SUBOXONE Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 020733/001.

Names and composition

"SUBOXONE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE and NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE.
It belongs to the class Opiate dependence treatments and is used in Opiate dependence (Poisoning and Drug Dependence)

Answered questions

Suboxone??
I ve benn on suboxone for almost 2 months 3 weeks ago i was raised up to 20 mg. Doing great on it had gotton a lil shakie thats why he my dr. raised it. Seems like for about that long 3 weeks or so i have these hard jumps as im falling asleep my body jumps so hard before i even know it which causes my heart to be... Asked by Birdie Cota 3 months ago.

I ve benn on suboxone for almost 2 months 3 weeks ago i was raised up to 20 mg. Doing great on it had gotton a lil shakie thats why he my dr. raised it. Seems like for about that long 3 weeks or so i have these hard jumps as im falling asleep my body jumps so hard before i even know it which causes my heart to be racing then causes me to fell panic?If it was happening before it must was not to bad that i didi not notice though before i ever started taking this med i did use to jump in my sleep but never like this its like ive left my skin behind it worries me as well as scares the **** out of me... THANKS SO MUCH! Answered by Lajuana Cave 3 months ago.

I take suboxone as well and have been on it for about 11 months. I used to take 16mg but have got down to about 2 1/2 or 3 mg now and am comfortable. It's weird how your brain seems to not want as much medicine. I started to get sick taking the same dose I was taking and went down and down because of that. My Dr. says "my brain is healing". I can relate to the jumpiness that I had especially when I was detoxing from oxycontin etc. It usually stops once you take suboxone and get your mg dose right, although everyone is different and you should give it about a month longer, I KNOW ITS HARD, when you can't sleep right because of the shakes and jumpiness, but once you get through that...which you will.. you simply feel content which is a feeling we addicted people wish for so much. Most people don't go higher then about 34 mg of suboxone and usually get to that within the first month, so if you feel sick at all or feel lethargic then perhaps you should lower your suboxone mg but if you feel ok and happy and are still getting the nightly shakes and jumpiness then maybe you should go up a little in the sub. I don't know what you were using and how much before you started sub so its hard for me to give you exact advice, although I do have a lot of experience in this department I believe that you will be fine. Just give it another 2 weeks and if you are still feeling the jumpiness then perhaps its something unrelated to drug use and the suboxone, like restless leg syndrome or something of that sort. Give it 2 more weeks and see if it subsides. I wish you all the best!! I think it will go away within 2 weeks if your dosage is correct. Answered by Tanner Shelling 3 months ago.

It sounds like you are doing the right thing. When your doctor is ready to start weaning you off of the Suboxone, see if he/she minds you doing a very gradual taper off the medicine. If you taper slow enough you can avoid withdrawal altogether. If you like tinkering with charts and stuff, you can use this taper charting tool to plot out a tapering schedule, and even show your doctor and see if your doc is okay with it. My readers say that tapering down to 1 or 2 mg daily isn't too hard but getting below 1mg sucks. So they take the part from 1mg to zero REALLY slow. Suboxone is strong stuff, a micro-dose is enough to kill withdrawal it just takes an hour or so. If someone were steady state at 16mg and was to start tapering down, my readers would probably say ask their doctor for permission to do taper like below (it will minimize withdrawal to almost nothing) otherwise your doc will probably take you cold-turkey from 1mg and it will suck after day 3. Most docs laugh about that and say 1mg isn't enough to feel withdrawal but 99% of my readers say 1mg is way too high to stop cold-turkey. Most doctors won't mind letting you taper slower, it is probably safer anyway. So say you were taking 16 mg for a few months and doc says time to taper down, my readers favorite taper for 16 mg takes at least one week per milligram on average... Normal Dose was around 16mg then.... Taper Week 1 = 14mg daily (1 3/4 of 8mg film) Taper Week 2 = 12mg daily (1 1/2 of 8mg film) Taper Week 3 & 4 = 8mg daily Taper Week 5 & 6 = 6mg daily (3/4 of 8mg film) Taper Week 7 & 8 = 4mg daily ( 1/2 of 8mg film) Taper Week 9 & 10 = 2mg daily (1/4 of 8mg film) Taper Week 11 & 12 = 1mg daily (1/8 of 8mg film) Taper Week 13 &-14 = .5mg daily (1/16 of 8mg film) Taper Week 15 & 16 = .25mg daily (1/32nd of 8mg film use razor or scissors) Taper Week 17 & 18 = .25mg daily every other day Taper Week 19 & 20 = .25mg daily every third day *some people still get withdrawal from .25 and they slice .125mg (1/64th of a 8mg Film, super hard to cut that small) but cold turkey from .25mg is usually low enough to avoid bad withdrawals. ** always give a dose at least 2 hours after taking before deciding if it worked or not especially very low doses. ** I am not a doctor, this is for entertainment purposes only! Answered by Kristan Scrogham 3 months ago.

