Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 007600/003.

Names and composition

"SURITAL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of THIAMYLAL SODIUM.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
007600/003 SURITAL THIAMYLAL SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1GM per VIAL
007600/005 SURITAL THIAMYLAL SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5GM per VIAL
007600/009 SURITAL THIAMYLAL SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10GM per VIAL

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
007600/003 SURITAL THIAMYLAL SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1GM per VIAL
007600/005 SURITAL THIAMYLAL SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5GM per VIAL
007600/009 SURITAL THIAMYLAL SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10GM per VIAL

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Answered questions

Induce anesthesia in a 12# cat using?
4% Surital at a dosage rate of 3mg/lb Asked by Patrica Komula 1 year ago.

Probably. Is this a question? Are you looking for the total dose? Do they use English rather than metric units in veterinary medicine? (We use kg for humans). Can you even get Surital now? They stopped making it available for people ages ago. And why are you anesthetizing cats anyway? You need 3 mg x 12# for your induction dose, or 36 mg. 4% means there are 40 mg per cc. So, you need 36/40cc, or 0.9 cc of the drug. Got it? Answered by Ervin Merriman 1 year ago.

Using a Veterinarian. Leave your poor cat alone. Answered by Tommie Battani 1 year ago.


What pills are barbituates?
i would like to know what pills are considered barbituates Asked by Augusta Covey 1 year ago.

Phenobarbitol, Aprobarbital Alurate Nembutal, Luminal Secobarbital Quinalbarbital Seconal Talbutal Lotusate Thiamylal Surital Thiopenta Answered by Wilber Bessellieu 1 year ago.

Barbiturates are drugs that act as central nervous system (CNS) depressants, and by virtue of this they produce a wide spectrum of effects, from mild sedation to anesthesia. Some are also used as anticonvulsants. Barbiturates are believed to be GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) agonists, acting on the GABA-A receptor. GABA is the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian CNS. Answered by Eusebia Menter 1 year ago.

sweety...they are the ones that u need a prescription for and in the package insert it will say "barbituates".read the package insert...may be its time to cut back on a few hey..as whitney says,"crack is wack". Answered by Audra Zaiss 1 year ago.

Barbiturates are powerful depressants that slow down the central nervous system (CNS). Classified as sedative/hypnotics, they include amobarbital (e.g. Amytal), pen obarbital (e.g. Nembutal), phenobarbital (e.g. Luminal), secobarbital (e.g. Seconal), and the combination amobarbital-secobarbital (e.g. Tuinal). (Note that where a drug name is capitalized, it is a registered trade name of the manufacturer.) Answered by Barbra Degrange 1 year ago.

Barbiturates are powerful depressants that slow down the central nervous system (CNS). Classified as sedative/hypnotics, they include amobarbital (e.g. Amytal), pen obarbital (e.g. Nembutal), phenobarbital (e.g. Luminal), secobarbital (e.g. Seconal), and the combination amobarbital-secobarbital (e.g. Tuinal). (Note that where a drug name is capitalized, it is a registered trade name of the manufacturer.) Answered by Magen Leaird 1 year ago.

are trying to get stoned? Answered by Augustine Joun 1 year ago.


What are barbiturates?
Asked by Lucila Hammette 1 year ago.

