Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 019443/001.

Names and composition

"SODIUM BICARBONATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER" is the commercial name of a drug composed of SODIUM BICARBONATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019443/001 SODIUM BICARBONATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER SODIUM BICARBONATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.9MEQ per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019443/002 SODIUM BICARBONATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER SODIUM BICARBONATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MEQ per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019443/001 SODIUM BICARBONATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER SODIUM BICARBONATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.9MEQ per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019443/002 SODIUM BICARBONATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER SODIUM BICARBONATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MEQ per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
077394/001 SODIUM BICARBONATE SODIUM BICARBONATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.9MEQ per ML
077394/002 SODIUM BICARBONATE SODIUM BICARBONATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MEQ per ML
202494/001 SODIUM BICARBONATE SODIUM BICARBONATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.9MEQ per ML
202494/002 SODIUM BICARBONATE SODIUM BICARBONATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MEQ per ML
202495/001 SODIUM BICARBONATE SODIUM BICARBONATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MEQ per ML
202679/001 SODIUM BICARBONATE SODIUM BICARBONATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.5MEQ per ML
202981/001 SODIUM BICARBONATE SODIUM BICARBONATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.5MEQ per ML

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Answered questions

Sodium bicarbonate + Vinegar?
I mixed sodium bicarbonate and vinegar in a closed plastic bottle. There was a chemical reaction, carbon dioxide was released..I measured the mass after and there was no difference. Why is this? I know that this somehow relates to the law of conversation of mass. Can someone explain this to me? Asked by Inez Govan 1 year ago.

CO2 is a gas but is not going to be lost from a closed container. You observed no loss in mass because the chemical reaction only changes the identities of the chemicals that are present but not the amount of them. Mass has to be conserved in chemical reactions Answered by Mercy Barclay 1 year ago.

i think of there's a chemical reaction between the vinegar and sodium bicarbonate, throughout the reaction carbon dioxide is launched which extinguishes the candle. If there is extra CO2 than Oxygen the candle won't ignite. desire this facilitates Answered by Tamesha Fyfe 1 year ago.

Because the CO2 does not escape, so the amount of matter before and after the reaction is unchanged. Because of this the mass for all the matter inside the bottle is also unchanged. Answered by Floy Sabad 1 year ago.


Can you inflate a balloon with vinegar and baking soda? Can it also inflate with soda?
If anyone is willing to help I need this answred by January 24! Please try and list all sources! Can you inflate a balloon with vinegar and baking soda? What about soda like Dr. Pepper? Asked by Aiko Hislip 1 year ago.

Vinegar is an acid base. When mixed with Baking Soda an alkaline ( Bicarbonate of Soda / Sodium Bicarbonate ) it gives off carbon dioxide gas which will in fact inflate a balloon. Another fun way to explore this Off Gassing is to place a small amount of Baking Soda in a plastic 35 MM Film container that you have poked a small hole in the lid close to the edge. Then add a few drops of Vinegar, place lid on container and place in a bowl of water. It will run around the bowl like a little boat.... Soda, like Dr. Pepper is a different kind of SODA. Water (H2O) when combined with Carbon Dioxide (CO2) forms Carbonic Acid - (ancient name acid of air or aerial acid) (H2CO3) which is basically soda pop. The hydrogen's dissociated from the oxygen and are now bonded to carbon instead of oxygen. Try placing some baking soda in an empty soda bottle. Add some Dr. Pepper from a freshly opened container and then place a balloon over the bottle opening. Shake lightly and watch what happens to the balloon. Answered by Janise Sarkisian 1 year ago.

baking soda is NaHCO3, sodium bicarbonate. if Dr. pepper soda is NAHCO3. it could inflate balloon with vinegar since NAHCO3 reacts with vinegar (acetic acid) to form CO2 gas. Answered by Kimberlie Patlan 1 year ago.

