Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 010348/001.

Names and composition

"SPARINE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of PROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
010348/001 SPARINE PROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
010348/002 SPARINE PROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
010348/003 SPARINE PROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
010348/004 SPARINE PROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
010348/006 SPARINE PROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
010349/006 SPARINE PROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
010349/008 SPARINE PROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 25MG per ML
010942/001 SPARINE PROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CONCENTRATE/ORAL 30MG per ML
010942/003 SPARINE PROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE SYRUP/ORAL 10MG per 5ML
010942/004 SPARINE PROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CONCENTRATE/ORAL 100MG per ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
010348/001 SPARINE PROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
010348/002 SPARINE PROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
010348/003 SPARINE PROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
010348/004 SPARINE PROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
010348/006 SPARINE PROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
010349/006 SPARINE PROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
010349/008 SPARINE PROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 25MG per ML
010942/001 SPARINE PROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CONCENTRATE/ORAL 30MG per ML
010942/003 SPARINE PROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE SYRUP/ORAL 10MG per 5ML
010942/004 SPARINE PROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE CONCENTRATE/ORAL 100MG per ML
084510/001 PROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE PROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 25MG per ML
084517/001 PROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE PROMAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML

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Answered questions

Does anybody have experiences with the medication promazine/sparine? I'm interested to know about weight gain?
Asked by Ina Lettieri 2 years ago.

You're interested to know about weight gain? As though you don't have enough problems, you want to be fat too? Answered by Fatimah Muyskens 2 years ago.


I have a b/p of 86/50, hr is 58, resp are 16, and I have lost 5 lbs. Which do I report to the physician?
Homework question for pharmacology and I cannot find Sparine in my drug book. The above question is for someone admitted to the hospital and is taking Sparine (promazine). Asked by Clark Goeser 2 years ago.

Promazine is used for schizophrenia and other behavioral problems. I would say the weight loss would be siginfigant. The bp is slightly low, but ok and resp are ok. Pulse is a little low. 60-100 is normal in adults. Hope this helps. Answered by Tresa Spisak 2 years ago.

Why is the sparine being taken? Nausea and vomiting? What time frame for the 5 lb. weight loss? The BP is low, are you athletic? Is the BP a vagal response to vomiting? The heart rate is mildly low, but again, this may be normal for you. Are you using the sparine for mental distubances? Sparine is a phenothiazine derivitive used for nausea, makes the effects of pain meds stronger, and as a short term antipsychotic. The significant things you mentioned would be the BP and the weight loss. Answered by Malia Jesiolowski 2 years ago.

The blood pressure and pulse are both low. A lot of anti depressants anti psychotics cause orthostatic hypotension which is low b/p and pulse with a sudden change in body position. It can happen if you stand up too fast, people have experienced it on carnival rides. It is a side effect of the drug and not necessarily a problem if you understand why it is happening and how to avoid it. Call your pharmacist and ask him or her about your symptoms and if they normal with this drug. Contact your MD with this and and further unsettling symptoms. Answered by Kesha Terhorst 2 years ago.

i would most likely report the blood pressure, it seems extremely low Answered by Rosy Krzemien 2 years ago.

All of the above. Answered by Ricarda Wirkkala 2 years ago.


If you take antibiotics and you get a real bad headache from it would you stop?
The medicine is call Erythromycin base 500 Asked by Chiquita Gorbet 2 years ago.

Side Effects of This Medicine: Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur: Fever; headache, nausea; skin rash, redness, or itching; stomach pain (severe); unusual tiredness or weakness; vomiting; yellow eyes or skin-with erythromycin estolate (rare with other erythromycins) Pain, swelling, or redness at place of injection Fainting (repeated); irregular or slow heartbeat; loss of hearing (temporary) Other medicines—Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking or receiving erythromycins, it is especially important that your health care professional know if you are taking any of the following: Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Amiodarone (e.g., Cordarone) or Anabolic steroids (nandrolone [e.g., Anabolin], oxandrolone [e.g., Anavar], oxymetholone [e.g., Anadrol], stanozolol [e.g., Winstrol]) or Androgens (male hormones) or Antithyroid agents (medicine for overactive thyroid) or Carmustine (e.g., BiCNU) or Chloroquine (e.g., Aralen) or Dantrolene (e.g., Dantrium) or Daunorubicin (e.g., Cerubidine) or Disulfiram (e.g., Antabuse) or Divalproex (e.g., Depakote) or Estrogens (female hormones) or Etretinate (e.g., Tegison) or Gold salts (medicine for arthritis) or Hydroxychloroquine (e.g., Plaquenil) or Mercaptopurine (e.g., Purinethol) or Methotrexate (e.g., Mexate) or Methyldopa (e.g., Aldomet) or Naltrexone (e.g., Trexan) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Oral contraceptives (birth control pills) containing estrogen or Other anti-infectives by mouth or by injection (medicine for infection) or Phenothiazines (acetophenazine [e.g., Tindal], chlorpromazine [e.g., Thorazine], fluphenazine [e.g., Prolixin], mesoridazine [e.g., Serentil], perphenazine [e.g., Trilafon], prochlorperazine [e.g., Compazine], promazine [e.g., Sparine], promethazine [e.g., Phenergan], thioridazine [e.g., Mellaril], trifluoperazine [e.g., Stelazine], triflupromazine [e.g., Vesprin], trimeprazine [e.g., Temaril]) or Phenytoin (e.g., Dilantin) or Plicamycin (e.g., Mithracin) or Valproic acid (e.g., Depakene)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins, especially erythromycin estolate, may increase the chance of liver problems Aminophylline (e.g., Somophyllin) or Caffeine (e.g., NoDoz) or Oxtriphylline (e.g., Choledyl) or Theophylline (e.g., Somophyllin-T, Theo-Dur)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the chance of side effects from aminophylline, caffeine, oxtriphylline, or theophylline Astemizole (e.g., Hismanal) or Terfenadine (e.g., Seldane)—Use of astemizole or terfenadine with erythromycins may cause heart problems, such as an irregular heartbeat; these medicines should not be used together Carbamazepine (e.g., Tegretol)—Use of carbamazepine with erythromycin may increase the side effects of carbamazepine or increase the chance of liver problems Chloramphenicol (e.g., Chloromycetin) or Clindamycin (e.g., Cleocin) or Lincomycin (e.g., Lincocin)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may decrease the effectiveness of these other antibiotics Cyclosporine (e.g., Sandimmune) or Warfarin (e.g., Coumadin)—Use of any of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the side effects of these medicines Other medical problems—The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of erythromycins. Answered by Twanda Seumanu 2 years ago.

I'd page my doctor right away to ask if the headache is actually related to the medication and not something happening by chance. Only your doctor can advise you whether you should take a medication or not--remember also to tell the doctor the names of the other medications you're on to make sure there's not an interaction. Answered by Vicente Bilbao 2 years ago.

It is not likely that the antibiotic is giving you the headache. You have to finish your antibiotics, as long as you don't have a life threatening reaction. Take some Tylenol for your head. If it is really bothering you, you should ask your parents, anyway. Answered by Ermelinda Herling 2 years ago.

in case you get a headache because of the fact of taking the medicine and as you think of you're clearing up now, you are able to desire to not proceed taking the medicine. Drink countless comfortable beverages, shop hydrated to have sufficient kidney filtration. Answered by Vincenza Scalzo 2 years ago.

Headaches aren't a side effect to this drug (in a general sense). Don't stop taking it unless the prescribing doctor says so. Answered by Ivonne Quinteros 2 years ago.


How much urine is needed to do an extensive lab test break down of opiates?
I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up that it was only... Asked by Ailene Lickey 2 years ago.

I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up that it was only cough syrup. Also, what and how does it get broken down? What illicits drugs can they break down? Answered by Dong Stalls 2 years ago.

Any toxicology lab will be able to detect the "broken down" metabolites of any substance they want to find: If cough syrup is all your worried about then tell "them" exactly what you took and they can tell if it's the same compounds or not using GC/MS (gas chromotography/mass spec) Drug Profile, Urine (Nine Drugs), Immunoassay With GC/MS Confirmation Synonyms: IA-9 Test Includes: Amphetamines; barbiturates; benzodiazepines; cannabinoids (marijuana); cocaine; methadone (Dolophine®); opiates (codeine, morphine only); phencyclidine (PCP); propoxyphene Specimen: Urine (random) Volume: 45 mL (about 4 tablespoons) Container: Use plastic urine drug bottle and evidence tape or tamper-evident container for forensic specimen. Collection kits are available by request from the laboratory. GC/MS confirmation Methodology: Initial test by immunoassay; confirmation of positives by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) ---------------------- For a typical drug screen usually 20 mL of urine should be enough for additional drug testing. (per LabCorp.com) If a compound wants to be detected, it can be found using the instrumentation available in most toxicology labs. •Volatiles: acetone; ethanol; isopropanol; methanol •*Amphetamines: amphetamine (Dexedrine®), ephedrine/pseudoephedrine; methamphetamine (Desoxyn®); phenmetrazine (Preludin®); phentermine (Ionamin®); phenylpropanolamine •*Antidepressants: amitriptyline (Elavil®); desipramine (Norpramin®); doxepin (Adapin®, Sinequan®); imipramine (Tofranil®); nortriptyline (Pamelor®) •*Barbiturates: amobarbital (Amytal®); butabarbital (Butisol Sodium®); pentobarbital (Nembutal®); phenobarbital (Luminal®); secobarbital (Seconal®) •*Benzodiazepines: chlordiazepoxide (Librium®); diazepam (Valium®) •*Opiates: codeine; morphine •*Phenothiazines: chlorpromazine (Thorazine®); promazine (Sparine®); thioridazine (Mellaril®) •Others: acetaminophen (Tylenol®, Datril®); caffeine; carbamazepine (Tegretol®); cimetidine (Tagamet®); cocaine and/or metabolite; diphenhydramine (Benadryl®); ethchlorvynol (Placidyl®); glutethimide (Doriden®); meperidine (Demerol®); meprobamate (Miltown®, Equanil); methadone (Dolophine®); nicotine; pentazocine (Talwin®); phencyclidine (PCP); propoxyphene (Darvon®) or its metabolite norpropoxyphene; quinine/quinidine *Reported as a class if negative. Listed drugs reported if positive. Urine testing shows drug use over the last 2 or 3 days for amphetamines, cocaine, and opiates. Marijuana and its metabolites, cannabinoids, may be detectable for several weeks. Hair samples, which test the root end of the hair, reflect drug use within the last 2 to 3 months but not the most recent 2-3 weeks - the amount of time it takes for the hair to grow. Saliva detects which drugs have been used in the last 24 hours. Samples of sweat may be collected on an absorbent patch worn for several days to weeks and therefore can indicate drug use at any point during that extended period of time. These other types of samples are often used for specific purposes. For instance, hair samples may be used as an alternative to urine testing for employment or accident drug testing. Sweat testing may be used as a court-ordered monitoring tool in those who have been convicted of drug use, while saliva is often used by the insurance industry to test insurance applicants for drug use. Answered by Magdalen Opdahl 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: How much urine is needed to do an extensive lab test break down of opiates? I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up... Answered by Yong Karban 2 years ago.

It is possible he will fail the lab test. The home tests are not the same and aren't as good as the lab tests. There is a bit of misinformation out there and that is cocaine is out of your system in 2-3 days. Well while that might be true LABS DON'T TEST FOR THE DRUG ITSELF. Yes, that is true, they look for the metabolite. A metabolite is something that the body produces when it ingests something, in the case of cocaine it is "benzoylecgonine" that will stay around long after the drug is gone, up to 30 days for a frequent user. THE DRUG ITSELF can stay in your bloodstream up to 72 hours. It can stay in your urine for about 1 or up to 3 days after single use. Habitual or chronic use can be detected in urine for up to 12 weeks depending on quantity, duration, and frequency of use. Answered by Adelina Morganson 2 years ago.

Who is "they"? Are you on probation or parole and court-ordered to submit to drug testing? Is this a pre-employment or random employment drug testing in accordance with your company's policies? If not, then no one can drug test you without your consent. Whatever you do, don't use synthetic urine. I used it once and it came back positive for THC. Answered by Winter Marci 2 years ago.


Does anybody have experiences with the medication promazine/sparine? I'm interested to know about weight gain?
Asked by Larue Bighorse 2 years ago.

You're interested to know about weight gain? As though you don't have enough problems, you want to be fat too? Answered by Nicolasa Lukin 2 years ago.


I have a b/p of 86/50, hr is 58, resp are 16, and I have lost 5 lbs. Which do I report to the physician?
Homework question for pharmacology and I cannot find Sparine in my drug book. The above question is for someone admitted to the hospital and is taking Sparine (promazine). Asked by Domenic Lakhan 2 years ago.

Promazine is used for schizophrenia and other behavioral problems. I would say the weight loss would be siginfigant. The bp is slightly low, but ok and resp are ok. Pulse is a little low. 60-100 is normal in adults. Hope this helps. Answered by Ernesto Quimet 2 years ago.

Why is the sparine being taken? Nausea and vomiting? What time frame for the 5 lb. weight loss? The BP is low, are you athletic? Is the BP a vagal response to vomiting? The heart rate is mildly low, but again, this may be normal for you. Are you using the sparine for mental distubances? Sparine is a phenothiazine derivitive used for nausea, makes the effects of pain meds stronger, and as a short term antipsychotic. The significant things you mentioned would be the BP and the weight loss. Answered by Loma Muncie 2 years ago.

The blood pressure and pulse are both low. A lot of anti depressants anti psychotics cause orthostatic hypotension which is low b/p and pulse with a sudden change in body position. It can happen if you stand up too fast, people have experienced it on carnival rides. It is a side effect of the drug and not necessarily a problem if you understand why it is happening and how to avoid it. Call your pharmacist and ask him or her about your symptoms and if they normal with this drug. Contact your MD with this and and further unsettling symptoms. Answered by Pearlene Kaliszewski 2 years ago.

i would most likely report the blood pressure, it seems extremely low Answered by Sonia Rosenblum 2 years ago.