Firstly Wikipedia is NEVER a legitimate source of infomration The following is from Medscape from the article Barbiturate Toxicity- Barbiturates are the earliest class of sedative-hypnotic agents to be developed and were once extremely popular drugs of abuse. Today, barbiturates are commonly used in geriatric suicide involving medication overdose. In one New York City study, 27.2% of fatal overdose suicide cases in the elderly were due to barbiturates. Interestingly enough, two other popular sedative-hypnotic drugs, propofol and ketamine, have had a rise in their abuse. In fact, 18% of academic anesthesiology departments surveyed have reported a case of propofol abuse or diversion in the past 10 years, a 5-fold increase from prior studies. Ketamine has become one of the mainstream club drugs, rising from 25% use among nightclub goers in the United Kingdom in 1999 to 40% in 2003. In general, sedative-hypnotic drugs are nonselective in their effects. At lower doses, a reduction in restlessness and emotional tension occurs. At increasingly higher doses, sedation is followed by increasing levels of anesthesia and eventually death. Benzodiazepines have largely replaced barbiturates for outpatient medical therapy, with a subsequent decline in barbiturate abuse. Stricter guidelines dictating barbiturate use have also contributed to their decreased availability. Though tolerance occurs to the sedative-hypnotic effects, no tolerance appears to develop to the level at which lethal toxicity occurs. Barbiturates background infomration (DEA): Barbiturates were first introduced for medical use in the early 1900s. More than 2,500 barbiturates have been synthesized, and at the height of their popularity, about 50 were marketed for human use. Today, about a dozen are in medical use. Barbiturates produce a wide spectrum of central nervous system depression, from mild sedation to coma, and have been used as sedatives, hypnotics, anesthetics, and anticonvulsants. The primary differences among many of these products are how fast they produce an effect and how long those effects last. Barbiturates are classified as ultrashort, short, intermediate, and long-acting. The ultrashort-acting barbiturates produce anesthesia within about one minute after intravenous administration. Those in current medical use are the Schedule IV drug methohexital (Brevital®), and the Schedule III drugs thiamyl (Surital®) and thiopental (Pentothal®). Barbiturate abusers prefer the Schedule II short-acting and intermediate-acting barbiturates that include amobarbital (Amyta®), pentobarbital (Nembutal®), secobarbital (Seconal®), and Tuinal (an amobarbital/secobarbital combination product). Other short and intermediate-acting barbiturates are in Schedule III and include butalbital (Fiorina®), butabarbital (Butisol®), talbutal (Lotusate®), and aprobarbital (Alurate®). After oral administration, the onset of action is from 15 to 40 minutes, and the effects last up to six hours. These drugs are primarily used for insomnia and preoperative sedation. Veterinarians use pentobarbital for anesthesia and euthanasia. Long-acting barbiturates include phenobarbital (Luminal®) and mephobarbital (Mebaral®), both of which are in Schedule IV. Effects of these drugs are realized in about one hour and last for about 12 hours, and are used primarily for daytime sedation and the treatment of seizure disorder. Answered by Donte Septer 1 year ago.

drugs. wikipedia is your friend. Answered by Senaida Valme 1 year ago.


Induce anesthesia in a 12# cat using?
4% Surital at a dosage rate of 3mg/lb Asked by Alvin Ollivierre 1 year ago.

Probably. Is this a question? Are you looking for the total dose? Do they use English rather than metric units in veterinary medicine? (We use kg for humans). Can you even get Surital now? They stopped making it available for people ages ago. And why are you anesthetizing cats anyway? You need 3 mg x 12# for your induction dose, or 36 mg. 4% means there are 40 mg per cc. So, you need 36/40cc, or 0.9 cc of the drug. Got it? Answered by Francisco Scholl 1 year ago.

Using a Veterinarian. Leave your poor cat alone. Answered by Zulma Maleck 1 year ago.


What pills are barbituates?
i would like to know what pills are considered barbituates Asked by Nilsa Schouviller 1 year ago.

Phenobarbitol, Aprobarbital Alurate Nembutal, Luminal Secobarbital Quinalbarbital Seconal Talbutal Lotusate Thiamylal Surital Thiopenta Answered by Jean Peninger 1 year ago.

Barbiturates are drugs that act as central nervous system (CNS) depressants, and by virtue of this they produce a wide spectrum of effects, from mild sedation to anesthesia. Some are also used as anticonvulsants. Barbiturates are believed to be GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) agonists, acting on the GABA-A receptor. GABA is the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian CNS. Answered by Zana Lournes 1 year ago.

sweety...they are the ones that u need a prescription for and in the package insert it will say "barbituates".read the package insert...may be its time to cut back on a few hey..as whitney says,"crack is wack". Answered by Emmaline Meighen 1 year ago.

Barbiturates are powerful depressants that slow down the central nervous system (CNS). Classified as sedative/hypnotics, they include amobarbital (e.g. Amytal), pen obarbital (e.g. Nembutal), phenobarbital (e.g. Luminal), secobarbital (e.g. Seconal), and the combination amobarbital-secobarbital (e.g. Tuinal). (Note that where a drug name is capitalized, it is a registered trade name of the manufacturer.) Answered by Courtney Johnsen 1 year ago.

Barbiturates are powerful depressants that slow down the central nervous system (CNS). Classified as sedative/hypnotics, they include amobarbital (e.g. Amytal), pen obarbital (e.g. Nembutal), phenobarbital (e.g. Luminal), secobarbital (e.g. Seconal), and the combination amobarbital-secobarbital (e.g. Tuinal). (Note that where a drug name is capitalized, it is a registered trade name of the manufacturer.) Answered by Kalyn Rudh 1 year ago.

are trying to get stoned? Answered by Zandra Rudasill 1 year ago.


What are barbiturates?
Asked by Carolyn Zabik 1 year ago.

