Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 000159/001.

Names and composition

"SULFAPYRIDINE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of SULFAPYRIDINE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
000159/001 SULFAPYRIDINE SULFAPYRIDINE TABLET/ORAL 500MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
000159/001 SULFAPYRIDINE SULFAPYRIDINE TABLET/ORAL 500MG

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Answered questions

Ulcerative Colitis and headaches?
I have Ulcerative Colitis and am currently taking Sulfasalazine. This medicine causes me to have extreme headaches. I cannot take asprin or ibuprofin and tylenol does not help. Does anyone know something that will help with my headaches???? Asked by Maryellen Keenom 1 year ago.

Headaches are a common side effect of sulfasalazine. Sulfasalazine is broken down by bacteria in the colon into 5-ASA (the active ingredient) and sulfapyridine, which is inactive. However, it is the sulfapyridine which is thought to be responsible for many of the common side effects of sulfasalazine. Some people develop true allergic reactions to the sulfapyridine portion of sulfasalazine and these can be quite serious. You basically have two options: 1) temporarily lower the dose and then gradually increase it back to your current dose; this seems to help with headaches in some people. 2) there are a number of newer medications that contain 5-ASA but not the sulfapyridine portion. Although you may still have a headache with another 5-ASA product, there is a good chance that your headaches are caused by the sulfapyridine portion. If you have a bad headache to sulfasalazine I would speak to your gastroenterologist about which of these two options is better for you. There is no need to suffer with these headaches! Answered by Ninfa Bartholow 1 year ago.

Yes, Sulfasalazine does causes you headaches. Well, try this. Slice some fresh ginger (rounded like coins), put them on a piece of cloth. (The cloth should be long enough to be tied around your head). Tie this cloth around your head tightly, as tight as you can. It does help. Or try visualization, close your eyes and imagine you're somewhere nice and relaxing, try breathing slowly and imagine your pain fly away. Been there, done that. Answered by Anne Decant 1 year ago.


Difference between gram positive cocci & gram negative bacilli?
Whats the difference between gram positive cocci and gram negative bacilli regarding their growth patterns on: 1.TSA or SBS 2.EMB or MAC 3.Enterococcal media (assuming some of the organisms are Neisseria/Spirochetes and Urine cultures) Asked by Kelle Farrens 1 year ago.

TSA is an Undefined media and will grow a large number of things. This is usually used for an overall evaluation of quantity present, not for differentiation. SBS is Brilliant Green Agar with Sulfapyridine. This is a differential media that will only grow Salmonella spp. (Gram negative rods) EMB is Eosin Methylene Blue Agar is used to grown coliforms (Gram negatives). In this media a pH indicator shows the reduction of peptone, helping to distinguish the different coliforms. MAC is MacConkey's Agar. This media will only grow Gram negative bacteria. Also included is a pH indicator allowing for the differentiation of S. areus. Enterococcal media is used to only grow Gram positive cocci. You can match up the organisms if you know a couple things about them: Nisseria spp. are Gram negative Spirochetes and Gram negative Answered by Domonique Pihl 1 year ago.

You stain specimens to show up different structures in them different proteins, starches, cellulose and fats in the cells absorb different dyes different ways. With the right dyes you can colour specific structures very effectively. Gram negative bacteria usually have an extra outside layer on the cell wall. Bacteria might also be classified as procaryote or eucaryote depending on whether they have a nucleus. Answered by Lavelle Gildersleeve 1 year ago.

complicated matter. lookup at bing and yahoo. this may help! Answered by Dulcie Gajeski 1 year ago.


Can anyone tell me about Linear Iga diseas,please?
My mother has a Linear Iga diseas for around 3 years. Kindly tell me about the causes of Linear Iga and the treatment of this wierd disease. We have tried many medications for her but it works temporary and the disease comes back again and again. I would be very thankful to you. Asked by Debra Fiorello 1 year ago.

