Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 016191/001.

Names and composition

"SORBITRATE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016191/001 SORBITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 5MG
016191/002 SORBITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 2.5MG
016192/001 SORBITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
016192/002 SORBITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
016776/002 SORBITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET, CHEWABLE/ORAL 5MG
016776/003 SORBITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET, CHEWABLE/ORAL 10MG
086405/002 SORBITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
088124/001 SORBITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
088125/001 SORBITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/ORAL 40MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
012093/001 ISORDIL ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
012093/002 ISORDIL ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
012093/005 ISORDIL ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/ORAL 30MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
012093/006 ISORDIL ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/ORAL 20MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
012093/007 ISORDIL ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
012882/001 ISORDIL ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 40MG
012882/002 ISORDIL ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 40MG
012940/003 ISORDIL ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 5MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
012940/004 ISORDIL ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 2.5MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
012940/005 ISORDIL ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 10MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
016191/001 SORBITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 5MG
016191/002 SORBITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 2.5MG
016192/001 SORBITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
016192/002 SORBITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
016776/002 SORBITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET, CHEWABLE/ORAL 5MG
016776/003 SORBITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET, CHEWABLE/ORAL 10MG
019790/001 DILATRATE-SR ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 40MG
040009/001 ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 40MG
040591/001 ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
040723/001 ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 40MG
084204/001 ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 2.5MG
086031/001 ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 5MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
086032/001 ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
086033/001 ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 2.5MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
086034/001 ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
086054/001 ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 2.5MG
086055/001 ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 5MG
086066/001 ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
086067/001 ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
086166/002 ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
086167/001 ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
086168/001 ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 5MG
086169/001 ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
086221/001 ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
086222/001 ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 5MG
086223/001 ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
086225/001 ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 2.5MG
086405/002 SORBITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
086923/001 ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
086925/001 ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
087537/001 ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
087545/001 ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 10MG
087564/001 ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
087946/001 ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
088088/001 ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
088124/001 SORBITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
088125/001 SORBITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
089190/001 ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
089191/001 ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
089192/001 ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
089367/001 ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE ISOSORBIDE DINITRATE TABLET/ORAL 20MG

Ask a doctor

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

Does having Asprin & Sorbitrate together cause any harm in patients misdiagnosed as having a Heart Attack?
The actual reason could be something else. Is it OK to be on the safe side and to administer the Tablets to the him / her? Asked by Dorian Betsill 1 year ago.

It OK, No lethal harm was seen except for throbbing sensation due to nitrates, and occasionally dizziness. I have seen many cases during my career. Answered by Ruben Lesh 1 year ago.


What is the alternative tablet for 'Sarbitrate 10 mg' in Germany?
This is a tablet prescreibed by the cardiologist in India for heart disease. Asked by Leonel Acquaviva 1 year ago.

Sorbitrate 10mg (isosorbide dinitrate) should be available worldwide. Answered by Myrna Bartush 1 year ago.


Waht is the content of the tablet ' sarbitrate 10 mg' ?
Asked by Abe Neylon 1 year ago.

It is sorbitrate 10 mg: isosorbide dinitrate, dilates blood vessels, mainly used in the treatment of anginal paing due to narrowing of blood vessels supplying the heart. Answered by Renaldo Pinchbeck 1 year ago.

It's a drug, man. Don't take it. Answered by Jean Tassinari 1 year ago.


Is Levitra good for a guy who has diabetes and had a heart surgery?
Asked by Chasity Louch 1 year ago.

If your Doctor says so, otherwise NO - read some of the warnings below Do not take vardenafil if you are also using a nitrate drug for chest pain or heart problems. This includes nitroglycerin (Nitrostat, Nitrolingual, Nitro-Dur, Nitro-Bid, and others), isosorbide dinitrate (Dilatrate-SR, Isordil, Sorbitrate), and isosorbide mononitrate (Imdur, ISMO, Monoket). Nitrates are also found in some recreational drugs such as amyl nitrate or nitrite ("poppers"). Taking vardenafil with a nitrate medicine can cause a serious decrease in blood pressure, leading to fainting, stroke, or heart attack. A small number of patients have had a sudden loss of eyesight after taking vardenafil. This type of vision loss is caused by decreased blood flow to the optic nerve of the eye. It is not clear whether vardenafil is the actual cause of such vision loss. Sudden vision loss with vardenafil use has occurred most often in people with heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or certain pre-existing eye problems, and in those who smoke or are over 50 years old. Before taking vardenafil, tell your doctor if you have: -heart disease or heart rhythm problems; -a recent history (in the past 6 months) of a heart attack, -angina (chest pain), or congestive heart failure; -a history of stroke or blood clots; -a personal or family history of "Long QT syndrome"; -high or low blood pressure; -liver disease; -kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis); -a blood cell disorder such as sickle cell anemia, multiple myeloma, or leukemia; -a bleeding disorder such as hemophilia; -a stomach ulcer; retinitis pigmentosa (an inherited condition of the eye); -a physical deformity of the penis (such as Peyronie's disease); or -if you have been told you should not have sexual intercourse for health reasons. If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use vardenafil or you may need a dosage adjustment or special tests during treatment. Answered by Reuben Berenbaum 1 year ago.

A man with diabetes and a history of heart disease has a lot of risk factors and should be consulting his doctor. I wouldn't recommend looking for advice from anonymous people online who can't be held accountable if something were to go wrong. Answered by Clorinda Smyre 1 year ago.

Probably not. I don't think Levitra is good for anybody, really... because it's just another drug. But you should really ask your doctor to be sure. Answered by Yen Ryman 1 year ago.

NO, it seriously interacts with heart meds. And will affect your hearth rhythm. Please ask a doctor before use Answered by Addie Mcgahey 1 year ago.

your going to have to go to a doctor to get it anyway ask them. Answered by Paulita Smithee 1 year ago.


If someone is having symptoms of a heart attack like pain n shoulders and jaw then took paracetemol?
would that make the pain go away Asked by Virginia Alltop 1 year ago.

Well, a common drug used under this condition is the Sorbitrate(Isosorbide - Dinitrate 5/10mg) based upon condition. Along with this, a tramadol containing tablet would be helpful. The first option is more safe and preferred. Answered by Ellen Ewin 1 year ago.

If someone is having a heart attack, you do not want to give them paracetamol. By the time it relieves the pain, the person will be dead. If this happens again, give 81mg aspirin, a nitro tablet, and call 911 right away. For non-heart attack pain (angina), daily aspirin and something like lisinopril might help. Answered by Elena Elger 1 year ago.

Aspirin (delayed release) would be fine. It will prevent or lessen the severity of heart attack.(75 mg daily). Take ECG and confirm that you have no heart attack. Answered by Granville Emoto 1 year ago.


My father just had an angina attack.?
The doctor has prescribed certain allopathic medicines. Along with that can homeopathic medicine also be consumed? I read on a site that both can be taken as they do not cross each others' path, whereas on some other I saw that if both taken together, the results can be fatal. Kindly tell me which one is true? Asked by Mindy Pecatoste 1 year ago.

Your father had an angina attack and requires allopathic medications to prevent the angina from recurring or becoming worse. The drugs increase heart perfusion and oxygenation and improve heart muscle tone, usually Sorbitrate (Nicholas) and other anti angina drugs, and other drugs like platelet aggregation inhibitors like salicylates. The homeopathic pills are to help boost body vitality and may be of benefit, if prescribed by a registered homeopath. Please make sure that you always consult a registered allopath or homeopath. Both are safe and very helpful in helping your father overcome his condition and live a healthy life. Avoid cigarettes, avoid alcohol, avoid fried fatty foods, avoid straining and avoid emotional stress. Do take wholesome foods, keep blood pressure in control and take prescribed medications regularly. All the best. Answered by Marjory Cobine 1 year ago.

While it is rather unlikely that a homeopathic drug would react with prescription medication, it is not impossible. Why take the risk? At least ask a pharmacist. Answered by Hassie Asch 1 year ago.

Taking water with medicines is fine. Answered by Breann Fraher 1 year ago.

What are the names of the medicines? You left that out. Answered by Lani Pruden 1 year ago.

He should be take only allopathic medicine. Answered by Shavon Fox 1 year ago.

Triple by-pass is the best medicine. Answered by Roseanne Buyck 1 year ago.

homeopathic medicine is nothing, Answered by Sarita Hopman 1 year ago.


How do i prevent a heart attack?
i do research on forests in North india and in the Himalayas as well. Sometimes i have to trek 10 km a day, but sometimes i decide to save time by trekking 30 kms a day too. I have very good fitness but the walks are hard. In the day, in summer the forests can become quite hot and i perspire a lot. In the... Asked by Noel Casolary 1 year ago.

i do research on forests in North india and in the Himalayas as well. Sometimes i have to trek 10 km a day, but sometimes i decide to save time by trekking 30 kms a day too. I have very good fitness but the walks are hard. In the day, in summer the forests can become quite hot and i perspire a lot. In the Himalayas the uphill walks can get unbearably tiring. Im in my early 30's but a friend my age got a heart attack while climbing up the himalayas on a pilgrimage. And i can go 1-2 days without meeting anybody in the forests. So should i keep sorbitrate with me all the time. What other precautions can i take. Answered by Fe Baldomero 1 year ago.

Simplify your life. Not everything in our life needs to be in our life. We all accumulate excess baggage. Simplify by clearing out the physical clutter. Give things you no longer need to people who could use them. Evaluate your everyday tasks and commitments, and delegate what you can. Keeping your life simple may mean saying no to some things so you can concentrate on what's valuable. Answered by Lacresha Akhtar 1 year ago.

Well its good that you exercise regularly. That right there is a key to prevent a heart attack. Really eating healthy and exercising. If you have blood pressure problems, you should see a Dr. and they can prescribe something to lower your BP as a result lowering your risk for a heart attack. Answered by Lili Obannon 1 year ago.