There are certain things you can do to prevent withdrawal symptoms while not having to increase your suboxone dose. More information can be found on renaissancepn.com Answered by Francesco Mierzwiak 3 months ago.


Any experience with suboxone?
i take them cause i was addicted to pain pillls can anyone give me there experience with this pill? Asked by Fleta Keneipp 3 months ago.

About SUBOXONE SUBOXONE is the first opioid medication approved under DATA 2000 for the treatment of opioid dependence in an office-based setting. SUBOXONE also can be dispensed for take-home use, just as any other medicine for other medical conditions. The primary active ingredient in SUBOXONE is buprenorphine. Because buprenorphine is a partial opioid agonist, its opioid effects are limited compared with those produced by full opioid agonists, such as oxycodone or heroin. SUBOXONE also contains naloxone, an opioid antagonist. The naloxone in SUBOXONE is there to discourage people from dissolving the tablet and injecting it. When SUBOXONE is placed under the tongue, as directed, very little naloxone reaches the bloodstream, so what the patient feels are the effects of the buprenorphine. However, if naloxone is injected, it can cause that person to quickly go into withdrawal. SUBOXONE at the appropriate dose may be used to: Suppress symptoms of opioid withdrawal Decrease cravings for opioids Reduce illicit opioid use Block the effects of other opioids Help patients stay in treatment Answered by Salome Bartolotto 3 months ago.

Im on subs as well and have been for the past year or so. I started at one 8mg strip a day (half in morn. Half at night) and my opioid usage before was about 200mg oxy a day. Now im down to .5mg a day and after a few months ill be off completely. The best way is to taper slowly and jump off at the lowest dosage you can. Best of luck to you though! Answered by Wyatt Munning 3 months ago.


When should I stop taking Suboxone?
My husband is an ex addict, he had ended up getting high about two weeks ago and now he is taking suboxone, I would like to know how long he should take this for? He only got high one time so I feel that a week on suboxone is more than enough, and do you think it is harmful? or a good thing for him to take it... Asked by Glory Machain 3 months ago.

My husband is an ex addict, he had ended up getting high about two weeks ago and now he is taking suboxone, I would like to know how long he should take this for? He only got high one time so I feel that a week on suboxone is more than enough, and do you think it is harmful? or a good thing for him to take it whenever he feels the need? Answered by Delores Ashland 3 months ago.