Yes to both, but you want a cooler experiment? Works bomb Answered by Thelma Acosta 1 year ago.


How to calculate the volume of CO2 produced in a reaction?
I am designing an experiment to measure the amount of Sodium Bicarbonate in an Alka Selzter Tablet. I will determine this by finding the amount of CO2 produced after the reaction. How can I capture the gas and accuratley find the number of moles produced. The first plan was to use a plastic bag or balloon, but the... Asked by Lino Mowatt 1 year ago.

I am designing an experiment to measure the amount of Sodium Bicarbonate in an Alka Selzter Tablet. I will determine this by finding the amount of CO2 produced after the reaction. How can I capture the gas and accuratley find the number of moles produced. The first plan was to use a plastic bag or balloon, but the balloon might add exteral pressure because of its elasticity. To measure the volume i would place the bag or baloon in water and calculate the displacment. Is there another way to do this or will this plan work? Answered by Walton Skala 1 year ago.

IT should, We did something like this by using an inverted glass tube filled with water and focused the CO2 into the tube then measured amount of water displaced. You have to consider the air pressure on the water. Your plan should work, but you would need a narrow container to get an accurate measurement of water displacement using a balloon. Answered by Verena Senter 1 year ago.

a million) First use the suitable gasoline formula PV=nRT to discover the quantity of moles (n) for O2(g). we are given: V=30L T=27ºC=3 hundred.15K (think ofyou've have been given to understand that 0ºC=273.15K) R=0.08206 Latm/molK <===it extremely is a relentless, you may desire to memorize this or it extremely is given P=745 mmHg=0.98026 atm <=== (a million atm=760torr=760mmHg=a hundred and one.3kPa) <==think ofyou've have been given to memorize this, pondering think ofyou've have been given to manage to rework stress into atm products. Now use PV=nRT to sparkling up for n (0.98026atm)(30L)=n(0.08206Latm/molK)... N=a million.19397 mol of O2 now to discover the quantity of moles for KClO3 employing the balances chemical equation a million.19397mol O2 * (1mol KClO3 / a million mol O2)=a million.19397 mol of KClO3 Now find the mass of KClO3 employing the quantity of moles. M=a million.19397 mol * (122.543g KClO3 / a million mol)= 235 g <==respond The entertainment of the questions are all beautiful same, all think ofyou've have been given to do is record the unknowns, use the equation PV=nRT, and sparkling up for what you're in seek of. verify you rework to appropriate fashions till now than employing the equation. additionally remember to write down down balances chemical equations while u might desire to that might actually assist you establish the question. Answered by Nettie Filmer 1 year ago.


Sodium acetate handwarmers - why does flexing the aluminium disk get the whole thing to change state?
Asked by Vance Mahrenholz 1 year ago.

