Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 011777/001.

Names and composition

"SODIUM PHOSPHATE P 32" is the commercial name of a drug composed of SODIUM PHOSPHATE P-32.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
011777/001 SODIUM PHOSPHATE P 32 SODIUM PHOSPHATE P-32 SOLUTION/INJECTION, ORAL 0.67mCi per ML
011777/002 SODIUM PHOSPHATE P 32 SODIUM PHOSPHATE P-32 SOLUTION/INJECTION, ORAL 1.5mCi per VIAL

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
010927/001 PHOSPHOTOPE SODIUM PHOSPHATE P-32 SOLUTION/INJECTION, ORAL 1-8mCi per VIAL
011777/001 SODIUM PHOSPHATE P 32 SODIUM PHOSPHATE P-32 SOLUTION/INJECTION, ORAL 0.67mCi per ML
011777/002 SODIUM PHOSPHATE P 32 SODIUM PHOSPHATE P-32 SOLUTION/INJECTION, ORAL 1.5mCi per VIAL

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Answered questions

Phosphorus-32 is a commonly used radioactive nuclide in biochemical research, particularly in studies of?
Phosphorus-32 is a commonly used radioactive nuclide in biochemical research, particularly in studies of nucleic acids. The half-life of phosphorus-32 is 14.3 days. What mass of phosphorus-32 is left from an original sample of 175 mg of Na3.(32)PO4 after 35.0 days? Assume the atomic mass of (32)P is 32.0. Asked by Shanelle Craighead 1 year ago.

half life of P32 = 14.3 days given days = 35 days So, number of half life, n = 35/14.3 = 2.45 So, after 35 days, the mass of sodium phosphate sample left = original mass x (1/2)^n, = 175 mg x (1/2)^2.45 = 32 g of Na3PO4 after 35 days Formula mass of Sodium phosphate = 3(23) + 32 + 4(16) amu = 165 amu 165 g of sodium phosphate contains 32 g of Phosphorus 32 g ------------------------------? = 32 x 32/ 165 = 6.20606g of P32 Answered by Twanda Permann 1 year ago.

how do you get 3200 mg from 175 mg? Answered by Shirly Reistad 1 year ago.

Thanks for all the answers! Answered by Ninfa Ellenberger 1 year ago.


Convert the following?
How do you convert 1) 12 g sodium chloride -> ? mol sodium chloride and 2) 980. g barium phosphate -> ? mol barium phosphate Explaining will be helpful. Thank you (: Asked by Angelita Georgiana 1 year ago.

So first you need to find the Molar Mass of sodium chloride, to get the molar mass you just add up the weights you'll find on you periodic table NaCl Na weight: 22.98 amu Cl weight: 35.45 amu now adding those together you get 22.98 +35.45 = 58.43 so your molar mass is 58.43 g/mol the formula for converting mass to moles is mols=mass/molar mass So take your mass (in grams) 12 and divide it by your molar mass that you found 58.43 12/58.43 = .205 mols mols are always going to be a smaller number than the mass so if you get a bigger # you did something wrong. 2) Now this one is a little harder because barium phosphate has the chemical equation of Ba3P2 Basically the only difference is when you calculate your molar mass you now have to multiply the weights by the number of atoms there is Ba weight: 137.32 *3 P weight: 30.97 *2 so the total you'll get is 473.9 980/473.9= 2.067 mols Answered by Ruben Leinonen 1 year ago.

Use the molar masses of each to convert to moles! 12 g NaCl/(23 g + 35 g) = 0.21 moles Molar mass of NaCl is 58 g/mol 980.0 g Ba3(PO4)2 980 g Ba3(PO4)2/[(137*3 + (2)*(31+(16*4))] = 1.631 moles Molar mass of Ba3(PO4)2 is 601 g/mol Answered by Alison Phomsoukha 1 year ago.


Check my work on some simple chem problems please?
I'm doing practice problems to prepare for an exam and was wondering if I could get my work checked - sigfigs in particular? Thanks!!1. Consider a 2.3L solution of 0.535M sodium phosphate. What is the molar concentration of the sodium ion in this solution?I determined the equation to be 3Na + PO4 ->... Asked by Palmira Faircloth 1 year ago.

