Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 016792/001.

Names and composition

"SURMONTIL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of TRIMIPRAMINE MALEATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016792/001 SURMONTIL TRIMIPRAMINE MALEATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE
016792/002 SURMONTIL TRIMIPRAMINE MALEATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 50MG BASE
016792/003 SURMONTIL TRIMIPRAMINE MALEATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 100MG BASE

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016792/001 SURMONTIL TRIMIPRAMINE MALEATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE
016792/002 SURMONTIL TRIMIPRAMINE MALEATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 50MG BASE
016792/003 SURMONTIL TRIMIPRAMINE MALEATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 100MG BASE
071283/001 TRIMIPRAMINE MALEATE TRIMIPRAMINE MALEATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE
071284/001 TRIMIPRAMINE MALEATE TRIMIPRAMINE MALEATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 50MG BASE
071285/001 TRIMIPRAMINE MALEATE TRIMIPRAMINE MALEATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 100MG BASE
077361/001 TRIMIPRAMINE MALEATE TRIMIPRAMINE MALEATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE
077361/002 TRIMIPRAMINE MALEATE TRIMIPRAMINE MALEATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 50MG BASE
077361/003 TRIMIPRAMINE MALEATE TRIMIPRAMINE MALEATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 100MG BASE
208127/001 TRIMIPRAMINE MALEATE TRIMIPRAMINE MALEATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE
208127/002 TRIMIPRAMINE MALEATE TRIMIPRAMINE MALEATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 50MG BASE
208127/003 TRIMIPRAMINE MALEATE TRIMIPRAMINE MALEATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 100MG BASE

Ask a doctor

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

Can surmontil be taken for hot flash's?
I have am going through menopause, and I thought I read somewhere on the internet,that surmontil was good for hotflash's can you please help me? Asked by Leota Ziminski 1 year ago.

soy and estroven /dong quai at gnc naturally others that are hormones cause cancers Answered by Oliva Clemenson 1 year ago.

I don't know about that, but red clover in the promensil formulation is pretty good. I know some people who use that. Answered by Monica Nauyen 1 year ago.


Can i take fluanxol w/o consulting a doctor?
my doctor replace fluanxol to surmontil. i felt more depress with surmontil. i want to take fluanxol again. can i take fluanxol w/o consulting a doctor? Asked by Houston Lele 1 year ago.

When patients fail to respond to a particular antidepressant, or exhibit side effects, and a trial of another antidepressant is indicated. Consulting with with your doctor before making any changes in your medications is suggested. Take care as always! Answered by Merrie Hoevel 1 year ago.


Taken Clomipramine for 2 days dont like how i feel can i stop?
with no problems Asked by Albert Guinther 1 year ago.

hope this helps to answer your? clomipramine Generic Name: clomipramine (kloe MI pra meen) Brand Names: Anafranil What is the most important information I should know about clomipramine? Do not use this medication if you have recently had a heart attack, or if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Do not use clomipramine if you are allergic to it or to similar drugs such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), amoxapine (Ascendin), desipramine (Norpramin), doxepin (Sinequan), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), protriptyline (Vivactil), or trimipramine (Surmontil). You may have suicidal thoughts or behavior when you start taking an antidepressant, especially if you are under 18 years old. You will need to be monitored for worsening symptoms of depression or suicidal thoughts. Your doctor should check you at regular visits during the first 12 weeks of treatment, or whenever your dose is changed. Contact your doctor promptly if you have any of the following side effects, especially if they are new symptoms or if they get worse: mood changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, irritability, agitation, aggressiveness, severe restlessness, mania (mental and/or physical hyperactivity), thoughts of suicide or hurting yourself. What is clomipramine? Clomipramine is a tricyclic antidepressant. It affects chemicals in the brain that may become unbalanced. Clomipramine is used to treat symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) such as recurrent thoughts or feelings and repetitive actions. Clomipramine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking clomipramine? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to clomipramine or to similar drugs such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), amoxapine (Ascendin), desipramine (Norpramin), doxepin (Sinequan), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), protriptyline (Vivactil), or trimipramine (Surmontil). Do not use clomipramine if you have recently had a heart attack, or if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take clomipramine before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body. Before taking clomipramine, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have: heart disease or a history of heart attack, stroke, or seizures; bipolar disorder (manic-depression), schizophrenia or other mental illness; kidney or liver disease; overactive thyroid or adrenal gland tumor (pheochromocytoma); glaucoma; or problems with urination. If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use clomipramine, or you may need a dosage adjustment or special tests during treatment. You may have suicidal thoughts or behavior when you first start taking an antidepressant, especially if you are under 18 years old. Watch for worsening symptoms of depression or suicidal thoughts. Your doctor should check you at regular visits during the first 12 weeks of treatment, or whenever your dose is changed. In addition to you watching for changes in your own symptoms, your family or caregivers should be alert to changes in your mood or symptoms. Contact your doctor promptly if you have any of the following side effects, especially if they are new symptoms or if they get worse: mood changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, irritability, agitation, aggressiveness, severe restlessness, mania (mental and/or physical hyperactivity), thoughts of suicide or hurting yourself. FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Clomipramine can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take clomipramine? Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from this medication. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Take clomipramine with food to reduce stomach upset. If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are taking clomipramine. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time. Do not stop using clomipramine without first talking to your doctor. You may need to use less and less before you stop the medication completely. It may take up to 4 weeks of using this medicine before your symptoms improve. For best results, keep using the medication as directed. Talk with your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 4 weeks of treatment. Store clomipramine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose? Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose. What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of clomipramine can be fatal. Symptoms may include fast or uneven heart rate, extreme drowsiness, confusion, agitation, vomiting, blurred vision, sweating, muscle stiffness, increased or decreased urination, swelling, shortness of breath, blue lips or fingernails, feeling light-headed, fainting, seizure (convulsions), or coma. What should I avoid while taking clomipramine? Avoid drinking alcohol. It can cause dangerous side effects when taken together with clomipramine. Avoid using other medicines that make you sleepy (such as cold medicine, pain medication, muscle relaxers, medicine for seizures, or other antidepressants). They can add to sleepiness caused by clomipramine. Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with clomipramine. Discuss the use of grapefruit products with your doctor before increasing or decreasing the amount of grapefruit products in your diet. Clomipramine can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Avoid exposure to sunlight or artificial UV rays (sunlamps or tanning beds). Clomipramine can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight and sunburn may result. Use a sunscreen (minimum SPF 15) and wear protective clothing if you must be out in the sun. What are the possible side effects of clomipramine? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling; sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body; sudden headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance; feeling light-headed, fainting; fever, confusion, muscle stiffness, sweating, fast or uneven heartbeats; pale skin, easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness; o urinating more than usual. Less serious side effects may be more likely to occur, such as: nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, loss of appetite, constipation or diarrhea; dry mouth, unpleasant taste; increased appetite, weight changes; feeling anxious, restless, dizzy, drowsy, or tired; blurred vision, trouble concentrating; sleep problems (insomnia), nightmares; blurred vision; increased sweating; or decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect clomipramine? Before taking clomipramine, tell your doctor if you have used an "SSRI" antidepressant in the past 5 weeks, such as citalopram (Celexa), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem), fluvoxamine (Luvox), paroxetine (Paxil), or sertraline (Zoloft). Before taking clomipramine, tell your doctor if you are currently using any of the following drugs: cimetidine (Tagamet); guanethidine (Ismelin); methylphenidate (Concerta, Ritalin, Daytrana); phenytoin (Dilantin); warfarin (Coumadin); heart or blood pressure medication such as clonidine (Catapres) or digoxin (Lanoxin); heart rhythm medications such as flecainide (Tambocor), propafenone (Rhythmol), or quinidine (Cardioquin, Quinidex, Quinaglute); or anti-psychotic medications such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), haloperidol (Haldol), thioridazine (Mellaril), clozapine (Clozaril), olanzapine (Zyprexa, Zydis), quetiapine (Seroquel), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon). If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use clomipramine, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment. There are many other medicines that can interact with clomipramine. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list with you of all the medicines you use and show this list to any doctor or other healthcare provider who treats you. Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has information about clomipramine written for health professionals that you may read. What does my medication look like? Clomipramine is available with a prescription under the brand name Anafranil. Other brand or generic forms may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you. Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Copyright 1996-2006 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 7.02. Revision Date: 10/11/06 12:16:21 PM. Answered by Ashanti Pevy 1 year ago.

Although many folks wont agree, you have to get off the meds. It is in all likelihood that every one of those meds are inflicting a extreme hormonal and neurological chemical imbalance for your mind. Consult your medical professional earlier than nevertheless. You are NOT possessed! God and the Devil don't seem to be truly. Religion is only a hypnotizer and some way to provide an explanation for matters we dont realise. As a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine, my recommendation could be get off the juice. It could also be very feasible that you're conveniently having night time terrors. I have had many sufferers experiencing them and I think that's a developing contributor to intellectual instability. DO NOT act on any irregular ideas you've got. DO NOT attempt to kill your self. If you do think that you're having unusual emotions and many others. then please name 911 as quickly as feasible. It is critical that you just obtain on the spot aid in a suicidal concern. There is desire for you but and the reply isn't God, its your possess frame. Answered by Jimmy Miggins 1 year ago.

Medications are to make you better and to fix whatever chemical imbalance you have. They are optional. If you don't feel good then quit taking them. I was given Prozac for depression and ended up with heart palpitations. so I quit. Now I feel better.You are your own best doctor and if they aren't helping you then don't do it!!! Answered by Lela Mow 1 year ago.

How to stop taking desipramine? Answered by Cami Bozic 1 year ago.


After taking one 50mg pill of anti-depressant how long does the side effects last?
@ ziggy... the anti-depressant was a prescription from the Doctor...Just want to know how long the side effects last, nothing else. Asked by Mozella Armantrout 1 year ago.

Anti-depressants do not cause hallucinations. Something else is wrong with your friend. Answered by Arcelia Bonge 1 year ago.

1. Your friend took an unknown substance. She/he or they are not certain what the heck it was, right? 2. Your friend then hallucinated. 3. Your friend diagnosed that this was an affect of the unknown substance (suspected of being an anti-depressant. 4. Your friend wants to know about orgasms? Honey, if this is your friend then you must know that his/her/their problems are NOT sexual. Each one of the above illustrate instability on a deeper level. Talk to your friend (like a real friend). Why take something in the first place? That's where to start. Your friend needs professional help. Your friend doesn't have good judgment on this and I suspect it's because they are feeling stressed out. You can help this person by finding a professional to help with they're problems. I wish you well & hope this helps. Answered by Joslyn Schallhorn 1 year ago.

Are they still having hallucinatinos? Better that they talk to their doctor about those side effects and find a better medication. Sexual dysfunction is often a reported side effect of many anti depressants, so maybe your doctor can give you advice on this too. Answered by An Grohoske 1 year ago.


I'm 55 not a athlete my bp in the mornings is 98/64 to 107/70 standing at night it's low also?
It usually is 107/75 to 114/75 I also have a slow resting pulse In the 50s had a ekg and blood tests everything came out good. I'm on xanix and Surmontil for anxiety. Is this normal? Or just my anxiety. Asked by Rozella Kozub 1 year ago.

It's not your anxiety. Anxiety usually pushes those numbers up. For some people it is just normal to have a slow resting pulse and low BP regardless of fitness level. It is also possible (but rare) for the medications that you are on to cause this. If you aren't suffering any symptoms then it isnt worth worrying about. A low BP is usually a good thing so long as you do not get dizzy often or faint. Answered by Ronni Huckeby 1 year ago.


None of the depression medications are working, and my therapist is driving me crazy?
Jamie im trying to find one who makes me happy and you have a good point there because the therapist person should make you happy or else why are you even going there but i dunno maybe i set my expectation too high or somethin Asked by Dennis Pullens 1 year ago.

I've taken Lexapro, Prozac, Paxil, Celexa, Zoloft, Norpramin, Vivactil, Effexor, and Parnate, and am currently on Surmontil (100 mg-blue/white capsules) (3 in the morning / day), and I still feel like crap sometimes. I'm really talkative and hyper and than all of a sudden I just want to be left alone and die, like even before I started taking all the meds. My therapist also drives me crazy, she is boring and I just want to fall asleep, nothing she says is relevant and she is like my 7th one I've been too. Sometimes I just see her lips moving and I go yeh, yeh, yeh, alright..because she doesn't ever stop. What can I do, it's driving me crazy, I just want her to go away, and something to start working. Answered by Korey Vandevender 1 year ago.

Yeh so she has a pic of her children hanging on the wall and she'll just point to em and be like oooh this is my son he is in uni trying to be a lawyer, ohhh and this is my daughter going to school to be a doctor and im so proud of my children and okay lady thats cool but talk about your children sometime else cause yeh Answered by Nelle Kuehnle 1 year ago.

Hi, If you have tried ten medications and nothing is really working, your doctor should refer you to a psychiatrist for recommendations. They are the experts on medications for depression, anxiety, etc. It doesn't sound like you have a therapeutic relationship with your therapist. It's not appropriate for the therapist to be focusing on herself and her family when she's talking to you. The focus should be on helping you to gain coping strategies for your problems. You should tell your doctor what you just told us, and ask for a referral to a different counsellor. I admire you for having this much patience with your treatment to date. Start by being very honest with your family doctor, especially tell him the part about feeling like being left alone to die. That's an indication that you are pretty depressed and discouraged. Know that you are loved, and keep on trying. Best wishes to you. Answered by Blondell Milloy 1 year ago.