bear with me. Sodium Acetate is a special chemical because it FREEZES at ROOM TEMPERATURE. But then why isn't it frozen when you hold it in your hand? Because of another of its' specialties: Sodium Acetate can be supercooled. That means that it can be below its freezing level and still be a liquid if there are no impurities within it to trigger the reaction. I have read few essays on how flexing the aluminum gets the whole thing to change states. One said that there were frozen NaCH3COO- [sodium acetate] trapped within the ridges of it, and another said that that simple 'click' of the aluminum is enough movement to set the reaction in place. The same essay suggested that hitting the solution with a hammer would give the same results. I haven't tried it. Try the experiment yourself! The basic 'baking soda vinegar' experiment produces CO2, H2O, and NaCH3CHOO, that's Carbon dioxide, water, and sodium acetate! Here are some numbers I've worked out, you may want to check the ratios: 3.31505 vinegar(HCH3COO)+4.63733 baking soda(NaHCO3, sodium bicarbonate)=4.5279 sodium acetate(NaCH3COO)+1 water(H2O)+2.42941 carbon dioxide(CO2). Thence mix 3.31505 g. vinegar with 4.63733 g. baking soda. The carbon dioxide will be a gas, so it will bubble out of the solution. The proceeding solution should be placed in the sun until it weighs ~4.528 grams. You now have Sodium Acetate! Now you have to heat your sodium acetate solution so you can supersaturate it in water. What does that mean? You know when you put salt in water and mix until it is SATURATED, or if you put any more it will just sink to the bottom and not mix with the water? That same thing can happen to the sodium acetate. We, however, are going to heat it, so you can add more sodium acetate and less water. I can't get the ratio of water:NaCH3COO but you get the idea. To supersaturate it, heat water and add the dry Na acetate to it. Now put the supersaturated, heated solution somewhere, but keep it all along in a clean container with plastic wrap over it, so that no impurities set off the reaction. Let it cool to room temperature, it should remain in liquid state, this is called a supercooled solution. Now drop a dry crystal [doesn't matter how small] of sodium acetate to the solution. It all freezes. When it freezes, it becomes cold. It loses its heat. It releases its heat, which you feel. In fact, when water freezes, it also releases heat. ..WOW way too much for one night! Answered by Miesha Gemmen 1 year ago.

Because it's not really a state or phase change. When you heat the solution, it raises the solubility and the sodium acetate dissolves. When it cools, what you hopefully end up with is a supersaturated solution. Supersaturated solutions are usually pretty difficult to produce and maintain. Supersaturated means that the solution is holding more solute at the temperature where it is than what it should be able to hold. So they're pretty rare to come across, so enjoy this example. Anyway......the dissolving process for sodium acetate is endothermic, so the precipitation process is exothermic. What you're getting out is a "heat of solution" - in reverse. So.....you're not REALLY changing phase liquid to solid.....you're taking lots of sodium acetate dissolved in a little water and precipitating it out. When you do, the heat that was absorbed in the dissolving process is released again. Cool item, those hand warmers. I use them in my classes. Answered by Selma Petras 1 year ago.

Aluminium Disk Answered by Demetria Bromberg 1 year ago.

The supersaturated solution inside requires some sort of impetus in order to "crash out." The clicking of the disk inside provides the energy of initiation that causes crystalization; the reaction is thermodynamically "downhill," being exothermic and all. It's just that a certain amount of energy is required to get the ball rolling- and that is imparted by the disk. Yay. Answered by Merlene Muller 1 year ago.

Why do people ask these extremely difficult questions here. Have you seen the typical questions, answers, spelling, smart-asses, arguments and basically "people with no lives" who exist in this realm". Wouldn't you be more likely to get a meaningful answer by going to the library and doing a small modicum of research on the subject at hand or better yet going to a professor at the local university to ask your seemingly impossible to answer. It seems like you are one of the smartest people on the planet or just making this crap up. Either way there is no possible way for 99.9% of the cretins who visit this website to understand the vocabulary of you question let alone give you a coherent answer. Answered by Jaunita Lukman 1 year ago.


Best way to make a chemical bomb?
maybe a dirt bomb how do you make a dirt bomb Asked by Shaunte Sabatelli 1 year ago.

The word "best" in this context is meaningless. By best do you mean "highest yield", "least volatile" or "simplest"? I'm going to assume you're an honest person wanting to make a bomb for a classroom experiment so I'm going to assume you mean best = safest. My bomb will explode but it won't take your arm off or do any damage. Take a tub like a margarine tub or similar small plastic container with a lid. Half fill the container with water. Next take something like sodium bicarbonate (here in the UK it retails under the brand name Andrews and is used as an antacid). Put a generous quantity wrapped up in tissue paper and taped to the inside of the tub. Make sure the water doesn't come into contact with the sodium bicarbonate and secure the lid. To arm your bomb simply turn the tub upside down and place it lid down on the ground and walk away from it. After a few seconds to a minute or two the pressure from the released CO2 will build up until it explodes. The explosion will be so small that even if you are holding it when it explodes it won't hurt you but it will demonstrate the principle behind explosives safely. Edit: Ah, well in that case, it would be highly irresponsible of me to help you. If you're writing fiction make something up as it would be very irresponsible of you to put realistic methods of making bombs into a book and if you're planning a terrorist attack, I urge you don't. It invariably ends badly for everyone especially the terrorist. Answered by Sabrina Liberti 1 year ago.