Suboxone is more a long term treatment drug. It can be used short term, but the benefits are largely from longer term use. Why? Suboxone is Buprenorphine combined with Naloxone. The buprenorphine is an opiate/opioid just like codeine, hydrocodone, oxycodone, morphine, heroin, fentanyl, hydromorphone, and all the rest. It binds to our opiate receptors and 'fulfills' the need the brain is craving to put it simply. The Naloxone is an opiate 'blocker' -- the purpose of this is to keep people who are taking Suboxone from being able to get high. Theoretically if one uses another opiate while on suboxone they won't get the same or any effects from it.. it is a measure of prevention of abuse of other more harmful drugs to the body. So, suboxone is prescribed for addicts who can't just 'quit' or perhaps can't go through rehab and quit.. keep relapsing etc. The main benefit is they can take the one pill/film daily and feel 'normal' and get their lives in order without the withdrawals and cravings they have been going through while on other substances. The term 'clean' while taking suboxone is relative -- it is sort of like saying I am clean and on methadone treatment. I don't take away from anyone who is bettering themselves with suboxone -- it isn't the same 'high'/'euphoria' their drug of choice was and they have elected to take it. With this medication they can , again, get their lives in order and it is a fundamental step in the recovery process. Some people may stay on suboxone for years,.. some a few weeks. In my opinion it is more advisable for someone who is an I.V. user of drugs to stay ON the suboxone for a lengthy period of time and get support from AA/NA, therapy, and generally allow their brains to process living life out of the 'chase' of finding the next fix, high, etc. Learn to live normally. Later down the road they can begin to taper the suboxone if they truly want to be 'opiate free' and 100% clean of exogenous opiates. As for being harmful,.. well , that is relative. Harmful as in toxic -- no. Deadly, no. The only downside to suboxone is that it has a long half life,.. meaning when one attempts to withdraw from suboxone it can be quite difficult as the withdrawals can last longer than shorter acting opiates. It is a trade off. Further, people need to understand addiction is a disease, it isn't what you consume or necessarily how you consume it. And realize that while on suboxone they are clean in a sense, but technically not clean.. they are still taking an opiate drug thus the brain is not re-regulating the opiate receptors to normal levels. The key here is harm reduction. If someone is shooting up heroin, or other opiate drugs they are at risk of contracting Hepatitis, HIV, STD's, infection, collapsed veins, infection, and other deadly disease. Moving to a once daily , legal, Rx like suboxone takes all of that harm out of the equation. Further it takes the real risk of law enforcement catching up with someone out of the equation. Your husband needs to follow the doctors advice, and really needs to get tools to deal with addiction -- whether this is AA, NA, private therapy,.. etc it is up to him. But having the tools and mindset on how to live 'clean' takes time and practice. The suboxone can give him that opportunity to prepare himself. Take care, Answered by Arline Handel 3 months ago.

Suboxone is typically taken to help an addict stop taking opiates. It really wasn't intended to take every time you fall off the wagon, but to answer your question, it is really hard to answer it because there is no medical recommendation for using it the way you describe. I wrote an article about what your husband is essence doing, I like to call it, the "The Suboxone Roller-coaster Is Not Approved by the FDA", the link is in the "source" section below. :) But even though this practice is not doctor recommended I hear about it from my readers a lot. I would be concerned about precipitated withdrawal occurring based on literature, but in reality precipitated withdrawal appears to be less a risk than it is said to be, then again I doubt the manufacturer made it up just to scare people into not abusing Suboxone. I wish your husband the best and hope that he is able to break the cycle of addiction. He fell off the wagon, and it sounds like his doctor let's him take Suboxone on as needed basis if that happens, he has a pretty cool doctor. Again I'd make sure his doctor warned him about precipitated withdrawal, otherwise he seems to know what he is doing. Also, never take Suboxone after being on a long-lasting opioid like Methadone, it could result in a trip to the ER or worse. Answered by Hiedi Tiotuico 3 months ago.

Talk to your doctor about lowering the dose. It will have to restrict the withdrawal signs from going off Vicodin with out making you suppose excessive. And don't fear too much about getting off it. Sure, it's addictive but I found it rather easy to get off of. If you find yourself able to stop it your medical professional will taper you off it slowly so you won't suppose any agony. Don't attempt to stop it instantly in view that then you will go into withdrawal. Good success! Answered by Arnold Sciavillo 3 months ago.

I agree that you should consult with a physician who has a lot of experience treating opiate addiction, but many areas do not have access to physicians who can prescribe suboxone. Some doctors are now using telehealth, so it may be wise to look into sites such as renaissancepn.com Answered by Kaila Gault 3 months ago.

He has just moved from heroin to less harmful addictive drug. He will need a proper detox to get off Suboxone because he'll have withdrawals after he stops taking it. Answered by Gita Nono 3 months ago.

my doctor said after at least a year Answered by Odette Revak 3 months ago.

Whatever his doctor says is what he should follow Answered by Francoise Margison 3 months ago.


Question about suboxone?
I Have Been taking suboxone for a week and my girlfriend is getting mad cause i cant ejaculate no matter how hard i try i cant do it...she likes that i can last long but its a little too long and i wanna ejaculate...any advice Asked by Marlin Lovan 3 months ago.