A couple years ago I saw a therapist and was diagnosed with depression. They suggested I take medication, so they prescribed me Wellbutrin. I took it for a few weeks and did notice a small change. I felt like I was getting better so quit the meds and the therapist; I don't know if any of this helps, because I wasn't on the medication that long and I don't attribute all of my feeling better to the meds, as there were outside things that helped me. The important thing to know is that a pill won't simply make you better or happy. As I understand them, they're designed to help increase certain chemicals (different for different medications) in the brain which help you be more positive (or less negative, depending on how you look at it). You have to WANT to get better--but if only seeing a therapist isn't helping, I'd definitely consider medication if I were you. However, I wouldn't recommend mixing anti-depressents with alcohol. And since alcohol is a depressant, it's only going to make your depressive state even worse. Bottom line, if you continue drinking, it's going to be almost impossible for you to get better. Think about some AA meetings. And don't be afraid to ask your doctor questions about the medication; they're there to help. Answered by Shayla Moretti 1 year ago.

Well in some people a higher dose of drug is needed and some people 1,2,3, different types of drugs are needed and some need a less of a dose it all depends most drugs take like a week to start to work,etc. Therapist is trying to get u to open up! I know u don't want to talk about anything But u need to start talking about what u are feeling or let off some steam. Talking is the 1st step in getting out of depression and then working on what is really the problem - eating at u is next! Remember this takes time and u going to have to make the therapy work for u! Answered by Earnestine Paripovich 1 year ago.

Over the last five years I had begun to have increasingly withdraw into a downward spiral of depression.. But now with the method I can fully focus my energy and thoughts into a decisive line on how to make my life better constantly. And it works like magic! I'm beginning to attract people to me once again and things have just been looking up since then. Helping you eliminate depression? Answered by Shanell Carnighan 1 year ago.

You need to be re-evaluated for the meds that you are on. Something needs to change. Also look around, talk to people to see if they would recommend a new therapist. You have to be happy with the person that is supposed to be "helping" you through this. I'm sorry that you have to go through all this just to be happy, but good luck. Answered by Antione Copenhaver 1 year ago.

I know you've been to a million therapists, but you really need to find a new one. Your therapist sounds like my therapist, who I hate, so I'm getting another one. I'm often suicidal but I always stop myself before I do anything drastic by thinking about who would miss me and what I'd missing out on, even if I didn't even believe it. I hope you feel better someday. Answered by Dusty Sweeden 1 year ago.

depression meds never really work, they're just for psychiatrists to make money, if you feel depressed take a walk while listening to some uplifting music, that always works for me, even when i'm sobbing like a maniac, just focus your attention on the music, and the neighborhood. Some bands that always make me happy are, the kooks, lily allen, and led zeppelin. Answered by Siu Paroda 1 year ago.

i suggest you get a male counselor who is like in his 20's so he doesn't annoy the s h i t out of you depression is i hard thing last year i went through of few months when i was depressed mostly kiddie stuff tho it wasn't bad but i felt like c r ap Answered by Zaida Kulick 1 year ago.

sounds like you could have adhd, which can make you depressed. i thought i was depressed because i had racing thoughts and i was sad sometimes. then i got re evaluated and i found out i had adhd. Answered by Ruben Agbisit 1 year ago.


Stop breathing at onset of trying to go to sleep?
I stop breathing during the beginning stages of sleep and wake up ia a panic, often jumping out of bed gasping for air. It started 28 years ago and only happened about once every couple of months. Now, it happens daily, even when I try to nap. The only was I can drift off to sleep peacefully is with either,... Asked by Tamra Shreiner 1 year ago.

I stop breathing during the beginning stages of sleep and wake up ia a panic, often jumping out of bed gasping for air. It started 28 years ago and only happened about once every couple of months. Now, it happens daily, even when I try to nap. The only was I can drift off to sleep peacefully is with either, Ambien, Lunesta or a BENZO (like Valium or Lorazepam). The last week it is getting even worse. I get a throbbing small pain near either my right temple area, sometimes either temple area or on the top/side middle of my head. I have been to two sleep studies, but the last one was 2 years ago and that night I didn't have an event. However, I was diagnosed with having mild OSA. The sleep doctor put me on a CPAP machine (which I bought) and it only made the condition worse. He tried every titration and still was bad. I don't know if I have mixed sleep apnea. I had a neurological study done and it turned up negative. I have read about Central or Mixed Sleep Apnea and in my opinion, I might be suffering from it. It seems that my brain-control center for going to sleep have gone haywire. I have read about taking Medroxyprogestorne (Provera, Cycrin, Amen), Acetazolamide (Diamox). Theophylline (Theo-Dur, Respbid, Slo-Bid, Theo-24, Theolair, Uniphyl, Slo-Phyllin), traicyclic antidepressants and selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRI's). I am currently taking Surmontil 100 mg. per day and and Lamictal 125 mg. Please help me if you have any ideas or suggestions. I feel that my body can't handle the stress of this much longer. Answered by Elida Shelvey 1 year ago.

You're obviously on meds from the doctor. Talk to him and let him know how you feel. Ask him to recommend a Specialist that you can see for a second opinion. There is a chance the combination of drugs could be causing the problems. Make sure the doctor knows all of the over the counter medications and supplements you are taking too. Hope things get better for you. Answered by Janetta Ovington 1 year ago.

If I were you, I would seek out another physician, or just, in all those years, go to Mayo Clinic for a complete - head to toe - - evaluation. You would find you answer there. Answered by Timika Vanleuven 1 year ago.

I would seek help from another Doctor,it doesn't sound like the meds are helping.Good luck Answered by Kizzie Ruts 1 year ago.


How many antidepressants are there on the market/are available?
Asked by Indira Walkinshaw 1 year ago.

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)[edit] Citalopram (Celexa) Escitalopram (Lexapro, Cipralex) Paroxetine (Paxil, Seroxat) Fluoxetine (Prozac) Fluvoxamine (Luvox) Sertraline (Zoloft, Lustral) Zimelidine (Normud, Zelmid) and indalpine (Upstene) were also formerly used as antidepressants, but were withdrawn from the market. Serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs)[edit] Desvenlafaxine (Pristiq) Duloxetine (Cymbalta) Levomilnacipran (Fetzima) Milnacipran (Ixel, Savella) Tofenacin (Elamol, Tofacine) Venlafaxine (Effexor) Serotonin modulators and stimulators (SMSs)[edit] Vilazodone (Viibryd) Vortioxetine (Brintellix) These drugs act as serotonin reuptake inhibitors and agonize/antagonize various serotonin receptors. Serotonin antagonists and reuptake inhibitors (SARIs)[edit] Etoperidone (Axiomin, Etonin) Nefazodone (Nefadar, Serzone) – withdrawn/discontinued in many countries Trazodone (Desyrel) These drugs act as antagonists of various serotonin receptors and as weak monoamine reuptake inhibitors. Norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (NRIs)[edit] Reboxetine (Edronax) Viloxazine (Vivalan) Atomoxetine (Strattera) is also sometimes used as an antidepressant, but is not specifically approved for this purpose. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs)[edit] Amitriptyline (Elavil, Endep) Amitriptylinoxide (Amioxid, Ambivalon, Equilibrin) Clomipramine (Anafranil) Desipramine (Norpramin, Pertofrane) Dibenzepin (Noveril, Victoril) Dosulepin (Prothiaden) Doxepin (Adapin, Sinequan) Imipramine (Tofranil) Lofepramine (Lomont, Gamanil) Melitracen (Dixeran, Melixeran, Trausabun) Nitroxazepine (Sintamil) Nortriptyline (Pamelor, Aventyl) Noxiptiline (Agedal, Elronon, Nogedal) Pipofezine (Azafen/Azaphen) Protriptyline (Vivactil) Trimipramine (Surmontil) Butriptyline (Evadyne), demexiptiline (Deparon, Tinoran), imipraminoxide (Imiprex, Elepsin), iprindole (Prondol, Galatur, Tetran), metapramine (Timaxel), propizepine (Depressin, Vagran), and quinupramine (Kinupril, Kevopril) were also formerly marketed, but have since been discontinued. The following are also TCAs, but are atypical pharmacologically: Opipramol (Insidon) – sigma receptor agonist Tianeptine (Stablon) – unknown/unclear mechanism of action Amineptine (Survector, Maneon) is another atypical TCA, acting as a norepinephrine-dopamine reuptake inhibitor (NDRI), but was withdrawn from the market. Tiazesim (Altinil) is technically not a TCA, but it is a heterocyclic antidepressant that is very closely related, and similarly to various TCAs, it is no longer marketed. Tetracyclic antidepressants (TeCAs)[edit] Amoxapine (Asendin) Maprotiline (Ludiomil) Mianserin (Bolvidon, Norval, Tolvon) Mirtazapine (Remeron) Setiptiline (Tecipul) Mianserin, mirtazapine, and setiptiline are also sometimes described as noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressants (NaSSAs). Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs)[edit] Irreversible[edit] Non-selective[edit] Isocarboxazid (Marplan) Phenelzine (Nardil) Tranylcypromine (Parnate) Many others, including benmoxin (Neuralex), iproclozide (Sursum), iproniazid (Marsilid), mebanazine (Actomol), nialamide (Niamid), octamoxin (Ximaol), pheniprazine (Catron), phenoxypropazine (Drazine), pivhydrazine (Tersavid), and safrazine (Safra) were used as antidepressants in the past, but have since been discontinued. Selective for MAO-B[edit] Selegiline (Eldepryl, Zelapar, Emsam) Reversible[edit] Non-selective[edit] Caroxazone (Surodil, Timostenil) was formerly used as an antidepressant, but has been discontinued. Selective for MAO-A[edit] Metralindole (Inkazan) Moclobemide (Aurorix, Manerix) Pirlindole (Pirazidol) Toloxatone (Humoryl) These drugs are sometimes described as reversible inhibitors of MAO-A (RIMAs). Eprobemide (Befol) and minaprine (Brantur, Cantor) were also formerly used as antidepressants, but have been discontinued. Atypical antipsychotics[edit] Amisulpride (Solian) – specifically approved as a monotherapy for dysthymia Lurasidone (Latuda) – specifically approved as a monotherapy for depressive episodes in bipolar disorder Quetiapine (Seroquel) – specifically approved as a monotherapy for depressive episodes in bipolar disorder Others[edit] Marketed[edit] Agomelatine (Valdoxan) – 5-HT2C receptor antagonist and MT1 and MT2 receptor agonist – sometimes described as a norepinephrine-dopamine disinhibitor (NDDI) Bupropion (Wellbutrin) – NRI and non-competitive antagonist of various neuronal nACh receptors Ketamine (Ketalar) – primarily a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist – not specifically approved for depression (used off-label) Tandospirone (Sediel) – 5-HT1A receptor partial agonist Teniloxazine (Lucelan, Metatone) – NRI and 5-HT2A receptor antagonist Discontinued/withdrawn from the market[edit] α-Methyltryptamine [αMT] (Indopan) – multiple serotonin receptor agonist, serotonin-norepinephrine-dopamine releasing agent (SNDRA), and weak RIMA Etryptamine [α-Ethyltryptamine (αET)] (Monase) – multiple serotonin receptor agonist, SNDRA, and weak RIMA Medifoxamine (Cledial, Gerdaxyl) – dopamine reuptake inhibitor (DRI) and 5-HT2A receptor antagonist Nefazodone (Serzone) - SARI Nomifensine (Merital, Alival) – NDRI Oxaflozane (Conflictan) – 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT2C receptor agonist Over-the-counter[edit] The following antidepressants are available both with a prescription and over-the-counter: Ademetionine [S-Adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe)] (Heptral, Transmetil, Samyl) – cofactor in monoamine neurotransmitter biosynthesis Hypericum perforatum [St. John's Wort (SJW)] (Jarsin, Kira, Movina) – TRPC6 activator, and various other actions Oxitriptan [5-Hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP)] (Cincofarm, Levothym, Triptum) – precursor in serotonin biosynthesis Tryptophan (Tryptan, Optimax, Aminomine) – precursor in serotonin biosynthesis Adjunctive treatments[edit] Atypical antipsychotics[edit] Aripiprazole (Abilify) – specifically approved as an adjunct for major depressive disorder Brexpiprazole (Rexulti) – specifically approved as an adjunct for major depressive disorder Lurasidone (Latuda) – specifically approved as an adjunct for depressive episodes in bipolar disorder Olanzapine (Zyprexa) – specifically approved as an adjunct for major depressive disorder Quetiapine (Seroquel) – approved as an adjunct for both major depressive disorder and depressive episodes in bipolar disorder Risperidone (Risperdal) - not specifically approved as an adjunct for major depressive disorder (used off-label) Others[edit] Buspirone (BuSpar) – 5-HT1A receptor partial agonist – not specifically approved for depression (used off-label) Lithium (Eskalith, Lithobid) – mood stabilizer (exact mechanism of action unknown) – not specifically approved for depression (used off-label) Thyroxine (T4) – thyroid hormone (THR agonist) – not specifically approved for depression (used off-label) Triiodothyronine (T3) – thyroid hormone (THR agonist) – not specifically approved for depression (used off-label) Combination products[edit] Amitriptyline/perphenazine (Etafron) – TCA and typical antipsychotic combination Flupentixol/melitracen (Deanxit) – TCA and typical antipsychotic combination Olanzapine/fluoxetine (Symbyax) – SSRI and atypical antipsychotic combination – specifically approved as a monotherapy for depressive episodes in bipolar disorder Tranylcypromine/trifluoperazine (Parstelin) - MAOI and typical antipsychotic combination Currently in clinical trials (investigational)[edit] ALKS-5461 (buprenorphine/samidorphan) – κ-opioid receptor antagonist AV-101 (4-chlorokynurenine) – NMDA receptor glycine site antagonist Basimglurant (RG7090) – mGlu5 receptor negative allosteric modulator CERC-301 (MK-0657) – NMDA receptor subunit 2B (NR2B) antagonist CERC-501 (LY-2456302) – κ-opioid receptor antagonist Esketamine – non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist LY-2940094 – nociceptin receptor antagonist NRX-1074 – NMDA receptor glycine site partial agonist NSI-189 – hippocampal neurotrophin (exact mechanism of action unknown) Rapastinel (GLYX-13) – NMDA receptor glycine site partial agonist RO4491533 – mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptor negative allosteric modulator Tramadol (ETS6103/Viotra) – μ-opioid receptor agonist, δ- and κ-opioid receptor ligand, serotonin releasing agent (SRA), NRI, 5-HT2C receptor antagonist, NMDAR antagonist, α7 nAChR antagonist, M1 and M3 receptor antagonist, and TRPV1 agonist Answered by Margrett Bjella 1 year ago.