All of the above. Answered by Janean Jaegers 2 years ago.


If you take antibiotics and you get a real bad headache from it would you stop?
The medicine is call Erythromycin base 500 Asked by Blaine Keefauver 2 years ago.

Side Effects of This Medicine: Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur: Fever; headache, nausea; skin rash, redness, or itching; stomach pain (severe); unusual tiredness or weakness; vomiting; yellow eyes or skin-with erythromycin estolate (rare with other erythromycins) Pain, swelling, or redness at place of injection Fainting (repeated); irregular or slow heartbeat; loss of hearing (temporary) Other medicines—Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking or receiving erythromycins, it is especially important that your health care professional know if you are taking any of the following: Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Amiodarone (e.g., Cordarone) or Anabolic steroids (nandrolone [e.g., Anabolin], oxandrolone [e.g., Anavar], oxymetholone [e.g., Anadrol], stanozolol [e.g., Winstrol]) or Androgens (male hormones) or Antithyroid agents (medicine for overactive thyroid) or Carmustine (e.g., BiCNU) or Chloroquine (e.g., Aralen) or Dantrolene (e.g., Dantrium) or Daunorubicin (e.g., Cerubidine) or Disulfiram (e.g., Antabuse) or Divalproex (e.g., Depakote) or Estrogens (female hormones) or Etretinate (e.g., Tegison) or Gold salts (medicine for arthritis) or Hydroxychloroquine (e.g., Plaquenil) or Mercaptopurine (e.g., Purinethol) or Methotrexate (e.g., Mexate) or Methyldopa (e.g., Aldomet) or Naltrexone (e.g., Trexan) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Oral contraceptives (birth control pills) containing estrogen or Other anti-infectives by mouth or by injection (medicine for infection) or Phenothiazines (acetophenazine [e.g., Tindal], chlorpromazine [e.g., Thorazine], fluphenazine [e.g., Prolixin], mesoridazine [e.g., Serentil], perphenazine [e.g., Trilafon], prochlorperazine [e.g., Compazine], promazine [e.g., Sparine], promethazine [e.g., Phenergan], thioridazine [e.g., Mellaril], trifluoperazine [e.g., Stelazine], triflupromazine [e.g., Vesprin], trimeprazine [e.g., Temaril]) or Phenytoin (e.g., Dilantin) or Plicamycin (e.g., Mithracin) or Valproic acid (e.g., Depakene)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins, especially erythromycin estolate, may increase the chance of liver problems Aminophylline (e.g., Somophyllin) or Caffeine (e.g., NoDoz) or Oxtriphylline (e.g., Choledyl) or Theophylline (e.g., Somophyllin-T, Theo-Dur)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the chance of side effects from aminophylline, caffeine, oxtriphylline, or theophylline Astemizole (e.g., Hismanal) or Terfenadine (e.g., Seldane)—Use of astemizole or terfenadine with erythromycins may cause heart problems, such as an irregular heartbeat; these medicines should not be used together Carbamazepine (e.g., Tegretol)—Use of carbamazepine with erythromycin may increase the side effects of carbamazepine or increase the chance of liver problems Chloramphenicol (e.g., Chloromycetin) or Clindamycin (e.g., Cleocin) or Lincomycin (e.g., Lincocin)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may decrease the effectiveness of these other antibiotics Cyclosporine (e.g., Sandimmune) or Warfarin (e.g., Coumadin)—Use of any of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the side effects of these medicines Other medical problems—The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of erythromycins. Answered by Lanny Arnn 2 years ago.

I'd page my doctor right away to ask if the headache is actually related to the medication and not something happening by chance. Only your doctor can advise you whether you should take a medication or not--remember also to tell the doctor the names of the other medications you're on to make sure there's not an interaction. Answered by Noella Gadue 2 years ago.

It is not likely that the antibiotic is giving you the headache. You have to finish your antibiotics, as long as you don't have a life threatening reaction. Take some Tylenol for your head. If it is really bothering you, you should ask your parents, anyway. Answered by Jazmin Arrott 2 years ago.

in case you get a headache because of the fact of taking the medicine and as you think of you're clearing up now, you are able to desire to not proceed taking the medicine. Drink countless comfortable beverages, shop hydrated to have sufficient kidney filtration. Answered by Agatha Marungo 2 years ago.

Headaches aren't a side effect to this drug (in a general sense). Don't stop taking it unless the prescribing doctor says so. Answered by Diana Stremmel 2 years ago.


How much urine is needed to do an extensive lab test break down of opiates?
I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up that it was only... Asked by Nguyet Zmolek 2 years ago.

I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up that it was only cough syrup. Also, what and how does it get broken down? What illicits drugs can they break down? Answered by Marhta Darby 2 years ago.

Any toxicology lab will be able to detect the "broken down" metabolites of any substance they want to find: If cough syrup is all your worried about then tell "them" exactly what you took and they can tell if it's the same compounds or not using GC/MS (gas chromotography/mass spec) Drug Profile, Urine (Nine Drugs), Immunoassay With GC/MS Confirmation Synonyms: IA-9 Test Includes: Amphetamines; barbiturates; benzodiazepines; cannabinoids (marijuana); cocaine; methadone (Dolophine®); opiates (codeine, morphine only); phencyclidine (PCP); propoxyphene Specimen: Urine (random) Volume: 45 mL (about 4 tablespoons) Container: Use plastic urine drug bottle and evidence tape or tamper-evident container for forensic specimen. Collection kits are available by request from the laboratory. GC/MS confirmation Methodology: Initial test by immunoassay; confirmation of positives by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) ---------------------- For a typical drug screen usually 20 mL of urine should be enough for additional drug testing. (per LabCorp.com) If a compound wants to be detected, it can be found using the instrumentation available in most toxicology labs. •Volatiles: acetone; ethanol; isopropanol; methanol •*Amphetamines: amphetamine (Dexedrine®), ephedrine/pseudoephedrine; methamphetamine (Desoxyn®); phenmetrazine (Preludin®); phentermine (Ionamin®); phenylpropanolamine •*Antidepressants: amitriptyline (Elavil®); desipramine (Norpramin®); doxepin (Adapin®, Sinequan®); imipramine (Tofranil®); nortriptyline (Pamelor®) •*Barbiturates: amobarbital (Amytal®); butabarbital (Butisol Sodium®); pentobarbital (Nembutal®); phenobarbital (Luminal®); secobarbital (Seconal®) •*Benzodiazepines: chlordiazepoxide (Librium®); diazepam (Valium®) •*Opiates: codeine; morphine •*Phenothiazines: chlorpromazine (Thorazine®); promazine (Sparine®); thioridazine (Mellaril®) •Others: acetaminophen (Tylenol®, Datril®); caffeine; carbamazepine (Tegretol®); cimetidine (Tagamet®); cocaine and/or metabolite; diphenhydramine (Benadryl®); ethchlorvynol (Placidyl®); glutethimide (Doriden®); meperidine (Demerol®); meprobamate (Miltown®, Equanil); methadone (Dolophine®); nicotine; pentazocine (Talwin®); phencyclidine (PCP); propoxyphene (Darvon®) or its metabolite norpropoxyphene; quinine/quinidine *Reported as a class if negative. Listed drugs reported if positive. Urine testing shows drug use over the last 2 or 3 days for amphetamines, cocaine, and opiates. Marijuana and its metabolites, cannabinoids, may be detectable for several weeks. Hair samples, which test the root end of the hair, reflect drug use within the last 2 to 3 months but not the most recent 2-3 weeks - the amount of time it takes for the hair to grow. Saliva detects which drugs have been used in the last 24 hours. Samples of sweat may be collected on an absorbent patch worn for several days to weeks and therefore can indicate drug use at any point during that extended period of time. These other types of samples are often used for specific purposes. For instance, hair samples may be used as an alternative to urine testing for employment or accident drug testing. Sweat testing may be used as a court-ordered monitoring tool in those who have been convicted of drug use, while saliva is often used by the insurance industry to test insurance applicants for drug use. Answered by Liza Bierer 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: How much urine is needed to do an extensive lab test break down of opiates? I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up... Answered by Concha Lafayette 2 years ago.

It is possible he will fail the lab test. The home tests are not the same and aren't as good as the lab tests. There is a bit of misinformation out there and that is cocaine is out of your system in 2-3 days. Well while that might be true LABS DON'T TEST FOR THE DRUG ITSELF. Yes, that is true, they look for the metabolite. A metabolite is something that the body produces when it ingests something, in the case of cocaine it is "benzoylecgonine" that will stay around long after the drug is gone, up to 30 days for a frequent user. THE DRUG ITSELF can stay in your bloodstream up to 72 hours. It can stay in your urine for about 1 or up to 3 days after single use. Habitual or chronic use can be detected in urine for up to 12 weeks depending on quantity, duration, and frequency of use. Answered by Keturah Reisin 2 years ago.

Who is "they"? Are you on probation or parole and court-ordered to submit to drug testing? Is this a pre-employment or random employment drug testing in accordance with your company's policies? If not, then no one can drug test you without your consent. Whatever you do, don't use synthetic urine. I used it once and it came back positive for THC. Answered by Danna Fabrizio 2 years ago.


Does anybody have experiences with the medication promazine/sparine? I'm interested to know about weight gain?
Asked by Cassy Jerding 2 years ago.

You're interested to know about weight gain? As though you don't have enough problems, you want to be fat too? Answered by Mathew Ishak 2 years ago.


I have a b/p of 86/50, hr is 58, resp are 16, and I have lost 5 lbs. Which do I report to the physician?
Homework question for pharmacology and I cannot find Sparine in my drug book. The above question is for someone admitted to the hospital and is taking Sparine (promazine). Asked by Stacey Patneaude 2 years ago.

Promazine is used for schizophrenia and other behavioral problems. I would say the weight loss would be siginfigant. The bp is slightly low, but ok and resp are ok. Pulse is a little low. 60-100 is normal in adults. Hope this helps. Answered by Monte Pantano 2 years ago.

Why is the sparine being taken? Nausea and vomiting? What time frame for the 5 lb. weight loss? The BP is low, are you athletic? Is the BP a vagal response to vomiting? The heart rate is mildly low, but again, this may be normal for you. Are you using the sparine for mental distubances? Sparine is a phenothiazine derivitive used for nausea, makes the effects of pain meds stronger, and as a short term antipsychotic. The significant things you mentioned would be the BP and the weight loss. Answered by Wiley Rutheford 2 years ago.

The blood pressure and pulse are both low. A lot of anti depressants anti psychotics cause orthostatic hypotension which is low b/p and pulse with a sudden change in body position. It can happen if you stand up too fast, people have experienced it on carnival rides. It is a side effect of the drug and not necessarily a problem if you understand why it is happening and how to avoid it. Call your pharmacist and ask him or her about your symptoms and if they normal with this drug. Contact your MD with this and and further unsettling symptoms. Answered by Sterling Hohman 2 years ago.

i would most likely report the blood pressure, it seems extremely low Answered by Denice Yarwood 2 years ago.

All of the above. Answered by Gaylene Cockriel 2 years ago.


If you take antibiotics and you get a real bad headache from it would you stop?
The medicine is call Erythromycin base 500 Asked by Latanya Berrien 2 years ago.

Side Effects of This Medicine: Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur: Fever; headache, nausea; skin rash, redness, or itching; stomach pain (severe); unusual tiredness or weakness; vomiting; yellow eyes or skin-with erythromycin estolate (rare with other erythromycins) Pain, swelling, or redness at place of injection Fainting (repeated); irregular or slow heartbeat; loss of hearing (temporary) Other medicines—Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking or receiving erythromycins, it is especially important that your health care professional know if you are taking any of the following: Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Amiodarone (e.g., Cordarone) or Anabolic steroids (nandrolone [e.g., Anabolin], oxandrolone [e.g., Anavar], oxymetholone [e.g., Anadrol], stanozolol [e.g., Winstrol]) or Androgens (male hormones) or Antithyroid agents (medicine for overactive thyroid) or Carmustine (e.g., BiCNU) or Chloroquine (e.g., Aralen) or Dantrolene (e.g., Dantrium) or Daunorubicin (e.g., Cerubidine) or Disulfiram (e.g., Antabuse) or Divalproex (e.g., Depakote) or Estrogens (female hormones) or Etretinate (e.g., Tegison) or Gold salts (medicine for arthritis) or Hydroxychloroquine (e.g., Plaquenil) or Mercaptopurine (e.g., Purinethol) or Methotrexate (e.g., Mexate) or Methyldopa (e.g., Aldomet) or Naltrexone (e.g., Trexan) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Oral contraceptives (birth control pills) containing estrogen or Other anti-infectives by mouth or by injection (medicine for infection) or Phenothiazines (acetophenazine [e.g., Tindal], chlorpromazine [e.g., Thorazine], fluphenazine [e.g., Prolixin], mesoridazine [e.g., Serentil], perphenazine [e.g., Trilafon], prochlorperazine [e.g., Compazine], promazine [e.g., Sparine], promethazine [e.g., Phenergan], thioridazine [e.g., Mellaril], trifluoperazine [e.g., Stelazine], triflupromazine [e.g., Vesprin], trimeprazine [e.g., Temaril]) or Phenytoin (e.g., Dilantin) or Plicamycin (e.g., Mithracin) or Valproic acid (e.g., Depakene)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins, especially erythromycin estolate, may increase the chance of liver problems Aminophylline (e.g., Somophyllin) or Caffeine (e.g., NoDoz) or Oxtriphylline (e.g., Choledyl) or Theophylline (e.g., Somophyllin-T, Theo-Dur)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the chance of side effects from aminophylline, caffeine, oxtriphylline, or theophylline Astemizole (e.g., Hismanal) or Terfenadine (e.g., Seldane)—Use of astemizole or terfenadine with erythromycins may cause heart problems, such as an irregular heartbeat; these medicines should not be used together Carbamazepine (e.g., Tegretol)—Use of carbamazepine with erythromycin may increase the side effects of carbamazepine or increase the chance of liver problems Chloramphenicol (e.g., Chloromycetin) or Clindamycin (e.g., Cleocin) or Lincomycin (e.g., Lincocin)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may decrease the effectiveness of these other antibiotics Cyclosporine (e.g., Sandimmune) or Warfarin (e.g., Coumadin)—Use of any of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the side effects of these medicines Other medical problems—The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of erythromycins. Answered by Teodoro Tassinari 2 years ago.