Biggest tips are: Don't smoke Reduce your stress load Don't eat fatty / salty foods Maintain a healthy weight / BMI Exercise If you have precursors to heart disease, take a baby aspirin daily. Answered by Chauncey Applonie 1 year ago.

Swallow a teaspoon of olive oil every day, and take a low dose of asprin daily as well. Answered by Shandra Byes 1 year ago.

Speak to you doctor and before for you exercising I would take an advil BUT again speak to you doctor. Answered by Isabell Orloff 1 year ago.

Stop worrying so much. That's awesome what you do by the way. I wish I could do something like that. Answered by Elayne Leconey 1 year ago.

The time is now and now is all we have. Answered by Jodee Garich 1 year ago.


What happens if you get a heart attack?
I mean, lets say, I get a heart attack. Do I hafta get surgery? If so, what kind? Can you ONLY get heart attacks because of the cholestrial? Can you get it if you already have a bad heart? Can you get it over working yourself? And after a heart attack, how can you prevent if from happening again? So many... Asked by Julian Hollandsworth 1 year ago.

I mean, lets say, I get a heart attack. Do I hafta get surgery? If so, what kind? Can you ONLY get heart attacks because of the cholestrial? Can you get it if you already have a bad heart? Can you get it over working yourself? And after a heart attack, how can you prevent if from happening again? So many questions... Hahaha Answered by Edyth Slack 1 year ago.

Heart attack may be mild, moderate or severe. In cases of severe (acute) heart attack the mortality is very high and the patient is generally brought dead to the hospital. This may occur more commonly in very high smokers, patients suffering from sever uncontrolled blood pressure, Chronic uncontrolled diabetics, uncontrolled obesity cases, uncontrolled long standing cholesteroiemia, more rarely in high wrestlers, high class body builders, etc., etc. One should be careful of this type and try to avoid the predisposing causes in this cases. An element of genetic and familial tendency is also seen in all these heart attacks. In moderate case of CAD (heart attack) the attack may take some time (say about 10 mts. to 1/2 hour) to go into acute MI where timely treatment / management in the ICCU with continued IV sorbitrate or glyceryl trinitrate and more importantly a timely STK, etc., may reverse back the condition without going to a muscle damage (MI) or death. Here the patient should be monitored in the ICCU continuously under a cardiologist care with a ready Defibrillator and a special ICCU trained nursing care for at least 3 to 5 days to avoid a recurrence leading to sudden death. In these cases a CAG, is generally done and further interventional cardiological procedures like PTCA, and Stent etc are provided as per the result of the CAG (coronary Angiogram); or a CABG (coronary bypass surgery) is advised and done. Such of these patients may recover with out a morbidity but is to be reviewed by the cardiologist periodically throught life to avoid a recurrance etc. Rarely when the heart attack is mild or just like a threatining type the patient may have to be hospitalised for a detailed investigations under a cardiologist supervision and the precipitating cause eleminated. Such cases are also advised a CAG or a PTCA with a stent (generally drug coated) or a CABG may be advised / undertaken as a preventive measure, depending on the findings and severity of the mild heart attack etc., etc...... In all the above different varieties; a calm, worry and hurry free, relaxed, but a timely quick attitude; is very important to save from mortality or morbidity in the heart attacks. Answered by Aurora Caulley 1 year ago.

You don't necessarily have to have surgery, it depends on the size of the clot, it can often be broken up with drugs that break up clots. Heart attacks can be caused by many different things, not just cholesterol, all it is is a blood clot in a coronary artery, so it could be a piece that has broken off from a damaged area and flowed in to the coronary artery. If you have a bad heart you are no more likely to suffer one, having bad cholesterol doesn't help though. Stress can be a factor as well, because it can cause high blood pressure, which can damage the arteries and cause them to thin by a processes called Atherosclerosis. Preventative methods involve limiting the factors: Diet=Less fatty foods, Stress=Lower it. There are also some factors such as genetics that you can't control, but by controlling the ones that you can, then you can do a great deal to stop it again. Answered by Cathey Park 1 year ago.

Let's see....40% of the time you'll die before making it to a hospital. If you're fortunate enough to survive, it all depends on the type of attack and the severity as to whether surgery is warranted. Answered by Dee Dunton 1 year ago.


I REALLY need to know this. PLEASE help.!?
My dad first had a heart attack in April of 2008. Then, he had another heart attack a couple weeks ago. Will this increase his chances of anything happening in the future, and if so, will he survive it? Asked by Deedee Halfacre 1 year ago.

Yes he is a high risk patient. But proper medication and care will minimise the worst effect. Alaways keep Aspirin and Sorbitrate tablet available. Incase of heart attack first give this tablets and then call Dr. Answered by Peggie Droneburg 1 year ago.

I agree with the first answerer - Rely ENTIRELY on what his doctors tell you and NOT an what COULD be nothing but sheer guesswork - we have no access to his medical records so even if there WERE doctors on here they couldn't really give a professional answer or even opinion Answered by Frederic Nightingale 1 year ago.

please dont ask amateurs here. your father needs to talk to doctor about lowering the risk. the doctor may perscribe some medication as his heart attacks maybe genetic or environment related (eating bad food). Answered by Marci Tufano 1 year ago.


Does having Asprin & Sorbitrate together cause any harm in patients misdiagnosed as having a Heart Attack?
The actual reason could be something else. Is it OK to be on the safe side and to administer the Tablets to the him / her? Asked by Devin Hetjonk 1 year ago.

It OK, No lethal harm was seen except for throbbing sensation due to nitrates, and occasionally dizziness. I have seen many cases during my career. Answered by Claudie Atengco 1 year ago.


What is the alternative tablet for 'Sarbitrate 10 mg' in Germany?
This is a tablet prescreibed by the cardiologist in India for heart disease. Asked by Micaela Bagg 1 year ago.

Sorbitrate 10mg (isosorbide dinitrate) should be available worldwide. Answered by Marty Asleson 1 year ago.


Waht is the content of the tablet ' sarbitrate 10 mg' ?
Asked by Lia Sipe 1 year ago.

It is sorbitrate 10 mg: isosorbide dinitrate, dilates blood vessels, mainly used in the treatment of anginal paing due to narrowing of blood vessels supplying the heart. Answered by Delorse Phippard 1 year ago.

It's a drug, man. Don't take it. Answered by Helen Gambee 1 year ago.


Is Levitra good for a guy who has diabetes and had a heart surgery?
Asked by Olympia Fergerstrom 1 year ago.

If your Doctor says so, otherwise NO - read some of the warnings below Do not take vardenafil if you are also using a nitrate drug for chest pain or heart problems. This includes nitroglycerin (Nitrostat, Nitrolingual, Nitro-Dur, Nitro-Bid, and others), isosorbide dinitrate (Dilatrate-SR, Isordil, Sorbitrate), and isosorbide mononitrate (Imdur, ISMO, Monoket). Nitrates are also found in some recreational drugs such as amyl nitrate or nitrite ("poppers"). Taking vardenafil with a nitrate medicine can cause a serious decrease in blood pressure, leading to fainting, stroke, or heart attack. A small number of patients have had a sudden loss of eyesight after taking vardenafil. This type of vision loss is caused by decreased blood flow to the optic nerve of the eye. It is not clear whether vardenafil is the actual cause of such vision loss. Sudden vision loss with vardenafil use has occurred most often in people with heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or certain pre-existing eye problems, and in those who smoke or are over 50 years old. Before taking vardenafil, tell your doctor if you have: -heart disease or heart rhythm problems; -a recent history (in the past 6 months) of a heart attack, -angina (chest pain), or congestive heart failure; -a history of stroke or blood clots; -a personal or family history of "Long QT syndrome"; -high or low blood pressure; -liver disease; -kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis); -a blood cell disorder such as sickle cell anemia, multiple myeloma, or leukemia; -a bleeding disorder such as hemophilia; -a stomach ulcer; retinitis pigmentosa (an inherited condition of the eye); -a physical deformity of the penis (such as Peyronie's disease); or -if you have been told you should not have sexual intercourse for health reasons. If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use vardenafil or you may need a dosage adjustment or special tests during treatment. Answered by Yolanda Bocanegra 1 year ago.

A man with diabetes and a history of heart disease has a lot of risk factors and should be consulting his doctor. I wouldn't recommend looking for advice from anonymous people online who can't be held accountable if something were to go wrong. Answered by Reagan Landruth 1 year ago.

Probably not. I don't think Levitra is good for anybody, really... because it's just another drug. But you should really ask your doctor to be sure. Answered by Wilfredo Desler 1 year ago.

NO, it seriously interacts with heart meds. And will affect your hearth rhythm. Please ask a doctor before use Answered by Eda Hillegass 1 year ago.

your going to have to go to a doctor to get it anyway ask them. Answered by Leah Nanney 1 year ago.


If someone is having symptoms of a heart attack like pain n shoulders and jaw then took paracetemol?
would that make the pain go away Asked by Almeta Pfarr 1 year ago.

Well, a common drug used under this condition is the Sorbitrate(Isosorbide - Dinitrate 5/10mg) based upon condition. Along with this, a tramadol containing tablet would be helpful. The first option is more safe and preferred. Answered by Toya Timoteo 1 year ago.

If someone is having a heart attack, you do not want to give them paracetamol. By the time it relieves the pain, the person will be dead. If this happens again, give 81mg aspirin, a nitro tablet, and call 911 right away. For non-heart attack pain (angina), daily aspirin and something like lisinopril might help. Answered by German Svennungsen 1 year ago.

Aspirin (delayed release) would be fine. It will prevent or lessen the severity of heart attack.(75 mg daily). Take ECG and confirm that you have no heart attack. Answered by Meredith Carboneau 1 year ago.


My father just had an angina attack.?
The doctor has prescribed certain allopathic medicines. Along with that can homeopathic medicine also be consumed? I read on a site that both can be taken as they do not cross each others' path, whereas on some other I saw that if both taken together, the results can be fatal. Kindly tell me which one is true? Asked by Giselle Dyar 1 year ago.