What medication would be best for anxiety disorder ~long~?
I get these bad panic attacks where it feels like I am going to be stuck in hell forever. They say it is PTSD because I smoked synthetic and almost died but I the bad trip I had was terrible. I get panic attacks whenever something reminds me about the bad trip which is everything literally. I have been to a... Asked by Talitha Oshell 1 year ago.

I get these bad panic attacks where it feels like I am going to be stuck in hell forever. They say it is PTSD because I smoked synthetic and almost died but I the bad trip I had was terrible. I get panic attacks whenever something reminds me about the bad trip which is everything literally. I have been to a mental hospital for a week. The first week after my bad trip Sept. 24. They guided my mom and I to a therapist and a psychiatrist for medication. They also put me on a low dose of Seroquel at night because every night I was there I would wake up having a panic attack and go out of my room and talk to one of the staff members which helped a little bit but enough for me to go back to sleep. We did not get to see the psychiatrist until 2 months in November. I had many many many panic attacks within that time they were really bad and every time I had one I made my mom drive me to the ER which was 30 minutes away. In the car I would be talking nonsense I would be tremoring every time something reminded me of the bad trip I would be crying and all kinds of stuff. To other people I looked like I had schizophrenia. SO within those two months and the visits to the hospital they boosted my Seroquel to 2 at night and one in the morning. Then a clinic doctor prescribed me Buspirone 1 in the morning then one at night. Also one of the ER doctors prescribed me Xanax because on my 5th or 6th time going there he finally gave one of them to me and we waited and it helped incredibly so I only use it for emergencies. I was then no longer having tremors while having a panic attacks and I had improved and was not having them as much but still occasionally. I still could not sleep alone. My mom and i slept together on a bed in the living room. I had to have the tv on all night. I then saw a psychiatrist in November. She prescribed me paxil and told me to go off of the Buspirone. During this time she was not going to see me for another 4 weeks. Also my therapist her schedule got full and I could not see her for 4 weeks also. This was all between thanks giving and Christmas. So when I went off of the buspirone I started having worse panic attacks and more often. But my mood had improved but I was getting more panic attacks. I thought it was because I was not seeing my therapist. I then ruined thanksgiving for everyone and then during Christmas day I was having a panic attack and my mom was like how about you take a buspirone instead of Xanax and I did and I felt not as scared. So I went back on that. Then I thought it was a good idea to double my buspirone because I remember the clinic doctor saying the 30 mg a day was a low dose. So then I started having tremors and uncontrollable movements but I was no longer being so scared daily and some what facing some of my irrational fears and best of all I started sleeping alone. But -what I think- I was getting more comfortable and kind of becoming a bit more normal and my suicidal thoughts came back and cutting thoughts and just sad moods thinking about my past kind of clogged parts of my days. I mostly only wanted to kill and cut myself when my mom was drunk or if I was thinking about how I am doing nothing with my life because I am not in school and I can barely get through days with out feeling like I am going to be stuck in hell forever it just brought me down but since I found god I know I can not kill myself and that only he can decide when I pass away. I then saw my psychiatrist and she freaked out because I was overdosing on Serotonin so she quickly took me off of the paxil and told me to take what I was supposed to of the buspirone. Then she put me on welbutron. My 2 weeks on welburton were terrible I started having panic attacks but way different from before so I had no idea how to deal with them then I started to get angry over everything my moods all spiked In a terrible way and my suicidal thoughts got worse and the urge to cut myself was almost inevitable. My anger is terrible just bad I would through things punch my body and yank out my hair. Then this Monday I saw her and she said yeah I was scared that was going to happen because welbutron can do that that's why she put me on a low dose. So we agreed that I am gong to be taken off the welbutron and go on nothing in the anti depressant for week so I am not going on one pill then switched then switched then switched. So next week o thursday I will see her and she was already talking about putting me on prozac. I read about it and it said it can cause nervousness and some of the same side efffects of welbutron. What is your opinion on what meds I should try and be on? I do not understand why I am being put on anti depressants when my problem is all anxiety based? Should I be put on anti psychotics?! Answered by Shea Mittag 1 year ago.

First of all, you need to understand that PTSD is a type of anxiety disorder which is why you are on the anti-anxiety medications. PTSD is a normal, natural, and expected reaction whenever a person is exposed to some type of trauma. Some of the symptoms you wrote about -- the panic attacks, the trouble sleeping at night, thoughts of suicide -- are all a part of PTSD. If you would like to check out all of the diagnostic symptoms of this disorder, you can go to: www.helpguide.org/mental/post_traumati... ptsd.about.com/od/symptomsanddiagnosis... You also need to understand that PTSD can "evolve", and when it does this, depression can often result. So that's why you doctor is talking about putting you on anti-depressants along with the medication for anxiety. PTSD will usually respond very well to traditional talk therapy. The goal is for you to be able to talk about your trauma, and express any feelings or emotions that were repressed at the time. Once you've talked through the traumatic event, and externalized your repressed feelings and emotions, you should be fine and will be free of the symptoms you described above. And that means you won't need to be taking the medications any longer. Now before I get into some of the medications your doctor might prescribe for you, I need to make sure you understand that I am not a physician or a psychiatrist. What I am is a retired psychologist. So all I'm going to do here is give you the names of some of the medications that might be prescribed and leave it to you to talk with your doctor about them. First you would have Alpha Blockers such as Minipress, Catapres, and Tenex. And then Beta Blockers such as Inderal and Tenormin. Next would be a class of drugs called Benzodiazepines and these would include drugs such as Ativan, Dalmane, Klonopin, Halcion, Librium, Restoril, Serax, Tranxene, Valium, and Xanax. The next type of drug is the Anapirone and the main drug in this category is BuSpar. All of these drugs treat anxiety. As far as the anti-depressants go, you have the Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs). In this group, you would have drugs such as Celexa, Lexapro, Luvox, Paxil, Prozac, and Zoloft. Next you have the Tricyclic Anti-Depressants such as Adapin, Anafranil, Aventyl, Elavil, Ludiomil, Norpramin, Pamelor, Sinequan, Surmontil, Tofranil, and Vivactil. And finally, you have the newer, unclassified anti-depressants. These would include Cymbalta, Desyrel, Effexor, and Remeron. Now that's a lot of drugs that can be used to treat PTSD. and there are reasons for prescribing each of them as well as reasons not to prescribe them. Many things need to be taken into consideration when deciding on the best drug combination for you: how severe your symptoms are, your past medical history, your sex, your age (young women who are ovulating sometimes don't react well to certain medications but have no problems with others, so that needs to be considered), other medications you're taking, including birth control pills, genetic problems and conditions, etc. So it sometimes takes a few tries before the proper combination can be found. And even when the doctor finds something that works, they will often fine tune the dosage, or change the medications entirely if they think they can get better results with other drug combinations. So please be patient with your psychiatrist as she tries to get you stabilized. There's a lot of information here, but I hope something proves helpful. If you have any further questions, please feel free to E-mail me through Yahoo Answers and I'll do my best to help in any way I can. Good luck to you! Answered by Samual Butzlaff 1 year ago.

seroquel IS an antipsycotic. you are being put on too many medications then taken off them abruptly. this can make your symptoms more profound. What you think is a side effect of a new med may just be the withdrawal symptoms from the previous. Your doc is being irrisponsible. Welburtin is a stimulant... its different than other antidepressants, it works in the brain in the same way that ephedra does. That stuff dialates my pupils and makes me run around and start a bunch of different projects. anxiety medications are meant to be used short term while you work with a therapist. Docs don't want to prescribe them because they are habit forming so they give a bunch of BS that isn't even designed for anxiety, just mood. if you have admitted to using drugs in the past, even just salvia or marijuana, thats why they arent giving you anxiety specific medicine... because they believe you cant be trusted with it. Never admit to using drugs cause then its in your medical records forever.. your records may even say that yo uare a "marijuana abuser" if you only used it once and told them about it. The only way to get around it, is to get out of the public healthcare system, and start seeing a private doctor. you opened with "smoked synthetic". I'm sorry but, they are never going to prescribe orstart you on a regular regimen of anxiety specific medication like valium, xanax, klonopin... even if you genuinley need it... thats why the emergency room wouldn't give it to you untill you had been in crisis a bunch of times. give up on trying to get an RX for it and get ready for the ride of going off and on all these different powerful psychiatric medications. you might be able to get lyrica. I was in the public system and recorded as a drug abuser, they put me on lyrica for mood and anxiety because it has low abuse potential and youd have to eat 10 grams of it to get high. If you have those mystery depression aches and pangs and tension it fixes that too because its a fibromyalga medication. It worked wonders but not as good as xanax. Its an off-label use to prescribe it for anxiety or mood but really effective. However if you're takin xanax and seroquel at the same time, all these things interact with eachother and can make you really sedated. Answered by Tracie Arguin 1 year ago.

The SSRIs are antidperessants with anti-anxiety properties. They work well for the anxiety disorders without the severe long term side-effects of the antipsychotics and benzodiazepines (xanax, etc). Buspirone and Wellbutrin are not SSRIs. The side effects of Prozac go away in a few days. Millions of people take Prozac, it's very effective for anxiety. Answered by Deja Opaka 1 year ago.

I am so happy, it was only a 35 minute drive ( 70 minutes total) but absolutely no sign of anxiety or panic i shopped till I dropped - brilliant! I will now go for the next stage DUAL CARRIAGE way, probably at the weekend, with my husband accompanying me first then the solo drive, if successful the final stage of driving on motorway Beat Anxiety And Panic Attacks Naturally? Answered by Hwa Bayird 1 year ago.

Actually, the doctor will try to talk you into something long term, usually like Celexa or Prozac. Xanax is nice temporarily, but it can be very addicting. I would suggest hypnosis or breathing into a paper bag. Answered by Demetrius Muncie 1 year ago.

Please ask your doctor about propranolol. It's a beta blocker used to treat anxiety. NO crazy side effects like anti psychotics -and it really does help. Good luck. Answered by Lemuel Stassi 1 year ago.


Can surmontil be taken for hot flash's?
I have am going through menopause, and I thought I read somewhere on the internet,that surmontil was good for hotflash's can you please help me? Asked by Lucas Klees 1 year ago.

soy and estroven /dong quai at gnc naturally others that are hormones cause cancers Answered by Tamika Bramall 1 year ago.

I don't know about that, but red clover in the promensil formulation is pretty good. I know some people who use that. Answered by Parthenia Freedland 1 year ago.


Can i take fluanxol w/o consulting a doctor?
my doctor replace fluanxol to surmontil. i felt more depress with surmontil. i want to take fluanxol again. can i take fluanxol w/o consulting a doctor? Asked by Bret Brenchley 1 year ago.

When patients fail to respond to a particular antidepressant, or exhibit side effects, and a trial of another antidepressant is indicated. Consulting with with your doctor before making any changes in your medications is suggested. Take care as always! Answered by Apolonia Cleckley 1 year ago.


Taken Clomipramine for 2 days dont like how i feel can i stop?
with no problems Asked by Rudy Nunes 1 year ago.