Firstly Wikipedia is NEVER a legitimate source of infomration The following is from Medscape from the article Barbiturate Toxicity- Barbiturates are the earliest class of sedative-hypnotic agents to be developed and were once extremely popular drugs of abuse. Today, barbiturates are commonly used in geriatric suicide involving medication overdose. In one New York City study, 27.2% of fatal overdose suicide cases in the elderly were due to barbiturates. Interestingly enough, two other popular sedative-hypnotic drugs, propofol and ketamine, have had a rise in their abuse. In fact, 18% of academic anesthesiology departments surveyed have reported a case of propofol abuse or diversion in the past 10 years, a 5-fold increase from prior studies. Ketamine has become one of the mainstream club drugs, rising from 25% use among nightclub goers in the United Kingdom in 1999 to 40% in 2003. In general, sedative-hypnotic drugs are nonselective in their effects. At lower doses, a reduction in restlessness and emotional tension occurs. At increasingly higher doses, sedation is followed by increasing levels of anesthesia and eventually death. Benzodiazepines have largely replaced barbiturates for outpatient medical therapy, with a subsequent decline in barbiturate abuse. Stricter guidelines dictating barbiturate use have also contributed to their decreased availability. Though tolerance occurs to the sedative-hypnotic effects, no tolerance appears to develop to the level at which lethal toxicity occurs. Barbiturates background infomration (DEA): Barbiturates were first introduced for medical use in the early 1900s. More than 2,500 barbiturates have been synthesized, and at the height of their popularity, about 50 were marketed for human use. Today, about a dozen are in medical use. Barbiturates produce a wide spectrum of central nervous system depression, from mild sedation to coma, and have been used as sedatives, hypnotics, anesthetics, and anticonvulsants. The primary differences among many of these products are how fast they produce an effect and how long those effects last. Barbiturates are classified as ultrashort, short, intermediate, and long-acting. The ultrashort-acting barbiturates produce anesthesia within about one minute after intravenous administration. Those in current medical use are the Schedule IV drug methohexital (Brevital®), and the Schedule III drugs thiamyl (Surital®) and thiopental (Pentothal®). Barbiturate abusers prefer the Schedule II short-acting and intermediate-acting barbiturates that include amobarbital (Amyta®), pentobarbital (Nembutal®), secobarbital (Seconal®), and Tuinal (an amobarbital/secobarbital combination product). Other short and intermediate-acting barbiturates are in Schedule III and include butalbital (Fiorina®), butabarbital (Butisol®), talbutal (Lotusate®), and aprobarbital (Alurate®). After oral administration, the onset of action is from 15 to 40 minutes, and the effects last up to six hours. These drugs are primarily used for insomnia and preoperative sedation. Veterinarians use pentobarbital for anesthesia and euthanasia. Long-acting barbiturates include phenobarbital (Luminal®) and mephobarbital (Mebaral®), both of which are in Schedule IV. Effects of these drugs are realized in about one hour and last for about 12 hours, and are used primarily for daytime sedation and the treatment of seizure disorder. Answered by Kiyoko Mellish 1 year ago.

drugs. wikipedia is your friend. Answered by Marylee Hakel 1 year ago.


Induce anesthesia in a 12# cat using?
4% Surital at a dosage rate of 3mg/lb Asked by Jeanie Pollett 1 year ago.

Probably. Is this a question? Are you looking for the total dose? Do they use English rather than metric units in veterinary medicine? (We use kg for humans). Can you even get Surital now? They stopped making it available for people ages ago. And why are you anesthetizing cats anyway? You need 3 mg x 12# for your induction dose, or 36 mg. 4% means there are 40 mg per cc. So, you need 36/40cc, or 0.9 cc of the drug. Got it? Answered by Avril Hurwitz 1 year ago.

Using a Veterinarian. Leave your poor cat alone. Answered by Epifania Hubsch 1 year ago.


What pills are barbituates?
i would like to know what pills are considered barbituates Asked by Laura Danese 1 year ago.

Phenobarbitol, Aprobarbital Alurate Nembutal, Luminal Secobarbital Quinalbarbital Seconal Talbutal Lotusate Thiamylal Surital Thiopenta Answered by Lavonne Borozny 1 year ago.