chemical? as opposed to what.. nuclear? Answered by Miss Koslow 1 year ago.

why do you want to know? Answered by Cheyenne Cucvas 1 year ago.


Questions about hot ice experiment?
I have to do a science project on "hot ice" for school. If any of you have seen the video on youtube, you'll know what I am talking about. I'll post the link below anyways though. I was unsure of how much sodium acetate and water I will need. I was hoping someone who has done this experiment or... Asked by Lorene Critelli 1 year ago.

Try This dear..... Prepare the Sodium Acetate or Hot Ice 1.In a saucepan or large beaker, add baking soda to the vinegar, a little at a time and stirring between additions. The baking soda and vinegar react to form sodium acetate and carbon dioxide gas. If you don't add the baking soda slowly, you'll essentially get a baking soda and vinegar volcano, which would overflow your container. You've made the sodium acetate, but it is too dilute to be very useful, so you need to remove most of the water. Here is the reaction between the baking soda and vinegar to produce the sodium acetate: Na+[HCO3]– + CH3–COOH → CH3–COO– Na+ + H2O + CO2 2.Boil the solution to concentrate the sodium acetate. You could just remove the solution from heat once you have 100-150 ml of solution remaining, but the easiest way to get good results is to simply boil the solution until a crystal skin or film starts to form on the surface. This took me about an hour on the stove over medium heat. If you use lower heat you are less likely to get yellow or brown liguid, but it will take longer. If discoloration occurs, it's okay. 3.Once you remove the sodium acetate solution from heat, immediately cover it to prevent any further evaporation. I poured my solution into a separate container and covered it with plastic wrap. You should not have any crystals in your solution. If you do have crystals, stir a very small amount of water or vinegar into the solution, just sufficient to dissolve the crystals. 4.Place the covered container of sodium acetate solution in the refrigerator to chill. Activities Involving Hot Ice The sodium acetate in the solution in the refrigerator is an example of a supercooled liquid. That is, the sodium acetate exists in liquid form below its usual melting point. You can initiate crystallization by adding a small crystal of sodium acetate or possibly even by touching the surface of the sodium acetate solution with a spoon or finger. The crystallization is an example of an exothermic process. Heat is released as the 'ice' forms. To demonstrate supercooling, crystallization, and heat release you could: •Drop a crystal into the container of cooled sodium acetate solution. The sodium acetate will crystallize within seconds, working outward from where you added the crystal. The crystal acts as a nucleation site or seed for rapid crystal growth. Although the solution just came out of the refrigerator, if you touch the container you will find it is now warm or hot. •Pour the solution onto a shallow dish. If the hot ice does not spontaneously begin crystallization, you can touch it with a crystal of sodium acetate (you can usually scrape a small amount of sodium acetate from the side of the container you used earlier). The crystallization will progress from the dish up toward where you are pouring the liquid. You can construct towers of hot ice. The towers will be warm to the touch. •You can re-melt sodium acetate and re-use it for demonstrations. --------------------------------------... You can make hot ice yourself from baking soda and clear vinegar. I've got written instructions and a video tutorial to show you how to do it. In the lab, you could make hot ice from sodium bicarbonate and weak acetic acid (1 L 6% acetic acid, 84 grams sodium bicarbonate) or from acetic acid and sodium hydroxide (dangerous! 60 ml water, 60 ml glacial acetic acid, 40 g sodium hydroxide). The mixture is boiled down and prepared the same as the homemade version. You can also buy sodium acetate (or sodium acetate anhydrous) and sodium acetate trihydrate. Sodium acetate trihydrate can be melted and used as-is. Convert sodium acetate anhydrous to sodium acetate trihydrate by dissolving it in water and cooking it down to remove the excess water. Answered by Charline Lekey 1 year ago.