It is a side effect in some people. And 1 sub is not quite "equal" to 50mgs of morphine. Although it is an opiate agonist, it acts in a different manner and contains low doses of naloxone (an opiate antagonist) intended to block euphoria. Low, that is, if taken sublingually. If swallowed, chewed, or injected, the amount of naloxone absorbed is much higher. So comparing an 8mg Suboxone to 50mg of morphine is like comparing tylenol and advil. They do the same job (both NSAID pain relievers) but are different chemicals that act slightly differently in the body. Furthermore, for any opiate addict 50mg of morphine is not much. For me, a 120mg capsule of morphine-sulfate might give me a slight buzz and/or a busting migraine, but the euphoria would be stronger off of a 40mg OxyContin. And 8mg Suboxone is nowhere near that potent. Compared to methadone one 8mg Suboxone should be taken for every 50mg of methadone you would take for the same dependence. Or so I heard from one doctor who prescribes Suboxone and used to prescribe methadone for recovering addicts. Answered by Karan Strous 3 months ago.

nothing you can do about it. its just a side effect of suboxone. it will go away when you get off the pills. i went through an out patient program when i decided to get off oxys and the suboxone was a wonder drug, but the clinic kept trying to squeeze every penny out of me, ( drug testing weekly, medication co-pay weekly, opiate dependent classes weekly which were 60 bux a week.) also, you can become dependent on suboxone and will go through withdrawl when you stop taking them. start cutting your dosage and you should be able to "finish the job". good luck buddy. Answered by Magda Boscarino 3 months ago.

You mean it didn't get you high, or it didn't keep away the withdrawals ? Lol Answered by Fumiko Chhun 3 months ago.


When is a easy time to quit suboxone?
My husband has been doing suboxone for 4 yrs now and is now being monitored by the doctor. So now he takes 8mgs everyday. Does this stuff also affect your behaviour? sex drive? has anyone quit, what is the best way?????????? Asked by Carylon Clagon 3 months ago.

Suboxone is used as an alternative to whatever he was addicted to as you know. Most peoples lives are wrecked by their addiction. You take suboxone for a while until you get your life straight and your mind in the right place. Once you are ready to quit, tell your doctor. Remember, suboxone is an opiate so he is still addicted. There is no painless way to detox from opiates but its a good thing he sees a doctor because he can make it as ainless as possible, which he should because it cost so much money to see those doctors. The doctor will start a taper process. I started taking two 8mg strips or pills a day. Once I started the taper I was taking 6mg a day for a month (2mg strips). Then i went to 4mg a for a month, and then down to 2mg for a month. The tapering is very important and a little difficult but if your really ready to quit then it wont be that bad. Once, you are down to as little of a dose as possible, you will get sick for about a week. Its not as bad as going through your typical withdrawal because you were taking a very low dose. It will be like having the flu for a week, and nothing worse. I took a week of work. There are other drugs beside suboxone (nothing as good as suboxone) that your doctor will give you(some old school stuff). He gives you a cocktail of those, muscle relaxers and sleeping pills. You pretty much sleep it off. Its not bad at all. I was taking 300mg of norcos (vicodin) a day for years and I took suboxone for 5 months and quit. The doctor makes a lot of money from prescribing suboxone so he will keep giving you them unless you tell him it time to for yourself to quit (most of the time). After all that, you will feel fine. Then its all mental but if your really ready, its not bad. The whole reason I didnt want to quit was because of the physical pain I knew I was going to be in. Most doctors want you to also go to rehab or out-patient programs but youve probably spent enough money like i did. A good rehab place will cost a years salary for a month. They have NA or AA meetings you can go to, but I found most of them to be extremely religious but there is good support there. I found my support through my dog. I was kind of bad to him while I was using so that was my main motivation to get better. As long as your motivated, you wont need all that extra crap. You spend a lot of money at that doctor, I would expect, so you should expect a lot from it. So the easiest time to quit is when your head and your life is in he right place and you have motivation to quit. Suboxone made me happy and always in a good mood while I took it and I had no sex drive what so ever. Good Luck. Theres nothing to fear since you have a doctors help. I never needed anything but my doctors help. Answered by Brenton Meucci 3 months ago.

It's the equal energetic component in each (buprenorphine) and within the distinct equal strengths (2mg & 8mg) so the withdrawal goes to be the equal regardless. The naloxone in Suboxone serves no intent rather then the incorrect information that's unfold approximately it that scares humans into doing bizarre **** with it. Answered by Hilary Bisagna 3 months ago.