I'd page my doctor right away to ask if the headache is actually related to the medication and not something happening by chance. Only your doctor can advise you whether you should take a medication or not--remember also to tell the doctor the names of the other medications you're on to make sure there's not an interaction. Answered by Wally Micha 2 years ago.

It is not likely that the antibiotic is giving you the headache. You have to finish your antibiotics, as long as you don't have a life threatening reaction. Take some Tylenol for your head. If it is really bothering you, you should ask your parents, anyway. Answered by Gaylord Einfeldt 2 years ago.

in case you get a headache because of the fact of taking the medicine and as you think of you're clearing up now, you are able to desire to not proceed taking the medicine. Drink countless comfortable beverages, shop hydrated to have sufficient kidney filtration. Answered by Otis Hilovsky 2 years ago.

Headaches aren't a side effect to this drug (in a general sense). Don't stop taking it unless the prescribing doctor says so. Answered by Napoleon Booth 2 years ago.


How much urine is needed to do an extensive lab test break down of opiates?
I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up that it was only... Asked by Reyes Fastlaben 2 years ago.

I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up that it was only cough syrup. Also, what and how does it get broken down? What illicits drugs can they break down? Answered by Sandra Wardall 2 years ago.

Any toxicology lab will be able to detect the "broken down" metabolites of any substance they want to find: If cough syrup is all your worried about then tell "them" exactly what you took and they can tell if it's the same compounds or not using GC/MS (gas chromotography/mass spec) Drug Profile, Urine (Nine Drugs), Immunoassay With GC/MS Confirmation Synonyms: IA-9 Test Includes: Amphetamines; barbiturates; benzodiazepines; cannabinoids (marijuana); cocaine; methadone (Dolophine®); opiates (codeine, morphine only); phencyclidine (PCP); propoxyphene Specimen: Urine (random) Volume: 45 mL (about 4 tablespoons) Container: Use plastic urine drug bottle and evidence tape or tamper-evident container for forensic specimen. Collection kits are available by request from the laboratory. GC/MS confirmation Methodology: Initial test by immunoassay; confirmation of positives by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) ---------------------- For a typical drug screen usually 20 mL of urine should be enough for additional drug testing. (per LabCorp.com) If a compound wants to be detected, it can be found using the instrumentation available in most toxicology labs. •Volatiles: acetone; ethanol; isopropanol; methanol •*Amphetamines: amphetamine (Dexedrine®), ephedrine/pseudoephedrine; methamphetamine (Desoxyn®); phenmetrazine (Preludin®); phentermine (Ionamin®); phenylpropanolamine •*Antidepressants: amitriptyline (Elavil®); desipramine (Norpramin®); doxepin (Adapin®, Sinequan®); imipramine (Tofranil®); nortriptyline (Pamelor®) •*Barbiturates: amobarbital (Amytal®); butabarbital (Butisol Sodium®); pentobarbital (Nembutal®); phenobarbital (Luminal®); secobarbital (Seconal®) •*Benzodiazepines: chlordiazepoxide (Librium®); diazepam (Valium®) •*Opiates: codeine; morphine •*Phenothiazines: chlorpromazine (Thorazine®); promazine (Sparine®); thioridazine (Mellaril®) •Others: acetaminophen (Tylenol®, Datril®); caffeine; carbamazepine (Tegretol®); cimetidine (Tagamet®); cocaine and/or metabolite; diphenhydramine (Benadryl®); ethchlorvynol (Placidyl®); glutethimide (Doriden®); meperidine (Demerol®); meprobamate (Miltown®, Equanil); methadone (Dolophine®); nicotine; pentazocine (Talwin®); phencyclidine (PCP); propoxyphene (Darvon®) or its metabolite norpropoxyphene; quinine/quinidine *Reported as a class if negative. Listed drugs reported if positive. Urine testing shows drug use over the last 2 or 3 days for amphetamines, cocaine, and opiates. Marijuana and its metabolites, cannabinoids, may be detectable for several weeks. Hair samples, which test the root end of the hair, reflect drug use within the last 2 to 3 months but not the most recent 2-3 weeks - the amount of time it takes for the hair to grow. Saliva detects which drugs have been used in the last 24 hours. Samples of sweat may be collected on an absorbent patch worn for several days to weeks and therefore can indicate drug use at any point during that extended period of time. These other types of samples are often used for specific purposes. For instance, hair samples may be used as an alternative to urine testing for employment or accident drug testing. Sweat testing may be used as a court-ordered monitoring tool in those who have been convicted of drug use, while saliva is often used by the insurance industry to test insurance applicants for drug use. Answered by Evelyne Courville 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: How much urine is needed to do an extensive lab test break down of opiates? I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up... Answered by Slyvia Liggin 2 years ago.

It is possible he will fail the lab test. The home tests are not the same and aren't as good as the lab tests. There is a bit of misinformation out there and that is cocaine is out of your system in 2-3 days. Well while that might be true LABS DON'T TEST FOR THE DRUG ITSELF. Yes, that is true, they look for the metabolite. A metabolite is something that the body produces when it ingests something, in the case of cocaine it is "benzoylecgonine" that will stay around long after the drug is gone, up to 30 days for a frequent user. THE DRUG ITSELF can stay in your bloodstream up to 72 hours. It can stay in your urine for about 1 or up to 3 days after single use. Habitual or chronic use can be detected in urine for up to 12 weeks depending on quantity, duration, and frequency of use. Answered by Titus Hixson 2 years ago.

Who is "they"? Are you on probation or parole and court-ordered to submit to drug testing? Is this a pre-employment or random employment drug testing in accordance with your company's policies? If not, then no one can drug test you without your consent. Whatever you do, don't use synthetic urine. I used it once and it came back positive for THC. Answered by Nicki Furtak 2 years ago.


Does anybody have experiences with the medication promazine/sparine? I'm interested to know about weight gain?
Asked by Gail Guitano 2 years ago.

You're interested to know about weight gain? As though you don't have enough problems, you want to be fat too? Answered by Sharonda Moosa 2 years ago.


I have a b/p of 86/50, hr is 58, resp are 16, and I have lost 5 lbs. Which do I report to the physician?
Homework question for pharmacology and I cannot find Sparine in my drug book. The above question is for someone admitted to the hospital and is taking Sparine (promazine). Asked by Maurice Lorenzini 2 years ago.

Promazine is used for schizophrenia and other behavioral problems. I would say the weight loss would be siginfigant. The bp is slightly low, but ok and resp are ok. Pulse is a little low. 60-100 is normal in adults. Hope this helps. Answered by Duane Benken 2 years ago.

Why is the sparine being taken? Nausea and vomiting? What time frame for the 5 lb. weight loss? The BP is low, are you athletic? Is the BP a vagal response to vomiting? The heart rate is mildly low, but again, this may be normal for you. Are you using the sparine for mental distubances? Sparine is a phenothiazine derivitive used for nausea, makes the effects of pain meds stronger, and as a short term antipsychotic. The significant things you mentioned would be the BP and the weight loss. Answered by Shelby Millian 2 years ago.

The blood pressure and pulse are both low. A lot of anti depressants anti psychotics cause orthostatic hypotension which is low b/p and pulse with a sudden change in body position. It can happen if you stand up too fast, people have experienced it on carnival rides. It is a side effect of the drug and not necessarily a problem if you understand why it is happening and how to avoid it. Call your pharmacist and ask him or her about your symptoms and if they normal with this drug. Contact your MD with this and and further unsettling symptoms. Answered by Deandre Janosik 2 years ago.

i would most likely report the blood pressure, it seems extremely low Answered by Yaeko Renburg 2 years ago.

All of the above. Answered by Orlando Mitri 2 years ago.


If you take antibiotics and you get a real bad headache from it would you stop?
The medicine is call Erythromycin base 500 Asked by Phillis Gillentine 2 years ago.

Side Effects of This Medicine: Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur: Fever; headache, nausea; skin rash, redness, or itching; stomach pain (severe); unusual tiredness or weakness; vomiting; yellow eyes or skin-with erythromycin estolate (rare with other erythromycins) Pain, swelling, or redness at place of injection Fainting (repeated); irregular or slow heartbeat; loss of hearing (temporary) Other medicines—Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking or receiving erythromycins, it is especially important that your health care professional know if you are taking any of the following: Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Amiodarone (e.g., Cordarone) or Anabolic steroids (nandrolone [e.g., Anabolin], oxandrolone [e.g., Anavar], oxymetholone [e.g., Anadrol], stanozolol [e.g., Winstrol]) or Androgens (male hormones) or Antithyroid agents (medicine for overactive thyroid) or Carmustine (e.g., BiCNU) or Chloroquine (e.g., Aralen) or Dantrolene (e.g., Dantrium) or Daunorubicin (e.g., Cerubidine) or Disulfiram (e.g., Antabuse) or Divalproex (e.g., Depakote) or Estrogens (female hormones) or Etretinate (e.g., Tegison) or Gold salts (medicine for arthritis) or Hydroxychloroquine (e.g., Plaquenil) or Mercaptopurine (e.g., Purinethol) or Methotrexate (e.g., Mexate) or Methyldopa (e.g., Aldomet) or Naltrexone (e.g., Trexan) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Oral contraceptives (birth control pills) containing estrogen or Other anti-infectives by mouth or by injection (medicine for infection) or Phenothiazines (acetophenazine [e.g., Tindal], chlorpromazine [e.g., Thorazine], fluphenazine [e.g., Prolixin], mesoridazine [e.g., Serentil], perphenazine [e.g., Trilafon], prochlorperazine [e.g., Compazine], promazine [e.g., Sparine], promethazine [e.g., Phenergan], thioridazine [e.g., Mellaril], trifluoperazine [e.g., Stelazine], triflupromazine [e.g., Vesprin], trimeprazine [e.g., Temaril]) or Phenytoin (e.g., Dilantin) or Plicamycin (e.g., Mithracin) or Valproic acid (e.g., Depakene)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins, especially erythromycin estolate, may increase the chance of liver problems Aminophylline (e.g., Somophyllin) or Caffeine (e.g., NoDoz) or Oxtriphylline (e.g., Choledyl) or Theophylline (e.g., Somophyllin-T, Theo-Dur)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the chance of side effects from aminophylline, caffeine, oxtriphylline, or theophylline Astemizole (e.g., Hismanal) or Terfenadine (e.g., Seldane)—Use of astemizole or terfenadine with erythromycins may cause heart problems, such as an irregular heartbeat; these medicines should not be used together Carbamazepine (e.g., Tegretol)—Use of carbamazepine with erythromycin may increase the side effects of carbamazepine or increase the chance of liver problems Chloramphenicol (e.g., Chloromycetin) or Clindamycin (e.g., Cleocin) or Lincomycin (e.g., Lincocin)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may decrease the effectiveness of these other antibiotics Cyclosporine (e.g., Sandimmune) or Warfarin (e.g., Coumadin)—Use of any of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the side effects of these medicines Other medical problems—The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of erythromycins. Answered by Dustin Earthly 2 years ago.

I'd page my doctor right away to ask if the headache is actually related to the medication and not something happening by chance. Only your doctor can advise you whether you should take a medication or not--remember also to tell the doctor the names of the other medications you're on to make sure there's not an interaction. Answered by Parthenia Axt 2 years ago.

It is not likely that the antibiotic is giving you the headache. You have to finish your antibiotics, as long as you don't have a life threatening reaction. Take some Tylenol for your head. If it is really bothering you, you should ask your parents, anyway. Answered by Seema Tammen 2 years ago.

in case you get a headache because of the fact of taking the medicine and as you think of you're clearing up now, you are able to desire to not proceed taking the medicine. Drink countless comfortable beverages, shop hydrated to have sufficient kidney filtration. Answered by Cleora Depasse 2 years ago.

Headaches aren't a side effect to this drug (in a general sense). Don't stop taking it unless the prescribing doctor says so. Answered by Tiana Korner 2 years ago.


How much urine is needed to do an extensive lab test break down of opiates?
I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up that it was only... Asked by Grazyna Venible 2 years ago.

I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up that it was only cough syrup. Also, what and how does it get broken down? What illicits drugs can they break down? Answered by Maximo Madaffari 2 years ago.