Your father had an angina attack and requires allopathic medications to prevent the angina from recurring or becoming worse. The drugs increase heart perfusion and oxygenation and improve heart muscle tone, usually Sorbitrate (Nicholas) and other anti angina drugs, and other drugs like platelet aggregation inhibitors like salicylates. The homeopathic pills are to help boost body vitality and may be of benefit, if prescribed by a registered homeopath. Please make sure that you always consult a registered allopath or homeopath. Both are safe and very helpful in helping your father overcome his condition and live a healthy life. Avoid cigarettes, avoid alcohol, avoid fried fatty foods, avoid straining and avoid emotional stress. Do take wholesome foods, keep blood pressure in control and take prescribed medications regularly. All the best. Answered by Regenia Iwaoka 1 year ago.

While it is rather unlikely that a homeopathic drug would react with prescription medication, it is not impossible. Why take the risk? At least ask a pharmacist. Answered by Leigh Hoevel 1 year ago.

Taking water with medicines is fine. Answered by Herbert Mallicoat 1 year ago.

What are the names of the medicines? You left that out. Answered by Sydney Phenix 1 year ago.

He should be take only allopathic medicine. Answered by Nickole Goody 1 year ago.

Triple by-pass is the best medicine. Answered by Heath Wiglesworth 1 year ago.

homeopathic medicine is nothing, Answered by Bryon Tomshack 1 year ago.


How do i prevent a heart attack?
i do research on forests in North india and in the Himalayas as well. Sometimes i have to trek 10 km a day, but sometimes i decide to save time by trekking 30 kms a day too. I have very good fitness but the walks are hard. In the day, in summer the forests can become quite hot and i perspire a lot. In the... Asked by Jonah Rosenblatt 1 year ago.

i do research on forests in North india and in the Himalayas as well. Sometimes i have to trek 10 km a day, but sometimes i decide to save time by trekking 30 kms a day too. I have very good fitness but the walks are hard. In the day, in summer the forests can become quite hot and i perspire a lot. In the Himalayas the uphill walks can get unbearably tiring. Im in my early 30's but a friend my age got a heart attack while climbing up the himalayas on a pilgrimage. And i can go 1-2 days without meeting anybody in the forests. So should i keep sorbitrate with me all the time. What other precautions can i take. Answered by Ruthann Vacher 1 year ago.

Simplify your life. Not everything in our life needs to be in our life. We all accumulate excess baggage. Simplify by clearing out the physical clutter. Give things you no longer need to people who could use them. Evaluate your everyday tasks and commitments, and delegate what you can. Keeping your life simple may mean saying no to some things so you can concentrate on what's valuable. Answered by Merna Wand 1 year ago.

Well its good that you exercise regularly. That right there is a key to prevent a heart attack. Really eating healthy and exercising. If you have blood pressure problems, you should see a Dr. and they can prescribe something to lower your BP as a result lowering your risk for a heart attack. Answered by Christiana Rancatti 1 year ago.

Biggest tips are: Don't smoke Reduce your stress load Don't eat fatty / salty foods Maintain a healthy weight / BMI Exercise If you have precursors to heart disease, take a baby aspirin daily. Answered by Trudie Fette 1 year ago.

Swallow a teaspoon of olive oil every day, and take a low dose of asprin daily as well. Answered by Meryl Orrock 1 year ago.

Speak to you doctor and before for you exercising I would take an advil BUT again speak to you doctor. Answered by Lucilla Malakan 1 year ago.

Stop worrying so much. That's awesome what you do by the way. I wish I could do something like that. Answered by Berry Evick 1 year ago.

The time is now and now is all we have. Answered by Nella Nivison 1 year ago.


What happens if you get a heart attack?
I mean, lets say, I get a heart attack. Do I hafta get surgery? If so, what kind? Can you ONLY get heart attacks because of the cholestrial? Can you get it if you already have a bad heart? Can you get it over working yourself? And after a heart attack, how can you prevent if from happening again? So many... Asked by James Poulton 1 year ago.

I mean, lets say, I get a heart attack. Do I hafta get surgery? If so, what kind? Can you ONLY get heart attacks because of the cholestrial? Can you get it if you already have a bad heart? Can you get it over working yourself? And after a heart attack, how can you prevent if from happening again? So many questions... Hahaha Answered by Bret Browen 1 year ago.

Heart attack may be mild, moderate or severe. In cases of severe (acute) heart attack the mortality is very high and the patient is generally brought dead to the hospital. This may occur more commonly in very high smokers, patients suffering from sever uncontrolled blood pressure, Chronic uncontrolled diabetics, uncontrolled obesity cases, uncontrolled long standing cholesteroiemia, more rarely in high wrestlers, high class body builders, etc., etc. One should be careful of this type and try to avoid the predisposing causes in this cases. An element of genetic and familial tendency is also seen in all these heart attacks. In moderate case of CAD (heart attack) the attack may take some time (say about 10 mts. to 1/2 hour) to go into acute MI where timely treatment / management in the ICCU with continued IV sorbitrate or glyceryl trinitrate and more importantly a timely STK, etc., may reverse back the condition without going to a muscle damage (MI) or death. Here the patient should be monitored in the ICCU continuously under a cardiologist care with a ready Defibrillator and a special ICCU trained nursing care for at least 3 to 5 days to avoid a recurrence leading to sudden death. In these cases a CAG, is generally done and further interventional cardiological procedures like PTCA, and Stent etc are provided as per the result of the CAG (coronary Angiogram); or a CABG (coronary bypass surgery) is advised and done. Such of these patients may recover with out a morbidity but is to be reviewed by the cardiologist periodically throught life to avoid a recurrance etc. Rarely when the heart attack is mild or just like a threatining type the patient may have to be hospitalised for a detailed investigations under a cardiologist supervision and the precipitating cause eleminated. Such cases are also advised a CAG or a PTCA with a stent (generally drug coated) or a CABG may be advised / undertaken as a preventive measure, depending on the findings and severity of the mild heart attack etc., etc...... In all the above different varieties; a calm, worry and hurry free, relaxed, but a timely quick attitude; is very important to save from mortality or morbidity in the heart attacks. Answered by Marcelle Vannover 1 year ago.

You don't necessarily have to have surgery, it depends on the size of the clot, it can often be broken up with drugs that break up clots. Heart attacks can be caused by many different things, not just cholesterol, all it is is a blood clot in a coronary artery, so it could be a piece that has broken off from a damaged area and flowed in to the coronary artery. If you have a bad heart you are no more likely to suffer one, having bad cholesterol doesn't help though. Stress can be a factor as well, because it can cause high blood pressure, which can damage the arteries and cause them to thin by a processes called Atherosclerosis. Preventative methods involve limiting the factors: Diet=Less fatty foods, Stress=Lower it. There are also some factors such as genetics that you can't control, but by controlling the ones that you can, then you can do a great deal to stop it again. Answered by Elton Mikrot 1 year ago.

Let's see....40% of the time you'll die before making it to a hospital. If you're fortunate enough to survive, it all depends on the type of attack and the severity as to whether surgery is warranted. Answered by Marica Rydolph 1 year ago.


I REALLY need to know this. PLEASE help.!?
My dad first had a heart attack in April of 2008. Then, he had another heart attack a couple weeks ago. Will this increase his chances of anything happening in the future, and if so, will he survive it? Asked by Lahoma Scavona 1 year ago.

Yes he is a high risk patient. But proper medication and care will minimise the worst effect. Alaways keep Aspirin and Sorbitrate tablet available. Incase of heart attack first give this tablets and then call Dr. Answered by Louvenia Helgerson 1 year ago.

I agree with the first answerer - Rely ENTIRELY on what his doctors tell you and NOT an what COULD be nothing but sheer guesswork - we have no access to his medical records so even if there WERE doctors on here they couldn't really give a professional answer or even opinion Answered by Freda Yellow 1 year ago.

please dont ask amateurs here. your father needs to talk to doctor about lowering the risk. the doctor may perscribe some medication as his heart attacks maybe genetic or environment related (eating bad food). Answered by Polly Biddie 1 year ago.


Does having Asprin & Sorbitrate together cause any harm in patients misdiagnosed as having a Heart Attack?
The actual reason could be something else. Is it OK to be on the safe side and to administer the Tablets to the him / her? Asked by Tempie Groesbeck 1 year ago.

It OK, No lethal harm was seen except for throbbing sensation due to nitrates, and occasionally dizziness. I have seen many cases during my career. Answered by Edna Dukich 1 year ago.


What is the alternative tablet for 'Sarbitrate 10 mg' in Germany?
This is a tablet prescreibed by the cardiologist in India for heart disease. Asked by Madonna Enslen 1 year ago.

Sorbitrate 10mg (isosorbide dinitrate) should be available worldwide. Answered by Ronda Woodroof 1 year ago.


Waht is the content of the tablet ' sarbitrate 10 mg' ?
Asked by Maryln Trusello 1 year ago.

It is sorbitrate 10 mg: isosorbide dinitrate, dilates blood vessels, mainly used in the treatment of anginal paing due to narrowing of blood vessels supplying the heart. Answered by Hilaria Toncrey 1 year ago.

It's a drug, man. Don't take it. Answered by Sophie Garton 1 year ago.


Is Levitra good for a guy who has diabetes and had a heart surgery?
Asked by Omega Lasseson 1 year ago.