The best way is to undergo detox and stop using Suboxone. In case that he doesn't feel comfortable not using anything and being afraid to slip, he could use Naltrexone as it's not addictive and prevents relapse. Answered by Johnnie Jenkens 3 months ago.


Withdrawals from suboxone?
I am currently getting off suboxone and going through some withdrawals, they havent reached the unbearable symptoms yet but I know its coming in the next day or so....does anyone know ANY way at all to ease the symptoms...like the restless legs...ect...ANY advice would be helpful at this point!! Also if you have... Asked by Sheryll Vandresar 3 months ago.

I am currently getting off suboxone and going through some withdrawals, they havent reached the unbearable symptoms yet but I know its coming in the next day or so....does anyone know ANY way at all to ease the symptoms...like the restless legs...ect...ANY advice would be helpful at this point!! Also if you have ever gone through this, how long did it last and when was your worst part? Thanks in advance! Answered by Zina Ladika 3 months ago.

Suboxone was originally designed to be used anywhere from three months to a maximum of six months to help a person withdraw from opiate addiction. Sadly it has been abused by both doctors and patients alike, and there are people out there who have been on Suboxone for years. It was also designed to be gradually lower the dose towards the end and not stop taking it cold turkey when you are taking a maximum dose. So, depending on how long you have been taking it and at what dose level you were at when you stopped, withdrawal may be more of less difficult - but it should not be terribly tough to get through. EFT (Emotional Freedom Technique) and/or Yoga can help you relax. So can listening to soft, soothing music. No rap (rythmes with crap), hip hop, acid rock, etc. They just make you more hyper and they will remind you of drug use. Frequent baths will help wash off the night sweats one may experience and give a better sense of cleanliness and well being. At some point you should consider cleanses and detoxes on a regular basis, as well as periodic fasting, to help get any drugs, street or prescribed, out of your system. Otherwise, minute amounts may remain and trigger continued cravings for quite some time. A weekly fasting day where nothing but one of the following items is consumed (as much as you want, but nothing else) will help: watermelon, dark grapes (seeds and all), juiced vegetables, water. That is also a good idea for people looking to reach and maintain their optimum weight. Sugar must absolutely be avoided to the greatest degree possible, as should bleached white flour, processed foods and junk foods - all of which feed addiction and retard recovery. Avoid alcohol. It lowers inhibitions and brings on cravings that may lead back to drug use. A high protein, nutrient rich diet that emphasizes raw foods is best. Make sure there are plenty of omega 3's and essential fatty acids. Dark green leafy vegetables, such as baby spinach, are great. I would also add some good supergreen food protein drinks containing such items as spirulina, chlorella, wheatgrass, barley grass and more. Here are some supplement suggestions: Vitamin B complex (100 mg of each major B vitamin) plus extra pantothenic acid (Vitamin B5 500 mg three times daily) and Vitamin B3 in the form of Niacinamide (500 mg 3 times daily and do not substitute niacin for the niacinamide). Those will help reduce stress and help with proper brain function (and the way drugs work is primarily through tricking the brain and neurotransmitter interference). Essential fatty acids, as directed on the label, are good for reversing the effects of malnourishment, which is common in opiate addiction as well as other substance abuse victims. Calcium and magnesium (use 15oo mg along with 1000 mg of magnesium at bedtime). These two essentials nourish the central nervous system and help calm the body to control tremors that often accompany opiate addiction. L-glutamine (500 mg 3 times daily) passes the blood-brain barrier to promote healthy mental function and increases the level of gamma-aminobutryic acid (GABA), which has a calming effect. GABA, as directed on label. Glutathione, as directed on label. Aids in detoxing and reduces cravings for drugs and alcohol. L-phenylalanine (1500 mg daily upon awakening). Necessary as a brain food and helps with withdrawal symptoms. Caution: Not to be taken when someone is pregnant (unlikely in his case - lol), nursing (ditto), or suffer from panic attack, diabetes or high blood pressure. S-Adenosylmethionine (SAMe), as directed on label. Aids in stress relief and depression, eases pain, and has an antioxidant effect that can improve liver health. Caution: Do not use if there is a manic-depressive disorder OR if taking prescription antidepressants. Vitamin C with bioflavonoids (up to 2000 mg every 3 hours). Detoxes the system and lessens drug cravings. Use a buffered form such as sodium ascorbate and cut back on the dosage if diarrhea occurs. Zinc, as directed on label but not to exceed 100 mg daily from all supplement sources. Promotes a healthy immune system and protects the liver. Iodine (up to 100 mg daily). Helps restore thyroid function, which is often affected by opiate users. Take with selenium (as directed on label) for maximum effectiveness. Valerian root has a calming effect (it was given to the citizens of London during the bombings in WWII) Chamomile tea is also calming as is aromotherapy which uses oils from plants that contain the compound linolool (for example, lavender, mint, coriander, bergamot, lemon, mango). I hope that helps! Answered by Terese Stammler 3 months ago.