hope this helps to answer your? clomipramine Generic Name: clomipramine (kloe MI pra meen) Brand Names: Anafranil What is the most important information I should know about clomipramine? Do not use this medication if you have recently had a heart attack, or if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Do not use clomipramine if you are allergic to it or to similar drugs such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), amoxapine (Ascendin), desipramine (Norpramin), doxepin (Sinequan), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), protriptyline (Vivactil), or trimipramine (Surmontil). You may have suicidal thoughts or behavior when you start taking an antidepressant, especially if you are under 18 years old. You will need to be monitored for worsening symptoms of depression or suicidal thoughts. Your doctor should check you at regular visits during the first 12 weeks of treatment, or whenever your dose is changed. Contact your doctor promptly if you have any of the following side effects, especially if they are new symptoms or if they get worse: mood changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, irritability, agitation, aggressiveness, severe restlessness, mania (mental and/or physical hyperactivity), thoughts of suicide or hurting yourself. What is clomipramine? Clomipramine is a tricyclic antidepressant. It affects chemicals in the brain that may become unbalanced. Clomipramine is used to treat symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) such as recurrent thoughts or feelings and repetitive actions. Clomipramine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking clomipramine? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to clomipramine or to similar drugs such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), amoxapine (Ascendin), desipramine (Norpramin), doxepin (Sinequan), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), protriptyline (Vivactil), or trimipramine (Surmontil). Do not use clomipramine if you have recently had a heart attack, or if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take clomipramine before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body. Before taking clomipramine, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have: heart disease or a history of heart attack, stroke, or seizures; bipolar disorder (manic-depression), schizophrenia or other mental illness; kidney or liver disease; overactive thyroid or adrenal gland tumor (pheochromocytoma); glaucoma; or problems with urination. If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use clomipramine, or you may need a dosage adjustment or special tests during treatment. You may have suicidal thoughts or behavior when you first start taking an antidepressant, especially if you are under 18 years old. Watch for worsening symptoms of depression or suicidal thoughts. Your doctor should check you at regular visits during the first 12 weeks of treatment, or whenever your dose is changed. In addition to you watching for changes in your own symptoms, your family or caregivers should be alert to changes in your mood or symptoms. Contact your doctor promptly if you have any of the following side effects, especially if they are new symptoms or if they get worse: mood changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, irritability, agitation, aggressiveness, severe restlessness, mania (mental and/or physical hyperactivity), thoughts of suicide or hurting yourself. FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Clomipramine can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take clomipramine? Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from this medication. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Take clomipramine with food to reduce stomach upset. If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are taking clomipramine. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time. Do not stop using clomipramine without first talking to your doctor. You may need to use less and less before you stop the medication completely. It may take up to 4 weeks of using this medicine before your symptoms improve. For best results, keep using the medication as directed. Talk with your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 4 weeks of treatment. Store clomipramine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose? Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose. What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of clomipramine can be fatal. Symptoms may include fast or uneven heart rate, extreme drowsiness, confusion, agitation, vomiting, blurred vision, sweating, muscle stiffness, increased or decreased urination, swelling, shortness of breath, blue lips or fingernails, feeling light-headed, fainting, seizure (convulsions), or coma. What should I avoid while taking clomipramine? Avoid drinking alcohol. It can cause dangerous side effects when taken together with clomipramine. Avoid using other medicines that make you sleepy (such as cold medicine, pain medication, muscle relaxers, medicine for seizures, or other antidepressants). They can add to sleepiness caused by clomipramine. Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with clomipramine. Discuss the use of grapefruit products with your doctor before increasing or decreasing the amount of grapefruit products in your diet. Clomipramine can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Avoid exposure to sunlight or artificial UV rays (sunlamps or tanning beds). Clomipramine can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight and sunburn may result. Use a sunscreen (minimum SPF 15) and wear protective clothing if you must be out in the sun. What are the possible side effects of clomipramine? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling; sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body; sudden headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance; feeling light-headed, fainting; fever, confusion, muscle stiffness, sweating, fast or uneven heartbeats; pale skin, easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness; o urinating more than usual. Less serious side effects may be more likely to occur, such as: nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, loss of appetite, constipation or diarrhea; dry mouth, unpleasant taste; increased appetite, weight changes; feeling anxious, restless, dizzy, drowsy, or tired; blurred vision, trouble concentrating; sleep problems (insomnia), nightmares; blurred vision; increased sweating; or decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect clomipramine? Before taking clomipramine, tell your doctor if you have used an "SSRI" antidepressant in the past 5 weeks, such as citalopram (Celexa), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem), fluvoxamine (Luvox), paroxetine (Paxil), or sertraline (Zoloft). Before taking clomipramine, tell your doctor if you are currently using any of the following drugs: cimetidine (Tagamet); guanethidine (Ismelin); methylphenidate (Concerta, Ritalin, Daytrana); phenytoin (Dilantin); warfarin (Coumadin); heart or blood pressure medication such as clonidine (Catapres) or digoxin (Lanoxin); heart rhythm medications such as flecainide (Tambocor), propafenone (Rhythmol), or quinidine (Cardioquin, Quinidex, Quinaglute); or anti-psychotic medications such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), haloperidol (Haldol), thioridazine (Mellaril), clozapine (Clozaril), olanzapine (Zyprexa, Zydis), quetiapine (Seroquel), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon). If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use clomipramine, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment. There are many other medicines that can interact with clomipramine. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list with you of all the medicines you use and show this list to any doctor or other healthcare provider who treats you. Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has information about clomipramine written for health professionals that you may read. What does my medication look like? Clomipramine is available with a prescription under the brand name Anafranil. Other brand or generic forms may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you. Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Copyright 1996-2006 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 7.02. Revision Date: 10/11/06 12:16:21 PM. Answered by Hulda Vasilauskas 1 year ago.

Although many folks wont agree, you have to get off the meds. It is in all likelihood that every one of those meds are inflicting a extreme hormonal and neurological chemical imbalance for your mind. Consult your medical professional earlier than nevertheless. You are NOT possessed! God and the Devil don't seem to be truly. Religion is only a hypnotizer and some way to provide an explanation for matters we dont realise. As a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine, my recommendation could be get off the juice. It could also be very feasible that you're conveniently having night time terrors. I have had many sufferers experiencing them and I think that's a developing contributor to intellectual instability. DO NOT act on any irregular ideas you've got. DO NOT attempt to kill your self. If you do think that you're having unusual emotions and many others. then please name 911 as quickly as feasible. It is critical that you just obtain on the spot aid in a suicidal concern. There is desire for you but and the reply isn't God, its your possess frame. Answered by Marcie Sumbry 1 year ago.

Medications are to make you better and to fix whatever chemical imbalance you have. They are optional. If you don't feel good then quit taking them. I was given Prozac for depression and ended up with heart palpitations. so I quit. Now I feel better.You are your own best doctor and if they aren't helping you then don't do it!!! Answered by Bridgette Chapdelaine 1 year ago.

How to stop taking desipramine? Answered by Matha Boblett 1 year ago.


After taking one 50mg pill of anti-depressant how long does the side effects last?
@ ziggy... the anti-depressant was a prescription from the Doctor...Just want to know how long the side effects last, nothing else. Asked by Galina Voong 1 year ago.

Anti-depressants do not cause hallucinations. Something else is wrong with your friend. Answered by Greta Macnevin 1 year ago.

1. Your friend took an unknown substance. She/he or they are not certain what the heck it was, right? 2. Your friend then hallucinated. 3. Your friend diagnosed that this was an affect of the unknown substance (suspected of being an anti-depressant. 4. Your friend wants to know about orgasms? Honey, if this is your friend then you must know that his/her/their problems are NOT sexual. Each one of the above illustrate instability on a deeper level. Talk to your friend (like a real friend). Why take something in the first place? That's where to start. Your friend needs professional help. Your friend doesn't have good judgment on this and I suspect it's because they are feeling stressed out. You can help this person by finding a professional to help with they're problems. I wish you well & hope this helps. Answered by Brendon Flirt 1 year ago.

Are they still having hallucinatinos? Better that they talk to their doctor about those side effects and find a better medication. Sexual dysfunction is often a reported side effect of many anti depressants, so maybe your doctor can give you advice on this too. Answered by Tashia Testman 1 year ago.


I'm 55 not a athlete my bp in the mornings is 98/64 to 107/70 standing at night it's low also?
It usually is 107/75 to 114/75 I also have a slow resting pulse In the 50s had a ekg and blood tests everything came out good. I'm on xanix and Surmontil for anxiety. Is this normal? Or just my anxiety. Asked by Hassan Justesen 1 year ago.

It's not your anxiety. Anxiety usually pushes those numbers up. For some people it is just normal to have a slow resting pulse and low BP regardless of fitness level. It is also possible (but rare) for the medications that you are on to cause this. If you aren't suffering any symptoms then it isnt worth worrying about. A low BP is usually a good thing so long as you do not get dizzy often or faint. Answered by Nidia Bartrum 1 year ago.


None of the depression medications are working, and my therapist is driving me crazy?
Jamie im trying to find one who makes me happy and you have a good point there because the therapist person should make you happy or else why are you even going there but i dunno maybe i set my expectation too high or somethin Asked by Mikki Magera 1 year ago.

I've taken Lexapro, Prozac, Paxil, Celexa, Zoloft, Norpramin, Vivactil, Effexor, and Parnate, and am currently on Surmontil (100 mg-blue/white capsules) (3 in the morning / day), and I still feel like crap sometimes. I'm really talkative and hyper and than all of a sudden I just want to be left alone and die, like even before I started taking all the meds. My therapist also drives me crazy, she is boring and I just want to fall asleep, nothing she says is relevant and she is like my 7th one I've been too. Sometimes I just see her lips moving and I go yeh, yeh, yeh, alright..because she doesn't ever stop. What can I do, it's driving me crazy, I just want her to go away, and something to start working. Answered by Zena Berglund 1 year ago.

Yeh so she has a pic of her children hanging on the wall and she'll just point to em and be like oooh this is my son he is in uni trying to be a lawyer, ohhh and this is my daughter going to school to be a doctor and im so proud of my children and okay lady thats cool but talk about your children sometime else cause yeh Answered by Bridgette Connors 1 year ago.

Hi, If you have tried ten medications and nothing is really working, your doctor should refer you to a psychiatrist for recommendations. They are the experts on medications for depression, anxiety, etc. It doesn't sound like you have a therapeutic relationship with your therapist. It's not appropriate for the therapist to be focusing on herself and her family when she's talking to you. The focus should be on helping you to gain coping strategies for your problems. You should tell your doctor what you just told us, and ask for a referral to a different counsellor. I admire you for having this much patience with your treatment to date. Start by being very honest with your family doctor, especially tell him the part about feeling like being left alone to die. That's an indication that you are pretty depressed and discouraged. Know that you are loved, and keep on trying. Best wishes to you. Answered by Tegan Slaney 1 year ago.

A couple years ago I saw a therapist and was diagnosed with depression. They suggested I take medication, so they prescribed me Wellbutrin. I took it for a few weeks and did notice a small change. I felt like I was getting better so quit the meds and the therapist; I don't know if any of this helps, because I wasn't on the medication that long and I don't attribute all of my feeling better to the meds, as there were outside things that helped me. The important thing to know is that a pill won't simply make you better or happy. As I understand them, they're designed to help increase certain chemicals (different for different medications) in the brain which help you be more positive (or less negative, depending on how you look at it). You have to WANT to get better--but if only seeing a therapist isn't helping, I'd definitely consider medication if I were you. However, I wouldn't recommend mixing anti-depressents with alcohol. And since alcohol is a depressant, it's only going to make your depressive state even worse. Bottom line, if you continue drinking, it's going to be almost impossible for you to get better. Think about some AA meetings. And don't be afraid to ask your doctor questions about the medication; they're there to help. Answered by Noftsger 1 year ago.

Well in some people a higher dose of drug is needed and some people 1,2,3, different types of drugs are needed and some need a less of a dose it all depends most drugs take like a week to start to work,etc. Therapist is trying to get u to open up! I know u don't want to talk about anything But u need to start talking about what u are feeling or let off some steam. Talking is the 1st step in getting out of depression and then working on what is really the problem - eating at u is next! Remember this takes time and u going to have to make the therapy work for u! Answered by Alba Akbari 1 year ago.

Over the last five years I had begun to have increasingly withdraw into a downward spiral of depression.. But now with the method I can fully focus my energy and thoughts into a decisive line on how to make my life better constantly. And it works like magic! I'm beginning to attract people to me once again and things have just been looking up since then. Helping you eliminate depression? Answered by Carlyn Brough 1 year ago.

You need to be re-evaluated for the meds that you are on. Something needs to change. Also look around, talk to people to see if they would recommend a new therapist. You have to be happy with the person that is supposed to be "helping" you through this. I'm sorry that you have to go through all this just to be happy, but good luck. Answered by Lauretta Ambrose 1 year ago.

I know you've been to a million therapists, but you really need to find a new one. Your therapist sounds like my therapist, who I hate, so I'm getting another one. I'm often suicidal but I always stop myself before I do anything drastic by thinking about who would miss me and what I'd missing out on, even if I didn't even believe it. I hope you feel better someday. Answered by Jeana Gronquist 1 year ago.

depression meds never really work, they're just for psychiatrists to make money, if you feel depressed take a walk while listening to some uplifting music, that always works for me, even when i'm sobbing like a maniac, just focus your attention on the music, and the neighborhood. Some bands that always make me happy are, the kooks, lily allen, and led zeppelin. Answered by Kaitlyn Bhattacharya 1 year ago.

i suggest you get a male counselor who is like in his 20's so he doesn't annoy the s h i t out of you depression is i hard thing last year i went through of few months when i was depressed mostly kiddie stuff tho it wasn't bad but i felt like c r ap Answered by Margurite Kapitula 1 year ago.

sounds like you could have adhd, which can make you depressed. i thought i was depressed because i had racing thoughts and i was sad sometimes. then i got re evaluated and i found out i had adhd. Answered by Ninfa Kalafatis 1 year ago.


Stop breathing at onset of trying to go to sleep?
I stop breathing during the beginning stages of sleep and wake up ia a panic, often jumping out of bed gasping for air. It started 28 years ago and only happened about once every couple of months. Now, it happens daily, even when I try to nap. The only was I can drift off to sleep peacefully is with either,... Asked by Trang Casdorph 1 year ago.

I stop breathing during the beginning stages of sleep and wake up ia a panic, often jumping out of bed gasping for air. It started 28 years ago and only happened about once every couple of months. Now, it happens daily, even when I try to nap. The only was I can drift off to sleep peacefully is with either, Ambien, Lunesta or a BENZO (like Valium or Lorazepam). The last week it is getting even worse. I get a throbbing small pain near either my right temple area, sometimes either temple area or on the top/side middle of my head. I have been to two sleep studies, but the last one was 2 years ago and that night I didn't have an event. However, I was diagnosed with having mild OSA. The sleep doctor put me on a CPAP machine (which I bought) and it only made the condition worse. He tried every titration and still was bad. I don't know if I have mixed sleep apnea. I had a neurological study done and it turned up negative. I have read about Central or Mixed Sleep Apnea and in my opinion, I might be suffering from it. It seems that my brain-control center for going to sleep have gone haywire. I have read about taking Medroxyprogestorne (Provera, Cycrin, Amen), Acetazolamide (Diamox). Theophylline (Theo-Dur, Respbid, Slo-Bid, Theo-24, Theolair, Uniphyl, Slo-Phyllin), traicyclic antidepressants and selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRI's). I am currently taking Surmontil 100 mg. per day and and Lamictal 125 mg. Please help me if you have any ideas or suggestions. I feel that my body can't handle the stress of this much longer. Answered by Roman Ketcherside 1 year ago.

You're obviously on meds from the doctor. Talk to him and let him know how you feel. Ask him to recommend a Specialist that you can see for a second opinion. There is a chance the combination of drugs could be causing the problems. Make sure the doctor knows all of the over the counter medications and supplements you are taking too. Hope things get better for you. Answered by Zenaida Ketchen 1 year ago.

If I were you, I would seek out another physician, or just, in all those years, go to Mayo Clinic for a complete - head to toe - - evaluation. You would find you answer there. Answered by Sharri Knick 1 year ago.

I would seek help from another Doctor,it doesn't sound like the meds are helping.Good luck Answered by Domenic Meringolo 1 year ago.