I'm doing practice problems to prepare for an exam and was wondering if I could get my work checked - sigfigs in particular? Thanks!! 1. Consider a 2.3L solution of 0.535M sodium phosphate. What is the molar concentration of the sodium ion in this solution? I determined the equation to be 3Na + PO4 -> Na3PO4 0.535M Na3PO4 * (3 moles Na/1mol Na3PO4) = 1.605M Na+ 2. If a 35mL sample of the above sodium phosphate is diluted to 150 mL, what is the resulting molarity of the solution? I used: M1V1 = M2V2 and said (0.035L)(0.535M) = (m2)(0.15L) which is 0.12M Na3PO4 3. A sample of Cl2 gas in a fixed volume container has a pressure of 0.78 atm at 26.5 degrees celcius a) what is the density of chlorine gas under these conditions? (molar mass)(p)=RTd (35.45g Cl/1mol * 2)(0.78atm) = (0.0821)(26.5 Celcius+ 273K)(d) which equals a density of 2.2g/L b) what's the pressure of the sample if the temperature is raised to 75 degrees Celsius? P1/T1 = P2/T2 (0.78atm)/(26.5 Celcius + 273K) = (P2 atm)/(75 degrees celcius + 273K) which is 0.91 atm C) what's the concentration of the Cl2 gas at 75 degrees celcius at this new pressure? P/RT = n/V (n/V gives mol/L) (0.91atm)/(0.0821)(75 + 273) = 0.32 mol/L 4. A 3 gram sample of Xe gas in a 3.25L vessel has a temperature of 19.6 degrees Celsius (R=0.08206) a) determine the pressure of the sample (1 mol Xe)/(131.29g/mol) = (xmol/3g) 0.02 mol Xe PV=nRT (p)(3.25L) = (0.02 mol Xe)(0.0821)(19.6 + 273) P = 0.12 atm B) If 5g of O2 gas is added to the sample while the volume and temperature are held constant, what is the mole fraction of O2 gas in the mix? 5g O2 = 0.3 mol (P)(3.25L) = (0.3 mol O2)(0.0821)(19.6+273) Pressure of O2 gas = 2.23 atm total pressure therefore is .12atm Xe + 2.23 atm O2 = 2.34 atm 2,23 atm O2/ total pressure of 2.34 = the mol fraction for O2 is 0.95 c) what is the partial pressure of Xe in the mix? the partial pressure of Xe would be .12 atm because .12atm of Xe + 2.23 atm of O2 combine to give the total pressure Thanks!!! Answered by Ali Hebrank 1 year ago.

1. Correct 2. Correct 3a and 3b, both correct 4a. Your method is correct, I would not round off the moles to 1 sig fig though in the first step, you introduce a significant error. If you don't round off, you get P = 0.169 atm. I'm not sure how you get 0.12 atm. Even if I use n = 0.02 moles, I get 0.148 atm. 4b 5 g of O2 = 0.1563 moles, did you use 32 g/mole or 16 g/mole? O2 exists as a diatomic molecule. You can also calculate mole fraction of O2 = moles of O2 / ( moles O2 + moles Xe). You don't have calculate the pressures and then work from them. The partial pressure of Xe is correct, pending my comments above. Good work overall. Answered by Olimpia Gove 1 year ago.


Percent of Mass?
I need help calculating the percent of mass in the following -sodium sulfate -sodium sulfide -potassium phosphate *thanks if anyone could help* Asked by Yasmin Blackshear 1 year ago.

Na2SO4 mol mass = (2 x 23) + 32 + 64 = 142g/mol. Na2 = 46/142 = 0.3239 x 100% = 32.39%. S = 32/142 = 0.2254 x 100% = 22.54%. O4 = 64/142 = 0.4507 x 100% = 45.07%. = 100%. Na2S mol.mass = (2 x 23) + 32 = 78g/mol. Na2 = 46/78 = 0.5897 x 100% = 58.97% s = 32/78 = 0.4103 x 100% = 41.03%. = 100%. K3PO4 mol.mass = (3 x 39) + 31 + 64 = 212g/mol. K3 = 117/212 = 0.5519 x 100% = 55.19%. P = 31/212 = 0.1462 x 100% = 14.62%. O4 = 64/212 = 0.3019 x 100% = 30.19%. = 100%. Answered by Merri Demonett 1 year ago.


Is anyone taking hydrogen peroxide 35% orally and what has it done for you?
Asked by Ona Andrepont 1 year ago.

Contact doctors who provide hydrogen peroxide therapy, before using 35% H2O2. P.S. - for information Grades of Hydrogen Peroxide - (A) 3.5% Pharmaceutical Grade: This is the grade sold at your local drugstore or supermarket. This product is not recommended for internal use. It contains an assortment of stabilizers which shouldn't be ingested. Various stabilizers include: acetanilide, phenol, sodium stanate and tertrasodium phosphate. (B) 6% Beautician Grade: This is used in beauty shops to color hair and is not recommended for internal use. (C) 30% Reagent Grade: This is used for various scientific experimentation and also contains stabilizers. It is also not for internal use. (D) 30% to 32% Electronic Grade: This is used to clean electronic parts and not for internal use. (E) 35% Technical Grade: This is a more concentrated product than the Reagent Grade and differs slightly in that phosphorus is added to help neutralize any chlorine from the water used to dilute it. (F) 35% Food Grade: This is used in the production of foods like cheese, eggs, and whey-containing products. It is also sprayed on the foil lining of aseptic packages containing fruit juices and milk products. It is available in pints, quarts, gallons or even drums. (G) 90%: This is used as an oxygen source for rocket fuel. Only 35% Food Grade hydrogen peroxide is recommended for internal use. At this concentration, however, hydrogen peroxide is a very strong oxidizer and if not diluted, it can be extremely dangerous or even fatal. Any concentrations over 10% can cause neurological reactions and damage to the upper gastrointestinal tract. 35% Food Grade H202 must be (1) handled carefully (direct contact will burn the skin--immediate flushing with water is recommended). (2) diluted properly before use. (3) stored safely and properly (after making a dilution the remainder should be stored tightly sealed in the freezer). One of the most convenient methods of dispensing 35% H202 is from a small glass eye dropper bottle.The drops( 1-3 ) are mixed with either 6 to 8 ounces of distilled water, juice, milk or even aloe vera juice or gel. (Don't use chlorinated tap water to dilute the peroxide!) Making and Using 3% Solutions of H202 - A 3.5% solution can be made quite easily by first pouring 1 ounce of 35% H202 into a pint jar. To this add 11 ounces of distilled water. This will make 12 ounces of 3.5% H202. Individuals who have had transplants should not take H2O2. H202 stimulates the immune system and could possibly cause a rejection of the organ. Answered by Eleni Sedam 1 year ago.

i typed in the 35% hydrogen peroxide/and what i could tell that sttrength is NOT to be taken orally/i know smaller % r used for mouth rinses/please read up on Answered by Miranda Niebergall 1 year ago.