It is really best if you could get a doctors advice on tapering and detoxing with the Suboxone. You cannot take Suboxone within 24 hours of using any opiate (herion) or you will put yourself into a very bad withdrawal. Suboxone is a drug that requires a special license for even doctors to prescribe because it is not a benign drug. You will have withdrawal from Suboxone if you do not follow a regime for taking it. See if you can speak with an addictionologist on how to take it safely. Better to be safe than sorry. Answered by Joane Gittins 3 months ago.

Did you already slowly, slowly cut down the amount that you were consuming? Like going from a full pill to half to a quarter and then even to breaking the quarter into smaller pieces? Because by doing that you will really reduce your withdrawal symptoms a lot. Answered by Jesse Wahoske 3 months ago.

its all bullshit for pharm companies to make money..believe me they know what these drugs do..its unfortunate but you have to suffer to get better..and you can its all inside you..addiction has a simple answer.do you want to live or die....26 people i know have died from addiction.and im not even 44 yet..good luck to you all you can do it.... Answered by Joycelyn Felson 3 months ago.


Questions about Suboxone?
Does suboxone make you happy like an antidepressant?Did you ever talk to your doctor about taking suboxone as a maintenance med for the rest of your life?Do you think you could stop using suboxone eventually?How much does it cost you with your insurance for a 30 day supply 8mg? Without insurance? Is... Asked by Nicholle Aites 3 months ago.

Does suboxone make you happy like an antidepressant? Did you ever talk to your doctor about taking suboxone as a maintenance med for the rest of your life? Do you think you could stop using suboxone eventually? How much does it cost you with your insurance for a 30 day supply 8mg? Without insurance? Is it possible for your body to not feel the buprenorphine after a while? Any details you can provide will really help me, i'd really like to know how many other people are going through the same situation as me Answered by Charmain Augustyn 3 months ago.

1. Suboxone does make you feel good/normal. Not high. 2. I plan on stepping down the subs eventually. 3. Absolutely. I have been on it for about 4 months. I was on 3 daily and I am now down to 2. I haven't told my doctor I have stepped down, just in-case he starts prescribing 2. I can actually skip a few days of going back to the doc this way, and I have the extra just in-case I need them. 4. I have Blue Cross Blue Shield insurance. The meds are about $120 monthly w/insurance and about $670 w/o. From my experience most doctors that prescribe this med do not accept insurance. My visits started at $500 1st month, $400 for the next 3 months and $300 now. I can visit him weekly if I can't afford the full month. 5. I am not sure. I don't really feel different with subs. I take one as soon as I start to feel bad from withdrawal and in just a few minutes I am normal. I don't feel high or bad. It is great. - Just to let you know, I am 24. I used opiates for around 10 years. That was hard for me to believe when I started to think about it. I started on Tylox, Lortab. Lorcet, Percocet, etc... and for about the past 5 years before starting the Subs I was using strictly Methadone since nothing else had any effect anymore. I actually found Suboxone from a dealer one day. I had read about Suboxone for a while, and since the dealer didn't have my usual Methadone, I decided to try it... I didn't like it at first because it didn't get me high, although it did stop my withdrawal. I just wasn't ready to quit at the time. I finally decided to stop when everything started to catch up with me... The closest people around me began to question what I was doing and catch me in lies. The person I am dating found out I had stolen from them and that devastated each of us. I didn't think about it when I did it but it is one of the worst thing I have ever done to someone, and I regret it emmencly. Although, if that hadn't happened I probably wouldn't be where I am today, so, I take it for what it is. I am so glad I decided to start the program, and I wish you the best of luck with whatever you decide to do! Answered by Domitila Huey 3 months ago.

www.suboxone.com/patients/suboxone/ I don't know the answer to your question, but this might help. Sorry. It was the most informative thing I could find. :( Answered by Maude Sullenberger 3 months ago.