How many antidepressants are there on the market/are available?
Asked by Angla Bartz 1 year ago.

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)[edit] Citalopram (Celexa) Escitalopram (Lexapro, Cipralex) Paroxetine (Paxil, Seroxat) Fluoxetine (Prozac) Fluvoxamine (Luvox) Sertraline (Zoloft, Lustral) Zimelidine (Normud, Zelmid) and indalpine (Upstene) were also formerly used as antidepressants, but were withdrawn from the market. Serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs)[edit] Desvenlafaxine (Pristiq) Duloxetine (Cymbalta) Levomilnacipran (Fetzima) Milnacipran (Ixel, Savella) Tofenacin (Elamol, Tofacine) Venlafaxine (Effexor) Serotonin modulators and stimulators (SMSs)[edit] Vilazodone (Viibryd) Vortioxetine (Brintellix) These drugs act as serotonin reuptake inhibitors and agonize/antagonize various serotonin receptors. Serotonin antagonists and reuptake inhibitors (SARIs)[edit] Etoperidone (Axiomin, Etonin) Nefazodone (Nefadar, Serzone) – withdrawn/discontinued in many countries Trazodone (Desyrel) These drugs act as antagonists of various serotonin receptors and as weak monoamine reuptake inhibitors. Norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (NRIs)[edit] Reboxetine (Edronax) Viloxazine (Vivalan) Atomoxetine (Strattera) is also sometimes used as an antidepressant, but is not specifically approved for this purpose. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs)[edit] Amitriptyline (Elavil, Endep) Amitriptylinoxide (Amioxid, Ambivalon, Equilibrin) Clomipramine (Anafranil) Desipramine (Norpramin, Pertofrane) Dibenzepin (Noveril, Victoril) Dosulepin (Prothiaden) Doxepin (Adapin, Sinequan) Imipramine (Tofranil) Lofepramine (Lomont, Gamanil) Melitracen (Dixeran, Melixeran, Trausabun) Nitroxazepine (Sintamil) Nortriptyline (Pamelor, Aventyl) Noxiptiline (Agedal, Elronon, Nogedal) Pipofezine (Azafen/Azaphen) Protriptyline (Vivactil) Trimipramine (Surmontil) Butriptyline (Evadyne), demexiptiline (Deparon, Tinoran), imipraminoxide (Imiprex, Elepsin), iprindole (Prondol, Galatur, Tetran), metapramine (Timaxel), propizepine (Depressin, Vagran), and quinupramine (Kinupril, Kevopril) were also formerly marketed, but have since been discontinued. The following are also TCAs, but are atypical pharmacologically: Opipramol (Insidon) – sigma receptor agonist Tianeptine (Stablon) – unknown/unclear mechanism of action Amineptine (Survector, Maneon) is another atypical TCA, acting as a norepinephrine-dopamine reuptake inhibitor (NDRI), but was withdrawn from the market. Tiazesim (Altinil) is technically not a TCA, but it is a heterocyclic antidepressant that is very closely related, and similarly to various TCAs, it is no longer marketed. Tetracyclic antidepressants (TeCAs)[edit] Amoxapine (Asendin) Maprotiline (Ludiomil) Mianserin (Bolvidon, Norval, Tolvon) Mirtazapine (Remeron) Setiptiline (Tecipul) Mianserin, mirtazapine, and setiptiline are also sometimes described as noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressants (NaSSAs). Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs)[edit] Irreversible[edit] Non-selective[edit] Isocarboxazid (Marplan) Phenelzine (Nardil) Tranylcypromine (Parnate) Many others, including benmoxin (Neuralex), iproclozide (Sursum), iproniazid (Marsilid), mebanazine (Actomol), nialamide (Niamid), octamoxin (Ximaol), pheniprazine (Catron), phenoxypropazine (Drazine), pivhydrazine (Tersavid), and safrazine (Safra) were used as antidepressants in the past, but have since been discontinued. Selective for MAO-B[edit] Selegiline (Eldepryl, Zelapar, Emsam) Reversible[edit] Non-selective[edit] Caroxazone (Surodil, Timostenil) was formerly used as an antidepressant, but has been discontinued. Selective for MAO-A[edit] Metralindole (Inkazan) Moclobemide (Aurorix, Manerix) Pirlindole (Pirazidol) Toloxatone (Humoryl) These drugs are sometimes described as reversible inhibitors of MAO-A (RIMAs). Eprobemide (Befol) and minaprine (Brantur, Cantor) were also formerly used as antidepressants, but have been discontinued. Atypical antipsychotics[edit] Amisulpride (Solian) – specifically approved as a monotherapy for dysthymia Lurasidone (Latuda) – specifically approved as a monotherapy for depressive episodes in bipolar disorder Quetiapine (Seroquel) – specifically approved as a monotherapy for depressive episodes in bipolar disorder Others[edit] Marketed[edit] Agomelatine (Valdoxan) – 5-HT2C receptor antagonist and MT1 and MT2 receptor agonist – sometimes described as a norepinephrine-dopamine disinhibitor (NDDI) Bupropion (Wellbutrin) – NRI and non-competitive antagonist of various neuronal nACh receptors Ketamine (Ketalar) – primarily a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist – not specifically approved for depression (used off-label) Tandospirone (Sediel) – 5-HT1A receptor partial agonist Teniloxazine (Lucelan, Metatone) – NRI and 5-HT2A receptor antagonist Discontinued/withdrawn from the market[edit] α-Methyltryptamine [αMT] (Indopan) – multiple serotonin receptor agonist, serotonin-norepinephrine-dopamine releasing agent (SNDRA), and weak RIMA Etryptamine [α-Ethyltryptamine (αET)] (Monase) – multiple serotonin receptor agonist, SNDRA, and weak RIMA Medifoxamine (Cledial, Gerdaxyl) – dopamine reuptake inhibitor (DRI) and 5-HT2A receptor antagonist Nefazodone (Serzone) - SARI Nomifensine (Merital, Alival) – NDRI Oxaflozane (Conflictan) – 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT2C receptor agonist Over-the-counter[edit] The following antidepressants are available both with a prescription and over-the-counter: Ademetionine [S-Adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe)] (Heptral, Transmetil, Samyl) – cofactor in monoamine neurotransmitter biosynthesis Hypericum perforatum [St. John's Wort (SJW)] (Jarsin, Kira, Movina) – TRPC6 activator, and various other actions Oxitriptan [5-Hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP)] (Cincofarm, Levothym, Triptum) – precursor in serotonin biosynthesis Tryptophan (Tryptan, Optimax, Aminomine) – precursor in serotonin biosynthesis Adjunctive treatments[edit] Atypical antipsychotics[edit] Aripiprazole (Abilify) – specifically approved as an adjunct for major depressive disorder Brexpiprazole (Rexulti) – specifically approved as an adjunct for major depressive disorder Lurasidone (Latuda) – specifically approved as an adjunct for depressive episodes in bipolar disorder Olanzapine (Zyprexa) – specifically approved as an adjunct for major depressive disorder Quetiapine (Seroquel) – approved as an adjunct for both major depressive disorder and depressive episodes in bipolar disorder Risperidone (Risperdal) - not specifically approved as an adjunct for major depressive disorder (used off-label) Others[edit] Buspirone (BuSpar) – 5-HT1A receptor partial agonist – not specifically approved for depression (used off-label) Lithium (Eskalith, Lithobid) – mood stabilizer (exact mechanism of action unknown) – not specifically approved for depression (used off-label) Thyroxine (T4) – thyroid hormone (THR agonist) – not specifically approved for depression (used off-label) Triiodothyronine (T3) – thyroid hormone (THR agonist) – not specifically approved for depression (used off-label) Combination products[edit] Amitriptyline/perphenazine (Etafron) – TCA and typical antipsychotic combination Flupentixol/melitracen (Deanxit) – TCA and typical antipsychotic combination Olanzapine/fluoxetine (Symbyax) – SSRI and atypical antipsychotic combination – specifically approved as a monotherapy for depressive episodes in bipolar disorder Tranylcypromine/trifluoperazine (Parstelin) - MAOI and typical antipsychotic combination Currently in clinical trials (investigational)[edit] ALKS-5461 (buprenorphine/samidorphan) – κ-opioid receptor antagonist AV-101 (4-chlorokynurenine) – NMDA receptor glycine site antagonist Basimglurant (RG7090) – mGlu5 receptor negative allosteric modulator CERC-301 (MK-0657) – NMDA receptor subunit 2B (NR2B) antagonist CERC-501 (LY-2456302) – κ-opioid receptor antagonist Esketamine – non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist LY-2940094 – nociceptin receptor antagonist NRX-1074 – NMDA receptor glycine site partial agonist NSI-189 – hippocampal neurotrophin (exact mechanism of action unknown) Rapastinel (GLYX-13) – NMDA receptor glycine site partial agonist RO4491533 – mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptor negative allosteric modulator Tramadol (ETS6103/Viotra) – μ-opioid receptor agonist, δ- and κ-opioid receptor ligand, serotonin releasing agent (SRA), NRI, 5-HT2C receptor antagonist, NMDAR antagonist, α7 nAChR antagonist, M1 and M3 receptor antagonist, and TRPV1 agonist Answered by Kiyoko Maxin 1 year ago.


What medication would be best for anxiety disorder ~long~?
I get these bad panic attacks where it feels like I am going to be stuck in hell forever. They say it is PTSD because I smoked synthetic and almost died but I the bad trip I had was terrible. I get panic attacks whenever something reminds me about the bad trip which is everything literally. I have been to a... Asked by Reva Kinzer 1 year ago.

I get these bad panic attacks where it feels like I am going to be stuck in hell forever. They say it is PTSD because I smoked synthetic and almost died but I the bad trip I had was terrible. I get panic attacks whenever something reminds me about the bad trip which is everything literally. I have been to a mental hospital for a week. The first week after my bad trip Sept. 24. They guided my mom and I to a therapist and a psychiatrist for medication. They also put me on a low dose of Seroquel at night because every night I was there I would wake up having a panic attack and go out of my room and talk to one of the staff members which helped a little bit but enough for me to go back to sleep. We did not get to see the psychiatrist until 2 months in November. I had many many many panic attacks within that time they were really bad and every time I had one I made my mom drive me to the ER which was 30 minutes away. In the car I would be talking nonsense I would be tremoring every time something reminded me of the bad trip I would be crying and all kinds of stuff. To other people I looked like I had schizophrenia. SO within those two months and the visits to the hospital they boosted my Seroquel to 2 at night and one in the morning. Then a clinic doctor prescribed me Buspirone 1 in the morning then one at night. Also one of the ER doctors prescribed me Xanax because on my 5th or 6th time going there he finally gave one of them to me and we waited and it helped incredibly so I only use it for emergencies. I was then no longer having tremors while having a panic attacks and I had improved and was not having them as much but still occasionally. I still could not sleep alone. My mom and i slept together on a bed in the living room. I had to have the tv on all night. I then saw a psychiatrist in November. She prescribed me paxil and told me to go off of the Buspirone. During this time she was not going to see me for another 4 weeks. Also my therapist her schedule got full and I could not see her for 4 weeks also. This was all between thanks giving and Christmas. So when I went off of the buspirone I started having worse panic attacks and more often. But my mood had improved but I was getting more panic attacks. I thought it was because I was not seeing my therapist. I then ruined thanksgiving for everyone and then during Christmas day I was having a panic attack and my mom was like how about you take a buspirone instead of Xanax and I did and I felt not as scared. So I went back on that. Then I thought it was a good idea to double my buspirone because I remember the clinic doctor saying the 30 mg a day was a low dose. So then I started having tremors and uncontrollable movements but I was no longer being so scared daily and some what facing some of my irrational fears and best of all I started sleeping alone. But -what I think- I was getting more comfortable and kind of becoming a bit more normal and my suicidal thoughts came back and cutting thoughts and just sad moods thinking about my past kind of clogged parts of my days. I mostly only wanted to kill and cut myself when my mom was drunk or if I was thinking about how I am doing nothing with my life because I am not in school and I can barely get through days with out feeling like I am going to be stuck in hell forever it just brought me down but since I found god I know I can not kill myself and that only he can decide when I pass away. I then saw my psychiatrist and she freaked out because I was overdosing on Serotonin so she quickly took me off of the paxil and told me to take what I was supposed to of the buspirone. Then she put me on welbutron. My 2 weeks on welburton were terrible I started having panic attacks but way different from before so I had no idea how to deal with them then I started to get angry over everything my moods all spiked In a terrible way and my suicidal thoughts got worse and the urge to cut myself was almost inevitable. My anger is terrible just bad I would through things punch my body and yank out my hair. Then this Monday I saw her and she said yeah I was scared that was going to happen because welbutron can do that that's why she put me on a low dose. So we agreed that I am gong to be taken off the welbutron and go on nothing in the anti depressant for week so I am not going on one pill then switched then switched then switched. So next week o thursday I will see her and she was already talking about putting me on prozac. I read about it and it said it can cause nervousness and some of the same side efffects of welbutron. What is your opinion on what meds I should try and be on? I do not understand why I am being put on anti depressants when my problem is all anxiety based? Should I be put on anti psychotics?! Answered by Salome Rawl 1 year ago.