Any toxicology lab will be able to detect the "broken down" metabolites of any substance they want to find: If cough syrup is all your worried about then tell "them" exactly what you took and they can tell if it's the same compounds or not using GC/MS (gas chromotography/mass spec) Drug Profile, Urine (Nine Drugs), Immunoassay With GC/MS Confirmation Synonyms: IA-9 Test Includes: Amphetamines; barbiturates; benzodiazepines; cannabinoids (marijuana); cocaine; methadone (Dolophine®); opiates (codeine, morphine only); phencyclidine (PCP); propoxyphene Specimen: Urine (random) Volume: 45 mL (about 4 tablespoons) Container: Use plastic urine drug bottle and evidence tape or tamper-evident container for forensic specimen. Collection kits are available by request from the laboratory. GC/MS confirmation Methodology: Initial test by immunoassay; confirmation of positives by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) ---------------------- For a typical drug screen usually 20 mL of urine should be enough for additional drug testing. (per LabCorp.com) If a compound wants to be detected, it can be found using the instrumentation available in most toxicology labs. •Volatiles: acetone; ethanol; isopropanol; methanol •*Amphetamines: amphetamine (Dexedrine®), ephedrine/pseudoephedrine; methamphetamine (Desoxyn®); phenmetrazine (Preludin®); phentermine (Ionamin®); phenylpropanolamine •*Antidepressants: amitriptyline (Elavil®); desipramine (Norpramin®); doxepin (Adapin®, Sinequan®); imipramine (Tofranil®); nortriptyline (Pamelor®) •*Barbiturates: amobarbital (Amytal®); butabarbital (Butisol Sodium®); pentobarbital (Nembutal®); phenobarbital (Luminal®); secobarbital (Seconal®) •*Benzodiazepines: chlordiazepoxide (Librium®); diazepam (Valium®) •*Opiates: codeine; morphine •*Phenothiazines: chlorpromazine (Thorazine®); promazine (Sparine®); thioridazine (Mellaril®) •Others: acetaminophen (Tylenol®, Datril®); caffeine; carbamazepine (Tegretol®); cimetidine (Tagamet®); cocaine and/or metabolite; diphenhydramine (Benadryl®); ethchlorvynol (Placidyl®); glutethimide (Doriden®); meperidine (Demerol®); meprobamate (Miltown®, Equanil); methadone (Dolophine®); nicotine; pentazocine (Talwin®); phencyclidine (PCP); propoxyphene (Darvon®) or its metabolite norpropoxyphene; quinine/quinidine *Reported as a class if negative. Listed drugs reported if positive. Urine testing shows drug use over the last 2 or 3 days for amphetamines, cocaine, and opiates. Marijuana and its metabolites, cannabinoids, may be detectable for several weeks. Hair samples, which test the root end of the hair, reflect drug use within the last 2 to 3 months but not the most recent 2-3 weeks - the amount of time it takes for the hair to grow. Saliva detects which drugs have been used in the last 24 hours. Samples of sweat may be collected on an absorbent patch worn for several days to weeks and therefore can indicate drug use at any point during that extended period of time. These other types of samples are often used for specific purposes. For instance, hair samples may be used as an alternative to urine testing for employment or accident drug testing. Sweat testing may be used as a court-ordered monitoring tool in those who have been convicted of drug use, while saliva is often used by the insurance industry to test insurance applicants for drug use. Answered by Kourtney Longinotti 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: How much urine is needed to do an extensive lab test break down of opiates? I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up... Answered by Lemuel Evelyn 2 years ago.

It is possible he will fail the lab test. The home tests are not the same and aren't as good as the lab tests. There is a bit of misinformation out there and that is cocaine is out of your system in 2-3 days. Well while that might be true LABS DON'T TEST FOR THE DRUG ITSELF. Yes, that is true, they look for the metabolite. A metabolite is something that the body produces when it ingests something, in the case of cocaine it is "benzoylecgonine" that will stay around long after the drug is gone, up to 30 days for a frequent user. THE DRUG ITSELF can stay in your bloodstream up to 72 hours. It can stay in your urine for about 1 or up to 3 days after single use. Habitual or chronic use can be detected in urine for up to 12 weeks depending on quantity, duration, and frequency of use. Answered by Carin Vanstee 2 years ago.

Who is "they"? Are you on probation or parole and court-ordered to submit to drug testing? Is this a pre-employment or random employment drug testing in accordance with your company's policies? If not, then no one can drug test you without your consent. Whatever you do, don't use synthetic urine. I used it once and it came back positive for THC. Answered by Berniece Croston 2 years ago.


Does anybody have experiences with the medication promazine/sparine? I'm interested to know about weight gain?
Asked by Beatrice Vongal 2 years ago.

You're interested to know about weight gain? As though you don't have enough problems, you want to be fat too? Answered by Terrance Ruper 2 years ago.


I have a b/p of 86/50, hr is 58, resp are 16, and I have lost 5 lbs. Which do I report to the physician?
Homework question for pharmacology and I cannot find Sparine in my drug book. The above question is for someone admitted to the hospital and is taking Sparine (promazine). Asked by Harland Krstic 2 years ago.

Promazine is used for schizophrenia and other behavioral problems. I would say the weight loss would be siginfigant. The bp is slightly low, but ok and resp are ok. Pulse is a little low. 60-100 is normal in adults. Hope this helps. Answered by Lyndsay Strathy 2 years ago.

Why is the sparine being taken? Nausea and vomiting? What time frame for the 5 lb. weight loss? The BP is low, are you athletic? Is the BP a vagal response to vomiting? The heart rate is mildly low, but again, this may be normal for you. Are you using the sparine for mental distubances? Sparine is a phenothiazine derivitive used for nausea, makes the effects of pain meds stronger, and as a short term antipsychotic. The significant things you mentioned would be the BP and the weight loss. Answered by Daisey Morrone 2 years ago.

The blood pressure and pulse are both low. A lot of anti depressants anti psychotics cause orthostatic hypotension which is low b/p and pulse with a sudden change in body position. It can happen if you stand up too fast, people have experienced it on carnival rides. It is a side effect of the drug and not necessarily a problem if you understand why it is happening and how to avoid it. Call your pharmacist and ask him or her about your symptoms and if they normal with this drug. Contact your MD with this and and further unsettling symptoms. Answered by Iona Fellars 2 years ago.

i would most likely report the blood pressure, it seems extremely low Answered by Aliza Scozzafava 2 years ago.

All of the above. Answered by Ila Gusmar 2 years ago.


If you take antibiotics and you get a real bad headache from it would you stop?
The medicine is call Erythromycin base 500 Asked by Jamel Rayo 2 years ago.

Side Effects of This Medicine: Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur: Fever; headache, nausea; skin rash, redness, or itching; stomach pain (severe); unusual tiredness or weakness; vomiting; yellow eyes or skin-with erythromycin estolate (rare with other erythromycins) Pain, swelling, or redness at place of injection Fainting (repeated); irregular or slow heartbeat; loss of hearing (temporary) Other medicines—Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking or receiving erythromycins, it is especially important that your health care professional know if you are taking any of the following: Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Amiodarone (e.g., Cordarone) or Anabolic steroids (nandrolone [e.g., Anabolin], oxandrolone [e.g., Anavar], oxymetholone [e.g., Anadrol], stanozolol [e.g., Winstrol]) or Androgens (male hormones) or Antithyroid agents (medicine for overactive thyroid) or Carmustine (e.g., BiCNU) or Chloroquine (e.g., Aralen) or Dantrolene (e.g., Dantrium) or Daunorubicin (e.g., Cerubidine) or Disulfiram (e.g., Antabuse) or Divalproex (e.g., Depakote) or Estrogens (female hormones) or Etretinate (e.g., Tegison) or Gold salts (medicine for arthritis) or Hydroxychloroquine (e.g., Plaquenil) or Mercaptopurine (e.g., Purinethol) or Methotrexate (e.g., Mexate) or Methyldopa (e.g., Aldomet) or Naltrexone (e.g., Trexan) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Oral contraceptives (birth control pills) containing estrogen or Other anti-infectives by mouth or by injection (medicine for infection) or Phenothiazines (acetophenazine [e.g., Tindal], chlorpromazine [e.g., Thorazine], fluphenazine [e.g., Prolixin], mesoridazine [e.g., Serentil], perphenazine [e.g., Trilafon], prochlorperazine [e.g., Compazine], promazine [e.g., Sparine], promethazine [e.g., Phenergan], thioridazine [e.g., Mellaril], trifluoperazine [e.g., Stelazine], triflupromazine [e.g., Vesprin], trimeprazine [e.g., Temaril]) or Phenytoin (e.g., Dilantin) or Plicamycin (e.g., Mithracin) or Valproic acid (e.g., Depakene)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins, especially erythromycin estolate, may increase the chance of liver problems Aminophylline (e.g., Somophyllin) or Caffeine (e.g., NoDoz) or Oxtriphylline (e.g., Choledyl) or Theophylline (e.g., Somophyllin-T, Theo-Dur)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the chance of side effects from aminophylline, caffeine, oxtriphylline, or theophylline Astemizole (e.g., Hismanal) or Terfenadine (e.g., Seldane)—Use of astemizole or terfenadine with erythromycins may cause heart problems, such as an irregular heartbeat; these medicines should not be used together Carbamazepine (e.g., Tegretol)—Use of carbamazepine with erythromycin may increase the side effects of carbamazepine or increase the chance of liver problems Chloramphenicol (e.g., Chloromycetin) or Clindamycin (e.g., Cleocin) or Lincomycin (e.g., Lincocin)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may decrease the effectiveness of these other antibiotics Cyclosporine (e.g., Sandimmune) or Warfarin (e.g., Coumadin)—Use of any of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the side effects of these medicines Other medical problems—The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of erythromycins. Answered by Stephine Mauras 2 years ago.

I'd page my doctor right away to ask if the headache is actually related to the medication and not something happening by chance. Only your doctor can advise you whether you should take a medication or not--remember also to tell the doctor the names of the other medications you're on to make sure there's not an interaction. Answered by Marquerite Vazzana 2 years ago.

It is not likely that the antibiotic is giving you the headache. You have to finish your antibiotics, as long as you don't have a life threatening reaction. Take some Tylenol for your head. If it is really bothering you, you should ask your parents, anyway. Answered by Jo Sperber 2 years ago.

in case you get a headache because of the fact of taking the medicine and as you think of you're clearing up now, you are able to desire to not proceed taking the medicine. Drink countless comfortable beverages, shop hydrated to have sufficient kidney filtration. Answered by Carolyne Vanalstin 2 years ago.

Headaches aren't a side effect to this drug (in a general sense). Don't stop taking it unless the prescribing doctor says so. Answered by Amparo Loncar 2 years ago.


How much urine is needed to do an extensive lab test break down of opiates?
I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up that it was only... Asked by Jade Karratti 2 years ago.

I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up that it was only cough syrup. Also, what and how does it get broken down? What illicits drugs can they break down? Answered by Carissa Cadotte 2 years ago.

Any toxicology lab will be able to detect the "broken down" metabolites of any substance they want to find: If cough syrup is all your worried about then tell "them" exactly what you took and they can tell if it's the same compounds or not using GC/MS (gas chromotography/mass spec) Drug Profile, Urine (Nine Drugs), Immunoassay With GC/MS Confirmation Synonyms: IA-9 Test Includes: Amphetamines; barbiturates; benzodiazepines; cannabinoids (marijuana); cocaine; methadone (Dolophine®); opiates (codeine, morphine only); phencyclidine (PCP); propoxyphene Specimen: Urine (random) Volume: 45 mL (about 4 tablespoons) Container: Use plastic urine drug bottle and evidence tape or tamper-evident container for forensic specimen. Collection kits are available by request from the laboratory. GC/MS confirmation Methodology: Initial test by immunoassay; confirmation of positives by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) ---------------------- For a typical drug screen usually 20 mL of urine should be enough for additional drug testing. (per LabCorp.com) If a compound wants to be detected, it can be found using the instrumentation available in most toxicology labs. •Volatiles: acetone; ethanol; isopropanol; methanol •*Amphetamines: amphetamine (Dexedrine®), ephedrine/pseudoephedrine; methamphetamine (Desoxyn®); phenmetrazine (Preludin®); phentermine (Ionamin®); phenylpropanolamine •*Antidepressants: amitriptyline (Elavil®); desipramine (Norpramin®); doxepin (Adapin®, Sinequan®); imipramine (Tofranil®); nortriptyline (Pamelor®) •*Barbiturates: amobarbital (Amytal®); butabarbital (Butisol Sodium®); pentobarbital (Nembutal®); phenobarbital (Luminal®); secobarbital (Seconal®) •*Benzodiazepines: chlordiazepoxide (Librium®); diazepam (Valium®) •*Opiates: codeine; morphine •*Phenothiazines: chlorpromazine (Thorazine®); promazine (Sparine®); thioridazine (Mellaril®) •Others: acetaminophen (Tylenol®, Datril®); caffeine; carbamazepine (Tegretol®); cimetidine (Tagamet®); cocaine and/or metabolite; diphenhydramine (Benadryl®); ethchlorvynol (Placidyl®); glutethimide (Doriden®); meperidine (Demerol®); meprobamate (Miltown®, Equanil); methadone (Dolophine®); nicotine; pentazocine (Talwin®); phencyclidine (PCP); propoxyphene (Darvon®) or its metabolite norpropoxyphene; quinine/quinidine *Reported as a class if negative. Listed drugs reported if positive. Urine testing shows drug use over the last 2 or 3 days for amphetamines, cocaine, and opiates. Marijuana and its metabolites, cannabinoids, may be detectable for several weeks. Hair samples, which test the root end of the hair, reflect drug use within the last 2 to 3 months but not the most recent 2-3 weeks - the amount of time it takes for the hair to grow. Saliva detects which drugs have been used in the last 24 hours. Samples of sweat may be collected on an absorbent patch worn for several days to weeks and therefore can indicate drug use at any point during that extended period of time. These other types of samples are often used for specific purposes. For instance, hair samples may be used as an alternative to urine testing for employment or accident drug testing. Sweat testing may be used as a court-ordered monitoring tool in those who have been convicted of drug use, while saliva is often used by the insurance industry to test insurance applicants for drug use. Answered by Hilma Chauvin 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: How much urine is needed to do an extensive lab test break down of opiates? I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up... Answered by Clarisa Macknight 2 years ago.

It is possible he will fail the lab test. The home tests are not the same and aren't as good as the lab tests. There is a bit of misinformation out there and that is cocaine is out of your system in 2-3 days. Well while that might be true LABS DON'T TEST FOR THE DRUG ITSELF. Yes, that is true, they look for the metabolite. A metabolite is something that the body produces when it ingests something, in the case of cocaine it is "benzoylecgonine" that will stay around long after the drug is gone, up to 30 days for a frequent user. THE DRUG ITSELF can stay in your bloodstream up to 72 hours. It can stay in your urine for about 1 or up to 3 days after single use. Habitual or chronic use can be detected in urine for up to 12 weeks depending on quantity, duration, and frequency of use. Answered by Desiree Turturro 2 years ago.