If your Doctor says so, otherwise NO - read some of the warnings below Do not take vardenafil if you are also using a nitrate drug for chest pain or heart problems. This includes nitroglycerin (Nitrostat, Nitrolingual, Nitro-Dur, Nitro-Bid, and others), isosorbide dinitrate (Dilatrate-SR, Isordil, Sorbitrate), and isosorbide mononitrate (Imdur, ISMO, Monoket). Nitrates are also found in some recreational drugs such as amyl nitrate or nitrite ("poppers"). Taking vardenafil with a nitrate medicine can cause a serious decrease in blood pressure, leading to fainting, stroke, or heart attack. A small number of patients have had a sudden loss of eyesight after taking vardenafil. This type of vision loss is caused by decreased blood flow to the optic nerve of the eye. It is not clear whether vardenafil is the actual cause of such vision loss. Sudden vision loss with vardenafil use has occurred most often in people with heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or certain pre-existing eye problems, and in those who smoke or are over 50 years old. Before taking vardenafil, tell your doctor if you have: -heart disease or heart rhythm problems; -a recent history (in the past 6 months) of a heart attack, -angina (chest pain), or congestive heart failure; -a history of stroke or blood clots; -a personal or family history of "Long QT syndrome"; -high or low blood pressure; -liver disease; -kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis); -a blood cell disorder such as sickle cell anemia, multiple myeloma, or leukemia; -a bleeding disorder such as hemophilia; -a stomach ulcer; retinitis pigmentosa (an inherited condition of the eye); -a physical deformity of the penis (such as Peyronie's disease); or -if you have been told you should not have sexual intercourse for health reasons. If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use vardenafil or you may need a dosage adjustment or special tests during treatment. Answered by Bo Dubbin 1 year ago.

A man with diabetes and a history of heart disease has a lot of risk factors and should be consulting his doctor. I wouldn't recommend looking for advice from anonymous people online who can't be held accountable if something were to go wrong. Answered by Billi Ackermann 1 year ago.

Probably not. I don't think Levitra is good for anybody, really... because it's just another drug. But you should really ask your doctor to be sure. Answered by Gretchen Lofts 1 year ago.

NO, it seriously interacts with heart meds. And will affect your hearth rhythm. Please ask a doctor before use Answered by Eliana Schwark 1 year ago.

your going to have to go to a doctor to get it anyway ask them. Answered by Valerie Polka 1 year ago.


If someone is having symptoms of a heart attack like pain n shoulders and jaw then took paracetemol?
would that make the pain go away Asked by Loma Seremet 1 year ago.

Well, a common drug used under this condition is the Sorbitrate(Isosorbide - Dinitrate 5/10mg) based upon condition. Along with this, a tramadol containing tablet would be helpful. The first option is more safe and preferred. Answered by Alisha Deshields 1 year ago.

If someone is having a heart attack, you do not want to give them paracetamol. By the time it relieves the pain, the person will be dead. If this happens again, give 81mg aspirin, a nitro tablet, and call 911 right away. For non-heart attack pain (angina), daily aspirin and something like lisinopril might help. Answered by Elane Mcgrade 1 year ago.

Aspirin (delayed release) would be fine. It will prevent or lessen the severity of heart attack.(75 mg daily). Take ECG and confirm that you have no heart attack. Answered by Etta Stifel 1 year ago.


My father just had an angina attack.?
The doctor has prescribed certain allopathic medicines. Along with that can homeopathic medicine also be consumed? I read on a site that both can be taken as they do not cross each others' path, whereas on some other I saw that if both taken together, the results can be fatal. Kindly tell me which one is true? Asked by Brigida Kaminaka 1 year ago.

Your father had an angina attack and requires allopathic medications to prevent the angina from recurring or becoming worse. The drugs increase heart perfusion and oxygenation and improve heart muscle tone, usually Sorbitrate (Nicholas) and other anti angina drugs, and other drugs like platelet aggregation inhibitors like salicylates. The homeopathic pills are to help boost body vitality and may be of benefit, if prescribed by a registered homeopath. Please make sure that you always consult a registered allopath or homeopath. Both are safe and very helpful in helping your father overcome his condition and live a healthy life. Avoid cigarettes, avoid alcohol, avoid fried fatty foods, avoid straining and avoid emotional stress. Do take wholesome foods, keep blood pressure in control and take prescribed medications regularly. All the best. Answered by Dean Luzuriaga 1 year ago.

While it is rather unlikely that a homeopathic drug would react with prescription medication, it is not impossible. Why take the risk? At least ask a pharmacist. Answered by Savanna Ziesmer 1 year ago.

Taking water with medicines is fine. Answered by Naoma Ruzich 1 year ago.

What are the names of the medicines? You left that out. Answered by Karolyn Nannie 1 year ago.

He should be take only allopathic medicine. Answered by Lolita Fortini 1 year ago.

Triple by-pass is the best medicine. Answered by Lourdes Ceasar 1 year ago.

homeopathic medicine is nothing, Answered by Shawn Colten 1 year ago.


How do i prevent a heart attack?
i do research on forests in North india and in the Himalayas as well. Sometimes i have to trek 10 km a day, but sometimes i decide to save time by trekking 30 kms a day too. I have very good fitness but the walks are hard. In the day, in summer the forests can become quite hot and i perspire a lot. In the... Asked by Jovan Michaux 1 year ago.

i do research on forests in North india and in the Himalayas as well. Sometimes i have to trek 10 km a day, but sometimes i decide to save time by trekking 30 kms a day too. I have very good fitness but the walks are hard. In the day, in summer the forests can become quite hot and i perspire a lot. In the Himalayas the uphill walks can get unbearably tiring. Im in my early 30's but a friend my age got a heart attack while climbing up the himalayas on a pilgrimage. And i can go 1-2 days without meeting anybody in the forests. So should i keep sorbitrate with me all the time. What other precautions can i take. Answered by Tammie Rimi 1 year ago.

Simplify your life. Not everything in our life needs to be in our life. We all accumulate excess baggage. Simplify by clearing out the physical clutter. Give things you no longer need to people who could use them. Evaluate your everyday tasks and commitments, and delegate what you can. Keeping your life simple may mean saying no to some things so you can concentrate on what's valuable. Answered by Karri Giroir 1 year ago.

Well its good that you exercise regularly. That right there is a key to prevent a heart attack. Really eating healthy and exercising. If you have blood pressure problems, you should see a Dr. and they can prescribe something to lower your BP as a result lowering your risk for a heart attack. Answered by Rene Maeweather 1 year ago.

Biggest tips are: Don't smoke Reduce your stress load Don't eat fatty / salty foods Maintain a healthy weight / BMI Exercise If you have precursors to heart disease, take a baby aspirin daily. Answered by Lisabeth Havel 1 year ago.

Swallow a teaspoon of olive oil every day, and take a low dose of asprin daily as well. Answered by Kay Bobak 1 year ago.

Speak to you doctor and before for you exercising I would take an advil BUT again speak to you doctor. Answered by Terri Matzek 1 year ago.

Stop worrying so much. That's awesome what you do by the way. I wish I could do something like that. Answered by Myrtis Chernoff 1 year ago.

The time is now and now is all we have. Answered by Kristie Robb 1 year ago.


What happens if you get a heart attack?
I mean, lets say, I get a heart attack. Do I hafta get surgery? If so, what kind? Can you ONLY get heart attacks because of the cholestrial? Can you get it if you already have a bad heart? Can you get it over working yourself? And after a heart attack, how can you prevent if from happening again? So many... Asked by Helena Kettman 1 year ago.

I mean, lets say, I get a heart attack. Do I hafta get surgery? If so, what kind? Can you ONLY get heart attacks because of the cholestrial? Can you get it if you already have a bad heart? Can you get it over working yourself? And after a heart attack, how can you prevent if from happening again? So many questions... Hahaha Answered by Marguerite Powles 1 year ago.

Heart attack may be mild, moderate or severe. In cases of severe (acute) heart attack the mortality is very high and the patient is generally brought dead to the hospital. This may occur more commonly in very high smokers, patients suffering from sever uncontrolled blood pressure, Chronic uncontrolled diabetics, uncontrolled obesity cases, uncontrolled long standing cholesteroiemia, more rarely in high wrestlers, high class body builders, etc., etc. One should be careful of this type and try to avoid the predisposing causes in this cases. An element of genetic and familial tendency is also seen in all these heart attacks. In moderate case of CAD (heart attack) the attack may take some time (say about 10 mts. to 1/2 hour) to go into acute MI where timely treatment / management in the ICCU with continued IV sorbitrate or glyceryl trinitrate and more importantly a timely STK, etc., may reverse back the condition without going to a muscle damage (MI) or death. Here the patient should be monitored in the ICCU continuously under a cardiologist care with a ready Defibrillator and a special ICCU trained nursing care for at least 3 to 5 days to avoid a recurrence leading to sudden death. In these cases a CAG, is generally done and further interventional cardiological procedures like PTCA, and Stent etc are provided as per the result of the CAG (coronary Angiogram); or a CABG (coronary bypass surgery) is advised and done. Such of these patients may recover with out a morbidity but is to be reviewed by the cardiologist periodically throught life to avoid a recurrance etc. Rarely when the heart attack is mild or just like a threatining type the patient may have to be hospitalised for a detailed investigations under a cardiologist supervision and the precipitating cause eleminated. Such cases are also advised a CAG or a PTCA with a stent (generally drug coated) or a CABG may be advised / undertaken as a preventive measure, depending on the findings and severity of the mild heart attack etc., etc...... In all the above different varieties; a calm, worry and hurry free, relaxed, but a timely quick attitude; is very important to save from mortality or morbidity in the heart attacks. Answered by Homer Mirzadeh 1 year ago.

You don't necessarily have to have surgery, it depends on the size of the clot, it can often be broken up with drugs that break up clots. Heart attacks can be caused by many different things, not just cholesterol, all it is is a blood clot in a coronary artery, so it could be a piece that has broken off from a damaged area and flowed in to the coronary artery. If you have a bad heart you are no more likely to suffer one, having bad cholesterol doesn't help though. Stress can be a factor as well, because it can cause high blood pressure, which can damage the arteries and cause them to thin by a processes called Atherosclerosis. Preventative methods involve limiting the factors: Diet=Less fatty foods, Stress=Lower it. There are also some factors such as genetics that you can't control, but by controlling the ones that you can, then you can do a great deal to stop it again. Answered by Zack Boslet 1 year ago.

Let's see....40% of the time you'll die before making it to a hospital. If you're fortunate enough to survive, it all depends on the type of attack and the severity as to whether surgery is warranted. Answered by Jaimie Swickheimer 1 year ago.