I have used 3% for many many years for a mouth wash and to brush my teeth, but I have not read anything good about 35% Answered by Mechelle Kepner 1 year ago.

That's way too strong - my mouthwash is 1.5% You mustn't use it neat. Try capful in a pint of water for 1 minute, if you stick your tongue out afterwards and you see foam patches then it's strong enough. Best time to use a tongue scraper is after using this rinse - the bubbles bring any debris to the top of the tongue from the pits. Good for "morning breath" Answered by Alysia Kovarovic 1 year ago.

Blonde Breath Answered by Florrie Lickey 1 year ago.

Do you mean drink it? I don't think thats a good idea. But, if you mean gargle, it's help me prevent infection when I was really sick and used it a a mouth wash that is a cheap way to whiten your teeth. Answered by Marta Luzania 1 year ago.

I hope to God you're not drinking it. It's TOXIC! You can use it as a teeth whitener and mouth rinse, but spit it out afterward and rinse with water. Answered by Tawanna Farnham 1 year ago.


Can a dog die from eating Algae waffers?
i can not call my vet becuase it is 10:40 p.m. and they are not open Asked by Nanette Funai 1 year ago.

I bought Hikari Tropical Algae Waffers for my snails and when i wasn't home my dog got a hold of it and ate them all. They are the kind of waffers that expand alot and i was worried if it would harm my 16 pound maltese/terrier mix. It was a 20 gram bag. Also, i have two dogs but i think just the one ate them but here are the ingredients if it helps at all : Ingredients: White fish meal, wheat flour, wheat germ meal, alpha starch, dehydrated alfalfa meal, soybean meal, fish oil, brewers' dried yeast, shrimp meal, spirulina, carotene, sodium phosphate, salt, vitamin A supplement, vitamin D3 supplement, vitamin E supplement, thiamine mononitrate, riboflavin, l-ascorbyl-2--polyphosphate (source of vitamin C), choline chloride, inositol, calcium iodate, manganese sulfate, magnesium carbonate. Guaranteed Analysis: Crude protein (min.) 32%, crude fat (min.) 4%, crude fiber (max.) 5%, moisture (max.) 10%, ash (max.) 12%. Will this harm my dog ? Answered by Louvenia Phu 1 year ago.

The ingredients shouldn't harm your dog. I occasionally spill some when I'm feeding my plecostamus and none of my dogs have had negative effects. Keep an eye on your dogs for the next 48 hours. Some diarrhea would be normal. Vomiting a meal, refusing to eat at all, looking sad, or having a very hard stomach are all reasons to go immediately to your vet or an emergency vet in the next 48 hours. Answered by Cecelia Payna 1 year ago.

It is not sugar free gum, but Xylitol that is an ingredients in some of these products. While not all pets become ill after eating xylitol (which is the ingredients that is hazardous to dogs) You needs to be aware of the potential dangers. Make sure that products containing xylitol are kept away from dogs. If an owner suspects that their dog has eaten products containing xylitol, they should contact their veterinarian immediately. I would contact the vet just to be on the safe side. Good luck Answered by Jazmin Waterman 1 year ago.

Call your vet! Answered by Wesley Niesporek 1 year ago.


Chemistry questions multiple choice please help?
Question 1 If the reaction of 3.50 moles of lithium with excess hydrofluoric acid produced an 75.5% yield of hydrogen gas, what was the actual yield of hydrogen gas?Unbalanced equation: Li + HF “yields”/ LiF + H21.32 mol H21.75 mol H22.32 mol H22.65 mol H2Question 2 What coefficients... Asked by Robt Wasmer 1 year ago.

Question 1 If the reaction of 3.50 moles of lithium with excess hydrofluoric acid produced an 75.5% yield of hydrogen gas, what was the actual yield of hydrogen gas? Unbalanced equation: Li + HF “yields”/ LiF + H2 1.32 mol H2 1.75 mol H2 2.32 mol H2 2.65 mol H2 Question 2 What coefficients must be added to balance the following reaction? _____ Sn + _____ H3PO4 yields _____ H2 + _____ Sn3(PO4)4 3, 2, 3, 1 3, 4, 3, 1 3, 4, 4, 1 3, 4, 6, 1 Question 3 According to the activity series, which of the following single replacement reactions will take place and result in a reaction? nickel and aluminum chloride barium and copper bromide potassium nitrate and aluminum sodium phosphate and zinc Question 4 How many moles of K3PO4 can be formed when 4.4 moles of H3PO4 react with 3.8 moles of KOH? H3PO4 + KOH yields H2O + K3PO4 Be sure to balance the equation. 1.3 mol K3PO4 1.9 mol K3PO4 2.2 mol K3PO4 4.4 mol K3PO4 Question 5 Which of the following is a product formed when PO3 and H2O react together? O2 H3PO4 H2 P(OH)2 Question 6 Which of the following is produced when magnesium (Mg) combusts? O2 MgO CO2 H2O Question 7 Which of the following equations violates the law of conservation of mass? 2Al + 6HCl yields 2AlCl3 + 3H2 Na2C2O4 + Pb(NO3)2 yields PbC2O4 + 2NaNO3 AgNO3 + LiCl yields AgCl + LiNO3 3Ca + 2Cr(NO3)3 yields 3Ca(NO3)3 + 2Cr Question 8 Which of the following is a product formed when LiClO3 decomposes? Li O2 Li2O Cl2O Question 9 What is always true of a combustion reaction? oxygen gas must be one of the reactants carbon dioxide will be produced the reaction absorbs energy one reactant must contain carbon Question 10 Which of the following is not a correct chemical equation for a double displacement reaction? 2 RbNO3 + BeF2 yields Be(NO3)2 + 2 RbF CaCl + LiCO3 yields CaCO3 + LiCl Na3PO4 + 3 KOH yields 3 NaOH + K3PO4 2 MgI2 + Mn(SO3)2 yields 2 MgSO3 + MnI4 Answered by Veda Gondek 1 year ago.