Question about Suboxone?
Can anyone explain (in simple terms please) how suboxone works exactly? My friend is getting out of detox tomorrow and is being put on that... I've read about it on wikipedia and google, but a lot of the terminology is medical and confusing. help please? Asked by Stephany Tumlison 3 months ago.

Suboxone is an unbelievably effective drug!! I have been on suboxone therapy for a year and a 1/2 and my life has never been better. It is a combination of drugs called buprenorphine and naloxone. The buprenorphine is the narcotic part and the naloxone is the "insurance". Naloxone is there to make sure that the drug is not snorted or injected because it will throw the patient into withdrawal. Buprenorphine is a strong narcotic used in Europe for chronic pain but it does not attach to the opioid receptors(one's for euphoria) that well which means less euphoria if any. The brain will be satisfied with this as a replacement for the narcotic drugs it has been receiving through addiction. In addition to that, anytime a patient would take another type of narcotic like heroin or oxycontin the effects would not be felt. It also has a "plateau" unlike these other narcotics which keeps the drug's effects on a level plain instead of spiking and dropping. Some will argue that this is just trading one narcotic addiction for another but it's trading a dangerous drug seeking lifestyle for a successful happy life. You no longer worry about when you will be able to take your next pill, you take your dose in the morning and go on living. Tell your friend that you're proud of him or her and that if they committ themselves to being drug free, suboxone will work miracles. Good luck and God bless. Answered by Kori Afshar 3 months ago.


Whats the best way to flush my system of suboxone?
Asked by Andres Fleischner 3 months ago.

Suboxone is a drug that you have to wean yourself off, otherwise you will go through terrible withdrawal. You can't just stop taking this drug. If you only took it once to see what it was like and now want to avoid the consequences of a random drug test, then the ONLY thing you can do is drink a lot of water to flush it out. Keep drinking as much as you can until you feel that you'vee peed enough. EDIT I have all the information you need on Suboxone if you would like to know. Just ask. EDIT Larry, Suboxone is the latest drug of choice for drug addicts. Many people become addicted to pain meds but it isn't their fault. The doctors give them the meds because they are in serious pain. So Suboxone is used not only for an addict, but for chronic pain. It is given because it has an ingredient called Naloxone. This Naloxone is the most important ingredient because in prevents the patient from becoming dependent on it. Naloxone blocks the receptors in the brain from "wanting More" so to speak. Addicts are given this because although it will satisfy their desires, when they are weaned off properly, there won't be any side effects. This treatment is much better than using the old Methadone treatment. Hope that answers your question. Answered by Robbyn Hailstone 3 months ago.

I hate to ask, but what the hell is that? The newest agent of bodily destruction foisted on the unsuspecting public? Eat a balanced diet with plenty of variety and you will do fine. Don't worry about the crap the supplement people are always trying to sell you. Answered by Leta Serb 3 months ago.

Suboxone does not show up on a standard 5 panel drug test. Answered by Jerri Fant 3 months ago.

um you're not suppose to take that stuff unless you're withdrawing from heroin. Answered by Juliane Cappetta 3 months ago.


How long does suboxone block opiates?
ive been on suboxone for a year and im stopping usage and i know that suboxone has a half life of 72 hours...does that mean that after 72 hours it no longer blocks opiates? Asked by Willis Jeff 3 months ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: how long does suboxone block opiates? ive been on suboxone for a year and im stopping usage and i know that suboxone has a half life of 72 hours...does that mean that after 72 hours it no longer blocks opiates? Answered by Dante Lozada 3 months ago.

Simplest answer is when you genuinely start feeling physically uncomfortable, or when you really feel w/ds starting. The worst you'll do, as you may know, is waste whatever opiate you take since buprenorphine holds on so damn tight to your receptors. (I hope you know it's the other way around..not what the previous answer stated& that taking sub too soon after opiates is what will throw you into precipitated wds.) Answered by John Daddio 3 months ago.