Who is "they"? Are you on probation or parole and court-ordered to submit to drug testing? Is this a pre-employment or random employment drug testing in accordance with your company's policies? If not, then no one can drug test you without your consent. Whatever you do, don't use synthetic urine. I used it once and it came back positive for THC. Answered by Delpha Schweyen 2 years ago.


Does anybody have experiences with the medication promazine/sparine? I'm interested to know about weight gain?
Asked by Jamie Arredla 2 years ago.

You're interested to know about weight gain? As though you don't have enough problems, you want to be fat too? Answered by Lakeshia Thurmer 2 years ago.


I have a b/p of 86/50, hr is 58, resp are 16, and I have lost 5 lbs. Which do I report to the physician?
Homework question for pharmacology and I cannot find Sparine in my drug book. The above question is for someone admitted to the hospital and is taking Sparine (promazine). Asked by Alexander Hilbrand 2 years ago.

Promazine is used for schizophrenia and other behavioral problems. I would say the weight loss would be siginfigant. The bp is slightly low, but ok and resp are ok. Pulse is a little low. 60-100 is normal in adults. Hope this helps. Answered by Donald Benigno 2 years ago.

Why is the sparine being taken? Nausea and vomiting? What time frame for the 5 lb. weight loss? The BP is low, are you athletic? Is the BP a vagal response to vomiting? The heart rate is mildly low, but again, this may be normal for you. Are you using the sparine for mental distubances? Sparine is a phenothiazine derivitive used for nausea, makes the effects of pain meds stronger, and as a short term antipsychotic. The significant things you mentioned would be the BP and the weight loss. Answered by Tyler Krain 2 years ago.

The blood pressure and pulse are both low. A lot of anti depressants anti psychotics cause orthostatic hypotension which is low b/p and pulse with a sudden change in body position. It can happen if you stand up too fast, people have experienced it on carnival rides. It is a side effect of the drug and not necessarily a problem if you understand why it is happening and how to avoid it. Call your pharmacist and ask him or her about your symptoms and if they normal with this drug. Contact your MD with this and and further unsettling symptoms. Answered by Dwight Milford 2 years ago.

i would most likely report the blood pressure, it seems extremely low Answered by Sheron Yoke 2 years ago.

All of the above. Answered by Dusti Chrispen 2 years ago.


If you take antibiotics and you get a real bad headache from it would you stop?
The medicine is call Erythromycin base 500 Asked by Ada Comstock 2 years ago.

Side Effects of This Medicine: Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur: Fever; headache, nausea; skin rash, redness, or itching; stomach pain (severe); unusual tiredness or weakness; vomiting; yellow eyes or skin-with erythromycin estolate (rare with other erythromycins) Pain, swelling, or redness at place of injection Fainting (repeated); irregular or slow heartbeat; loss of hearing (temporary) Other medicines—Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking or receiving erythromycins, it is especially important that your health care professional know if you are taking any of the following: Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Amiodarone (e.g., Cordarone) or Anabolic steroids (nandrolone [e.g., Anabolin], oxandrolone [e.g., Anavar], oxymetholone [e.g., Anadrol], stanozolol [e.g., Winstrol]) or Androgens (male hormones) or Antithyroid agents (medicine for overactive thyroid) or Carmustine (e.g., BiCNU) or Chloroquine (e.g., Aralen) or Dantrolene (e.g., Dantrium) or Daunorubicin (e.g., Cerubidine) or Disulfiram (e.g., Antabuse) or Divalproex (e.g., Depakote) or Estrogens (female hormones) or Etretinate (e.g., Tegison) or Gold salts (medicine for arthritis) or Hydroxychloroquine (e.g., Plaquenil) or Mercaptopurine (e.g., Purinethol) or Methotrexate (e.g., Mexate) or Methyldopa (e.g., Aldomet) or Naltrexone (e.g., Trexan) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Oral contraceptives (birth control pills) containing estrogen or Other anti-infectives by mouth or by injection (medicine for infection) or Phenothiazines (acetophenazine [e.g., Tindal], chlorpromazine [e.g., Thorazine], fluphenazine [e.g., Prolixin], mesoridazine [e.g., Serentil], perphenazine [e.g., Trilafon], prochlorperazine [e.g., Compazine], promazine [e.g., Sparine], promethazine [e.g., Phenergan], thioridazine [e.g., Mellaril], trifluoperazine [e.g., Stelazine], triflupromazine [e.g., Vesprin], trimeprazine [e.g., Temaril]) or Phenytoin (e.g., Dilantin) or Plicamycin (e.g., Mithracin) or Valproic acid (e.g., Depakene)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins, especially erythromycin estolate, may increase the chance of liver problems Aminophylline (e.g., Somophyllin) or Caffeine (e.g., NoDoz) or Oxtriphylline (e.g., Choledyl) or Theophylline (e.g., Somophyllin-T, Theo-Dur)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the chance of side effects from aminophylline, caffeine, oxtriphylline, or theophylline Astemizole (e.g., Hismanal) or Terfenadine (e.g., Seldane)—Use of astemizole or terfenadine with erythromycins may cause heart problems, such as an irregular heartbeat; these medicines should not be used together Carbamazepine (e.g., Tegretol)—Use of carbamazepine with erythromycin may increase the side effects of carbamazepine or increase the chance of liver problems Chloramphenicol (e.g., Chloromycetin) or Clindamycin (e.g., Cleocin) or Lincomycin (e.g., Lincocin)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may decrease the effectiveness of these other antibiotics Cyclosporine (e.g., Sandimmune) or Warfarin (e.g., Coumadin)—Use of any of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the side effects of these medicines Other medical problems—The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of erythromycins. Answered by Echo Muckey 2 years ago.

I'd page my doctor right away to ask if the headache is actually related to the medication and not something happening by chance. Only your doctor can advise you whether you should take a medication or not--remember also to tell the doctor the names of the other medications you're on to make sure there's not an interaction. Answered by Beatrice Aycock 2 years ago.

It is not likely that the antibiotic is giving you the headache. You have to finish your antibiotics, as long as you don't have a life threatening reaction. Take some Tylenol for your head. If it is really bothering you, you should ask your parents, anyway. Answered by Scottie Marucci 2 years ago.

in case you get a headache because of the fact of taking the medicine and as you think of you're clearing up now, you are able to desire to not proceed taking the medicine. Drink countless comfortable beverages, shop hydrated to have sufficient kidney filtration. Answered by Jasper Yacko 2 years ago.

Headaches aren't a side effect to this drug (in a general sense). Don't stop taking it unless the prescribing doctor says so. Answered by Valentin Dion 2 years ago.


How much urine is needed to do an extensive lab test break down of opiates?
I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up that it was only... Asked by Efrain Turntine 2 years ago.

I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up that it was only cough syrup. Also, what and how does it get broken down? What illicits drugs can they break down? Answered by Rina Jeswald 2 years ago.

Any toxicology lab will be able to detect the "broken down" metabolites of any substance they want to find: If cough syrup is all your worried about then tell "them" exactly what you took and they can tell if it's the same compounds or not using GC/MS (gas chromotography/mass spec) Drug Profile, Urine (Nine Drugs), Immunoassay With GC/MS Confirmation Synonyms: IA-9 Test Includes: Amphetamines; barbiturates; benzodiazepines; cannabinoids (marijuana); cocaine; methadone (Dolophine®); opiates (codeine, morphine only); phencyclidine (PCP); propoxyphene Specimen: Urine (random) Volume: 45 mL (about 4 tablespoons) Container: Use plastic urine drug bottle and evidence tape or tamper-evident container for forensic specimen. Collection kits are available by request from the laboratory. GC/MS confirmation Methodology: Initial test by immunoassay; confirmation of positives by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) ---------------------- For a typical drug screen usually 20 mL of urine should be enough for additional drug testing. (per LabCorp.com) If a compound wants to be detected, it can be found using the instrumentation available in most toxicology labs. •Volatiles: acetone; ethanol; isopropanol; methanol •*Amphetamines: amphetamine (Dexedrine®), ephedrine/pseudoephedrine; methamphetamine (Desoxyn®); phenmetrazine (Preludin®); phentermine (Ionamin®); phenylpropanolamine •*Antidepressants: amitriptyline (Elavil®); desipramine (Norpramin®); doxepin (Adapin®, Sinequan®); imipramine (Tofranil®); nortriptyline (Pamelor®) •*Barbiturates: amobarbital (Amytal®); butabarbital (Butisol Sodium®); pentobarbital (Nembutal®); phenobarbital (Luminal®); secobarbital (Seconal®) •*Benzodiazepines: chlordiazepoxide (Librium®); diazepam (Valium®) •*Opiates: codeine; morphine •*Phenothiazines: chlorpromazine (Thorazine®); promazine (Sparine®); thioridazine (Mellaril®) •Others: acetaminophen (Tylenol®, Datril®); caffeine; carbamazepine (Tegretol®); cimetidine (Tagamet®); cocaine and/or metabolite; diphenhydramine (Benadryl®); ethchlorvynol (Placidyl®); glutethimide (Doriden®); meperidine (Demerol®); meprobamate (Miltown®, Equanil); methadone (Dolophine®); nicotine; pentazocine (Talwin®); phencyclidine (PCP); propoxyphene (Darvon®) or its metabolite norpropoxyphene; quinine/quinidine *Reported as a class if negative. Listed drugs reported if positive. Urine testing shows drug use over the last 2 or 3 days for amphetamines, cocaine, and opiates. Marijuana and its metabolites, cannabinoids, may be detectable for several weeks. Hair samples, which test the root end of the hair, reflect drug use within the last 2 to 3 months but not the most recent 2-3 weeks - the amount of time it takes for the hair to grow. Saliva detects which drugs have been used in the last 24 hours. Samples of sweat may be collected on an absorbent patch worn for several days to weeks and therefore can indicate drug use at any point during that extended period of time. These other types of samples are often used for specific purposes. For instance, hair samples may be used as an alternative to urine testing for employment or accident drug testing. Sweat testing may be used as a court-ordered monitoring tool in those who have been convicted of drug use, while saliva is often used by the insurance industry to test insurance applicants for drug use. Answered by Nancy Fluitt 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: How much urine is needed to do an extensive lab test break down of opiates? I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up... Answered by Reid Makofsky 2 years ago.

It is possible he will fail the lab test. The home tests are not the same and aren't as good as the lab tests. There is a bit of misinformation out there and that is cocaine is out of your system in 2-3 days. Well while that might be true LABS DON'T TEST FOR THE DRUG ITSELF. Yes, that is true, they look for the metabolite. A metabolite is something that the body produces when it ingests something, in the case of cocaine it is "benzoylecgonine" that will stay around long after the drug is gone, up to 30 days for a frequent user. THE DRUG ITSELF can stay in your bloodstream up to 72 hours. It can stay in your urine for about 1 or up to 3 days after single use. Habitual or chronic use can be detected in urine for up to 12 weeks depending on quantity, duration, and frequency of use. Answered by Iola Mausbach 2 years ago.

Who is "they"? Are you on probation or parole and court-ordered to submit to drug testing? Is this a pre-employment or random employment drug testing in accordance with your company's policies? If not, then no one can drug test you without your consent. Whatever you do, don't use synthetic urine. I used it once and it came back positive for THC. Answered by Towanda Snide 2 years ago.


Does anybody have experiences with the medication promazine/sparine? I'm interested to know about weight gain?
Asked by Numbers Compos 2 years ago.

You're interested to know about weight gain? As though you don't have enough problems, you want to be fat too? Answered by Antione Riippi 2 years ago.


I have a b/p of 86/50, hr is 58, resp are 16, and I have lost 5 lbs. Which do I report to the physician?
Homework question for pharmacology and I cannot find Sparine in my drug book. The above question is for someone admitted to the hospital and is taking Sparine (promazine). Asked by Christiana Schnetzer 2 years ago.

Promazine is used for schizophrenia and other behavioral problems. I would say the weight loss would be siginfigant. The bp is slightly low, but ok and resp are ok. Pulse is a little low. 60-100 is normal in adults. Hope this helps. Answered by Jenifer Bungo 2 years ago.

Why is the sparine being taken? Nausea and vomiting? What time frame for the 5 lb. weight loss? The BP is low, are you athletic? Is the BP a vagal response to vomiting? The heart rate is mildly low, but again, this may be normal for you. Are you using the sparine for mental distubances? Sparine is a phenothiazine derivitive used for nausea, makes the effects of pain meds stronger, and as a short term antipsychotic. The significant things you mentioned would be the BP and the weight loss. Answered by Dante Burke 2 years ago.

The blood pressure and pulse are both low. A lot of anti depressants anti psychotics cause orthostatic hypotension which is low b/p and pulse with a sudden change in body position. It can happen if you stand up too fast, people have experienced it on carnival rides. It is a side effect of the drug and not necessarily a problem if you understand why it is happening and how to avoid it. Call your pharmacist and ask him or her about your symptoms and if they normal with this drug. Contact your MD with this and and further unsettling symptoms. Answered by Jona Trudel 2 years ago.

i would most likely report the blood pressure, it seems extremely low Answered by Felicidad Morasca 2 years ago.

All of the above. Answered by Chi Hillen 2 years ago.


If you take antibiotics and you get a real bad headache from it would you stop?
The medicine is call Erythromycin base 500 Asked by Odell Iacobelli 2 years ago.