Question 1 If the reaction of 3.50 moles of lithium with excess hydrofluoric acid produced an 75.5% yield of hydrogen gas, what was the actual yield of hydrogen gas? Unbalanced equation: Li + HF “yields”/ LiF + H2 1.32 mol H2 Question 2 What coefficients must be added to balance the following reaction? ___3__ Sn + ___4__ H3PO4 yields __6___ H2 + ___1__ Sn3(PO4)4 3, 4, 6, 1 Question 3 According to the activity series, which of the following single replacement reactions will take place and result in a reaction? barium and copper bromide Question 4 How many moles of K3PO4 can be formed when 4.4 moles of H3PO4 react with 3.8 moles of KOH? H3PO4 +3 KOH yields 3H2O + K3PO4 Be sure to balance the equation. 4.4 mol K3PO4 Question 5 Which of the following is a product formed when PO3 and H2O react together? H3PO4 Question 6 Which of the following is produced when magnesium (Mg) combusts? MgO Question 7 Which of the following equations violates the law of conservation of mass? 3Ca + 2Cr(NO3)3 yields 3Ca(NO3)3 + 2Cr Question 8 Which of the following is a product formed when LiClO3 decomposes? Li2O Question 9 What is always true of a combustion reaction? oxygen gas must be one of the reactants Question 10 Which of the following is not a correct chemical equation for a double displacement reaction? CaCl + LiCO3 yields CaCO3 + LiCl Answered by Tabetha Ostby 1 year ago.

D is the terrific decision A - melting factors are no longer indicative of solubility in water B - in all probability however the belief looks primitive, there are greater efficient techniques to remedy it C - hahahaha D - by skill of weighing the residues against one yet another, you are able to confirm that's the main soluble salt by skill of looking which residue weighs the main. this is because of the fact the greater residue there is, the greater of the salt replaced into interior the 5 ml saturated answer and consequently the greater soluble the salt. Answered by Chelsea Galyen 1 year ago.

How many moles of KOH are necessary to balance Equation B below? Equation B: _____ KOH + _____ H3PO4 -------> _____ K3PO4 + _____ H2O Answered by Rosalva Denver 1 year ago.


I need help with a chemistry question.?
A scientist wants to make a solution of tribasic sodium phosphate, Na3PO4, for a laboratory experiment. How many grams of Na3PO4 will be needed to produce 400 mL of a solution that has a concentration of Na+ ions of 1.50 M? Please explain, Thanks! Asked by Bobby Buissereth 1 year ago.

We can calculate the number of moles of Na^+ ions needed for this solution by using the following equation: molarity = (moles of Na^+) / (Liters of solution) or moles of Na^+ = (molarity)(Liters of solution) moles of Na^+ = (1.50 M)(0.400 L) moles of Na^+ = 0.600 mol Since one mole of Na3PO4 contains 3 moles of Na^+ ions, we need only one third as many moles of Na3PO4 to get that concentration of Na^+ ions, or 0.200 mol of Na3PO4. To find the number of grams of Na3PO4, multiply 0.200 mol by the mole mass of Na3PO4: Mole mass of Na3PO4: 3 × Na = 3 × 22.9898 = 68.9694 1 × P = 1 × 30.0738 = 30.9738 4 × O = 4 × 15.9994 = 63.9976 --------------------------------------... Total = 163.9408 g/mol (0.200 mol)(163.9408 g/mol) = 32.78816 g of Na3PO4 or 32.8 g of Na3PO4 rounded to three significant figures. Answer: About 32.8 grams of Na3PO4 will be needed to produce 400. mL of a solution that has a concentration of Na+ ions of 1.50 M. Answered by Ardis Maenner 1 year ago.

1.5 M in Na+ means 1/3 of that in Na3PO4 as each Na3PO4 has 3 Na's in it. So your final solution will be 1/3 x 1.5 = 0.5 M Na3PO4 That means in 1000 ml of this you have 0.5 mole Na3PO4 so in 400 ml 400/1000 x 0.5 mole = 0.2 moles Na3PO4 Na = 23; P = 31; O = 16 so formula mass of Na3PO4 is (3x23) + 31 + (4x16) = 164 gram 0.2 moles is then 0.2 x 164 = 32.8 gram Na3PO4 Answered by Lasandra Pfalmer 1 year ago.