I REALLY need to know this. PLEASE help.!?
My dad first had a heart attack in April of 2008. Then, he had another heart attack a couple weeks ago. Will this increase his chances of anything happening in the future, and if so, will he survive it? Asked by Beau Boisselle 1 year ago.

Yes he is a high risk patient. But proper medication and care will minimise the worst effect. Alaways keep Aspirin and Sorbitrate tablet available. Incase of heart attack first give this tablets and then call Dr. Answered by Fritz Wartenberg 1 year ago.

I agree with the first answerer - Rely ENTIRELY on what his doctors tell you and NOT an what COULD be nothing but sheer guesswork - we have no access to his medical records so even if there WERE doctors on here they couldn't really give a professional answer or even opinion Answered by Arline Streeby 1 year ago.

please dont ask amateurs here. your father needs to talk to doctor about lowering the risk. the doctor may perscribe some medication as his heart attacks maybe genetic or environment related (eating bad food). Answered by Janise Maslowsky 1 year ago.


Does having Asprin & Sorbitrate together cause any harm in patients misdiagnosed as having a Heart Attack?
The actual reason could be something else. Is it OK to be on the safe side and to administer the Tablets to the him / her? Asked by Simone Crotteau 1 year ago.

It OK, No lethal harm was seen except for throbbing sensation due to nitrates, and occasionally dizziness. I have seen many cases during my career. Answered by Susy Manassa 1 year ago.


What is the alternative tablet for 'Sarbitrate 10 mg' in Germany?
This is a tablet prescreibed by the cardiologist in India for heart disease. Asked by Josephine Matchett 1 year ago.

Sorbitrate 10mg (isosorbide dinitrate) should be available worldwide. Answered by Emmy Mazzuca 1 year ago.


Waht is the content of the tablet ' sarbitrate 10 mg' ?
Asked by John Pfnister 1 year ago.

It is sorbitrate 10 mg: isosorbide dinitrate, dilates blood vessels, mainly used in the treatment of anginal paing due to narrowing of blood vessels supplying the heart. Answered by Walker Wythe 1 year ago.

It's a drug, man. Don't take it. Answered by Alicia Gulan 1 year ago.


Is Levitra good for a guy who has diabetes and had a heart surgery?
Asked by Dawne Furbee 1 year ago.

If your Doctor says so, otherwise NO - read some of the warnings below Do not take vardenafil if you are also using a nitrate drug for chest pain or heart problems. This includes nitroglycerin (Nitrostat, Nitrolingual, Nitro-Dur, Nitro-Bid, and others), isosorbide dinitrate (Dilatrate-SR, Isordil, Sorbitrate), and isosorbide mononitrate (Imdur, ISMO, Monoket). Nitrates are also found in some recreational drugs such as amyl nitrate or nitrite ("poppers"). Taking vardenafil with a nitrate medicine can cause a serious decrease in blood pressure, leading to fainting, stroke, or heart attack. A small number of patients have had a sudden loss of eyesight after taking vardenafil. This type of vision loss is caused by decreased blood flow to the optic nerve of the eye. It is not clear whether vardenafil is the actual cause of such vision loss. Sudden vision loss with vardenafil use has occurred most often in people with heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or certain pre-existing eye problems, and in those who smoke or are over 50 years old. Before taking vardenafil, tell your doctor if you have: -heart disease or heart rhythm problems; -a recent history (in the past 6 months) of a heart attack, -angina (chest pain), or congestive heart failure; -a history of stroke or blood clots; -a personal or family history of "Long QT syndrome"; -high or low blood pressure; -liver disease; -kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis); -a blood cell disorder such as sickle cell anemia, multiple myeloma, or leukemia; -a bleeding disorder such as hemophilia; -a stomach ulcer; retinitis pigmentosa (an inherited condition of the eye); -a physical deformity of the penis (such as Peyronie's disease); or -if you have been told you should not have sexual intercourse for health reasons. If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use vardenafil or you may need a dosage adjustment or special tests during treatment. Answered by Wendell Rodrigez 1 year ago.

A man with diabetes and a history of heart disease has a lot of risk factors and should be consulting his doctor. I wouldn't recommend looking for advice from anonymous people online who can't be held accountable if something were to go wrong. Answered by Arminda Conway 1 year ago.

Probably not. I don't think Levitra is good for anybody, really... because it's just another drug. But you should really ask your doctor to be sure. Answered by Evelia Eichel 1 year ago.

NO, it seriously interacts with heart meds. And will affect your hearth rhythm. Please ask a doctor before use Answered by Eunice Castiglione 1 year ago.

your going to have to go to a doctor to get it anyway ask them. Answered by Teena Altmark 1 year ago.


If someone is having symptoms of a heart attack like pain n shoulders and jaw then took paracetemol?
would that make the pain go away Asked by Roselyn Sampere 1 year ago.

Well, a common drug used under this condition is the Sorbitrate(Isosorbide - Dinitrate 5/10mg) based upon condition. Along with this, a tramadol containing tablet would be helpful. The first option is more safe and preferred. Answered by Shiloh Edelman 1 year ago.

If someone is having a heart attack, you do not want to give them paracetamol. By the time it relieves the pain, the person will be dead. If this happens again, give 81mg aspirin, a nitro tablet, and call 911 right away. For non-heart attack pain (angina), daily aspirin and something like lisinopril might help. Answered by Luciana Marlow 1 year ago.

Aspirin (delayed release) would be fine. It will prevent or lessen the severity of heart attack.(75 mg daily). Take ECG and confirm that you have no heart attack. Answered by Jaquelyn Suders 1 year ago.


My father just had an angina attack.?
The doctor has prescribed certain allopathic medicines. Along with that can homeopathic medicine also be consumed? I read on a site that both can be taken as they do not cross each others' path, whereas on some other I saw that if both taken together, the results can be fatal. Kindly tell me which one is true? Asked by Tova Stutzman 1 year ago.

Your father had an angina attack and requires allopathic medications to prevent the angina from recurring or becoming worse. The drugs increase heart perfusion and oxygenation and improve heart muscle tone, usually Sorbitrate (Nicholas) and other anti angina drugs, and other drugs like platelet aggregation inhibitors like salicylates. The homeopathic pills are to help boost body vitality and may be of benefit, if prescribed by a registered homeopath. Please make sure that you always consult a registered allopath or homeopath. Both are safe and very helpful in helping your father overcome his condition and live a healthy life. Avoid cigarettes, avoid alcohol, avoid fried fatty foods, avoid straining and avoid emotional stress. Do take wholesome foods, keep blood pressure in control and take prescribed medications regularly. All the best. Answered by Hermina Zeh 1 year ago.

While it is rather unlikely that a homeopathic drug would react with prescription medication, it is not impossible. Why take the risk? At least ask a pharmacist. Answered by Kym Cabal 1 year ago.

Taking water with medicines is fine. Answered by Dino Fazzinga 1 year ago.

What are the names of the medicines? You left that out. Answered by Tu Gelder 1 year ago.

He should be take only allopathic medicine. Answered by Zona Privalsky 1 year ago.

Triple by-pass is the best medicine. Answered by Paul Hores 1 year ago.

homeopathic medicine is nothing, Answered by Dorian Evartt 1 year ago.


How do i prevent a heart attack?
i do research on forests in North india and in the Himalayas as well. Sometimes i have to trek 10 km a day, but sometimes i decide to save time by trekking 30 kms a day too. I have very good fitness but the walks are hard. In the day, in summer the forests can become quite hot and i perspire a lot. In the... Asked by Dorinda Cresci 1 year ago.

i do research on forests in North india and in the Himalayas as well. Sometimes i have to trek 10 km a day, but sometimes i decide to save time by trekking 30 kms a day too. I have very good fitness but the walks are hard. In the day, in summer the forests can become quite hot and i perspire a lot. In the Himalayas the uphill walks can get unbearably tiring. Im in my early 30's but a friend my age got a heart attack while climbing up the himalayas on a pilgrimage. And i can go 1-2 days without meeting anybody in the forests. So should i keep sorbitrate with me all the time. What other precautions can i take. Answered by Sol Flythe 1 year ago.

Simplify your life. Not everything in our life needs to be in our life. We all accumulate excess baggage. Simplify by clearing out the physical clutter. Give things you no longer need to people who could use them. Evaluate your everyday tasks and commitments, and delegate what you can. Keeping your life simple may mean saying no to some things so you can concentrate on what's valuable. Answered by Verdell Boyte 1 year ago.

Well its good that you exercise regularly. That right there is a key to prevent a heart attack. Really eating healthy and exercising. If you have blood pressure problems, you should see a Dr. and they can prescribe something to lower your BP as a result lowering your risk for a heart attack. Answered by Apryl Koutras 1 year ago.

Biggest tips are: Don't smoke Reduce your stress load Don't eat fatty / salty foods Maintain a healthy weight / BMI Exercise If you have precursors to heart disease, take a baby aspirin daily. Answered by Jonie Adell 1 year ago.

Swallow a teaspoon of olive oil every day, and take a low dose of asprin daily as well. Answered by Marisa Dugan 1 year ago.

Speak to you doctor and before for you exercising I would take an advil BUT again speak to you doctor. Answered by Leonel Cremonese 1 year ago.

Stop worrying so much. That's awesome what you do by the way. I wish I could do something like that. Answered by Donnie Cranston 1 year ago.

The time is now and now is all we have. Answered by Chasity Vellone 1 year ago.


What happens if you get a heart attack?
I mean, lets say, I get a heart attack. Do I hafta get surgery? If so, what kind? Can you ONLY get heart attacks because of the cholestrial? Can you get it if you already have a bad heart? Can you get it over working yourself? And after a heart attack, how can you prevent if from happening again? So many... Asked by Jeffry Kissell 1 year ago.