First of all, you need to understand that PTSD is a type of anxiety disorder which is why you are on the anti-anxiety medications. PTSD is a normal, natural, and expected reaction whenever a person is exposed to some type of trauma. Some of the symptoms you wrote about -- the panic attacks, the trouble sleeping at night, thoughts of suicide -- are all a part of PTSD. If you would like to check out all of the diagnostic symptoms of this disorder, you can go to: www.helpguide.org/mental/post_traumati... ptsd.about.com/od/symptomsanddiagnosis... You also need to understand that PTSD can "evolve", and when it does this, depression can often result. So that's why you doctor is talking about putting you on anti-depressants along with the medication for anxiety. PTSD will usually respond very well to traditional talk therapy. The goal is for you to be able to talk about your trauma, and express any feelings or emotions that were repressed at the time. Once you've talked through the traumatic event, and externalized your repressed feelings and emotions, you should be fine and will be free of the symptoms you described above. And that means you won't need to be taking the medications any longer. Now before I get into some of the medications your doctor might prescribe for you, I need to make sure you understand that I am not a physician or a psychiatrist. What I am is a retired psychologist. So all I'm going to do here is give you the names of some of the medications that might be prescribed and leave it to you to talk with your doctor about them. First you would have Alpha Blockers such as Minipress, Catapres, and Tenex. And then Beta Blockers such as Inderal and Tenormin. Next would be a class of drugs called Benzodiazepines and these would include drugs such as Ativan, Dalmane, Klonopin, Halcion, Librium, Restoril, Serax, Tranxene, Valium, and Xanax. The next type of drug is the Anapirone and the main drug in this category is BuSpar. All of these drugs treat anxiety. As far as the anti-depressants go, you have the Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs). In this group, you would have drugs such as Celexa, Lexapro, Luvox, Paxil, Prozac, and Zoloft. Next you have the Tricyclic Anti-Depressants such as Adapin, Anafranil, Aventyl, Elavil, Ludiomil, Norpramin, Pamelor, Sinequan, Surmontil, Tofranil, and Vivactil. And finally, you have the newer, unclassified anti-depressants. These would include Cymbalta, Desyrel, Effexor, and Remeron. Now that's a lot of drugs that can be used to treat PTSD. and there are reasons for prescribing each of them as well as reasons not to prescribe them. Many things need to be taken into consideration when deciding on the best drug combination for you: how severe your symptoms are, your past medical history, your sex, your age (young women who are ovulating sometimes don't react well to certain medications but have no problems with others, so that needs to be considered), other medications you're taking, including birth control pills, genetic problems and conditions, etc. So it sometimes takes a few tries before the proper combination can be found. And even when the doctor finds something that works, they will often fine tune the dosage, or change the medications entirely if they think they can get better results with other drug combinations. So please be patient with your psychiatrist as she tries to get you stabilized. There's a lot of information here, but I hope something proves helpful. If you have any further questions, please feel free to E-mail me through Yahoo Answers and I'll do my best to help in any way I can. Good luck to you! Answered by Lessie Wohletz 1 year ago.

seroquel IS an antipsycotic. you are being put on too many medications then taken off them abruptly. this can make your symptoms more profound. What you think is a side effect of a new med may just be the withdrawal symptoms from the previous. Your doc is being irrisponsible. Welburtin is a stimulant... its different than other antidepressants, it works in the brain in the same way that ephedra does. That stuff dialates my pupils and makes me run around and start a bunch of different projects. anxiety medications are meant to be used short term while you work with a therapist. Docs don't want to prescribe them because they are habit forming so they give a bunch of BS that isn't even designed for anxiety, just mood. if you have admitted to using drugs in the past, even just salvia or marijuana, thats why they arent giving you anxiety specific medicine... because they believe you cant be trusted with it. Never admit to using drugs cause then its in your medical records forever.. your records may even say that yo uare a "marijuana abuser" if you only used it once and told them about it. The only way to get around it, is to get out of the public healthcare system, and start seeing a private doctor. you opened with "smoked synthetic". I'm sorry but, they are never going to prescribe orstart you on a regular regimen of anxiety specific medication like valium, xanax, klonopin... even if you genuinley need it... thats why the emergency room wouldn't give it to you untill you had been in crisis a bunch of times. give up on trying to get an RX for it and get ready for the ride of going off and on all these different powerful psychiatric medications. you might be able to get lyrica. I was in the public system and recorded as a drug abuser, they put me on lyrica for mood and anxiety because it has low abuse potential and youd have to eat 10 grams of it to get high. If you have those mystery depression aches and pangs and tension it fixes that too because its a fibromyalga medication. It worked wonders but not as good as xanax. Its an off-label use to prescribe it for anxiety or mood but really effective. However if you're takin xanax and seroquel at the same time, all these things interact with eachother and can make you really sedated. Answered by Jean Trouser 1 year ago.

The SSRIs are antidperessants with anti-anxiety properties. They work well for the anxiety disorders without the severe long term side-effects of the antipsychotics and benzodiazepines (xanax, etc). Buspirone and Wellbutrin are not SSRIs. The side effects of Prozac go away in a few days. Millions of people take Prozac, it's very effective for anxiety. Answered by Eunice Janda 1 year ago.

I am so happy, it was only a 35 minute drive ( 70 minutes total) but absolutely no sign of anxiety or panic i shopped till I dropped - brilliant! I will now go for the next stage DUAL CARRIAGE way, probably at the weekend, with my husband accompanying me first then the solo drive, if successful the final stage of driving on motorway Beat Anxiety And Panic Attacks Naturally? Answered by Lasandra Kolata 1 year ago.

Actually, the doctor will try to talk you into something long term, usually like Celexa or Prozac. Xanax is nice temporarily, but it can be very addicting. I would suggest hypnosis or breathing into a paper bag. Answered by Shante Borysewicz 1 year ago.

Please ask your doctor about propranolol. It's a beta blocker used to treat anxiety. NO crazy side effects like anti psychotics -and it really does help. Good luck. Answered by Lorretta Register 1 year ago.


Can surmontil be taken for hot flash's?
I have am going through menopause, and I thought I read somewhere on the internet,that surmontil was good for hotflash's can you please help me? Asked by Hellen Griffies 1 year ago.

soy and estroven /dong quai at gnc naturally others that are hormones cause cancers Answered by Kurtis Ke 1 year ago.

I don't know about that, but red clover in the promensil formulation is pretty good. I know some people who use that. Answered by Nilsa Locust 1 year ago.


Can i take fluanxol w/o consulting a doctor?
my doctor replace fluanxol to surmontil. i felt more depress with surmontil. i want to take fluanxol again. can i take fluanxol w/o consulting a doctor? Asked by Debroah Graver 1 year ago.

When patients fail to respond to a particular antidepressant, or exhibit side effects, and a trial of another antidepressant is indicated. Consulting with with your doctor before making any changes in your medications is suggested. Take care as always! Answered by Keila Tzeremes 1 year ago.


Taken Clomipramine for 2 days dont like how i feel can i stop?
with no problems Asked by Rebekah Horio 1 year ago.

hope this helps to answer your? clomipramine Generic Name: clomipramine (kloe MI pra meen) Brand Names: Anafranil What is the most important information I should know about clomipramine? Do not use this medication if you have recently had a heart attack, or if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Do not use clomipramine if you are allergic to it or to similar drugs such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), amoxapine (Ascendin), desipramine (Norpramin), doxepin (Sinequan), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), protriptyline (Vivactil), or trimipramine (Surmontil). You may have suicidal thoughts or behavior when you start taking an antidepressant, especially if you are under 18 years old. You will need to be monitored for worsening symptoms of depression or suicidal thoughts. Your doctor should check you at regular visits during the first 12 weeks of treatment, or whenever your dose is changed. Contact your doctor promptly if you have any of the following side effects, especially if they are new symptoms or if they get worse: mood changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, irritability, agitation, aggressiveness, severe restlessness, mania (mental and/or physical hyperactivity), thoughts of suicide or hurting yourself. What is clomipramine? Clomipramine is a tricyclic antidepressant. It affects chemicals in the brain that may become unbalanced. Clomipramine is used to treat symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) such as recurrent thoughts or feelings and repetitive actions. Clomipramine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking clomipramine? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to clomipramine or to similar drugs such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), amoxapine (Ascendin), desipramine (Norpramin), doxepin (Sinequan), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), protriptyline (Vivactil), or trimipramine (Surmontil). Do not use clomipramine if you have recently had a heart attack, or if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take clomipramine before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body. Before taking clomipramine, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have: heart disease or a history of heart attack, stroke, or seizures; bipolar disorder (manic-depression), schizophrenia or other mental illness; kidney or liver disease; overactive thyroid or adrenal gland tumor (pheochromocytoma); glaucoma; or problems with urination. If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use clomipramine, or you may need a dosage adjustment or special tests during treatment. You may have suicidal thoughts or behavior when you first start taking an antidepressant, especially if you are under 18 years old. Watch for worsening symptoms of depression or suicidal thoughts. Your doctor should check you at regular visits during the first 12 weeks of treatment, or whenever your dose is changed. In addition to you watching for changes in your own symptoms, your family or caregivers should be alert to changes in your mood or symptoms. Contact your doctor promptly if you have any of the following side effects, especially if they are new symptoms or if they get worse: mood changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, irritability, agitation, aggressiveness, severe restlessness, mania (mental and/or physical hyperactivity), thoughts of suicide or hurting yourself. FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Clomipramine can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take clomipramine? Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from this medication. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Take clomipramine with food to reduce stomach upset. If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are taking clomipramine. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time. Do not stop using clomipramine without first talking to your doctor. You may need to use less and less before you stop the medication completely. It may take up to 4 weeks of using this medicine before your symptoms improve. For best results, keep using the medication as directed. Talk with your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 4 weeks of treatment. Store clomipramine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose? Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose. What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of clomipramine can be fatal. Symptoms may include fast or uneven heart rate, extreme drowsiness, confusion, agitation, vomiting, blurred vision, sweating, muscle stiffness, increased or decreased urination, swelling, shortness of breath, blue lips or fingernails, feeling light-headed, fainting, seizure (convulsions), or coma. What should I avoid while taking clomipramine? Avoid drinking alcohol. It can cause dangerous side effects when taken together with clomipramine. Avoid using other medicines that make you sleepy (such as cold medicine, pain medication, muscle relaxers, medicine for seizures, or other antidepressants). They can add to sleepiness caused by clomipramine. Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with clomipramine. Discuss the use of grapefruit products with your doctor before increasing or decreasing the amount of grapefruit products in your diet. Clomipramine can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Avoid exposure to sunlight or artificial UV rays (sunlamps or tanning beds). Clomipramine can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight and sunburn may result. Use a sunscreen (minimum SPF 15) and wear protective clothing if you must be out in the sun. What are the possible side effects of clomipramine? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling; sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body; sudden headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance; feeling light-headed, fainting; fever, confusion, muscle stiffness, sweating, fast or uneven heartbeats; pale skin, easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness; o urinating more than usual. Less serious side effects may be more likely to occur, such as: nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, loss of appetite, constipation or diarrhea; dry mouth, unpleasant taste; increased appetite, weight changes; feeling anxious, restless, dizzy, drowsy, or tired; blurred vision, trouble concentrating; sleep problems (insomnia), nightmares; blurred vision; increased sweating; or decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect clomipramine? Before taking clomipramine, tell your doctor if you have used an "SSRI" antidepressant in the past 5 weeks, such as citalopram (Celexa), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem), fluvoxamine (Luvox), paroxetine (Paxil), or sertraline (Zoloft). Before taking clomipramine, tell your doctor if you are currently using any of the following drugs: cimetidine (Tagamet); guanethidine (Ismelin); methylphenidate (Concerta, Ritalin, Daytrana); phenytoin (Dilantin); warfarin (Coumadin); heart or blood pressure medication such as clonidine (Catapres) or digoxin (Lanoxin); heart rhythm medications such as flecainide (Tambocor), propafenone (Rhythmol), or quinidine (Cardioquin, Quinidex, Quinaglute); or anti-psychotic medications such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), haloperidol (Haldol), thioridazine (Mellaril), clozapine (Clozaril), olanzapine (Zyprexa, Zydis), quetiapine (Seroquel), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon). If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use clomipramine, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment. There are many other medicines that can interact with clomipramine. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list with you of all the medicines you use and show this list to any doctor or other healthcare provider who treats you. Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has information about clomipramine written for health professionals that you may read. What does my medication look like? Clomipramine is available with a prescription under the brand name Anafranil. Other brand or generic forms may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you. Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Copyright 1996-2006 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 7.02. Revision Date: 10/11/06 12:16:21 PM. Answered by Bernardina Ofallon 1 year ago.

Although many folks wont agree, you have to get off the meds. It is in all likelihood that every one of those meds are inflicting a extreme hormonal and neurological chemical imbalance for your mind. Consult your medical professional earlier than nevertheless. You are NOT possessed! God and the Devil don't seem to be truly. Religion is only a hypnotizer and some way to provide an explanation for matters we dont realise. As a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine, my recommendation could be get off the juice. It could also be very feasible that you're conveniently having night time terrors. I have had many sufferers experiencing them and I think that's a developing contributor to intellectual instability. DO NOT act on any irregular ideas you've got. DO NOT attempt to kill your self. If you do think that you're having unusual emotions and many others. then please name 911 as quickly as feasible. It is critical that you just obtain on the spot aid in a suicidal concern. There is desire for you but and the reply isn't God, its your possess frame. Answered by Kym Cuello 1 year ago.

Medications are to make you better and to fix whatever chemical imbalance you have. They are optional. If you don't feel good then quit taking them. I was given Prozac for depression and ended up with heart palpitations. so I quit. Now I feel better.You are your own best doctor and if they aren't helping you then don't do it!!! Answered by Alecia Aupperle 1 year ago.

How to stop taking desipramine? Answered by Cortney Mullican 1 year ago.


After taking one 50mg pill of anti-depressant how long does the side effects last?
@ ziggy... the anti-depressant was a prescription from the Doctor...Just want to know how long the side effects last, nothing else. Asked by Marissa Loew 1 year ago.

Anti-depressants do not cause hallucinations. Something else is wrong with your friend. Answered by Joanna Vautrin 1 year ago.

1. Your friend took an unknown substance. She/he or they are not certain what the heck it was, right? 2. Your friend then hallucinated. 3. Your friend diagnosed that this was an affect of the unknown substance (suspected of being an anti-depressant. 4. Your friend wants to know about orgasms? Honey, if this is your friend then you must know that his/her/their problems are NOT sexual. Each one of the above illustrate instability on a deeper level. Talk to your friend (like a real friend). Why take something in the first place? That's where to start. Your friend needs professional help. Your friend doesn't have good judgment on this and I suspect it's because they are feeling stressed out. You can help this person by finding a professional to help with they're problems. I wish you well & hope this helps. Answered by Albert Ohanlon 1 year ago.