A rare autoimmune skin condition characterized by blistered skin. The condition may occur after using certain drugs, following infection or there may be no apparent cause. It tends to occur in the non-reproductive years and most often affects the limbs, face or genital regions but may occur anywhere. The blisters may occur separately, in clusters or various other formations. Bullae do not need special care, as long they remain intact. Ruptured lesions and erosions should be covered with sterile dressings. Infected lesions may be treated with topical mupirocin and sterile dressing changes twice daily. •Consult a dermatologist. •Consult an ophthalmologist. Patients with linear IgA dermatosis can have changes, such as fine scarring, in the absence of ocular complaints. Therefore, most, if not all, patients once diagnosed should be seen by an ophthalmologist. Most cases have been reported to respond to dapsone or sulfapyridine. Some clinicians favor the use of sulfapyridine because of the lower incidence of adverse effects.9 However, some patients' conditions may not respond to sulfapyridine but do respond to treatment with dapsone. A response may be seen in 48-72 hours. Other reportedly useful medications include prednisone, sulfamethoxypyridazine, colchicine, dicloxacillin, mycophenolate mofetil, and intravenous immunoglobulin in a single patient with chronic renal failure. Leprostatic agents, these agents have been shown to be beneficial in the treatment of linear IgA dermatosis. Immunoglobulins, these agents are used to improve the clinical and immunologic aspects of the disease. They may decrease autoantibody production and increase solubilization and removal of immune complexes In your question you say that the treatments that your mom has received haven't done anything but clear up the condition for a short period of time. The following are possible alternatives to the diagnosis of Linear IgA. The other diseases for which Linear IgA dermatosis is listed as a possible alternative diagnosis in their lists include: Bullous Pemphigoid Pemphigus Vulgaris Stevens-Johnson Syndrome You can look up any information on these alternatives and on Linear IgA on the internet. There are tons of websites that might be able to help you and your mom figure out what is going on. Answered by Moshe Uhl 1 year ago.


I have been diagnosed with severe ulcerative colitis and also severe psoriasis. Is there any connection?
I never had any health problems before and just about two years ago I both the psoriasis and colitis seemed to have arrived together. I have been seeing a dermatologist for a while and he said psoriasis without hesitation. There is not a part on my body that is uneffected by the psoriasis. Just resently I had... Asked by Kandi Versage 1 year ago.

I never had any health problems before and just about two years ago I both the psoriasis and colitis seemed to have arrived together. I have been seeing a dermatologist for a while and he said psoriasis without hesitation. There is not a part on my body that is uneffected by the psoriasis. Just resently I had all the great colon tests (at 20 years old) and told i have severe ulcerative colitis. I seem to be the only person thinking there might be some kind of link between these two horrible/un-curable diseases. Any thoughts? Answered by Marline Epler 1 year ago.

Yes, there is a connection and is part of the extraintestinal complications of ulcerative colitis. There are several dermatological manifestations that can result from the drugs used to treat the condition or from the body's immune response. I don't know the specific etology of psoriasis, but here is a blurb from my online text about other skin conditions associated with UC. The most common skin manifestations of UC are complications of drug treatment. These include hyper-sensitivity, photosensitivity, and urticarial rashes related to sulfasalazine and less commonly to mesalamines. Patients receiving glucocorticoids often develop acne, which can be distressing cosmetically. Other common dermatologic manifestations associated with UC are erythema nodosum and pyoderma gangrenosum. Erythema nodosum occurs in 2% to 4% of patients with UC. Its activity typically parallels the activity of the underlying bowel disease. Erythema nodosum also may occur as a drug reaction to the sulfapyridine component of sulfasalazine. It classically presents as single or multiple tender, raised, erythematous nodules on the extensor surfaces of the lower extremities. If possible, the diagnosis should be made clinically without biopsy, because biopsy is associated with increased tendency to scar formation. Erythema nodosum usually responds to treatment of the UC. Severe or refractory cases may require systemic glucocorticoids or immunosuppressive therapy. Pyoderma gangrenosum is less frequent than erythema nodosum and occurs in 1% to 2% of patients. It is usually related to the activity of colitis but may present or persist despite inactive bowel disease. Lesions may be single or multiple and usually occur on the trunk or extremities but may develop on the face, breast, or sites of trauma, including stoma and intravenous sites.The classic lesion begins as erythematous pustules or nodules that break down, ulcerate, and coalesce into a larger, tender, burrowing ulcer with irregular, violaceous edges. Although the appearance can be dramatic, the ulcers are sterile. Histopathologically, pyoderma has the features of a sterile abscess with a marked neutrophilic infiltration. Pyoderma gangrenosum may resolve with treatment of the underlying colitis. Most cases usually respond to intra-lesional glucocorticoid injections or topical therapy with cromolyn sodium, mesalamine, glucocorticoids, or tacrolimus. More severe cases may require systemic glucocorticoids, immunosuppressants, such as cyclo-sporine, azathioprine, methotrexate, and tacrolimus, dapsone, or infliximab. Other less common skin manifestations associated with UC include Sweet's syndrome or acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, and pyodermite végétante Hallopeau. The latter has a similar presentation to pyoderma gangrenosum but also involves the mouth Answered by Ara Younkers 1 year ago.

the colitis could have brought the psoriasis out of dormancy, Answered by Jon Ayuso 1 year ago.