Question about polyatomic ions?
I am drawing the electron dot config for PO4. According to my notes from class that I copied down the charge is -3. I cannot figure out where the extra three electrons came from. Both P and O have reached octet. Please explain. Thanks!! Asked by Jule Scrichfield 1 year ago.

PO4 has a charge of -3 which means it gain three more e- so you have to put bricks and put a -3 on it ...O ....| O-P-O ....| ...O [the drawing]-3 the dots are for the space Answered by Jose Borkholder 1 year ago.


Phosphorus-32 is a commonly used radioactive nuclide in biochemical research, particularly in studies of?
Phosphorus-32 is a commonly used radioactive nuclide in biochemical research, particularly in studies of nucleic acids. The half-life of phosphorus-32 is 14.3 days. What mass of phosphorus-32 is left from an original sample of 175 mg of Na3.(32)PO4 after 35.0 days? Assume the atomic mass of (32)P is 32.0. Asked by Milagro Lehew 1 year ago.

half life of P32 = 14.3 days given days = 35 days So, number of half life, n = 35/14.3 = 2.45 So, after 35 days, the mass of sodium phosphate sample left = original mass x (1/2)^n, = 175 mg x (1/2)^2.45 = 32 g of Na3PO4 after 35 days Formula mass of Sodium phosphate = 3(23) + 32 + 4(16) amu = 165 amu 165 g of sodium phosphate contains 32 g of Phosphorus 32 g ------------------------------? = 32 x 32/ 165 = 6.20606g of P32 Answered by Myles Lindig 1 year ago.

how do you get 3200 mg from 175 mg? Answered by Rueben Partelow 1 year ago.

Thanks for all the answers! Answered by Rodney Chappell 1 year ago.


Convert the following?
How do you convert 1) 12 g sodium chloride -> ? mol sodium chloride and 2) 980. g barium phosphate -> ? mol barium phosphate Explaining will be helpful. Thank you (: Asked by Micha Akemon 1 year ago.

So first you need to find the Molar Mass of sodium chloride, to get the molar mass you just add up the weights you'll find on you periodic table NaCl Na weight: 22.98 amu Cl weight: 35.45 amu now adding those together you get 22.98 +35.45 = 58.43 so your molar mass is 58.43 g/mol the formula for converting mass to moles is mols=mass/molar mass So take your mass (in grams) 12 and divide it by your molar mass that you found 58.43 12/58.43 = .205 mols mols are always going to be a smaller number than the mass so if you get a bigger # you did something wrong. 2) Now this one is a little harder because barium phosphate has the chemical equation of Ba3P2 Basically the only difference is when you calculate your molar mass you now have to multiply the weights by the number of atoms there is Ba weight: 137.32 *3 P weight: 30.97 *2 so the total you'll get is 473.9 980/473.9= 2.067 mols Answered by Earlene Fanguy 1 year ago.

Use the molar masses of each to convert to moles! 12 g NaCl/(23 g + 35 g) = 0.21 moles Molar mass of NaCl is 58 g/mol 980.0 g Ba3(PO4)2 980 g Ba3(PO4)2/[(137*3 + (2)*(31+(16*4))] = 1.631 moles Molar mass of Ba3(PO4)2 is 601 g/mol Answered by Emery Spirk 1 year ago.


Check my work on some simple chem problems please?
I'm doing practice problems to prepare for an exam and was wondering if I could get my work checked - sigfigs in particular? Thanks!!1. Consider a 2.3L solution of 0.535M sodium phosphate. What is the molar concentration of the sodium ion in this solution?I determined the equation to be 3Na + PO4 ->... Asked by Reyna Napps 1 year ago.

I'm doing practice problems to prepare for an exam and was wondering if I could get my work checked - sigfigs in particular? Thanks!! 1. Consider a 2.3L solution of 0.535M sodium phosphate. What is the molar concentration of the sodium ion in this solution? I determined the equation to be 3Na + PO4 -> Na3PO4 0.535M Na3PO4 * (3 moles Na/1mol Na3PO4) = 1.605M Na+ 2. If a 35mL sample of the above sodium phosphate is diluted to 150 mL, what is the resulting molarity of the solution? I used: M1V1 = M2V2 and said (0.035L)(0.535M) = (m2)(0.15L) which is 0.12M Na3PO4 3. A sample of Cl2 gas in a fixed volume container has a pressure of 0.78 atm at 26.5 degrees celcius a) what is the density of chlorine gas under these conditions? (molar mass)(p)=RTd (35.45g Cl/1mol * 2)(0.78atm) = (0.0821)(26.5 Celcius+ 273K)(d) which equals a density of 2.2g/L b) what's the pressure of the sample if the temperature is raised to 75 degrees Celsius? P1/T1 = P2/T2 (0.78atm)/(26.5 Celcius + 273K) = (P2 atm)/(75 degrees celcius + 273K) which is 0.91 atm C) what's the concentration of the Cl2 gas at 75 degrees celcius at this new pressure? P/RT = n/V (n/V gives mol/L) (0.91atm)/(0.0821)(75 + 273) = 0.32 mol/L 4. A 3 gram sample of Xe gas in a 3.25L vessel has a temperature of 19.6 degrees Celsius (R=0.08206) a) determine the pressure of the sample (1 mol Xe)/(131.29g/mol) = (xmol/3g) 0.02 mol Xe PV=nRT (p)(3.25L) = (0.02 mol Xe)(0.0821)(19.6 + 273) P = 0.12 atm B) If 5g of O2 gas is added to the sample while the volume and temperature are held constant, what is the mole fraction of O2 gas in the mix? 5g O2 = 0.3 mol (P)(3.25L) = (0.3 mol O2)(0.0821)(19.6+273) Pressure of O2 gas = 2.23 atm total pressure therefore is .12atm Xe + 2.23 atm O2 = 2.34 atm 2,23 atm O2/ total pressure of 2.34 = the mol fraction for O2 is 0.95 c) what is the partial pressure of Xe in the mix? the partial pressure of Xe would be .12 atm because .12atm of Xe + 2.23 atm of O2 combine to give the total pressure Thanks!!! Answered by Floy Bambhrolia 1 year ago.