I mean, lets say, I get a heart attack. Do I hafta get surgery? If so, what kind? Can you ONLY get heart attacks because of the cholestrial? Can you get it if you already have a bad heart? Can you get it over working yourself? And after a heart attack, how can you prevent if from happening again? So many questions... Hahaha Answered by Lyle Bullaro 1 year ago.

Heart attack may be mild, moderate or severe. In cases of severe (acute) heart attack the mortality is very high and the patient is generally brought dead to the hospital. This may occur more commonly in very high smokers, patients suffering from sever uncontrolled blood pressure, Chronic uncontrolled diabetics, uncontrolled obesity cases, uncontrolled long standing cholesteroiemia, more rarely in high wrestlers, high class body builders, etc., etc. One should be careful of this type and try to avoid the predisposing causes in this cases. An element of genetic and familial tendency is also seen in all these heart attacks. In moderate case of CAD (heart attack) the attack may take some time (say about 10 mts. to 1/2 hour) to go into acute MI where timely treatment / management in the ICCU with continued IV sorbitrate or glyceryl trinitrate and more importantly a timely STK, etc., may reverse back the condition without going to a muscle damage (MI) or death. Here the patient should be monitored in the ICCU continuously under a cardiologist care with a ready Defibrillator and a special ICCU trained nursing care for at least 3 to 5 days to avoid a recurrence leading to sudden death. In these cases a CAG, is generally done and further interventional cardiological procedures like PTCA, and Stent etc are provided as per the result of the CAG (coronary Angiogram); or a CABG (coronary bypass surgery) is advised and done. Such of these patients may recover with out a morbidity but is to be reviewed by the cardiologist periodically throught life to avoid a recurrance etc. Rarely when the heart attack is mild or just like a threatining type the patient may have to be hospitalised for a detailed investigations under a cardiologist supervision and the precipitating cause eleminated. Such cases are also advised a CAG or a PTCA with a stent (generally drug coated) or a CABG may be advised / undertaken as a preventive measure, depending on the findings and severity of the mild heart attack etc., etc...... In all the above different varieties; a calm, worry and hurry free, relaxed, but a timely quick attitude; is very important to save from mortality or morbidity in the heart attacks. Answered by Krystin Zaremski 1 year ago.

You don't necessarily have to have surgery, it depends on the size of the clot, it can often be broken up with drugs that break up clots. Heart attacks can be caused by many different things, not just cholesterol, all it is is a blood clot in a coronary artery, so it could be a piece that has broken off from a damaged area and flowed in to the coronary artery. If you have a bad heart you are no more likely to suffer one, having bad cholesterol doesn't help though. Stress can be a factor as well, because it can cause high blood pressure, which can damage the arteries and cause them to thin by a processes called Atherosclerosis. Preventative methods involve limiting the factors: Diet=Less fatty foods, Stress=Lower it. There are also some factors such as genetics that you can't control, but by controlling the ones that you can, then you can do a great deal to stop it again. Answered by Evie Wafer 1 year ago.

Let's see....40% of the time you'll die before making it to a hospital. If you're fortunate enough to survive, it all depends on the type of attack and the severity as to whether surgery is warranted. Answered by Spencer Abreo 1 year ago.


I REALLY need to know this. PLEASE help.!?
My dad first had a heart attack in April of 2008. Then, he had another heart attack a couple weeks ago. Will this increase his chances of anything happening in the future, and if so, will he survive it? Asked by Hermine Bickelhaupt 1 year ago.

Yes he is a high risk patient. But proper medication and care will minimise the worst effect. Alaways keep Aspirin and Sorbitrate tablet available. Incase of heart attack first give this tablets and then call Dr. Answered by Candace Brecheisen 1 year ago.

I agree with the first answerer - Rely ENTIRELY on what his doctors tell you and NOT an what COULD be nothing but sheer guesswork - we have no access to his medical records so even if there WERE doctors on here they couldn't really give a professional answer or even opinion Answered by Bernardina Paet 1 year ago.

please dont ask amateurs here. your father needs to talk to doctor about lowering the risk. the doctor may perscribe some medication as his heart attacks maybe genetic or environment related (eating bad food). Answered by Helen Uballe 1 year ago.


Does having Asprin & Sorbitrate together cause any harm in patients misdiagnosed as having a Heart Attack?
The actual reason could be something else. Is it OK to be on the safe side and to administer the Tablets to the him / her? Asked by Kendall Wickes 1 year ago.

It OK, No lethal harm was seen except for throbbing sensation due to nitrates, and occasionally dizziness. I have seen many cases during my career. Answered by Alexia Laurila 1 year ago.


What is the alternative tablet for 'Sarbitrate 10 mg' in Germany?
This is a tablet prescreibed by the cardiologist in India for heart disease. Asked by Essie Munshower 1 year ago.

Sorbitrate 10mg (isosorbide dinitrate) should be available worldwide. Answered by Griselda Petrus 1 year ago.


Waht is the content of the tablet ' sarbitrate 10 mg' ?
Asked by Alba Hutto 1 year ago.

It is sorbitrate 10 mg: isosorbide dinitrate, dilates blood vessels, mainly used in the treatment of anginal paing due to narrowing of blood vessels supplying the heart. Answered by Gale Imoto 1 year ago.

It's a drug, man. Don't take it. Answered by Janiece Brighenti 1 year ago.


Is Levitra good for a guy who has diabetes and had a heart surgery?
Asked by Kiyoko Mo 1 year ago.

If your Doctor says so, otherwise NO - read some of the warnings below Do not take vardenafil if you are also using a nitrate drug for chest pain or heart problems. This includes nitroglycerin (Nitrostat, Nitrolingual, Nitro-Dur, Nitro-Bid, and others), isosorbide dinitrate (Dilatrate-SR, Isordil, Sorbitrate), and isosorbide mononitrate (Imdur, ISMO, Monoket). Nitrates are also found in some recreational drugs such as amyl nitrate or nitrite ("poppers"). Taking vardenafil with a nitrate medicine can cause a serious decrease in blood pressure, leading to fainting, stroke, or heart attack. A small number of patients have had a sudden loss of eyesight after taking vardenafil. This type of vision loss is caused by decreased blood flow to the optic nerve of the eye. It is not clear whether vardenafil is the actual cause of such vision loss. Sudden vision loss with vardenafil use has occurred most often in people with heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or certain pre-existing eye problems, and in those who smoke or are over 50 years old. Before taking vardenafil, tell your doctor if you have: -heart disease or heart rhythm problems; -a recent history (in the past 6 months) of a heart attack, -angina (chest pain), or congestive heart failure; -a history of stroke or blood clots; -a personal or family history of "Long QT syndrome"; -high or low blood pressure; -liver disease; -kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis); -a blood cell disorder such as sickle cell anemia, multiple myeloma, or leukemia; -a bleeding disorder such as hemophilia; -a stomach ulcer; retinitis pigmentosa (an inherited condition of the eye); -a physical deformity of the penis (such as Peyronie's disease); or -if you have been told you should not have sexual intercourse for health reasons. If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use vardenafil or you may need a dosage adjustment or special tests during treatment. Answered by Shiloh Fox 1 year ago.

A man with diabetes and a history of heart disease has a lot of risk factors and should be consulting his doctor. I wouldn't recommend looking for advice from anonymous people online who can't be held accountable if something were to go wrong. Answered by Ingeborg Rothschild 1 year ago.

Probably not. I don't think Levitra is good for anybody, really... because it's just another drug. But you should really ask your doctor to be sure. Answered by Diane Rackham 1 year ago.

NO, it seriously interacts with heart meds. And will affect your hearth rhythm. Please ask a doctor before use Answered by Lindsy Rhymer 1 year ago.

your going to have to go to a doctor to get it anyway ask them. Answered by Korey Dunkle 1 year ago.


If someone is having symptoms of a heart attack like pain n shoulders and jaw then took paracetemol?
would that make the pain go away Asked by Shelia Fanoele 1 year ago.

Well, a common drug used under this condition is the Sorbitrate(Isosorbide - Dinitrate 5/10mg) based upon condition. Along with this, a tramadol containing tablet would be helpful. The first option is more safe and preferred. Answered by Evan Vinson 1 year ago.

If someone is having a heart attack, you do not want to give them paracetamol. By the time it relieves the pain, the person will be dead. If this happens again, give 81mg aspirin, a nitro tablet, and call 911 right away. For non-heart attack pain (angina), daily aspirin and something like lisinopril might help. Answered by Fletcher Cortright 1 year ago.

Aspirin (delayed release) would be fine. It will prevent or lessen the severity of heart attack.(75 mg daily). Take ECG and confirm that you have no heart attack. Answered by Serita Ronning 1 year ago.


My father just had an angina attack.?
The doctor has prescribed certain allopathic medicines. Along with that can homeopathic medicine also be consumed? I read on a site that both can be taken as they do not cross each others' path, whereas on some other I saw that if both taken together, the results can be fatal. Kindly tell me which one is true? Asked by Kiley Machtley 1 year ago.

Your father had an angina attack and requires allopathic medications to prevent the angina from recurring or becoming worse. The drugs increase heart perfusion and oxygenation and improve heart muscle tone, usually Sorbitrate (Nicholas) and other anti angina drugs, and other drugs like platelet aggregation inhibitors like salicylates. The homeopathic pills are to help boost body vitality and may be of benefit, if prescribed by a registered homeopath. Please make sure that you always consult a registered allopath or homeopath. Both are safe and very helpful in helping your father overcome his condition and live a healthy life. Avoid cigarettes, avoid alcohol, avoid fried fatty foods, avoid straining and avoid emotional stress. Do take wholesome foods, keep blood pressure in control and take prescribed medications regularly. All the best. Answered by Shaniqua Schmits 1 year ago.

While it is rather unlikely that a homeopathic drug would react with prescription medication, it is not impossible. Why take the risk? At least ask a pharmacist. Answered by Kizzie Simpton 1 year ago.

Taking water with medicines is fine. Answered by Samira Mccullin 1 year ago.