Are they still having hallucinatinos? Better that they talk to their doctor about those side effects and find a better medication. Sexual dysfunction is often a reported side effect of many anti depressants, so maybe your doctor can give you advice on this too. Answered by Jonna Asner 1 year ago.


I'm 55 not a athlete my bp in the mornings is 98/64 to 107/70 standing at night it's low also?
It usually is 107/75 to 114/75 I also have a slow resting pulse In the 50s had a ekg and blood tests everything came out good. I'm on xanix and Surmontil for anxiety. Is this normal? Or just my anxiety. Asked by Sindy Solon 1 year ago.

It's not your anxiety. Anxiety usually pushes those numbers up. For some people it is just normal to have a slow resting pulse and low BP regardless of fitness level. It is also possible (but rare) for the medications that you are on to cause this. If you aren't suffering any symptoms then it isnt worth worrying about. A low BP is usually a good thing so long as you do not get dizzy often or faint. Answered by Ronny Rocca 1 year ago.


None of the depression medications are working, and my therapist is driving me crazy?
Jamie im trying to find one who makes me happy and you have a good point there because the therapist person should make you happy or else why are you even going there but i dunno maybe i set my expectation too high or somethin Asked by Marnie Flether 1 year ago.

I've taken Lexapro, Prozac, Paxil, Celexa, Zoloft, Norpramin, Vivactil, Effexor, and Parnate, and am currently on Surmontil (100 mg-blue/white capsules) (3 in the morning / day), and I still feel like crap sometimes. I'm really talkative and hyper and than all of a sudden I just want to be left alone and die, like even before I started taking all the meds. My therapist also drives me crazy, she is boring and I just want to fall asleep, nothing she says is relevant and she is like my 7th one I've been too. Sometimes I just see her lips moving and I go yeh, yeh, yeh, alright..because she doesn't ever stop. What can I do, it's driving me crazy, I just want her to go away, and something to start working. Answered by Hana Hagy 1 year ago.

Yeh so she has a pic of her children hanging on the wall and she'll just point to em and be like oooh this is my son he is in uni trying to be a lawyer, ohhh and this is my daughter going to school to be a doctor and im so proud of my children and okay lady thats cool but talk about your children sometime else cause yeh Answered by Gaylord Hazlewood 1 year ago.

Hi, If you have tried ten medications and nothing is really working, your doctor should refer you to a psychiatrist for recommendations. They are the experts on medications for depression, anxiety, etc. It doesn't sound like you have a therapeutic relationship with your therapist. It's not appropriate for the therapist to be focusing on herself and her family when she's talking to you. The focus should be on helping you to gain coping strategies for your problems. You should tell your doctor what you just told us, and ask for a referral to a different counsellor. I admire you for having this much patience with your treatment to date. Start by being very honest with your family doctor, especially tell him the part about feeling like being left alone to die. That's an indication that you are pretty depressed and discouraged. Know that you are loved, and keep on trying. Best wishes to you. Answered by Jackelyn Matyi 1 year ago.

A couple years ago I saw a therapist and was diagnosed with depression. They suggested I take medication, so they prescribed me Wellbutrin. I took it for a few weeks and did notice a small change. I felt like I was getting better so quit the meds and the therapist; I don't know if any of this helps, because I wasn't on the medication that long and I don't attribute all of my feeling better to the meds, as there were outside things that helped me. The important thing to know is that a pill won't simply make you better or happy. As I understand them, they're designed to help increase certain chemicals (different for different medications) in the brain which help you be more positive (or less negative, depending on how you look at it). You have to WANT to get better--but if only seeing a therapist isn't helping, I'd definitely consider medication if I were you. However, I wouldn't recommend mixing anti-depressents with alcohol. And since alcohol is a depressant, it's only going to make your depressive state even worse. Bottom line, if you continue drinking, it's going to be almost impossible for you to get better. Think about some AA meetings. And don't be afraid to ask your doctor questions about the medication; they're there to help. Answered by Darius Grashot 1 year ago.

Well in some people a higher dose of drug is needed and some people 1,2,3, different types of drugs are needed and some need a less of a dose it all depends most drugs take like a week to start to work,etc. Therapist is trying to get u to open up! I know u don't want to talk about anything But u need to start talking about what u are feeling or let off some steam. Talking is the 1st step in getting out of depression and then working on what is really the problem - eating at u is next! Remember this takes time and u going to have to make the therapy work for u! Answered by Kacy Schulist 1 year ago.

Over the last five years I had begun to have increasingly withdraw into a downward spiral of depression.. But now with the method I can fully focus my energy and thoughts into a decisive line on how to make my life better constantly. And it works like magic! I'm beginning to attract people to me once again and things have just been looking up since then. Helping you eliminate depression? Answered by Criselda Seymor 1 year ago.

You need to be re-evaluated for the meds that you are on. Something needs to change. Also look around, talk to people to see if they would recommend a new therapist. You have to be happy with the person that is supposed to be "helping" you through this. I'm sorry that you have to go through all this just to be happy, but good luck. Answered by Jerica Ezelle 1 year ago.

I know you've been to a million therapists, but you really need to find a new one. Your therapist sounds like my therapist, who I hate, so I'm getting another one. I'm often suicidal but I always stop myself before I do anything drastic by thinking about who would miss me and what I'd missing out on, even if I didn't even believe it. I hope you feel better someday. Answered by Anastacia Tullier 1 year ago.

depression meds never really work, they're just for psychiatrists to make money, if you feel depressed take a walk while listening to some uplifting music, that always works for me, even when i'm sobbing like a maniac, just focus your attention on the music, and the neighborhood. Some bands that always make me happy are, the kooks, lily allen, and led zeppelin. Answered by Leandra Prohaska 1 year ago.

i suggest you get a male counselor who is like in his 20's so he doesn't annoy the s h i t out of you depression is i hard thing last year i went through of few months when i was depressed mostly kiddie stuff tho it wasn't bad but i felt like c r ap Answered by Jana Mchalffey 1 year ago.

sounds like you could have adhd, which can make you depressed. i thought i was depressed because i had racing thoughts and i was sad sometimes. then i got re evaluated and i found out i had adhd. Answered by Trent Warhurst 1 year ago.


Stop breathing at onset of trying to go to sleep?
I stop breathing during the beginning stages of sleep and wake up ia a panic, often jumping out of bed gasping for air. It started 28 years ago and only happened about once every couple of months. Now, it happens daily, even when I try to nap. The only was I can drift off to sleep peacefully is with either,... Asked by Marcelle Anson 1 year ago.

I stop breathing during the beginning stages of sleep and wake up ia a panic, often jumping out of bed gasping for air. It started 28 years ago and only happened about once every couple of months. Now, it happens daily, even when I try to nap. The only was I can drift off to sleep peacefully is with either, Ambien, Lunesta or a BENZO (like Valium or Lorazepam). The last week it is getting even worse. I get a throbbing small pain near either my right temple area, sometimes either temple area or on the top/side middle of my head. I have been to two sleep studies, but the last one was 2 years ago and that night I didn't have an event. However, I was diagnosed with having mild OSA. The sleep doctor put me on a CPAP machine (which I bought) and it only made the condition worse. He tried every titration and still was bad. I don't know if I have mixed sleep apnea. I had a neurological study done and it turned up negative. I have read about Central or Mixed Sleep Apnea and in my opinion, I might be suffering from it. It seems that my brain-control center for going to sleep have gone haywire. I have read about taking Medroxyprogestorne (Provera, Cycrin, Amen), Acetazolamide (Diamox). Theophylline (Theo-Dur, Respbid, Slo-Bid, Theo-24, Theolair, Uniphyl, Slo-Phyllin), traicyclic antidepressants and selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRI's). I am currently taking Surmontil 100 mg. per day and and Lamictal 125 mg. Please help me if you have any ideas or suggestions. I feel that my body can't handle the stress of this much longer. Answered by Ilda Pittari 1 year ago.

You're obviously on meds from the doctor. Talk to him and let him know how you feel. Ask him to recommend a Specialist that you can see for a second opinion. There is a chance the combination of drugs could be causing the problems. Make sure the doctor knows all of the over the counter medications and supplements you are taking too. Hope things get better for you. Answered by Rachael Trojanovich 1 year ago.

If I were you, I would seek out another physician, or just, in all those years, go to Mayo Clinic for a complete - head to toe - - evaluation. You would find you answer there. Answered by Lauralee Henneberry 1 year ago.

I would seek help from another Doctor,it doesn't sound like the meds are helping.Good luck Answered by Drew Mcfatten 1 year ago.


How many antidepressants are there on the market/are available?
Asked by Veronique Mojica 1 year ago.

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)[edit] Citalopram (Celexa) Escitalopram (Lexapro, Cipralex) Paroxetine (Paxil, Seroxat) Fluoxetine (Prozac) Fluvoxamine (Luvox) Sertraline (Zoloft, Lustral) Zimelidine (Normud, Zelmid) and indalpine (Upstene) were also formerly used as antidepressants, but were withdrawn from the market. Serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs)[edit] Desvenlafaxine (Pristiq) Duloxetine (Cymbalta) Levomilnacipran (Fetzima) Milnacipran (Ixel, Savella) Tofenacin (Elamol, Tofacine) Venlafaxine (Effexor) Serotonin modulators and stimulators (SMSs)[edit] Vilazodone (Viibryd) Vortioxetine (Brintellix) These drugs act as serotonin reuptake inhibitors and agonize/antagonize various serotonin receptors. Serotonin antagonists and reuptake inhibitors (SARIs)[edit] Etoperidone (Axiomin, Etonin) Nefazodone (Nefadar, Serzone) – withdrawn/discontinued in many countries Trazodone (Desyrel) These drugs act as antagonists of various serotonin receptors and as weak monoamine reuptake inhibitors. Norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (NRIs)[edit] Reboxetine (Edronax) Viloxazine (Vivalan) Atomoxetine (Strattera) is also sometimes used as an antidepressant, but is not specifically approved for this purpose. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs)[edit] Amitriptyline (Elavil, Endep) Amitriptylinoxide (Amioxid, Ambivalon, Equilibrin) Clomipramine (Anafranil) Desipramine (Norpramin, Pertofrane) Dibenzepin (Noveril, Victoril) Dosulepin (Prothiaden) Doxepin (Adapin, Sinequan) Imipramine (Tofranil) Lofepramine (Lomont, Gamanil) Melitracen (Dixeran, Melixeran, Trausabun) Nitroxazepine (Sintamil) Nortriptyline (Pamelor, Aventyl) Noxiptiline (Agedal, Elronon, Nogedal) Pipofezine (Azafen/Azaphen) Protriptyline (Vivactil) Trimipramine (Surmontil) Butriptyline (Evadyne), demexiptiline (Deparon, Tinoran), imipraminoxide (Imiprex, Elepsin), iprindole (Prondol, Galatur, Tetran), metapramine (Timaxel), propizepine (Depressin, Vagran), and quinupramine (Kinupril, Kevopril) were also formerly marketed, but have since been discontinued. The following are also TCAs, but are atypical pharmacologically: Opipramol (Insidon) – sigma receptor agonist Tianeptine (Stablon) – unknown/unclear mechanism of action Amineptine (Survector, Maneon) is another atypical TCA, acting as a norepinephrine-dopamine reuptake inhibitor (NDRI), but was withdrawn from the market. Tiazesim (Altinil) is technically not a TCA, but it is a heterocyclic antidepressant that is very closely related, and similarly to various TCAs, it is no longer marketed. Tetracyclic antidepressants (TeCAs)[edit] Amoxapine (Asendin) Maprotiline (Ludiomil) Mianserin (Bolvidon, Norval, Tolvon) Mirtazapine (Remeron) Setiptiline (Tecipul) Mianserin, mirtazapine, and setiptiline are also sometimes described as noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressants (NaSSAs). Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs)[edit] Irreversible[edit] Non-selective[edit] Isocarboxazid (Marplan) Phenelzine (Nardil) Tranylcypromine (Parnate) Many others, including benmoxin (Neuralex), iproclozide (Sursum), iproniazid (Marsilid), mebanazine (Actomol), nialamide (Niamid), octamoxin (Ximaol), pheniprazine (Catron), phenoxypropazine (Drazine), pivhydrazine (Tersavid), and safrazine (Safra) were used as antidepressants in the past, but have since been discontinued. Selective for MAO-B[edit] Selegiline (Eldepryl, Zelapar, Emsam) Reversible[edit] Non-selective[edit] Caroxazone (Surodil, Timostenil) was formerly used as an antidepressant, but has been discontinued. Selective for MAO-A[edit] Metralindole (Inkazan) Moclobemide (Aurorix, Manerix) Pirlindole (Pirazidol) Toloxatone (Humoryl) These drugs are sometimes described as reversible inhibitors of MAO-A (RIMAs). Eprobemide (Befol) and minaprine (Brantur, Cantor) were also formerly used as antidepressants, but have been discontinued. Atypical antipsychotics[edit] Amisulpride (Solian) – specifically approved as a monotherapy for dysthymia Lurasidone (Latuda) – specifically approved as a monotherapy for depressive episodes in bipolar disorder Quetiapine (Seroquel) – specifically approved as a monotherapy for depressive episodes in bipolar disorder Others[edit] Marketed[edit] Agomelatine (Valdoxan) – 5-HT2C receptor antagonist and MT1 and MT2 receptor agonist – sometimes described as a norepinephrine-dopamine disinhibitor (NDDI) Bupropion (Wellbutrin) – NRI and non-competitive antagonist of various neuronal nACh receptors Ketamine (Ketalar) – primarily a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist – not specifically approved for depression (used off-label) Tandospirone (Sediel) – 5-HT1A receptor partial agonist Teniloxazine (Lucelan, Metatone) – NRI and 5-HT2A receptor antagonist Discontinued/withdrawn from the market[edit] α-Methyltryptamine [αMT] (Indopan) – multiple serotonin receptor agonist, serotonin-norepinephrine-dopamine releasing agent (SNDRA), and weak RIMA Etryptamine [α-Ethyltryptamine (αET)] (Monase) – multiple serotonin receptor agonist, SNDRA, and weak RIMA Medifoxamine (Cledial, Gerdaxyl) – dopamine reuptake inhibitor (DRI) and 5-HT2A receptor antagonist Nefazodone (Serzone) - SARI Nomifensine (Merital, Alival) – NDRI Oxaflozane (Conflictan) – 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT2C receptor agonist Over-the-counter[edit] The following antidepressants are available both with a prescription and over-the-counter: Ademetionine [S-Adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe)] (Heptral, Transmetil, Samyl) – cofactor in monoamine neurotransmitter biosynthesis Hypericum perforatum [St. John's Wort (SJW)] (Jarsin, Kira, Movina) – TRPC6 activator, and various other actions Oxitriptan [5-Hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP)] (Cincofarm, Levothym, Triptum) – precursor in serotonin biosynthesis Tryptophan (Tryptan, Optimax, Aminomine) – precursor in serotonin biosynthesis Adjunctive treatments[edit] Atypical antipsychotics[edit] Aripiprazole (Abilify) – specifically approved as an adjunct for major depressive disorder Brexpiprazole (Rexulti) – specifically approved as an adjunct for major depressive disorder Lurasidone (Latuda) – specifically approved as an adjunct for depressive episodes in bipolar disorder Olanzapine (Zyprexa) – specifically approved as an adjunct for major depressive disorder Quetiapine (Seroquel) – approved as an adjunct for both major depressive disorder and depressive episodes in bipolar disorder Risperidone (Risperdal) - not specifically approved as an adjunct for major depressive disorder (used off-label) Others[edit] Buspirone (BuSpar) – 5-HT1A receptor partial agonist – not specifically approved for depression (used off-label) Lithium (Eskalith, Lithobid) – mood stabilizer (exact mechanism of action unknown) – not specifically approved for depression (used off-label) Thyroxine (T4) – thyroid hormone (THR agonist) – not specifically approved for depression (used off-label) Triiodothyronine (T3) – thyroid hormone (THR agonist) – not specifically approved for depression (used off-label) Combination products[edit] Amitriptyline/perphenazine (Etafron) – TCA and typical antipsychotic combination Flupentixol/melitracen (Deanxit) – TCA and typical antipsychotic combination Olanzapine/fluoxetine (Symbyax) – SSRI and atypical antipsychotic combination – specifically approved as a monotherapy for depressive episodes in bipolar disorder Tranylcypromine/trifluoperazine (Parstelin) - MAOI and typical antipsychotic combination Currently in clinical trials (investigational)[edit] ALKS-5461 (buprenorphine/samidorphan) – κ-opioid receptor antagonist AV-101 (4-chlorokynurenine) – NMDA receptor glycine site antagonist Basimglurant (RG7090) – mGlu5 receptor negative allosteric modulator CERC-301 (MK-0657) – NMDA receptor subunit 2B (NR2B) antagonist CERC-501 (LY-2456302) – κ-opioid receptor antagonist Esketamine – non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist LY-2940094 – nociceptin receptor antagonist NRX-1074 – NMDA receptor glycine site partial agonist NSI-189 – hippocampal neurotrophin (exact mechanism of action unknown) Rapastinel (GLYX-13) – NMDA receptor glycine site partial agonist RO4491533 – mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptor negative allosteric modulator Tramadol (ETS6103/Viotra) – μ-opioid receptor agonist, δ- and κ-opioid receptor ligand, serotonin releasing agent (SRA), NRI, 5-HT2C receptor antagonist, NMDAR antagonist, α7 nAChR antagonist, M1 and M3 receptor antagonist, and TRPV1 agonist Answered by Allyn Beekman 1 year ago.