1. Correct 2. Correct 3a and 3b, both correct 4a. Your method is correct, I would not round off the moles to 1 sig fig though in the first step, you introduce a significant error. If you don't round off, you get P = 0.169 atm. I'm not sure how you get 0.12 atm. Even if I use n = 0.02 moles, I get 0.148 atm. 4b 5 g of O2 = 0.1563 moles, did you use 32 g/mole or 16 g/mole? O2 exists as a diatomic molecule. You can also calculate mole fraction of O2 = moles of O2 / ( moles O2 + moles Xe). You don't have calculate the pressures and then work from them. The partial pressure of Xe is correct, pending my comments above. Good work overall. Answered by Grisel Strozier 1 year ago.


Percent of Mass?
I need help calculating the percent of mass in the following -sodium sulfate -sodium sulfide -potassium phosphate *thanks if anyone could help* Asked by Masako Cautillo 1 year ago.

Na2SO4 mol mass = (2 x 23) + 32 + 64 = 142g/mol. Na2 = 46/142 = 0.3239 x 100% = 32.39%. S = 32/142 = 0.2254 x 100% = 22.54%. O4 = 64/142 = 0.4507 x 100% = 45.07%. = 100%. Na2S mol.mass = (2 x 23) + 32 = 78g/mol. Na2 = 46/78 = 0.5897 x 100% = 58.97% s = 32/78 = 0.4103 x 100% = 41.03%. = 100%. K3PO4 mol.mass = (3 x 39) + 31 + 64 = 212g/mol. K3 = 117/212 = 0.5519 x 100% = 55.19%. P = 31/212 = 0.1462 x 100% = 14.62%. O4 = 64/212 = 0.3019 x 100% = 30.19%. = 100%. Answered by Tristan Glaspy 1 year ago.


Is anyone taking hydrogen peroxide 35% orally and what has it done for you?
Asked by Tandy Gheza 1 year ago.

Contact doctors who provide hydrogen peroxide therapy, before using 35% H2O2. P.S. - for information Grades of Hydrogen Peroxide - (A) 3.5% Pharmaceutical Grade: This is the grade sold at your local drugstore or supermarket. This product is not recommended for internal use. It contains an assortment of stabilizers which shouldn't be ingested. Various stabilizers include: acetanilide, phenol, sodium stanate and tertrasodium phosphate. (B) 6% Beautician Grade: This is used in beauty shops to color hair and is not recommended for internal use. (C) 30% Reagent Grade: This is used for various scientific experimentation and also contains stabilizers. It is also not for internal use. (D) 30% to 32% Electronic Grade: This is used to clean electronic parts and not for internal use. (E) 35% Technical Grade: This is a more concentrated product than the Reagent Grade and differs slightly in that phosphorus is added to help neutralize any chlorine from the water used to dilute it. (F) 35% Food Grade: This is used in the production of foods like cheese, eggs, and whey-containing products. It is also sprayed on the foil lining of aseptic packages containing fruit juices and milk products. It is available in pints, quarts, gallons or even drums. (G) 90%: This is used as an oxygen source for rocket fuel. Only 35% Food Grade hydrogen peroxide is recommended for internal use. At this concentration, however, hydrogen peroxide is a very strong oxidizer and if not diluted, it can be extremely dangerous or even fatal. Any concentrations over 10% can cause neurological reactions and damage to the upper gastrointestinal tract. 35% Food Grade H202 must be (1) handled carefully (direct contact will burn the skin--immediate flushing with water is recommended). (2) diluted properly before use. (3) stored safely and properly (after making a dilution the remainder should be stored tightly sealed in the freezer). One of the most convenient methods of dispensing 35% H202 is from a small glass eye dropper bottle.The drops( 1-3 ) are mixed with either 6 to 8 ounces of distilled water, juice, milk or even aloe vera juice or gel. (Don't use chlorinated tap water to dilute the peroxide!) Making and Using 3% Solutions of H202 - A 3.5% solution can be made quite easily by first pouring 1 ounce of 35% H202 into a pint jar. To this add 11 ounces of distilled water. This will make 12 ounces of 3.5% H202. Individuals who have had transplants should not take H2O2. H202 stimulates the immune system and could possibly cause a rejection of the organ. Answered by Francesca Vitera 1 year ago.

i typed in the 35% hydrogen peroxide/and what i could tell that sttrength is NOT to be taken orally/i know smaller % r used for mouth rinses/please read up on Answered by Isreal Mulroy 1 year ago.