Side Effects of This Medicine: Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur: Fever; headache, nausea; skin rash, redness, or itching; stomach pain (severe); unusual tiredness or weakness; vomiting; yellow eyes or skin-with erythromycin estolate (rare with other erythromycins) Pain, swelling, or redness at place of injection Fainting (repeated); irregular or slow heartbeat; loss of hearing (temporary) Other medicines—Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking or receiving erythromycins, it is especially important that your health care professional know if you are taking any of the following: Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Amiodarone (e.g., Cordarone) or Anabolic steroids (nandrolone [e.g., Anabolin], oxandrolone [e.g., Anavar], oxymetholone [e.g., Anadrol], stanozolol [e.g., Winstrol]) or Androgens (male hormones) or Antithyroid agents (medicine for overactive thyroid) or Carmustine (e.g., BiCNU) or Chloroquine (e.g., Aralen) or Dantrolene (e.g., Dantrium) or Daunorubicin (e.g., Cerubidine) or Disulfiram (e.g., Antabuse) or Divalproex (e.g., Depakote) or Estrogens (female hormones) or Etretinate (e.g., Tegison) or Gold salts (medicine for arthritis) or Hydroxychloroquine (e.g., Plaquenil) or Mercaptopurine (e.g., Purinethol) or Methotrexate (e.g., Mexate) or Methyldopa (e.g., Aldomet) or Naltrexone (e.g., Trexan) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Oral contraceptives (birth control pills) containing estrogen or Other anti-infectives by mouth or by injection (medicine for infection) or Phenothiazines (acetophenazine [e.g., Tindal], chlorpromazine [e.g., Thorazine], fluphenazine [e.g., Prolixin], mesoridazine [e.g., Serentil], perphenazine [e.g., Trilafon], prochlorperazine [e.g., Compazine], promazine [e.g., Sparine], promethazine [e.g., Phenergan], thioridazine [e.g., Mellaril], trifluoperazine [e.g., Stelazine], triflupromazine [e.g., Vesprin], trimeprazine [e.g., Temaril]) or Phenytoin (e.g., Dilantin) or Plicamycin (e.g., Mithracin) or Valproic acid (e.g., Depakene)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins, especially erythromycin estolate, may increase the chance of liver problems Aminophylline (e.g., Somophyllin) or Caffeine (e.g., NoDoz) or Oxtriphylline (e.g., Choledyl) or Theophylline (e.g., Somophyllin-T, Theo-Dur)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the chance of side effects from aminophylline, caffeine, oxtriphylline, or theophylline Astemizole (e.g., Hismanal) or Terfenadine (e.g., Seldane)—Use of astemizole or terfenadine with erythromycins may cause heart problems, such as an irregular heartbeat; these medicines should not be used together Carbamazepine (e.g., Tegretol)—Use of carbamazepine with erythromycin may increase the side effects of carbamazepine or increase the chance of liver problems Chloramphenicol (e.g., Chloromycetin) or Clindamycin (e.g., Cleocin) or Lincomycin (e.g., Lincocin)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may decrease the effectiveness of these other antibiotics Cyclosporine (e.g., Sandimmune) or Warfarin (e.g., Coumadin)—Use of any of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the side effects of these medicines Other medical problems—The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of erythromycins. Answered by Lera Ramento 2 years ago.

I'd page my doctor right away to ask if the headache is actually related to the medication and not something happening by chance. Only your doctor can advise you whether you should take a medication or not--remember also to tell the doctor the names of the other medications you're on to make sure there's not an interaction. Answered by Lorina Ziglar 2 years ago.

It is not likely that the antibiotic is giving you the headache. You have to finish your antibiotics, as long as you don't have a life threatening reaction. Take some Tylenol for your head. If it is really bothering you, you should ask your parents, anyway. Answered by Marvella Bareilles 2 years ago.

in case you get a headache because of the fact of taking the medicine and as you think of you're clearing up now, you are able to desire to not proceed taking the medicine. Drink countless comfortable beverages, shop hydrated to have sufficient kidney filtration. Answered by Eliz Samay 2 years ago.

Headaches aren't a side effect to this drug (in a general sense). Don't stop taking it unless the prescribing doctor says so. Answered by Suzi Delenick 2 years ago.


How much urine is needed to do an extensive lab test break down of opiates?
I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up that it was only... Asked by Rubi Pavy 2 years ago.

I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up that it was only cough syrup. Also, what and how does it get broken down? What illicits drugs can they break down? Answered by Patience Tacadina 2 years ago.

Any toxicology lab will be able to detect the "broken down" metabolites of any substance they want to find: If cough syrup is all your worried about then tell "them" exactly what you took and they can tell if it's the same compounds or not using GC/MS (gas chromotography/mass spec) Drug Profile, Urine (Nine Drugs), Immunoassay With GC/MS Confirmation Synonyms: IA-9 Test Includes: Amphetamines; barbiturates; benzodiazepines; cannabinoids (marijuana); cocaine; methadone (Dolophine®); opiates (codeine, morphine only); phencyclidine (PCP); propoxyphene Specimen: Urine (random) Volume: 45 mL (about 4 tablespoons) Container: Use plastic urine drug bottle and evidence tape or tamper-evident container for forensic specimen. Collection kits are available by request from the laboratory. GC/MS confirmation Methodology: Initial test by immunoassay; confirmation of positives by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) ---------------------- For a typical drug screen usually 20 mL of urine should be enough for additional drug testing. (per LabCorp.com) If a compound wants to be detected, it can be found using the instrumentation available in most toxicology labs. •Volatiles: acetone; ethanol; isopropanol; methanol •*Amphetamines: amphetamine (Dexedrine®), ephedrine/pseudoephedrine; methamphetamine (Desoxyn®); phenmetrazine (Preludin®); phentermine (Ionamin®); phenylpropanolamine •*Antidepressants: amitriptyline (Elavil®); desipramine (Norpramin®); doxepin (Adapin®, Sinequan®); imipramine (Tofranil®); nortriptyline (Pamelor®) •*Barbiturates: amobarbital (Amytal®); butabarbital (Butisol Sodium®); pentobarbital (Nembutal®); phenobarbital (Luminal®); secobarbital (Seconal®) •*Benzodiazepines: chlordiazepoxide (Librium®); diazepam (Valium®) •*Opiates: codeine; morphine •*Phenothiazines: chlorpromazine (Thorazine®); promazine (Sparine®); thioridazine (Mellaril®) •Others: acetaminophen (Tylenol®, Datril®); caffeine; carbamazepine (Tegretol®); cimetidine (Tagamet®); cocaine and/or metabolite; diphenhydramine (Benadryl®); ethchlorvynol (Placidyl®); glutethimide (Doriden®); meperidine (Demerol®); meprobamate (Miltown®, Equanil); methadone (Dolophine®); nicotine; pentazocine (Talwin®); phencyclidine (PCP); propoxyphene (Darvon®) or its metabolite norpropoxyphene; quinine/quinidine *Reported as a class if negative. Listed drugs reported if positive. Urine testing shows drug use over the last 2 or 3 days for amphetamines, cocaine, and opiates. Marijuana and its metabolites, cannabinoids, may be detectable for several weeks. Hair samples, which test the root end of the hair, reflect drug use within the last 2 to 3 months but not the most recent 2-3 weeks - the amount of time it takes for the hair to grow. Saliva detects which drugs have been used in the last 24 hours. Samples of sweat may be collected on an absorbent patch worn for several days to weeks and therefore can indicate drug use at any point during that extended period of time. These other types of samples are often used for specific purposes. For instance, hair samples may be used as an alternative to urine testing for employment or accident drug testing. Sweat testing may be used as a court-ordered monitoring tool in those who have been convicted of drug use, while saliva is often used by the insurance industry to test insurance applicants for drug use. Answered by Crysta Dagis 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: How much urine is needed to do an extensive lab test break down of opiates? I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up... Answered by Tristan Gulley 2 years ago.

It is possible he will fail the lab test. The home tests are not the same and aren't as good as the lab tests. There is a bit of misinformation out there and that is cocaine is out of your system in 2-3 days. Well while that might be true LABS DON'T TEST FOR THE DRUG ITSELF. Yes, that is true, they look for the metabolite. A metabolite is something that the body produces when it ingests something, in the case of cocaine it is "benzoylecgonine" that will stay around long after the drug is gone, up to 30 days for a frequent user. THE DRUG ITSELF can stay in your bloodstream up to 72 hours. It can stay in your urine for about 1 or up to 3 days after single use. Habitual or chronic use can be detected in urine for up to 12 weeks depending on quantity, duration, and frequency of use. Answered by Devin Limbaugh 2 years ago.

Who is "they"? Are you on probation or parole and court-ordered to submit to drug testing? Is this a pre-employment or random employment drug testing in accordance with your company's policies? If not, then no one can drug test you without your consent. Whatever you do, don't use synthetic urine. I used it once and it came back positive for THC. Answered by Brian Bolejack 2 years ago.


Does anybody have experiences with the medication promazine/sparine? I'm interested to know about weight gain?
Asked by Alan Presha 2 years ago.

You're interested to know about weight gain? As though you don't have enough problems, you want to be fat too? Answered by Jeremiah Tomala 2 years ago.


I have a b/p of 86/50, hr is 58, resp are 16, and I have lost 5 lbs. Which do I report to the physician?
Homework question for pharmacology and I cannot find Sparine in my drug book. The above question is for someone admitted to the hospital and is taking Sparine (promazine). Asked by Emerson Hillard 2 years ago.

Promazine is used for schizophrenia and other behavioral problems. I would say the weight loss would be siginfigant. The bp is slightly low, but ok and resp are ok. Pulse is a little low. 60-100 is normal in adults. Hope this helps. Answered by Fausto Reimmer 2 years ago.

Why is the sparine being taken? Nausea and vomiting? What time frame for the 5 lb. weight loss? The BP is low, are you athletic? Is the BP a vagal response to vomiting? The heart rate is mildly low, but again, this may be normal for you. Are you using the sparine for mental distubances? Sparine is a phenothiazine derivitive used for nausea, makes the effects of pain meds stronger, and as a short term antipsychotic. The significant things you mentioned would be the BP and the weight loss. Answered by Alda Kerbo 2 years ago.

The blood pressure and pulse are both low. A lot of anti depressants anti psychotics cause orthostatic hypotension which is low b/p and pulse with a sudden change in body position. It can happen if you stand up too fast, people have experienced it on carnival rides. It is a side effect of the drug and not necessarily a problem if you understand why it is happening and how to avoid it. Call your pharmacist and ask him or her about your symptoms and if they normal with this drug. Contact your MD with this and and further unsettling symptoms. Answered by John Toca 2 years ago.

i would most likely report the blood pressure, it seems extremely low Answered by Tessa Yamin 2 years ago.

All of the above. Answered by Merle Brasby 2 years ago.


If you take antibiotics and you get a real bad headache from it would you stop?
The medicine is call Erythromycin base 500 Asked by Holli Dirago 2 years ago.

Side Effects of This Medicine: Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur: Fever; headache, nausea; skin rash, redness, or itching; stomach pain (severe); unusual tiredness or weakness; vomiting; yellow eyes or skin-with erythromycin estolate (rare with other erythromycins) Pain, swelling, or redness at place of injection Fainting (repeated); irregular or slow heartbeat; loss of hearing (temporary) Other medicines—Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking or receiving erythromycins, it is especially important that your health care professional know if you are taking any of the following: Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Amiodarone (e.g., Cordarone) or Anabolic steroids (nandrolone [e.g., Anabolin], oxandrolone [e.g., Anavar], oxymetholone [e.g., Anadrol], stanozolol [e.g., Winstrol]) or Androgens (male hormones) or Antithyroid agents (medicine for overactive thyroid) or Carmustine (e.g., BiCNU) or Chloroquine (e.g., Aralen) or Dantrolene (e.g., Dantrium) or Daunorubicin (e.g., Cerubidine) or Disulfiram (e.g., Antabuse) or Divalproex (e.g., Depakote) or Estrogens (female hormones) or Etretinate (e.g., Tegison) or Gold salts (medicine for arthritis) or Hydroxychloroquine (e.g., Plaquenil) or Mercaptopurine (e.g., Purinethol) or Methotrexate (e.g., Mexate) or Methyldopa (e.g., Aldomet) or Naltrexone (e.g., Trexan) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Oral contraceptives (birth control pills) containing estrogen or Other anti-infectives by mouth or by injection (medicine for infection) or Phenothiazines (acetophenazine [e.g., Tindal], chlorpromazine [e.g., Thorazine], fluphenazine [e.g., Prolixin], mesoridazine [e.g., Serentil], perphenazine [e.g., Trilafon], prochlorperazine [e.g., Compazine], promazine [e.g., Sparine], promethazine [e.g., Phenergan], thioridazine [e.g., Mellaril], trifluoperazine [e.g., Stelazine], triflupromazine [e.g., Vesprin], trimeprazine [e.g., Temaril]) or Phenytoin (e.g., Dilantin) or Plicamycin (e.g., Mithracin) or Valproic acid (e.g., Depakene)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins, especially erythromycin estolate, may increase the chance of liver problems Aminophylline (e.g., Somophyllin) or Caffeine (e.g., NoDoz) or Oxtriphylline (e.g., Choledyl) or Theophylline (e.g., Somophyllin-T, Theo-Dur)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the chance of side effects from aminophylline, caffeine, oxtriphylline, or theophylline Astemizole (e.g., Hismanal) or Terfenadine (e.g., Seldane)—Use of astemizole or terfenadine with erythromycins may cause heart problems, such as an irregular heartbeat; these medicines should not be used together Carbamazepine (e.g., Tegretol)—Use of carbamazepine with erythromycin may increase the side effects of carbamazepine or increase the chance of liver problems Chloramphenicol (e.g., Chloromycetin) or Clindamycin (e.g., Cleocin) or Lincomycin (e.g., Lincocin)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may decrease the effectiveness of these other antibiotics Cyclosporine (e.g., Sandimmune) or Warfarin (e.g., Coumadin)—Use of any of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the side effects of these medicines Other medical problems—The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of erythromycins. Answered by Kiley Kassay 2 years ago.

