natural product that has helped me a lot, its name is "alfa PXP forte" and is from a company called "ENZACTA". We already bought a membership so we can get it at a better price. It has change my life. You should check it out. The Web Page is www.enzacta.com and if you have any question I'll be happy to answer them. Please take good care and God bless you. Teresa [email protected] Answered by Angela Yengo 1 month ago.

Yea, unfortunately, you do have to take medication for MS. It is a very serious condition also it is very hard to diagnose. You're a very young individual, it must either be a genetic. With MS you are constantly in pain. It can get very painful at times, which is why some MD's will place their patients on regular pain medication that are in the control narcotic catagory. With your symptoms it is very possible, but of course you should consult your doctor. I hope it is not MS, you can manage life with it, but only prepare yourself for it if your doctor diagnose you with it. One of the major celebrity with MS is Montel Williams, you should read is blog on his website, very inspiring. Answered by Yahaira Kahrer 1 month ago.


What is the drug that is most commonly used to reverse extrapyramidal side effects??
with the use of anti psychotic medication? Asked by Christinia Tozzi 1 month ago.

The most common are Artane, Cogentin, Benadryl and Symmetrel (Amantadine) which are used to decrease the EPS that are associated side effects of most anti-psychotics. Answered by Timothy Boyne 1 month ago.

That would be Ritalin..........If memory serves, what I read stated all four(4). The elevated heart rate and Insomnia being the most reported. The drug still gets mixed reviews, the debate over it's effectiveness has never ended. OH WELL.........LATER Answered by Na Gopen 1 month ago.

from what i know of this there is no way to reverse extrapyramidal side effects. once the damage is done it is permanent which is why the patient has to sign the paperwork as to not hold the prescriber or facility responsible. check out WebMD, there might be more info there and you can be sure it is accurate. Answered by Edwin Guagliardo 1 month ago.


What substances & therapy-like things are most beneficent for adults with Aspergers & vice-versa?
I have been diagnosed with Aspergers Syndrome (a high functioning part in the Autism Spectrum) in partial remission by a very reputable doctor in NY state. Doctors have also told me that ADHD/ADD are usually apparent in people with Aspergers.I would like to know what substances like vitamins/minerals,... Asked by Mellisa Harbater 1 month ago.

I have been diagnosed with Aspergers Syndrome (a high functioning part in the Autism Spectrum) in partial remission by a very reputable doctor in NY state. Doctors have also told me that ADHD/ADD are usually apparent in people with Aspergers. I would like to know what substances like vitamins/minerals, foods/drinks (including ingredients,) medications, or drugs that would particularly benefit my situation, or would adversely affect me more so than "normal," healthy people. I would also like to know of any kind of therapy (or even stuff i can do without seeing a Dr. or therapist) that would help project me to a higher and/or more balanced functionality. Spiritual suggestions are welcomed as well, besides plainly going to church and etc. Like would coffee, marijuana, candy/sugar, or alcohol adversely affect me more than a regular, healthy person, or perhaps in moderation provide benefits? are there any specific alcohols, foods, or hardcore drugs that "I" should specifically look out for? for example: one Dr. told me that certain ADHD meds could basically "scramble" my mind because i have Aspergers.. (by a doctor who has specialties in autism.) if you're going to suggest music as an activity i will tell you that i am already musically active. i am a multi-instrumentalist, composer, and performer. i am also currently attending college for an Associates in Music and plan to transfer for a Bachelors. i am frequently on social networking sites as well. P.S. i am never going to touch stuff like heroin, meth, crack/cocaine, or crocodile. i will tell you that i have experimented with stuff such as xanax, percocet, artane/cogentin/symmetrel, psychoactive mushrooms, valium, and more often (not every day or even every week) marijuana. none of this has greatly hindered me and i currently have all A's in college. i also graduated from high school in NY with a regents diploma, and yes i had an IEP because it took me a little extra time to get stuff done. Answered by Laveta Zmiejko 1 month ago.

All your questions and more are answered in the book, Healing and Preventing Autism by J. McCarthy. One major thing is never eat anything with Gluten. Since most processed foods contain gluten, read all labels. Answered by Eugenio Cerrano 1 month ago.


Best and latest medical tretment of parkinson,?
drug names of parkinson disease Asked by Curt Girdler 1 month ago.