What medication would be best for anxiety disorder ~long~?
I get these bad panic attacks where it feels like I am going to be stuck in hell forever. They say it is PTSD because I smoked synthetic and almost died but I the bad trip I had was terrible. I get panic attacks whenever something reminds me about the bad trip which is everything literally. I have been to a... Asked by Ja Bashinelli 1 year ago.

I get these bad panic attacks where it feels like I am going to be stuck in hell forever. They say it is PTSD because I smoked synthetic and almost died but I the bad trip I had was terrible. I get panic attacks whenever something reminds me about the bad trip which is everything literally. I have been to a mental hospital for a week. The first week after my bad trip Sept. 24. They guided my mom and I to a therapist and a psychiatrist for medication. They also put me on a low dose of Seroquel at night because every night I was there I would wake up having a panic attack and go out of my room and talk to one of the staff members which helped a little bit but enough for me to go back to sleep. We did not get to see the psychiatrist until 2 months in November. I had many many many panic attacks within that time they were really bad and every time I had one I made my mom drive me to the ER which was 30 minutes away. In the car I would be talking nonsense I would be tremoring every time something reminded me of the bad trip I would be crying and all kinds of stuff. To other people I looked like I had schizophrenia. SO within those two months and the visits to the hospital they boosted my Seroquel to 2 at night and one in the morning. Then a clinic doctor prescribed me Buspirone 1 in the morning then one at night. Also one of the ER doctors prescribed me Xanax because on my 5th or 6th time going there he finally gave one of them to me and we waited and it helped incredibly so I only use it for emergencies. I was then no longer having tremors while having a panic attacks and I had improved and was not having them as much but still occasionally. I still could not sleep alone. My mom and i slept together on a bed in the living room. I had to have the tv on all night. I then saw a psychiatrist in November. She prescribed me paxil and told me to go off of the Buspirone. During this time she was not going to see me for another 4 weeks. Also my therapist her schedule got full and I could not see her for 4 weeks also. This was all between thanks giving and Christmas. So when I went off of the buspirone I started having worse panic attacks and more often. But my mood had improved but I was getting more panic attacks. I thought it was because I was not seeing my therapist. I then ruined thanksgiving for everyone and then during Christmas day I was having a panic attack and my mom was like how about you take a buspirone instead of Xanax and I did and I felt not as scared. So I went back on that. Then I thought it was a good idea to double my buspirone because I remember the clinic doctor saying the 30 mg a day was a low dose. So then I started having tremors and uncontrollable movements but I was no longer being so scared daily and some what facing some of my irrational fears and best of all I started sleeping alone. But -what I think- I was getting more comfortable and kind of becoming a bit more normal and my suicidal thoughts came back and cutting thoughts and just sad moods thinking about my past kind of clogged parts of my days. I mostly only wanted to kill and cut myself when my mom was drunk or if I was thinking about how I am doing nothing with my life because I am not in school and I can barely get through days with out feeling like I am going to be stuck in hell forever it just brought me down but since I found god I know I can not kill myself and that only he can decide when I pass away. I then saw my psychiatrist and she freaked out because I was overdosing on Serotonin so she quickly took me off of the paxil and told me to take what I was supposed to of the buspirone. Then she put me on welbutron. My 2 weeks on welburton were terrible I started having panic attacks but way different from before so I had no idea how to deal with them then I started to get angry over everything my moods all spiked In a terrible way and my suicidal thoughts got worse and the urge to cut myself was almost inevitable. My anger is terrible just bad I would through things punch my body and yank out my hair. Then this Monday I saw her and she said yeah I was scared that was going to happen because welbutron can do that that's why she put me on a low dose. So we agreed that I am gong to be taken off the welbutron and go on nothing in the anti depressant for week so I am not going on one pill then switched then switched then switched. So next week o thursday I will see her and she was already talking about putting me on prozac. I read about it and it said it can cause nervousness and some of the same side efffects of welbutron. What is your opinion on what meds I should try and be on? I do not understand why I am being put on anti depressants when my problem is all anxiety based? Should I be put on anti psychotics?! Answered by Gino Ganie 1 year ago.

First of all, you need to understand that PTSD is a type of anxiety disorder which is why you are on the anti-anxiety medications. PTSD is a normal, natural, and expected reaction whenever a person is exposed to some type of trauma. Some of the symptoms you wrote about -- the panic attacks, the trouble sleeping at night, thoughts of suicide -- are all a part of PTSD. If you would like to check out all of the diagnostic symptoms of this disorder, you can go to: www.helpguide.org/mental/post_traumati... ptsd.about.com/od/symptomsanddiagnosis... You also need to understand that PTSD can "evolve", and when it does this, depression can often result. So that's why you doctor is talking about putting you on anti-depressants along with the medication for anxiety. PTSD will usually respond very well to traditional talk therapy. The goal is for you to be able to talk about your trauma, and express any feelings or emotions that were repressed at the time. Once you've talked through the traumatic event, and externalized your repressed feelings and emotions, you should be fine and will be free of the symptoms you described above. And that means you won't need to be taking the medications any longer. Now before I get into some of the medications your doctor might prescribe for you, I need to make sure you understand that I am not a physician or a psychiatrist. What I am is a retired psychologist. So all I'm going to do here is give you the names of some of the medications that might be prescribed and leave it to you to talk with your doctor about them. First you would have Alpha Blockers such as Minipress, Catapres, and Tenex. And then Beta Blockers such as Inderal and Tenormin. Next would be a class of drugs called Benzodiazepines and these would include drugs such as Ativan, Dalmane, Klonopin, Halcion, Librium, Restoril, Serax, Tranxene, Valium, and Xanax. The next type of drug is the Anapirone and the main drug in this category is BuSpar. All of these drugs treat anxiety. As far as the anti-depressants go, you have the Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs). In this group, you would have drugs such as Celexa, Lexapro, Luvox, Paxil, Prozac, and Zoloft. Next you have the Tricyclic Anti-Depressants such as Adapin, Anafranil, Aventyl, Elavil, Ludiomil, Norpramin, Pamelor, Sinequan, Surmontil, Tofranil, and Vivactil. And finally, you have the newer, unclassified anti-depressants. These would include Cymbalta, Desyrel, Effexor, and Remeron. Now that's a lot of drugs that can be used to treat PTSD. and there are reasons for prescribing each of them as well as reasons not to prescribe them. Many things need to be taken into consideration when deciding on the best drug combination for you: how severe your symptoms are, your past medical history, your sex, your age (young women who are ovulating sometimes don't react well to certain medications but have no problems with others, so that needs to be considered), other medications you're taking, including birth control pills, genetic problems and conditions, etc. So it sometimes takes a few tries before the proper combination can be found. And even when the doctor finds something that works, they will often fine tune the dosage, or change the medications entirely if they think they can get better results with other drug combinations. So please be patient with your psychiatrist as she tries to get you stabilized. There's a lot of information here, but I hope something proves helpful. If you have any further questions, please feel free to E-mail me through Yahoo Answers and I'll do my best to help in any way I can. Good luck to you! Answered by Gay Maulding 1 year ago.

seroquel IS an antipsycotic. you are being put on too many medications then taken off them abruptly. this can make your symptoms more profound. What you think is a side effect of a new med may just be the withdrawal symptoms from the previous. Your doc is being irrisponsible. Welburtin is a stimulant... its different than other antidepressants, it works in the brain in the same way that ephedra does. That stuff dialates my pupils and makes me run around and start a bunch of different projects. anxiety medications are meant to be used short term while you work with a therapist. Docs don't want to prescribe them because they are habit forming so they give a bunch of BS that isn't even designed for anxiety, just mood. if you have admitted to using drugs in the past, even just salvia or marijuana, thats why they arent giving you anxiety specific medicine... because they believe you cant be trusted with it. Never admit to using drugs cause then its in your medical records forever.. your records may even say that yo uare a "marijuana abuser" if you only used it once and told them about it. The only way to get around it, is to get out of the public healthcare system, and start seeing a private doctor. you opened with "smoked synthetic". I'm sorry but, they are never going to prescribe orstart you on a regular regimen of anxiety specific medication like valium, xanax, klonopin... even if you genuinley need it... thats why the emergency room wouldn't give it to you untill you had been in crisis a bunch of times. give up on trying to get an RX for it and get ready for the ride of going off and on all these different powerful psychiatric medications. you might be able to get lyrica. I was in the public system and recorded as a drug abuser, they put me on lyrica for mood and anxiety because it has low abuse potential and youd have to eat 10 grams of it to get high. If you have those mystery depression aches and pangs and tension it fixes that too because its a fibromyalga medication. It worked wonders but not as good as xanax. Its an off-label use to prescribe it for anxiety or mood but really effective. However if you're takin xanax and seroquel at the same time, all these things interact with eachother and can make you really sedated. Answered by Carry Dallam 1 year ago.

The SSRIs are antidperessants with anti-anxiety properties. They work well for the anxiety disorders without the severe long term side-effects of the antipsychotics and benzodiazepines (xanax, etc). Buspirone and Wellbutrin are not SSRIs. The side effects of Prozac go away in a few days. Millions of people take Prozac, it's very effective for anxiety. Answered by Dani Dickus 1 year ago.

I am so happy, it was only a 35 minute drive ( 70 minutes total) but absolutely no sign of anxiety or panic i shopped till I dropped - brilliant! I will now go for the next stage DUAL CARRIAGE way, probably at the weekend, with my husband accompanying me first then the solo drive, if successful the final stage of driving on motorway Beat Anxiety And Panic Attacks Naturally? Answered by Coreen Craige 1 year ago.

Actually, the doctor will try to talk you into something long term, usually like Celexa or Prozac. Xanax is nice temporarily, but it can be very addicting. I would suggest hypnosis or breathing into a paper bag. Answered by Sunni Sittre 1 year ago.

Please ask your doctor about propranolol. It's a beta blocker used to treat anxiety. NO crazy side effects like anti psychotics -and it really does help. Good luck. Answered by Cindy Ziman 1 year ago.


Related

Browse by letter
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

© Medications.li 2015-2017 - All rights reserved