Chemistry homework help please!!!!?
ok so for my chemistry class I had to do a "hands on" experiment at home, but I don't have all the materials you need. can someone please help me out with these two questions?----------This is the lab and the procedure----------one disposable plastic (not polystyrene—also referred to as... Asked by Elia Blissett 1 year ago.

ok so for my chemistry class I had to do a "hands on" experiment at home, but I don't have all the materials you need. can someone please help me out with these two questions? ----------This is the lab and the procedure---------- one disposable plastic (not polystyrene—also referred to as Styrofoam™) cup one disposable plastic spoon (plastic fork or knife may be used) thermometer (if you have one) measuring cup and spoon newspaper (Use it to cover the countertop next to the kitchen sink. This could get a little messy!) baking soda vinegar Procedure: Measure two tablespoons of baking soda and pour it into the clean, dry plastic cup. Measure out one cup of vinegar. If you have a thermometer, place it in the measuring cup of liquid and write down the initial temperature. Grasping the plastic cup near the bottom with one hand, pour the liquid into the plastic cup with your other hand. Continue to grasp the cup as you stir the solution gently with the plastic spoon. Observe any temperature change felt through the plastic cup. If you have a thermometer, record the temperature change as you stir the solution very gently. When you are done making observations, it is safe to pour the solution down the sink and to dispose of the plastic cup and spoon in the trash. Be sure to wash the measuring spoon, measuring cup, and thermometer before putting them away. --------------------------------------... ok so the two questions are: 1) Describe the chemical combination that you investigated in the hands-on lab activity. Also describe any observations from the investigation, including the temperature change of the container. 2) Based on your observations, was the reaction that you investigated endothermic or exothermic? Explain your answer in complete sentences. (to avoid any confusion you don't actually have to do the lab lol) Thanks! Answered by Serena Dolese 1 year ago.


Sodium bicarbonate + Vinegar?
I mixed sodium bicarbonate and vinegar in a closed plastic bottle. There was a chemical reaction, carbon dioxide was released..I measured the mass after and there was no difference. Why is this? I know that this somehow relates to the law of conversation of mass. Can someone explain this to me? Asked by Hilaria Hanft 1 year ago.

CO2 is a gas but is not going to be lost from a closed container. You observed no loss in mass because the chemical reaction only changes the identities of the chemicals that are present but not the amount of them. Mass has to be conserved in chemical reactions Answered by Israel Kiest 1 year ago.

i think of there's a chemical reaction between the vinegar and sodium bicarbonate, throughout the reaction carbon dioxide is launched which extinguishes the candle. If there is extra CO2 than Oxygen the candle won't ignite. desire this facilitates Answered by Tyrell Christopoulos 1 year ago.

Because the CO2 does not escape, so the amount of matter before and after the reaction is unchanged. Because of this the mass for all the matter inside the bottle is also unchanged. Answered by Kareem Keaffaber 1 year ago.


Can you inflate a balloon with vinegar and baking soda? Can it also inflate with soda?
If anyone is willing to help I need this answred by January 24! Please try and list all sources! Can you inflate a balloon with vinegar and baking soda? What about soda like Dr. Pepper? Asked by Ena Sens 1 year ago.