The Food and Drug Administration approved Azilect (rasagiline), a new molecular entity, for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. The drug is a monoamine oxidase type--B (MAO-B) inhibitor that blocks the breakdown of dopamine, a chemical that sends information to the parts of the brain that control movement and coordination. Another New Treatment On May 9, 2007, FDA announced the approval of Neupro (rotigotine transdermal system), a skin patch designed to treat symptoms of early Parkinson's disease. Rotigotine is a drug not previously approved in the United States. Neupro, manufactured by Schwarz Bioscience of Research Triangle Park, N.C., is the first transdermal patch approved for the treatment of symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Rotigotine is a member of the dopamine agonist class of drugs and is delivered continuously through the skin (transdermal) using a silicone-based patch that is replaced every 24 hours. A dopamine agonist works by activating dopamine receptors in the body, mimicking the effect of the neurotransmitter dopamine. Other Alternatives: A Brain "Pacemaker" FDA approved an important tool for controlling Parkinson's tremors. The Activa Tremor Control Therapy consists of a wire surgically implanted deep within the brain and connected to a pulse generator, similar to a cardiac pacemaker, implanted near the collarbone. Whenever a tremor begins, patients can activate the device by passing a hand-held magnet over the generator. The system delivers a mild electrical stimulation that blocks the dysfunctional brain signals that cause tremor. Effects are often dramatic. "Before the implant, patients can't raise a glass of water or a spoonful of food to their mouths without spilling it or striking themselves in the face," says William Koller, M.D., neurology chairman at Kansas University Medical Center. "Within hours, these same patients are sipping tea from a cup and eating peas with a fork, with no signs of their disability." Surgery Options A brain operation shown to be helpful for many Parkinson's patients, especially those in late stages of the disease, is called pallidotomy. Doctors are not sure why the procedure works, but an October 1997 report in the New England Journal of Medicine stated that half of the patients in a pallidotomy study at Toronto Hospital, who before the surgery needed help in eating, dressing, and personal hygiene, were able to resume these activities independently. The study cautioned, however, that some of the surgery's effects diminished after two years and that the long-term effectiveness of the procedure still is unknown. Answered by Kari Howk 1 month ago.

The Parkinson's Reversing Breakthrough? Answered by Treena Hintergardt 1 month ago.

Isradipine is a medicine that has recently shown to possibly stop Parkinson's disease in it's tracks. The stardard treatments are Levadopa (L-dopa), Carbadopa, Simemet. Answered by Jaunita Polivka 1 month ago.

I help the right for someone to chosen, yet previous due time period abortions are really out of the question. through then a lady must have already favourite what she became gonna do. except medically mandatory previous due time period abortions must be banned. convinced I suggested it banned. I help options no longer abortions... Answered by Jamel Musigdilok 1 month ago.


Does anyone know anything about seroquel?
Asked by Gema Poteat 1 month ago.

I've been precribed seroquel for anxiety/schizophrenia/insomnia, but it made me feel soooo tired the following morning that I quit taking it. I now take Geodon for sleep, abilify for schizophrenia and Lyrica for anxiety. There are several websites with information about seroquel: Answered by Silvia Metcalfe 1 month ago.

Hi I was on seroquel for about three months. I felt aweful on it. I just felt blah all the time Plus it caused me to have migraines almost daily. As soon as I was taken off it these symptons went away. If you are on it, I hope you don't get these symptons. Thank you! Hugs! Von! Answered by Lacie Rumley 1 month ago.

I took it for depression and it made me very sleepy and I had a huge appetite and gained 15 pounds in 3 weeks! Answered by Kelly Gardino 1 month ago.

Yeah, I've taken it for about four years. It's good for skitzophrenia and trouble sleeping. Answered by Gillian Moseby 1 month ago.

I've taken it and it gave me seizures my friend takes it and it makes her very tired Answered by Bob Fitzke 1 month ago.

Look it up at webmd.com and you will get all the answers you would want. In the meantime ask your pharmacist and your prescribing doctor questions. Answered by Dell Saisa 1 month ago.


How do I know If I have a cold or a flu?
Ok I checked webmd.com and It lists the differences between a cold and a flu. I don't know what I have. I have muscle soreness, eye soreness,coughing and sneezing that sprains my throat. Weight gain, I don't know why. I feel warm, but I don't think it's a fever. Some joint pain.. also my eyes are a... Asked by Rigoberto Monreal 1 month ago.

Ok I checked webmd.com and It lists the differences between a cold and a flu. I don't know what I have. I have muscle soreness, eye soreness,coughing and sneezing that sprains my throat. Weight gain, I don't know why. I feel warm, but I don't think it's a fever. Some joint pain.. also my eyes are a bit dark, not really dark but it shows a bit. I feel weak. My head is sore, or full of (pressure). Increased heart rate( I guess that's normal for sickness) But It's not like palpitations or anything, maybe It's just sickness. Do I need to go to a M.D.? Is It a Cold or the Flu? Below are cold symptoms and flu symptoms. See the differences and similarities between a cold and the flu. Symptoms Cold Flu Fever Rare Characteristic, high (100-102°F); lasts three to four days Headache Rare Prominent General Aches, Pains Slight Usual; often severe Fatigue, Weakness Quite mild Can last up to two to three weeks Extreme Exhaustion Never Early and prominent Stuffy Nose Common Sometimes Sneezing Usual Sometimes Sore Throat Common Sometimes Chest Discomfort, Cough Mild to moderate; hacking cough Common; can become severe Complications Sinus congestion or earache Bronchitis, pneumonia; can be life-threatening Prevention None Annual vaccination; Symmetrel, Flumadine, or Tamiflu (antiviral drugs) Treatment Only temporary relief of symptoms Symmetrel, Flumadine, Relenza, or Tamiflu within 24-48 hours after onset of symptoms This is from webmd.com Answered by Tamesha Canning 1 month ago.

If you have flu you generally can't get up but if you have a cold you should be able to live your life as normal! Answered by Alayna Magyar 1 month ago.

No the bloodless climate does not purpose bloodless/flu. You are correct in that they're viral infections. However, the bloodless and flu are extra ordinary in iciness since the germs have a area day interior in which we have now the heating up complete blast - this supplies maximum stipulations for them to multiply quicker and for this reason that means they may be able to multiply quicker than your immune process can do away with them! Answered by Demetra Rillera 1 month ago.


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