Barbiturates are drugs that act as central nervous system (CNS) depressants, and by virtue of this they produce a wide spectrum of effects, from mild sedation to anesthesia. Some are also used as anticonvulsants. Barbiturates are believed to be GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) agonists, acting on the GABA-A receptor. GABA is the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian CNS. Answered by Meri Moffat 1 year ago.

sweety...they are the ones that u need a prescription for and in the package insert it will say "barbituates".read the package insert...may be its time to cut back on a few hey..as whitney says,"crack is wack". Answered by Concha Erlanger 1 year ago.

Barbiturates are powerful depressants that slow down the central nervous system (CNS). Classified as sedative/hypnotics, they include amobarbital (e.g. Amytal), pen obarbital (e.g. Nembutal), phenobarbital (e.g. Luminal), secobarbital (e.g. Seconal), and the combination amobarbital-secobarbital (e.g. Tuinal). (Note that where a drug name is capitalized, it is a registered trade name of the manufacturer.) Answered by Phyllis Hjort 1 year ago.

Barbiturates are powerful depressants that slow down the central nervous system (CNS). Classified as sedative/hypnotics, they include amobarbital (e.g. Amytal), pen obarbital (e.g. Nembutal), phenobarbital (e.g. Luminal), secobarbital (e.g. Seconal), and the combination amobarbital-secobarbital (e.g. Tuinal). (Note that where a drug name is capitalized, it is a registered trade name of the manufacturer.) Answered by Nichole Konek 1 year ago.

are trying to get stoned? Answered by Gregory Rycroft 1 year ago.


What are barbiturates?
Asked by Kenton Lomago 1 year ago.

Firstly Wikipedia is NEVER a legitimate source of infomration The following is from Medscape from the article Barbiturate Toxicity- Barbiturates are the earliest class of sedative-hypnotic agents to be developed and were once extremely popular drugs of abuse. Today, barbiturates are commonly used in geriatric suicide involving medication overdose. In one New York City study, 27.2% of fatal overdose suicide cases in the elderly were due to barbiturates. Interestingly enough, two other popular sedative-hypnotic drugs, propofol and ketamine, have had a rise in their abuse. In fact, 18% of academic anesthesiology departments surveyed have reported a case of propofol abuse or diversion in the past 10 years, a 5-fold increase from prior studies. Ketamine has become one of the mainstream club drugs, rising from 25% use among nightclub goers in the United Kingdom in 1999 to 40% in 2003. In general, sedative-hypnotic drugs are nonselective in their effects. At lower doses, a reduction in restlessness and emotional tension occurs. At increasingly higher doses, sedation is followed by increasing levels of anesthesia and eventually death. Benzodiazepines have largely replaced barbiturates for outpatient medical therapy, with a subsequent decline in barbiturate abuse. Stricter guidelines dictating barbiturate use have also contributed to their decreased availability. Though tolerance occurs to the sedative-hypnotic effects, no tolerance appears to develop to the level at which lethal toxicity occurs. Barbiturates background infomration (DEA): Barbiturates were first introduced for medical use in the early 1900s. More than 2,500 barbiturates have been synthesized, and at the height of their popularity, about 50 were marketed for human use. Today, about a dozen are in medical use. Barbiturates produce a wide spectrum of central nervous system depression, from mild sedation to coma, and have been used as sedatives, hypnotics, anesthetics, and anticonvulsants. The primary differences among many of these products are how fast they produce an effect and how long those effects last. Barbiturates are classified as ultrashort, short, intermediate, and long-acting. The ultrashort-acting barbiturates produce anesthesia within about one minute after intravenous administration. Those in current medical use are the Schedule IV drug methohexital (Brevital®), and the Schedule III drugs thiamyl (Surital®) and thiopental (Pentothal®). Barbiturate abusers prefer the Schedule II short-acting and intermediate-acting barbiturates that include amobarbital (Amyta®), pentobarbital (Nembutal®), secobarbital (Seconal®), and Tuinal (an amobarbital/secobarbital combination product). Other short and intermediate-acting barbiturates are in Schedule III and include butalbital (Fiorina®), butabarbital (Butisol®), talbutal (Lotusate®), and aprobarbital (Alurate®). After oral administration, the onset of action is from 15 to 40 minutes, and the effects last up to six hours. These drugs are primarily used for insomnia and preoperative sedation. Veterinarians use pentobarbital for anesthesia and euthanasia. Long-acting barbiturates include phenobarbital (Luminal®) and mephobarbital (Mebaral®), both of which are in Schedule IV. Effects of these drugs are realized in about one hour and last for about 12 hours, and are used primarily for daytime sedation and the treatment of seizure disorder. Answered by Fermin Enwall 1 year ago.

drugs. wikipedia is your friend. Answered by Lakesha Kanno 1 year ago.


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