Vinegar is an acid base. When mixed with Baking Soda an alkaline ( Bicarbonate of Soda / Sodium Bicarbonate ) it gives off carbon dioxide gas which will in fact inflate a balloon. Another fun way to explore this Off Gassing is to place a small amount of Baking Soda in a plastic 35 MM Film container that you have poked a small hole in the lid close to the edge. Then add a few drops of Vinegar, place lid on container and place in a bowl of water. It will run around the bowl like a little boat.... Soda, like Dr. Pepper is a different kind of SODA. Water (H2O) when combined with Carbon Dioxide (CO2) forms Carbonic Acid - (ancient name acid of air or aerial acid) (H2CO3) which is basically soda pop. The hydrogen's dissociated from the oxygen and are now bonded to carbon instead of oxygen. Try placing some baking soda in an empty soda bottle. Add some Dr. Pepper from a freshly opened container and then place a balloon over the bottle opening. Shake lightly and watch what happens to the balloon. Answered by Sarina Abdeldayen 1 year ago.

baking soda is NaHCO3, sodium bicarbonate. if Dr. pepper soda is NAHCO3. it could inflate balloon with vinegar since NAHCO3 reacts with vinegar (acetic acid) to form CO2 gas. Answered by Eleanora Vongsakda 1 year ago.

Yes to both, but you want a cooler experiment? Works bomb Answered by Birgit Jabbie 1 year ago.


How to calculate the volume of CO2 produced in a reaction?
I am designing an experiment to measure the amount of Sodium Bicarbonate in an Alka Selzter Tablet. I will determine this by finding the amount of CO2 produced after the reaction. How can I capture the gas and accuratley find the number of moles produced. The first plan was to use a plastic bag or balloon, but the... Asked by Deeann Ebe 1 year ago.

I am designing an experiment to measure the amount of Sodium Bicarbonate in an Alka Selzter Tablet. I will determine this by finding the amount of CO2 produced after the reaction. How can I capture the gas and accuratley find the number of moles produced. The first plan was to use a plastic bag or balloon, but the balloon might add exteral pressure because of its elasticity. To measure the volume i would place the bag or baloon in water and calculate the displacment. Is there another way to do this or will this plan work? Answered by Freda Cocuzzo 1 year ago.

IT should, We did something like this by using an inverted glass tube filled with water and focused the CO2 into the tube then measured amount of water displaced. You have to consider the air pressure on the water. Your plan should work, but you would need a narrow container to get an accurate measurement of water displacement using a balloon. Answered by Randi Kohut 1 year ago.

a million) First use the suitable gasoline formula PV=nRT to discover the quantity of moles (n) for O2(g). we are given: V=30L T=27ºC=3 hundred.15K (think ofyou've have been given to understand that 0ºC=273.15K) R=0.08206 Latm/molK <===it extremely is a relentless, you may desire to memorize this or it extremely is given P=745 mmHg=0.98026 atm <=== (a million atm=760torr=760mmHg=a hundred and one.3kPa) <==think ofyou've have been given to memorize this, pondering think ofyou've have been given to manage to rework stress into atm products. Now use PV=nRT to sparkling up for n (0.98026atm)(30L)=n(0.08206Latm/molK)... N=a million.19397 mol of O2 now to discover the quantity of moles for KClO3 employing the balances chemical equation a million.19397mol O2 * (1mol KClO3 / a million mol O2)=a million.19397 mol of KClO3 Now find the mass of KClO3 employing the quantity of moles. M=a million.19397 mol * (122.543g KClO3 / a million mol)= 235 g <==respond The entertainment of the questions are all beautiful same, all think ofyou've have been given to do is record the unknowns, use the equation PV=nRT, and sparkling up for what you're in seek of. verify you rework to appropriate fashions till now than employing the equation. additionally remember to write down down balances chemical equations while u might desire to that might actually assist you establish the question. Answered by Nona Meagher 1 year ago.