I'd page my doctor right away to ask if the headache is actually related to the medication and not something happening by chance. Only your doctor can advise you whether you should take a medication or not--remember also to tell the doctor the names of the other medications you're on to make sure there's not an interaction. Answered by Daisy Kays 2 years ago.

It is not likely that the antibiotic is giving you the headache. You have to finish your antibiotics, as long as you don't have a life threatening reaction. Take some Tylenol for your head. If it is really bothering you, you should ask your parents, anyway. Answered by Sueann Templeton 2 years ago.

in case you get a headache because of the fact of taking the medicine and as you think of you're clearing up now, you are able to desire to not proceed taking the medicine. Drink countless comfortable beverages, shop hydrated to have sufficient kidney filtration. Answered by Kesha Tolbent 2 years ago.

Headaches aren't a side effect to this drug (in a general sense). Don't stop taking it unless the prescribing doctor says so. Answered by Cora Demiter 2 years ago.


How much urine is needed to do an extensive lab test break down of opiates?
I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up that it was only... Asked by Latonia Falke 2 years ago.

I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up that it was only cough syrup. Also, what and how does it get broken down? What illicits drugs can they break down? Answered by Chelsie Peppel 2 years ago.

Any toxicology lab will be able to detect the "broken down" metabolites of any substance they want to find: If cough syrup is all your worried about then tell "them" exactly what you took and they can tell if it's the same compounds or not using GC/MS (gas chromotography/mass spec) Drug Profile, Urine (Nine Drugs), Immunoassay With GC/MS Confirmation Synonyms: IA-9 Test Includes: Amphetamines; barbiturates; benzodiazepines; cannabinoids (marijuana); cocaine; methadone (Dolophine®); opiates (codeine, morphine only); phencyclidine (PCP); propoxyphene Specimen: Urine (random) Volume: 45 mL (about 4 tablespoons) Container: Use plastic urine drug bottle and evidence tape or tamper-evident container for forensic specimen. Collection kits are available by request from the laboratory. GC/MS confirmation Methodology: Initial test by immunoassay; confirmation of positives by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) ---------------------- For a typical drug screen usually 20 mL of urine should be enough for additional drug testing. (per LabCorp.com) If a compound wants to be detected, it can be found using the instrumentation available in most toxicology labs. •Volatiles: acetone; ethanol; isopropanol; methanol •*Amphetamines: amphetamine (Dexedrine®), ephedrine/pseudoephedrine; methamphetamine (Desoxyn®); phenmetrazine (Preludin®); phentermine (Ionamin®); phenylpropanolamine •*Antidepressants: amitriptyline (Elavil®); desipramine (Norpramin®); doxepin (Adapin®, Sinequan®); imipramine (Tofranil®); nortriptyline (Pamelor®) •*Barbiturates: amobarbital (Amytal®); butabarbital (Butisol Sodium®); pentobarbital (Nembutal®); phenobarbital (Luminal®); secobarbital (Seconal®) •*Benzodiazepines: chlordiazepoxide (Librium®); diazepam (Valium®) •*Opiates: codeine; morphine •*Phenothiazines: chlorpromazine (Thorazine®); promazine (Sparine®); thioridazine (Mellaril®) •Others: acetaminophen (Tylenol®, Datril®); caffeine; carbamazepine (Tegretol®); cimetidine (Tagamet®); cocaine and/or metabolite; diphenhydramine (Benadryl®); ethchlorvynol (Placidyl®); glutethimide (Doriden®); meperidine (Demerol®); meprobamate (Miltown®, Equanil); methadone (Dolophine®); nicotine; pentazocine (Talwin®); phencyclidine (PCP); propoxyphene (Darvon®) or its metabolite norpropoxyphene; quinine/quinidine *Reported as a class if negative. Listed drugs reported if positive. Urine testing shows drug use over the last 2 or 3 days for amphetamines, cocaine, and opiates. Marijuana and its metabolites, cannabinoids, may be detectable for several weeks. Hair samples, which test the root end of the hair, reflect drug use within the last 2 to 3 months but not the most recent 2-3 weeks - the amount of time it takes for the hair to grow. Saliva detects which drugs have been used in the last 24 hours. Samples of sweat may be collected on an absorbent patch worn for several days to weeks and therefore can indicate drug use at any point during that extended period of time. These other types of samples are often used for specific purposes. For instance, hair samples may be used as an alternative to urine testing for employment or accident drug testing. Sweat testing may be used as a court-ordered monitoring tool in those who have been convicted of drug use, while saliva is often used by the insurance industry to test insurance applicants for drug use. Answered by Cody Messmore 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: How much urine is needed to do an extensive lab test break down of opiates? I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up... Answered by Elba Fadley 2 years ago.

It is possible he will fail the lab test. The home tests are not the same and aren't as good as the lab tests. There is a bit of misinformation out there and that is cocaine is out of your system in 2-3 days. Well while that might be true LABS DON'T TEST FOR THE DRUG ITSELF. Yes, that is true, they look for the metabolite. A metabolite is something that the body produces when it ingests something, in the case of cocaine it is "benzoylecgonine" that will stay around long after the drug is gone, up to 30 days for a frequent user. THE DRUG ITSELF can stay in your bloodstream up to 72 hours. It can stay in your urine for about 1 or up to 3 days after single use. Habitual or chronic use can be detected in urine for up to 12 weeks depending on quantity, duration, and frequency of use. Answered by Leticia Market 2 years ago.

Who is "they"? Are you on probation or parole and court-ordered to submit to drug testing? Is this a pre-employment or random employment drug testing in accordance with your company's policies? If not, then no one can drug test you without your consent. Whatever you do, don't use synthetic urine. I used it once and it came back positive for THC. Answered by Madlyn Bierley 2 years ago.


Does anybody have experiences with the medication promazine/sparine? I'm interested to know about weight gain?
Asked by Isela Padden 2 years ago.

You're interested to know about weight gain? As though you don't have enough problems, you want to be fat too? Answered by Kristie Choudhury 2 years ago.


I have a b/p of 86/50, hr is 58, resp are 16, and I have lost 5 lbs. Which do I report to the physician?
Homework question for pharmacology and I cannot find Sparine in my drug book. The above question is for someone admitted to the hospital and is taking Sparine (promazine). Asked by Diedre Hulick 2 years ago.

Promazine is used for schizophrenia and other behavioral problems. I would say the weight loss would be siginfigant. The bp is slightly low, but ok and resp are ok. Pulse is a little low. 60-100 is normal in adults. Hope this helps. Answered by Zada Stecker 2 years ago.

Why is the sparine being taken? Nausea and vomiting? What time frame for the 5 lb. weight loss? The BP is low, are you athletic? Is the BP a vagal response to vomiting? The heart rate is mildly low, but again, this may be normal for you. Are you using the sparine for mental distubances? Sparine is a phenothiazine derivitive used for nausea, makes the effects of pain meds stronger, and as a short term antipsychotic. The significant things you mentioned would be the BP and the weight loss. Answered by Foster Dornier 2 years ago.

The blood pressure and pulse are both low. A lot of anti depressants anti psychotics cause orthostatic hypotension which is low b/p and pulse with a sudden change in body position. It can happen if you stand up too fast, people have experienced it on carnival rides. It is a side effect of the drug and not necessarily a problem if you understand why it is happening and how to avoid it. Call your pharmacist and ask him or her about your symptoms and if they normal with this drug. Contact your MD with this and and further unsettling symptoms. Answered by Brock Higashi 2 years ago.

i would most likely report the blood pressure, it seems extremely low Answered by Romana Mccaffrey 2 years ago.

All of the above. Answered by Jovan Sponsler 2 years ago.


If you take antibiotics and you get a real bad headache from it would you stop?
The medicine is call Erythromycin base 500 Asked by Williemae Shepherd 2 years ago.

Side Effects of This Medicine: Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur: Fever; headache, nausea; skin rash, redness, or itching; stomach pain (severe); unusual tiredness or weakness; vomiting; yellow eyes or skin-with erythromycin estolate (rare with other erythromycins) Pain, swelling, or redness at place of injection Fainting (repeated); irregular or slow heartbeat; loss of hearing (temporary) Other medicines—Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking or receiving erythromycins, it is especially important that your health care professional know if you are taking any of the following: Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Amiodarone (e.g., Cordarone) or Anabolic steroids (nandrolone [e.g., Anabolin], oxandrolone [e.g., Anavar], oxymetholone [e.g., Anadrol], stanozolol [e.g., Winstrol]) or Androgens (male hormones) or Antithyroid agents (medicine for overactive thyroid) or Carmustine (e.g., BiCNU) or Chloroquine (e.g., Aralen) or Dantrolene (e.g., Dantrium) or Daunorubicin (e.g., Cerubidine) or Disulfiram (e.g., Antabuse) or Divalproex (e.g., Depakote) or Estrogens (female hormones) or Etretinate (e.g., Tegison) or Gold salts (medicine for arthritis) or Hydroxychloroquine (e.g., Plaquenil) or Mercaptopurine (e.g., Purinethol) or Methotrexate (e.g., Mexate) or Methyldopa (e.g., Aldomet) or Naltrexone (e.g., Trexan) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Oral contraceptives (birth control pills) containing estrogen or Other anti-infectives by mouth or by injection (medicine for infection) or Phenothiazines (acetophenazine [e.g., Tindal], chlorpromazine [e.g., Thorazine], fluphenazine [e.g., Prolixin], mesoridazine [e.g., Serentil], perphenazine [e.g., Trilafon], prochlorperazine [e.g., Compazine], promazine [e.g., Sparine], promethazine [e.g., Phenergan], thioridazine [e.g., Mellaril], trifluoperazine [e.g., Stelazine], triflupromazine [e.g., Vesprin], trimeprazine [e.g., Temaril]) or Phenytoin (e.g., Dilantin) or Plicamycin (e.g., Mithracin) or Valproic acid (e.g., Depakene)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins, especially erythromycin estolate, may increase the chance of liver problems Aminophylline (e.g., Somophyllin) or Caffeine (e.g., NoDoz) or Oxtriphylline (e.g., Choledyl) or Theophylline (e.g., Somophyllin-T, Theo-Dur)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the chance of side effects from aminophylline, caffeine, oxtriphylline, or theophylline Astemizole (e.g., Hismanal) or Terfenadine (e.g., Seldane)—Use of astemizole or terfenadine with erythromycins may cause heart problems, such as an irregular heartbeat; these medicines should not be used together Carbamazepine (e.g., Tegretol)—Use of carbamazepine with erythromycin may increase the side effects of carbamazepine or increase the chance of liver problems Chloramphenicol (e.g., Chloromycetin) or Clindamycin (e.g., Cleocin) or Lincomycin (e.g., Lincocin)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may decrease the effectiveness of these other antibiotics Cyclosporine (e.g., Sandimmune) or Warfarin (e.g., Coumadin)—Use of any of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the side effects of these medicines Other medical problems—The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of erythromycins. Answered by Jacquelynn Arterburn 2 years ago.

I'd page my doctor right away to ask if the headache is actually related to the medication and not something happening by chance. Only your doctor can advise you whether you should take a medication or not--remember also to tell the doctor the names of the other medications you're on to make sure there's not an interaction. Answered by Almeda Mattke 2 years ago.

It is not likely that the antibiotic is giving you the headache. You have to finish your antibiotics, as long as you don't have a life threatening reaction. Take some Tylenol for your head. If it is really bothering you, you should ask your parents, anyway. Answered by Billie Bonsal 2 years ago.

in case you get a headache because of the fact of taking the medicine and as you think of you're clearing up now, you are able to desire to not proceed taking the medicine. Drink countless comfortable beverages, shop hydrated to have sufficient kidney filtration. Answered by Annita Lagergren 2 years ago.

Headaches aren't a side effect to this drug (in a general sense). Don't stop taking it unless the prescribing doctor says so. Answered by Temika Kushaney 2 years ago.


How much urine is needed to do an extensive lab test break down of opiates?
I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up that it was only... Asked by Maryjane Stvil 2 years ago.

I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up that it was only cough syrup. Also, what and how does it get broken down? What illicits drugs can they break down? Answered by Elna Vanderlip 2 years ago.