What are the names of the medicines? You left that out. Answered by Laveta Brochet 1 year ago.

He should be take only allopathic medicine. Answered by Horace Lambes 1 year ago.

Triple by-pass is the best medicine. Answered by Marion Turnham 1 year ago.

homeopathic medicine is nothing, Answered by Cruz Dezan 1 year ago.


How do i prevent a heart attack?
i do research on forests in North india and in the Himalayas as well. Sometimes i have to trek 10 km a day, but sometimes i decide to save time by trekking 30 kms a day too. I have very good fitness but the walks are hard. In the day, in summer the forests can become quite hot and i perspire a lot. In the... Asked by Mitzi Cravy 1 year ago.

i do research on forests in North india and in the Himalayas as well. Sometimes i have to trek 10 km a day, but sometimes i decide to save time by trekking 30 kms a day too. I have very good fitness but the walks are hard. In the day, in summer the forests can become quite hot and i perspire a lot. In the Himalayas the uphill walks can get unbearably tiring. Im in my early 30's but a friend my age got a heart attack while climbing up the himalayas on a pilgrimage. And i can go 1-2 days without meeting anybody in the forests. So should i keep sorbitrate with me all the time. What other precautions can i take. Answered by Lawanna Heaps 1 year ago.

Simplify your life. Not everything in our life needs to be in our life. We all accumulate excess baggage. Simplify by clearing out the physical clutter. Give things you no longer need to people who could use them. Evaluate your everyday tasks and commitments, and delegate what you can. Keeping your life simple may mean saying no to some things so you can concentrate on what's valuable. Answered by Gabriella Domangue 1 year ago.

Well its good that you exercise regularly. That right there is a key to prevent a heart attack. Really eating healthy and exercising. If you have blood pressure problems, you should see a Dr. and they can prescribe something to lower your BP as a result lowering your risk for a heart attack. Answered by Hai Bigas 1 year ago.

Biggest tips are: Don't smoke Reduce your stress load Don't eat fatty / salty foods Maintain a healthy weight / BMI Exercise If you have precursors to heart disease, take a baby aspirin daily. Answered by Agustina Mehner 1 year ago.

Swallow a teaspoon of olive oil every day, and take a low dose of asprin daily as well. Answered by Leonia Huff 1 year ago.

Speak to you doctor and before for you exercising I would take an advil BUT again speak to you doctor. Answered by Gwyneth Whetsell 1 year ago.

Stop worrying so much. That's awesome what you do by the way. I wish I could do something like that. Answered by Shanda Gregus 1 year ago.

The time is now and now is all we have. Answered by Yung Zakutney 1 year ago.


What happens if you get a heart attack?
I mean, lets say, I get a heart attack. Do I hafta get surgery? If so, what kind? Can you ONLY get heart attacks because of the cholestrial? Can you get it if you already have a bad heart? Can you get it over working yourself? And after a heart attack, how can you prevent if from happening again? So many... Asked by Dione Wentling 1 year ago.

I mean, lets say, I get a heart attack. Do I hafta get surgery? If so, what kind? Can you ONLY get heart attacks because of the cholestrial? Can you get it if you already have a bad heart? Can you get it over working yourself? And after a heart attack, how can you prevent if from happening again? So many questions... Hahaha Answered by Fumiko Pinilla 1 year ago.

Heart attack may be mild, moderate or severe. In cases of severe (acute) heart attack the mortality is very high and the patient is generally brought dead to the hospital. This may occur more commonly in very high smokers, patients suffering from sever uncontrolled blood pressure, Chronic uncontrolled diabetics, uncontrolled obesity cases, uncontrolled long standing cholesteroiemia, more rarely in high wrestlers, high class body builders, etc., etc. One should be careful of this type and try to avoid the predisposing causes in this cases. An element of genetic and familial tendency is also seen in all these heart attacks. In moderate case of CAD (heart attack) the attack may take some time (say about 10 mts. to 1/2 hour) to go into acute MI where timely treatment / management in the ICCU with continued IV sorbitrate or glyceryl trinitrate and more importantly a timely STK, etc., may reverse back the condition without going to a muscle damage (MI) or death. Here the patient should be monitored in the ICCU continuously under a cardiologist care with a ready Defibrillator and a special ICCU trained nursing care for at least 3 to 5 days to avoid a recurrence leading to sudden death. In these cases a CAG, is generally done and further interventional cardiological procedures like PTCA, and Stent etc are provided as per the result of the CAG (coronary Angiogram); or a CABG (coronary bypass surgery) is advised and done. Such of these patients may recover with out a morbidity but is to be reviewed by the cardiologist periodically throught life to avoid a recurrance etc. Rarely when the heart attack is mild or just like a threatining type the patient may have to be hospitalised for a detailed investigations under a cardiologist supervision and the precipitating cause eleminated. Such cases are also advised a CAG or a PTCA with a stent (generally drug coated) or a CABG may be advised / undertaken as a preventive measure, depending on the findings and severity of the mild heart attack etc., etc...... In all the above different varieties; a calm, worry and hurry free, relaxed, but a timely quick attitude; is very important to save from mortality or morbidity in the heart attacks. Answered by Chelsea Durnin 1 year ago.

You don't necessarily have to have surgery, it depends on the size of the clot, it can often be broken up with drugs that break up clots. Heart attacks can be caused by many different things, not just cholesterol, all it is is a blood clot in a coronary artery, so it could be a piece that has broken off from a damaged area and flowed in to the coronary artery. If you have a bad heart you are no more likely to suffer one, having bad cholesterol doesn't help though. Stress can be a factor as well, because it can cause high blood pressure, which can damage the arteries and cause them to thin by a processes called Atherosclerosis. Preventative methods involve limiting the factors: Diet=Less fatty foods, Stress=Lower it. There are also some factors such as genetics that you can't control, but by controlling the ones that you can, then you can do a great deal to stop it again. Answered by Ora Mcintyre 1 year ago.

Let's see....40% of the time you'll die before making it to a hospital. If you're fortunate enough to survive, it all depends on the type of attack and the severity as to whether surgery is warranted. Answered by Louann Waneka 1 year ago.


I REALLY need to know this. PLEASE help.!?
My dad first had a heart attack in April of 2008. Then, he had another heart attack a couple weeks ago. Will this increase his chances of anything happening in the future, and if so, will he survive it? Asked by Lyndia Quicksey 1 year ago.

Yes he is a high risk patient. But proper medication and care will minimise the worst effect. Alaways keep Aspirin and Sorbitrate tablet available. Incase of heart attack first give this tablets and then call Dr. Answered by Nicola Limbert 1 year ago.

I agree with the first answerer - Rely ENTIRELY on what his doctors tell you and NOT an what COULD be nothing but sheer guesswork - we have no access to his medical records so even if there WERE doctors on here they couldn't really give a professional answer or even opinion Answered by Rebekah Terron 1 year ago.

please dont ask amateurs here. your father needs to talk to doctor about lowering the risk. the doctor may perscribe some medication as his heart attacks maybe genetic or environment related (eating bad food). Answered by Ty Randoll 1 year ago.


Does having Asprin & Sorbitrate together cause any harm in patients misdiagnosed as having a Heart Attack?
The actual reason could be something else. Is it OK to be on the safe side and to administer the Tablets to the him / her? Asked by Yvone Rings 1 year ago.

It OK, No lethal harm was seen except for throbbing sensation due to nitrates, and occasionally dizziness. I have seen many cases during my career. Answered by Coretta Hudson 1 year ago.


What is the alternative tablet for 'Sarbitrate 10 mg' in Germany?
This is a tablet prescreibed by the cardiologist in India for heart disease. Asked by Basil Nicklin 1 year ago.

Sorbitrate 10mg (isosorbide dinitrate) should be available worldwide. Answered by Georgie Tota 1 year ago.


Waht is the content of the tablet ' sarbitrate 10 mg' ?
Asked by Oda Dabe 1 year ago.

It is sorbitrate 10 mg: isosorbide dinitrate, dilates blood vessels, mainly used in the treatment of anginal paing due to narrowing of blood vessels supplying the heart. Answered by Anneliese Dom 1 year ago.

It's a drug, man. Don't take it. Answered by Beulah Kostich 1 year ago.


Is Levitra good for a guy who has diabetes and had a heart surgery?
Asked by Ethyl Barrows 1 year ago.

If your Doctor says so, otherwise NO - read some of the warnings below Do not take vardenafil if you are also using a nitrate drug for chest pain or heart problems. This includes nitroglycerin (Nitrostat, Nitrolingual, Nitro-Dur, Nitro-Bid, and others), isosorbide dinitrate (Dilatrate-SR, Isordil, Sorbitrate), and isosorbide mononitrate (Imdur, ISMO, Monoket). Nitrates are also found in some recreational drugs such as amyl nitrate or nitrite ("poppers"). Taking vardenafil with a nitrate medicine can cause a serious decrease in blood pressure, leading to fainting, stroke, or heart attack. A small number of patients have had a sudden loss of eyesight after taking vardenafil. This type of vision loss is caused by decreased blood flow to the optic nerve of the eye. It is not clear whether vardenafil is the actual cause of such vision loss. Sudden vision loss with vardenafil use has occurred most often in people with heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or certain pre-existing eye problems, and in those who smoke or are over 50 years old. Before taking vardenafil, tell your doctor if you have: -heart disease or heart rhythm problems; -a recent history (in the past 6 months) of a heart attack, -angina (chest pain), or congestive heart failure; -a history of stroke or blood clots; -a personal or family history of "Long QT syndrome"; -high or low blood pressure; -liver disease; -kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis); -a blood cell disorder such as sickle cell anemia, multiple myeloma, or leukemia; -a bleeding disorder such as hemophilia; -a stomach ulcer; retinitis pigmentosa (an inherited condition of the eye); -a physical deformity of the penis (such as Peyronie's disease); or -if you have been told you should not have sexual intercourse for health reasons. If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use vardenafil or you may need a dosage adjustment or special tests during treatment. Answered by Retha Wimer 1 year ago.