How Long Does Suboxone Last Answered by Carson Tubby 3 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020733/001 SUBOXONE BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE; NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL EQ 2MG BASE and EQ 0.5MG BASE **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020733/002 SUBOXONE BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE; NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL EQ 8MG BASE and EQ 2MG BASE
022410/001 SUBOXONE BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE; NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE FILM/BUCCAL, SUBLINGUAL EQ 2MG BASE and EQ 0.5MG BASE
022410/002 SUBOXONE BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE; NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE FILM/BUCCAL, SUBLINGUAL EQ 8MG BASE and EQ 2MG BASE
022410/003 SUBOXONE BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE; NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE FILM/BUCCAL, SUBLINGUAL EQ 4MG BASE and EQ 1MG BASE
022410/004 SUBOXONE BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE; NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE FILM/BUCCAL, SUBLINGUAL EQ 12MG BASE and EQ 3MG BASE

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020733/001 SUBOXONE BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE; NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL EQ 2MG BASE and EQ 0.5MG BASE **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020733/002 SUBOXONE BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE; NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL EQ 8MG BASE and EQ 2MG BASE
022410/001 SUBOXONE BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE; NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE FILM/BUCCAL, SUBLINGUAL EQ 2MG BASE and EQ 0.5MG BASE
022410/002 SUBOXONE BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE; NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE FILM/BUCCAL, SUBLINGUAL EQ 8MG BASE and EQ 2MG BASE
022410/003 SUBOXONE BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE; NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE FILM/BUCCAL, SUBLINGUAL EQ 4MG BASE and EQ 1MG BASE
022410/004 SUBOXONE BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE; NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE FILM/BUCCAL, SUBLINGUAL EQ 12MG BASE and EQ 3MG BASE
091149/001 BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE AND NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE; NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL EQ 2MG BASE and EQ 0.5MG BASE
091149/002 BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE AND NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE; NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL EQ 8MG BASE and EQ 2MG BASE
091422/001 BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE AND NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE; NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL EQ 2MG BASE and EQ 0.5MG BASE
091422/002 BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE AND NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE; NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL EQ 8MG BASE and EQ 2MG BASE
201633/001 BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE AND NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE; NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL EQ 2MG BASE and EQ 0.5MG BASE
201633/002 BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE AND NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE; NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL EQ 8MG BASE and EQ 2MG BASE
203136/001 BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE AND NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE; NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL EQ 2MG BASE and EQ 0.5MG BASE
203136/002 BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE AND NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE; NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL EQ 8MG BASE and EQ 2MG BASE
203326/001 BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE AND NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE; NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL EQ 2MG BASE and EQ 0.5MG BASE
203326/002 BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE AND NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE; NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL EQ 8MG BASE and EQ 2MG BASE
204242/001 ZUBSOLV BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE; NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL EQ 1.4MG BASE and EQ 0.36MG BASE
204242/002 ZUBSOLV BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE; NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL EQ 5.7MG BASE and EQ 1.4MG BASE
204242/003 ZUBSOLV BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE; NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL EQ 8.6MG BASE and EQ 2.1MG BASE
204242/004 ZUBSOLV BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE; NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL EQ 11.4MG BASE and EQ 2.9MG BASE
204242/005 ZUBSOLV BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE; NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL EQ 2.9MG BASE and EQ 0.71MG BASE
204242/006 ZUBSOLV BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE; NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL EQ 0.7MG BASE and EQ 0.18MG BASE
204431/001 BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE AND NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE; NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL EQ 2MG BASE and EQ 0.5MG BASE
204431/002 BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE AND NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE; NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL EQ 8MG BASE and EQ 2MG BASE
205022/001 BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE AND NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE; NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL EQ 2MG BASE and EQ 0.5MG BASE
205022/002 BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE AND NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE; NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL EQ 8MG BASE and EQ 2MG BASE
205637/001 BUNAVAIL BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE; NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE FILM/BUCCAL EQ 2.1MG BASE and EQ 0.3MG BASE
205637/002 BUNAVAIL BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE; NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE FILM/BUCCAL EQ 4.2MG BASE and EQ 0.7MG BASE
205637/003 BUNAVAIL BUPRENORPHINE HYDROCHLORIDE; NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE FILM/BUCCAL EQ 6.3MG BASE and EQ 1MG BASE

Manufacturers

Manufacturer name
Indivior UK Limited

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