Any toxicology lab will be able to detect the "broken down" metabolites of any substance they want to find: If cough syrup is all your worried about then tell "them" exactly what you took and they can tell if it's the same compounds or not using GC/MS (gas chromotography/mass spec) Drug Profile, Urine (Nine Drugs), Immunoassay With GC/MS Confirmation Synonyms: IA-9 Test Includes: Amphetamines; barbiturates; benzodiazepines; cannabinoids (marijuana); cocaine; methadone (Dolophine®); opiates (codeine, morphine only); phencyclidine (PCP); propoxyphene Specimen: Urine (random) Volume: 45 mL (about 4 tablespoons) Container: Use plastic urine drug bottle and evidence tape or tamper-evident container for forensic specimen. Collection kits are available by request from the laboratory. GC/MS confirmation Methodology: Initial test by immunoassay; confirmation of positives by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) ---------------------- For a typical drug screen usually 20 mL of urine should be enough for additional drug testing. (per LabCorp.com) If a compound wants to be detected, it can be found using the instrumentation available in most toxicology labs. •Volatiles: acetone; ethanol; isopropanol; methanol •*Amphetamines: amphetamine (Dexedrine®), ephedrine/pseudoephedrine; methamphetamine (Desoxyn®); phenmetrazine (Preludin®); phentermine (Ionamin®); phenylpropanolamine •*Antidepressants: amitriptyline (Elavil®); desipramine (Norpramin®); doxepin (Adapin®, Sinequan®); imipramine (Tofranil®); nortriptyline (Pamelor®) •*Barbiturates: amobarbital (Amytal®); butabarbital (Butisol Sodium®); pentobarbital (Nembutal®); phenobarbital (Luminal®); secobarbital (Seconal®) •*Benzodiazepines: chlordiazepoxide (Librium®); diazepam (Valium®) •*Opiates: codeine; morphine •*Phenothiazines: chlorpromazine (Thorazine®); promazine (Sparine®); thioridazine (Mellaril®) •Others: acetaminophen (Tylenol®, Datril®); caffeine; carbamazepine (Tegretol®); cimetidine (Tagamet®); cocaine and/or metabolite; diphenhydramine (Benadryl®); ethchlorvynol (Placidyl®); glutethimide (Doriden®); meperidine (Demerol®); meprobamate (Miltown®, Equanil); methadone (Dolophine®); nicotine; pentazocine (Talwin®); phencyclidine (PCP); propoxyphene (Darvon®) or its metabolite norpropoxyphene; quinine/quinidine *Reported as a class if negative. Listed drugs reported if positive. Urine testing shows drug use over the last 2 or 3 days for amphetamines, cocaine, and opiates. Marijuana and its metabolites, cannabinoids, may be detectable for several weeks. Hair samples, which test the root end of the hair, reflect drug use within the last 2 to 3 months but not the most recent 2-3 weeks - the amount of time it takes for the hair to grow. Saliva detects which drugs have been used in the last 24 hours. Samples of sweat may be collected on an absorbent patch worn for several days to weeks and therefore can indicate drug use at any point during that extended period of time. These other types of samples are often used for specific purposes. For instance, hair samples may be used as an alternative to urine testing for employment or accident drug testing. Sweat testing may be used as a court-ordered monitoring tool in those who have been convicted of drug use, while saliva is often used by the insurance industry to test insurance applicants for drug use. Answered by Elene Radunz 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: How much urine is needed to do an extensive lab test break down of opiates? I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up... Answered by Shirl Cruze 2 years ago.

It is possible he will fail the lab test. The home tests are not the same and aren't as good as the lab tests. There is a bit of misinformation out there and that is cocaine is out of your system in 2-3 days. Well while that might be true LABS DON'T TEST FOR THE DRUG ITSELF. Yes, that is true, they look for the metabolite. A metabolite is something that the body produces when it ingests something, in the case of cocaine it is "benzoylecgonine" that will stay around long after the drug is gone, up to 30 days for a frequent user. THE DRUG ITSELF can stay in your bloodstream up to 72 hours. It can stay in your urine for about 1 or up to 3 days after single use. Habitual or chronic use can be detected in urine for up to 12 weeks depending on quantity, duration, and frequency of use. Answered by Norah Jean 2 years ago.

Who is "they"? Are you on probation or parole and court-ordered to submit to drug testing? Is this a pre-employment or random employment drug testing in accordance with your company's policies? If not, then no one can drug test you without your consent. Whatever you do, don't use synthetic urine. I used it once and it came back positive for THC. Answered by Charlesetta Soult 2 years ago.


Does anybody have experiences with the medication promazine/sparine? I'm interested to know about weight gain?
Asked by Haley Altomari 2 years ago.

You're interested to know about weight gain? As though you don't have enough problems, you want to be fat too? Answered by Jeanine Whitcraft 2 years ago.


I have a b/p of 86/50, hr is 58, resp are 16, and I have lost 5 lbs. Which do I report to the physician?
Homework question for pharmacology and I cannot find Sparine in my drug book. The above question is for someone admitted to the hospital and is taking Sparine (promazine). Asked by Jackqueline Barkins 2 years ago.

Promazine is used for schizophrenia and other behavioral problems. I would say the weight loss would be siginfigant. The bp is slightly low, but ok and resp are ok. Pulse is a little low. 60-100 is normal in adults. Hope this helps. Answered by Wei Urmos 2 years ago.

Why is the sparine being taken? Nausea and vomiting? What time frame for the 5 lb. weight loss? The BP is low, are you athletic? Is the BP a vagal response to vomiting? The heart rate is mildly low, but again, this may be normal for you. Are you using the sparine for mental distubances? Sparine is a phenothiazine derivitive used for nausea, makes the effects of pain meds stronger, and as a short term antipsychotic. The significant things you mentioned would be the BP and the weight loss. Answered by Jeannine Tomkowicz 2 years ago.

The blood pressure and pulse are both low. A lot of anti depressants anti psychotics cause orthostatic hypotension which is low b/p and pulse with a sudden change in body position. It can happen if you stand up too fast, people have experienced it on carnival rides. It is a side effect of the drug and not necessarily a problem if you understand why it is happening and how to avoid it. Call your pharmacist and ask him or her about your symptoms and if they normal with this drug. Contact your MD with this and and further unsettling symptoms. Answered by Carmelo Crandell 2 years ago.

i would most likely report the blood pressure, it seems extremely low Answered by Deidre Kilbourne 2 years ago.

All of the above. Answered by Tabetha Geils 2 years ago.


If you take antibiotics and you get a real bad headache from it would you stop?
The medicine is call Erythromycin base 500 Asked by Courtney Beaucage 2 years ago.

Side Effects of This Medicine: Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur: Fever; headache, nausea; skin rash, redness, or itching; stomach pain (severe); unusual tiredness or weakness; vomiting; yellow eyes or skin-with erythromycin estolate (rare with other erythromycins) Pain, swelling, or redness at place of injection Fainting (repeated); irregular or slow heartbeat; loss of hearing (temporary) Other medicines—Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking or receiving erythromycins, it is especially important that your health care professional know if you are taking any of the following: Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Amiodarone (e.g., Cordarone) or Anabolic steroids (nandrolone [e.g., Anabolin], oxandrolone [e.g., Anavar], oxymetholone [e.g., Anadrol], stanozolol [e.g., Winstrol]) or Androgens (male hormones) or Antithyroid agents (medicine for overactive thyroid) or Carmustine (e.g., BiCNU) or Chloroquine (e.g., Aralen) or Dantrolene (e.g., Dantrium) or Daunorubicin (e.g., Cerubidine) or Disulfiram (e.g., Antabuse) or Divalproex (e.g., Depakote) or Estrogens (female hormones) or Etretinate (e.g., Tegison) or Gold salts (medicine for arthritis) or Hydroxychloroquine (e.g., Plaquenil) or Mercaptopurine (e.g., Purinethol) or Methotrexate (e.g., Mexate) or Methyldopa (e.g., Aldomet) or Naltrexone (e.g., Trexan) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Oral contraceptives (birth control pills) containing estrogen or Other anti-infectives by mouth or by injection (medicine for infection) or Phenothiazines (acetophenazine [e.g., Tindal], chlorpromazine [e.g., Thorazine], fluphenazine [e.g., Prolixin], mesoridazine [e.g., Serentil], perphenazine [e.g., Trilafon], prochlorperazine [e.g., Compazine], promazine [e.g., Sparine], promethazine [e.g., Phenergan], thioridazine [e.g., Mellaril], trifluoperazine [e.g., Stelazine], triflupromazine [e.g., Vesprin], trimeprazine [e.g., Temaril]) or Phenytoin (e.g., Dilantin) or Plicamycin (e.g., Mithracin) or Valproic acid (e.g., Depakene)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins, especially erythromycin estolate, may increase the chance of liver problems Aminophylline (e.g., Somophyllin) or Caffeine (e.g., NoDoz) or Oxtriphylline (e.g., Choledyl) or Theophylline (e.g., Somophyllin-T, Theo-Dur)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the chance of side effects from aminophylline, caffeine, oxtriphylline, or theophylline Astemizole (e.g., Hismanal) or Terfenadine (e.g., Seldane)—Use of astemizole or terfenadine with erythromycins may cause heart problems, such as an irregular heartbeat; these medicines should not be used together Carbamazepine (e.g., Tegretol)—Use of carbamazepine with erythromycin may increase the side effects of carbamazepine or increase the chance of liver problems Chloramphenicol (e.g., Chloromycetin) or Clindamycin (e.g., Cleocin) or Lincomycin (e.g., Lincocin)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may decrease the effectiveness of these other antibiotics Cyclosporine (e.g., Sandimmune) or Warfarin (e.g., Coumadin)—Use of any of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the side effects of these medicines Other medical problems—The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of erythromycins. Answered by Gearldine Dankmeyer 2 years ago.

I'd page my doctor right away to ask if the headache is actually related to the medication and not something happening by chance. Only your doctor can advise you whether you should take a medication or not--remember also to tell the doctor the names of the other medications you're on to make sure there's not an interaction. Answered by Estelle Steeby 2 years ago.

It is not likely that the antibiotic is giving you the headache. You have to finish your antibiotics, as long as you don't have a life threatening reaction. Take some Tylenol for your head. If it is really bothering you, you should ask your parents, anyway. Answered by Shad Fetz 2 years ago.

in case you get a headache because of the fact of taking the medicine and as you think of you're clearing up now, you are able to desire to not proceed taking the medicine. Drink countless comfortable beverages, shop hydrated to have sufficient kidney filtration. Answered by Jonelle Obstfeld 2 years ago.

Headaches aren't a side effect to this drug (in a general sense). Don't stop taking it unless the prescribing doctor says so. Answered by Lizbeth Muhlestein 2 years ago.


How much urine is needed to do an extensive lab test break down of opiates?
I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up that it was only... Asked by Leonard Grubel 2 years ago.

I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up that it was only cough syrup. Also, what and how does it get broken down? What illicits drugs can they break down? Answered by Maisie Crepeau 2 years ago.

Any toxicology lab will be able to detect the "broken down" metabolites of any substance they want to find: If cough syrup is all your worried about then tell "them" exactly what you took and they can tell if it's the same compounds or not using GC/MS (gas chromotography/mass spec) Drug Profile, Urine (Nine Drugs), Immunoassay With GC/MS Confirmation Synonyms: IA-9 Test Includes: Amphetamines; barbiturates; benzodiazepines; cannabinoids (marijuana); cocaine; methadone (Dolophine®); opiates (codeine, morphine only); phencyclidine (PCP); propoxyphene Specimen: Urine (random) Volume: 45 mL (about 4 tablespoons) Container: Use plastic urine drug bottle and evidence tape or tamper-evident container for forensic specimen. Collection kits are available by request from the laboratory. GC/MS confirmation Methodology: Initial test by immunoassay; confirmation of positives by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) ---------------------- For a typical drug screen usually 20 mL of urine should be enough for additional drug testing. (per LabCorp.com) If a compound wants to be detected, it can be found using the instrumentation available in most toxicology labs. •Volatiles: acetone; ethanol; isopropanol; methanol •*Amphetamines: amphetamine (Dexedrine®), ephedrine/pseudoephedrine; methamphetamine (Desoxyn®); phenmetrazine (Preludin®); phentermine (Ionamin®); phenylpropanolamine •*Antidepressants: amitriptyline (Elavil®); desipramine (Norpramin®); doxepin (Adapin®, Sinequan®); imipramine (Tofranil®); nortriptyline (Pamelor®) •*Barbiturates: amobarbital (Amytal®); butabarbital (Butisol Sodium®); pentobarbital (Nembutal®); phenobarbital (Luminal®); secobarbital (Seconal®) •*Benzodiazepines: chlordiazepoxide (Librium®); diazepam (Valium®) •*Opiates: codeine; morphine •*Phenothiazines: chlorpromazine (Thorazine®); promazine (Sparine®); thioridazine (Mellaril®) •Others: acetaminophen (Tylenol®, Datril®); caffeine; carbamazepine (Tegretol®); cimetidine (Tagamet®); cocaine and/or metabolite; diphenhydramine (Benadryl®); ethchlorvynol (Placidyl®); glutethimide (Doriden®); meperidine (Demerol®); meprobamate (Miltown®, Equanil); methadone (Dolophine®); nicotine; pentazocine (Talwin®); phencyclidine (PCP); propoxyphene (Darvon®) or its metabolite norpropoxyphene; quinine/quinidine *Reported as a class if negative. Listed drugs reported if positive. Urine testing shows drug use over the last 2 or 3 days for amphetamines, cocaine, and opiates. Marijuana and its metabolites, cannabinoids, may be detectable for several weeks. Hair samples, which test the root end of the hair, reflect drug use within the last 2 to 3 months but not the most recent 2-3 weeks - the amount of time it takes for the hair to grow. Saliva detects which drugs have been used in the last 24 hours. Samples of sweat may be collected on an absorbent patch worn for several days to weeks and therefore can indicate drug use at any point during that extended period of time. These other types of samples are often used for specific purposes. For instance, hair samples may be used as an alternative to urine testing for employment or accident drug testing. Sweat testing may be used as a court-ordered monitoring tool in those who have been convicted of drug use, while saliva is often used by the insurance industry to test insurance applicants for drug use. Answered by Warner Hoste 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: How much urine is needed to do an extensive lab test break down of opiates? I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up... Answered by Annemarie Frerichs 2 years ago.

It is possible he will fail the lab test. The home tests are not the same and aren't as good as the lab tests. There is a bit of misinformation out there and that is cocaine is out of your system in 2-3 days. Well while that might be true LABS DON'T TEST FOR THE DRUG ITSELF. Yes, that is true, they look for the metabolite. A metabolite is something that the body produces when it ingests something, in the case of cocaine it is "benzoylecgonine" that will stay around long after the drug is gone, up to 30 days for a frequent user. THE DRUG ITSELF can stay in your bloodstream up to 72 hours. It can stay in your urine for about 1 or up to 3 days after single use. Habitual or chronic use can be detected in urine for up to 12 weeks depending on quantity, duration, and frequency of use. Answered by Felix Prause 2 years ago.

Who is "they"? Are you on probation or parole and court-ordered to submit to drug testing? Is this a pre-employment or random employment drug testing in accordance with your company's policies? If not, then no one can drug test you without your consent. Whatever you do, don't use synthetic urine. I used it once and it came back positive for THC. Answered by Alexander Bashinelli 2 years ago.


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