I have used 3% for many many years for a mouth wash and to brush my teeth, but I have not read anything good about 35% Answered by Diane Tekell 1 year ago.

That's way too strong - my mouthwash is 1.5% You mustn't use it neat. Try capful in a pint of water for 1 minute, if you stick your tongue out afterwards and you see foam patches then it's strong enough. Best time to use a tongue scraper is after using this rinse - the bubbles bring any debris to the top of the tongue from the pits. Good for "morning breath" Answered by Yolanda Corbo 1 year ago.

Blonde Breath Answered by Ouida Steffensmeier 1 year ago.

Do you mean drink it? I don't think thats a good idea. But, if you mean gargle, it's help me prevent infection when I was really sick and used it a a mouth wash that is a cheap way to whiten your teeth. Answered by Manie Corrigan 1 year ago.

I hope to God you're not drinking it. It's TOXIC! You can use it as a teeth whitener and mouth rinse, but spit it out afterward and rinse with water. Answered by Alpha Luttrell 1 year ago.


Can a dog die from eating Algae waffers?
i can not call my vet becuase it is 10:40 p.m. and they are not open Asked by Francene Thelin 1 year ago.

I bought Hikari Tropical Algae Waffers for my snails and when i wasn't home my dog got a hold of it and ate them all. They are the kind of waffers that expand alot and i was worried if it would harm my 16 pound maltese/terrier mix. It was a 20 gram bag. Also, i have two dogs but i think just the one ate them but here are the ingredients if it helps at all : Ingredients: White fish meal, wheat flour, wheat germ meal, alpha starch, dehydrated alfalfa meal, soybean meal, fish oil, brewers' dried yeast, shrimp meal, spirulina, carotene, sodium phosphate, salt, vitamin A supplement, vitamin D3 supplement, vitamin E supplement, thiamine mononitrate, riboflavin, l-ascorbyl-2--polyphosphate (source of vitamin C), choline chloride, inositol, calcium iodate, manganese sulfate, magnesium carbonate. Guaranteed Analysis: Crude protein (min.) 32%, crude fat (min.) 4%, crude fiber (max.) 5%, moisture (max.) 10%, ash (max.) 12%. Will this harm my dog ? Answered by In Ericson 1 year ago.

The ingredients shouldn't harm your dog. I occasionally spill some when I'm feeding my plecostamus and none of my dogs have had negative effects. Keep an eye on your dogs for the next 48 hours. Some diarrhea would be normal. Vomiting a meal, refusing to eat at all, looking sad, or having a very hard stomach are all reasons to go immediately to your vet or an emergency vet in the next 48 hours. Answered by Jamel Utt 1 year ago.

It is not sugar free gum, but Xylitol that is an ingredients in some of these products. While not all pets become ill after eating xylitol (which is the ingredients that is hazardous to dogs) You needs to be aware of the potential dangers. Make sure that products containing xylitol are kept away from dogs. If an owner suspects that their dog has eaten products containing xylitol, they should contact their veterinarian immediately. I would contact the vet just to be on the safe side. Good luck Answered by Brook Durousseau 1 year ago.

Call your vet! Answered by Vikki Ochiai 1 year ago.


Chemistry questions multiple choice please help?
Question 1 If the reaction of 3.50 moles of lithium with excess hydrofluoric acid produced an 75.5% yield of hydrogen gas, what was the actual yield of hydrogen gas?Unbalanced equation: Li + HF “yields”/ LiF + H21.32 mol H21.75 mol H22.32 mol H22.65 mol H2Question 2 What coefficients... Asked by Tabatha Commer 1 year ago.

Question 1 If the reaction of 3.50 moles of lithium with excess hydrofluoric acid produced an 75.5% yield of hydrogen gas, what was the actual yield of hydrogen gas? Unbalanced equation: Li + HF “yields”/ LiF + H2 1.32 mol H2 1.75 mol H2 2.32 mol H2 2.65 mol H2 Question 2 What coefficients must be added to balance the following reaction? _____ Sn + _____ H3PO4 yields _____ H2 + _____ Sn3(PO4)4 3, 2, 3, 1 3, 4, 3, 1 3, 4, 4, 1 3, 4, 6, 1 Question 3 According to the activity series, which of the following single replacement reactions will take place and result in a reaction? nickel and aluminum chloride barium and copper bromide potassium nitrate and aluminum sodium phosphate and zinc Question 4 How many moles of K3PO4 can be formed when 4.4 moles of H3PO4 react with 3.8 moles of KOH? H3PO4 + KOH yields H2O + K3PO4 Be sure to balance the equation. 1.3 mol K3PO4 1.9 mol K3PO4 2.2 mol K3PO4 4.4 mol K3PO4 Question 5 Which of the following is a product formed when PO3 and H2O react together? O2 H3PO4 H2 P(OH)2 Question 6 Which of the following is produced when magnesium (Mg) combusts? O2 MgO CO2 H2O Question 7 Which of the following equations violates the law of conservation of mass? 2Al + 6HCl yields 2AlCl3 + 3H2 Na2C2O4 + Pb(NO3)2 yields PbC2O4 + 2NaNO3 AgNO3 + LiCl yields AgCl + LiNO3 3Ca + 2Cr(NO3)3 yields 3Ca(NO3)3 + 2Cr Question 8 Which of the following is a product formed when LiClO3 decomposes? Li O2 Li2O Cl2O Question 9 What is always true of a combustion reaction? oxygen gas must be one of the reactants carbon dioxide will be produced the reaction absorbs energy one reactant must contain carbon Question 10 Which of the following is not a correct chemical equation for a double displacement reaction? 2 RbNO3 + BeF2 yields Be(NO3)2 + 2 RbF CaCl + LiCO3 yields CaCO3 + LiCl Na3PO4 + 3 KOH yields 3 NaOH + K3PO4 2 MgI2 + Mn(SO3)2 yields 2 MgSO3 + MnI4 Answered by Virginia Talayumptewa 1 year ago.