A man with diabetes and a history of heart disease has a lot of risk factors and should be consulting his doctor. I wouldn't recommend looking for advice from anonymous people online who can't be held accountable if something were to go wrong. Answered by Ronald Tuckerson 1 year ago.

Probably not. I don't think Levitra is good for anybody, really... because it's just another drug. But you should really ask your doctor to be sure. Answered by Christen Librandi 1 year ago.

NO, it seriously interacts with heart meds. And will affect your hearth rhythm. Please ask a doctor before use Answered by Kristen Pottebaum 1 year ago.

your going to have to go to a doctor to get it anyway ask them. Answered by Arnetta Podbielski 1 year ago.


If someone is having symptoms of a heart attack like pain n shoulders and jaw then took paracetemol?
would that make the pain go away Asked by Ann Gilmore 1 year ago.

Well, a common drug used under this condition is the Sorbitrate(Isosorbide - Dinitrate 5/10mg) based upon condition. Along with this, a tramadol containing tablet would be helpful. The first option is more safe and preferred. Answered by Romelia Mcgillis 1 year ago.

If someone is having a heart attack, you do not want to give them paracetamol. By the time it relieves the pain, the person will be dead. If this happens again, give 81mg aspirin, a nitro tablet, and call 911 right away. For non-heart attack pain (angina), daily aspirin and something like lisinopril might help. Answered by Tommie Riggsby 1 year ago.

Aspirin (delayed release) would be fine. It will prevent or lessen the severity of heart attack.(75 mg daily). Take ECG and confirm that you have no heart attack. Answered by Renato Escarcega 1 year ago.


My father just had an angina attack.?
The doctor has prescribed certain allopathic medicines. Along with that can homeopathic medicine also be consumed? I read on a site that both can be taken as they do not cross each others' path, whereas on some other I saw that if both taken together, the results can be fatal. Kindly tell me which one is true? Asked by Sylvester Daliva 1 year ago.

Your father had an angina attack and requires allopathic medications to prevent the angina from recurring or becoming worse. The drugs increase heart perfusion and oxygenation and improve heart muscle tone, usually Sorbitrate (Nicholas) and other anti angina drugs, and other drugs like platelet aggregation inhibitors like salicylates. The homeopathic pills are to help boost body vitality and may be of benefit, if prescribed by a registered homeopath. Please make sure that you always consult a registered allopath or homeopath. Both are safe and very helpful in helping your father overcome his condition and live a healthy life. Avoid cigarettes, avoid alcohol, avoid fried fatty foods, avoid straining and avoid emotional stress. Do take wholesome foods, keep blood pressure in control and take prescribed medications regularly. All the best. Answered by Armand Nathanson 1 year ago.

While it is rather unlikely that a homeopathic drug would react with prescription medication, it is not impossible. Why take the risk? At least ask a pharmacist. Answered by Winifred Jalkut 1 year ago.

Taking water with medicines is fine. Answered by Lauran Fossati 1 year ago.

What are the names of the medicines? You left that out. Answered by Gene Curit 1 year ago.

He should be take only allopathic medicine. Answered by Mai Birchler 1 year ago.

Triple by-pass is the best medicine. Answered by Bert Kolasa 1 year ago.

homeopathic medicine is nothing, Answered by Lane Eubanks 1 year ago.


How do i prevent a heart attack?
i do research on forests in North india and in the Himalayas as well. Sometimes i have to trek 10 km a day, but sometimes i decide to save time by trekking 30 kms a day too. I have very good fitness but the walks are hard. In the day, in summer the forests can become quite hot and i perspire a lot. In the... Asked by Micheal Cupstid 1 year ago.

i do research on forests in North india and in the Himalayas as well. Sometimes i have to trek 10 km a day, but sometimes i decide to save time by trekking 30 kms a day too. I have very good fitness but the walks are hard. In the day, in summer the forests can become quite hot and i perspire a lot. In the Himalayas the uphill walks can get unbearably tiring. Im in my early 30's but a friend my age got a heart attack while climbing up the himalayas on a pilgrimage. And i can go 1-2 days without meeting anybody in the forests. So should i keep sorbitrate with me all the time. What other precautions can i take. Answered by Raven Woodington 1 year ago.

Simplify your life. Not everything in our life needs to be in our life. We all accumulate excess baggage. Simplify by clearing out the physical clutter. Give things you no longer need to people who could use them. Evaluate your everyday tasks and commitments, and delegate what you can. Keeping your life simple may mean saying no to some things so you can concentrate on what's valuable. Answered by Grayce Arel 1 year ago.

Well its good that you exercise regularly. That right there is a key to prevent a heart attack. Really eating healthy and exercising. If you have blood pressure problems, you should see a Dr. and they can prescribe something to lower your BP as a result lowering your risk for a heart attack. Answered by Maryjane Boesel 1 year ago.

Biggest tips are: Don't smoke Reduce your stress load Don't eat fatty / salty foods Maintain a healthy weight / BMI Exercise If you have precursors to heart disease, take a baby aspirin daily. Answered by Zetta Berschauer 1 year ago.

Swallow a teaspoon of olive oil every day, and take a low dose of asprin daily as well. Answered by Julene Moloney 1 year ago.

Speak to you doctor and before for you exercising I would take an advil BUT again speak to you doctor. Answered by Candra Weather 1 year ago.

Stop worrying so much. That's awesome what you do by the way. I wish I could do something like that. Answered by Anika Maupin 1 year ago.

The time is now and now is all we have. Answered by Walter Orehek 1 year ago.


What happens if you get a heart attack?
I mean, lets say, I get a heart attack. Do I hafta get surgery? If so, what kind? Can you ONLY get heart attacks because of the cholestrial? Can you get it if you already have a bad heart? Can you get it over working yourself? And after a heart attack, how can you prevent if from happening again? So many... Asked by Delmy Stubson 1 year ago.

I mean, lets say, I get a heart attack. Do I hafta get surgery? If so, what kind? Can you ONLY get heart attacks because of the cholestrial? Can you get it if you already have a bad heart? Can you get it over working yourself? And after a heart attack, how can you prevent if from happening again? So many questions... Hahaha Answered by Waneta Blute 1 year ago.

Heart attack may be mild, moderate or severe. In cases of severe (acute) heart attack the mortality is very high and the patient is generally brought dead to the hospital. This may occur more commonly in very high smokers, patients suffering from sever uncontrolled blood pressure, Chronic uncontrolled diabetics, uncontrolled obesity cases, uncontrolled long standing cholesteroiemia, more rarely in high wrestlers, high class body builders, etc., etc. One should be careful of this type and try to avoid the predisposing causes in this cases. An element of genetic and familial tendency is also seen in all these heart attacks. In moderate case of CAD (heart attack) the attack may take some time (say about 10 mts. to 1/2 hour) to go into acute MI where timely treatment / management in the ICCU with continued IV sorbitrate or glyceryl trinitrate and more importantly a timely STK, etc., may reverse back the condition without going to a muscle damage (MI) or death. Here the patient should be monitored in the ICCU continuously under a cardiologist care with a ready Defibrillator and a special ICCU trained nursing care for at least 3 to 5 days to avoid a recurrence leading to sudden death. In these cases a CAG, is generally done and further interventional cardiological procedures like PTCA, and Stent etc are provided as per the result of the CAG (coronary Angiogram); or a CABG (coronary bypass surgery) is advised and done. Such of these patients may recover with out a morbidity but is to be reviewed by the cardiologist periodically throught life to avoid a recurrance etc. Rarely when the heart attack is mild or just like a threatining type the patient may have to be hospitalised for a detailed investigations under a cardiologist supervision and the precipitating cause eleminated. Such cases are also advised a CAG or a PTCA with a stent (generally drug coated) or a CABG may be advised / undertaken as a preventive measure, depending on the findings and severity of the mild heart attack etc., etc...... In all the above different varieties; a calm, worry and hurry free, relaxed, but a timely quick attitude; is very important to save from mortality or morbidity in the heart attacks. Answered by Aida Steinback 1 year ago.

You don't necessarily have to have surgery, it depends on the size of the clot, it can often be broken up with drugs that break up clots. Heart attacks can be caused by many different things, not just cholesterol, all it is is a blood clot in a coronary artery, so it could be a piece that has broken off from a damaged area and flowed in to the coronary artery. If you have a bad heart you are no more likely to suffer one, having bad cholesterol doesn't help though. Stress can be a factor as well, because it can cause high blood pressure, which can damage the arteries and cause them to thin by a processes called Atherosclerosis. Preventative methods involve limiting the factors: Diet=Less fatty foods, Stress=Lower it. There are also some factors such as genetics that you can't control, but by controlling the ones that you can, then you can do a great deal to stop it again. Answered by Felicia Denby 1 year ago.

Let's see....40% of the time you'll die before making it to a hospital. If you're fortunate enough to survive, it all depends on the type of attack and the severity as to whether surgery is warranted. Answered by Venus Sugalski 1 year ago.


I REALLY need to know this. PLEASE help.!?
My dad first had a heart attack in April of 2008. Then, he had another heart attack a couple weeks ago. Will this increase his chances of anything happening in the future, and if so, will he survive it? Asked by Ileana Koprowski 1 year ago.

Yes he is a high risk patient. But proper medication and care will minimise the worst effect. Alaways keep Aspirin and Sorbitrate tablet available. Incase of heart attack first give this tablets and then call Dr. Answered by Tommy Goletz 1 year ago.

I agree with the first answerer - Rely ENTIRELY on what his doctors tell you and NOT an what COULD be nothing but sheer guesswork - we have no access to his medical records so even if there WERE doctors on here they couldn't really give a professional answer or even opinion Answered by Tomika Kine 1 year ago.

please dont ask amateurs here. your father needs to talk to doctor about lowering the risk. the doctor may perscribe some medication as his heart attacks maybe genetic or environment related (eating bad food). Answered by Candice Laughner 1 year ago.


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