Sorry I did't toutch this page due to work with ball players, actually managing FIFA. But you can see real and I am managing PARKINSON. Please vivit my home page www.geocities.com/hideyukisato/ Answered by Gregory Petronzio 1 year ago.


Mysterious red bumps...?
Okay, so like a month ago i got this mysterious red bump (it's not really a bump but like a slightly raised area) on the side of my lower leg. It still hasn't gone away; I mean, it's lighter now like my skin color but somewhat shiny and darker and the bump is gone. Then, like a week ago, two other... Asked by Ludie Cleverley 1 year ago.

Okay, so like a month ago i got this mysterious red bump (it's not really a bump but like a slightly raised area) on the side of my lower leg. It still hasn't gone away; I mean, it's lighter now like my skin color but somewhat shiny and darker and the bump is gone. Then, like a week ago, two other small red bumps like the one before appeared on my legs (in different places tho) and they don't want to go away. It is very irritating to see them there. I have no clue what they could be. They don't itch or cause any physical discomfort. I know it can't be a ringworm because it's not clear in the middle and it's not in a ring shape. I would go to a dermatologist to find out what it could possibly be but I don't have the money for it. And I really don't want my parents to have to pay for it because of the hardships we're going through now. I would appreciate some true answers, possibly from doctors or dermatologists. Well, thanks for all the answers in advance! Answered by Shery Geraldo 1 year ago.

Mysterious Bumps On Skin Answered by Kennith Peppler 1 year ago.


Living with Crohn's Disease, Help?
Hello, my name is Tyler, i am 17 and i just got diagnosed with Crohn's Disease. Im reading all this stuff and all these studies conducted and im very scared. Stuff saying that i will die at age 63 and all this stuff. i dont have to much pain from crohns just alot of diarrhea and stomach pain, i am very sad... Asked by Emanuel Goldfeder 1 year ago.

Hello, my name is Tyler, i am 17 and i just got diagnosed with Crohn's Disease. Im reading all this stuff and all these studies conducted and im very scared. Stuff saying that i will die at age 63 and all this stuff. i dont have to much pain from crohns just alot of diarrhea and stomach pain, i am very sad listening to all this stuff. If you have crohns can you please tell me what i should eat or what should i avoid. Also, as a senior in High School alcohol consumption is a part of my life, i am responsible with it and love enjoying time with my friends over the weekends after a big win in football or something. With me diagnosed with Crohn's, i fear that i can no longer do any of this stuff and its kinda sucks. I really need to know if i should be worried or not. Also if i can have alcohol what kind or what should it be, beer vodka etc.. Answered by Ilona Batto 1 year ago.

the only thing that we calculate how long you will live is in cancers , so forget about the 63 thing , you will have to take your medications regularly as your doctor told you i think "5 ASA + sulfapyridine" and if failed you might go for corticosteroids , there is a list of food you should avoid like fatty food , alcohols , soda , especially during the relapse , you can play football and do all the activities you want , but its better for you to avoid alcohols and smoking as they would make your condition worse Answered by Kirby Gering 1 year ago.

They say if you have crohn's disease you need to stay away from gluten. Lately there have been many new food products introduced that are gluten free. Beer has gluten in it as well. Answered by Valeria Koprowski 1 year ago.

take probiotics, i promise it will help. do your research on it Answered by Maura Allsop 1 year ago.


Is Sulafasalazin good for Acne and skin disease?
My Doctor prescribe me Md_Sulfasalazin , I have Acne. Asked by Kimberely Chuyangher 1 year ago.

hm....silver sulfasalazine is so rarely used for acne...that's sort of weird. i'm assuming then you've tried alot of other acne medications and none of them worked? sulfasalazine is usually used now as an antibiotic cream that helps with rashes and also with some diagnostic procedures. yes it can be used in acne but there are stuff out there at are less messy and work just as well (and probably cheaper too) Answered by Dannielle Hartlep 1 year ago.

The link below might help. It says that it treats inflamation. It doesn't mention acne at all but acne is a type of inflamation, so it makes sense to take it for that. Answered by Ila Schwer 1 year ago.

Silver Sulfasalazine Answered by Leora Opyd 1 year ago.

the best way to prevent acne is to change your diet, aviod peanutbutter and anything thing that may contian peanuts. Eat a healthy vegetarian diet with lots of raw vegetables. Use aloe vera to heal acne scars.Avacadoes are also good for skin drink lots of water as well. Answered by Rebecka Cleven 1 year ago.

read tips on treating acne, skincare and home remedies to help you better on this site Answered by Merry Rushin 1 year ago.


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