Question 1 If the reaction of 3.50 moles of lithium with excess hydrofluoric acid produced an 75.5% yield of hydrogen gas, what was the actual yield of hydrogen gas? Unbalanced equation: Li + HF “yields”/ LiF + H2 1.32 mol H2 Question 2 What coefficients must be added to balance the following reaction? ___3__ Sn + ___4__ H3PO4 yields __6___ H2 + ___1__ Sn3(PO4)4 3, 4, 6, 1 Question 3 According to the activity series, which of the following single replacement reactions will take place and result in a reaction? barium and copper bromide Question 4 How many moles of K3PO4 can be formed when 4.4 moles of H3PO4 react with 3.8 moles of KOH? H3PO4 +3 KOH yields 3H2O + K3PO4 Be sure to balance the equation. 4.4 mol K3PO4 Question 5 Which of the following is a product formed when PO3 and H2O react together? H3PO4 Question 6 Which of the following is produced when magnesium (Mg) combusts? MgO Question 7 Which of the following equations violates the law of conservation of mass? 3Ca + 2Cr(NO3)3 yields 3Ca(NO3)3 + 2Cr Question 8 Which of the following is a product formed when LiClO3 decomposes? Li2O Question 9 What is always true of a combustion reaction? oxygen gas must be one of the reactants Question 10 Which of the following is not a correct chemical equation for a double displacement reaction? CaCl + LiCO3 yields CaCO3 + LiCl Answered by Joe Motta 1 year ago.

D is the terrific decision A - melting factors are no longer indicative of solubility in water B - in all probability however the belief looks primitive, there are greater efficient techniques to remedy it C - hahahaha D - by skill of weighing the residues against one yet another, you are able to confirm that's the main soluble salt by skill of looking which residue weighs the main. this is because of the fact the greater residue there is, the greater of the salt replaced into interior the 5 ml saturated answer and consequently the greater soluble the salt. Answered by Val Duenas 1 year ago.

How many moles of KOH are necessary to balance Equation B below? Equation B: _____ KOH + _____ H3PO4 -------> _____ K3PO4 + _____ H2O Answered by Karma Faiola 1 year ago.


I need help with a chemistry question.?
A scientist wants to make a solution of tribasic sodium phosphate, Na3PO4, for a laboratory experiment. How many grams of Na3PO4 will be needed to produce 400 mL of a solution that has a concentration of Na+ ions of 1.50 M? Please explain, Thanks! Asked by Sarita Bosch 1 year ago.

We can calculate the number of moles of Na^+ ions needed for this solution by using the following equation: molarity = (moles of Na^+) / (Liters of solution) or moles of Na^+ = (molarity)(Liters of solution) moles of Na^+ = (1.50 M)(0.400 L) moles of Na^+ = 0.600 mol Since one mole of Na3PO4 contains 3 moles of Na^+ ions, we need only one third as many moles of Na3PO4 to get that concentration of Na^+ ions, or 0.200 mol of Na3PO4. To find the number of grams of Na3PO4, multiply 0.200 mol by the mole mass of Na3PO4: Mole mass of Na3PO4: 3 × Na = 3 × 22.9898 = 68.9694 1 × P = 1 × 30.0738 = 30.9738 4 × O = 4 × 15.9994 = 63.9976 --------------------------------------... Total = 163.9408 g/mol (0.200 mol)(163.9408 g/mol) = 32.78816 g of Na3PO4 or 32.8 g of Na3PO4 rounded to three significant figures. Answer: About 32.8 grams of Na3PO4 will be needed to produce 400. mL of a solution that has a concentration of Na+ ions of 1.50 M. Answered by Tory Massaquoi 1 year ago.

1.5 M in Na+ means 1/3 of that in Na3PO4 as each Na3PO4 has 3 Na's in it. So your final solution will be 1/3 x 1.5 = 0.5 M Na3PO4 That means in 1000 ml of this you have 0.5 mole Na3PO4 so in 400 ml 400/1000 x 0.5 mole = 0.2 moles Na3PO4 Na = 23; P = 31; O = 16 so formula mass of Na3PO4 is (3x23) + 31 + (4x16) = 164 gram 0.2 moles is then 0.2 x 164 = 32.8 gram Na3PO4 Answered by Eun Yamagata 1 year ago.


Question about polyatomic ions?
I am drawing the electron dot config for PO4. According to my notes from class that I copied down the charge is -3. I cannot figure out where the extra three electrons came from. Both P and O have reached octet. Please explain. Thanks!! Asked by Hollie Heinzman 1 year ago.

PO4 has a charge of -3 which means it gain three more e- so you have to put bricks and put a -3 on it ...O ....| O-P-O ....| ...O [the drawing]-3 the dots are for the space Answered by Emogene Becvar 1 year ago.


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