Sodium acetate handwarmers - why does flexing the aluminium disk get the whole thing to change state?
Asked by Aubrey Balestra 1 year ago.

bear with me. Sodium Acetate is a special chemical because it FREEZES at ROOM TEMPERATURE. But then why isn't it frozen when you hold it in your hand? Because of another of its' specialties: Sodium Acetate can be supercooled. That means that it can be below its freezing level and still be a liquid if there are no impurities within it to trigger the reaction. I have read few essays on how flexing the aluminum gets the whole thing to change states. One said that there were frozen NaCH3COO- [sodium acetate] trapped within the ridges of it, and another said that that simple 'click' of the aluminum is enough movement to set the reaction in place. The same essay suggested that hitting the solution with a hammer would give the same results. I haven't tried it. Try the experiment yourself! The basic 'baking soda vinegar' experiment produces CO2, H2O, and NaCH3CHOO, that's Carbon dioxide, water, and sodium acetate! Here are some numbers I've worked out, you may want to check the ratios: 3.31505 vinegar(HCH3COO)+4.63733 baking soda(NaHCO3, sodium bicarbonate)=4.5279 sodium acetate(NaCH3COO)+1 water(H2O)+2.42941 carbon dioxide(CO2). Thence mix 3.31505 g. vinegar with 4.63733 g. baking soda. The carbon dioxide will be a gas, so it will bubble out of the solution. The proceeding solution should be placed in the sun until it weighs ~4.528 grams. You now have Sodium Acetate! Now you have to heat your sodium acetate solution so you can supersaturate it in water. What does that mean? You know when you put salt in water and mix until it is SATURATED, or if you put any more it will just sink to the bottom and not mix with the water? That same thing can happen to the sodium acetate. We, however, are going to heat it, so you can add more sodium acetate and less water. I can't get the ratio of water:NaCH3COO but you get the idea. To supersaturate it, heat water and add the dry Na acetate to it. Now put the supersaturated, heated solution somewhere, but keep it all along in a clean container with plastic wrap over it, so that no impurities set off the reaction. Let it cool to room temperature, it should remain in liquid state, this is called a supercooled solution. Now drop a dry crystal [doesn't matter how small] of sodium acetate to the solution. It all freezes. When it freezes, it becomes cold. It loses its heat. It releases its heat, which you feel. In fact, when water freezes, it also releases heat. ..WOW way too much for one night! Answered by Rosamond Newhart 1 year ago.

Because it's not really a state or phase change. When you heat the solution, it raises the solubility and the sodium acetate dissolves. When it cools, what you hopefully end up with is a supersaturated solution. Supersaturated solutions are usually pretty difficult to produce and maintain. Supersaturated means that the solution is holding more solute at the temperature where it is than what it should be able to hold. So they're pretty rare to come across, so enjoy this example. Anyway......the dissolving process for sodium acetate is endothermic, so the precipitation process is exothermic. What you're getting out is a "heat of solution" - in reverse. So.....you're not REALLY changing phase liquid to solid.....you're taking lots of sodium acetate dissolved in a little water and precipitating it out. When you do, the heat that was absorbed in the dissolving process is released again. Cool item, those hand warmers. I use them in my classes. Answered by Keisha Maj 1 year ago.

Aluminium Disk Answered by Shelton Headly 1 year ago.

The supersaturated solution inside requires some sort of impetus in order to "crash out." The clicking of the disk inside provides the energy of initiation that causes crystalization; the reaction is thermodynamically "downhill," being exothermic and all. It's just that a certain amount of energy is required to get the ball rolling- and that is imparted by the disk. Yay. Answered by Melodee Odden 1 year ago.

Why do people ask these extremely difficult questions here. Have you seen the typical questions, answers, spelling, smart-asses, arguments and basically "people with no lives" who exist in this realm". Wouldn't you be more likely to get a meaningful answer by going to the library and doing a small modicum of research on the subject at hand or better yet going to a professor at the local university to ask your seemingly impossible to answer. It seems like you are one of the smartest people on the planet or just making this crap up. Either way there is no possible way for 99.9% of the cretins who visit this website to understand the vocabulary of you question let alone give you a coherent answer. Answered by Markus Rippin 1 year ago.


Best way to make a chemical bomb?
maybe a dirt bomb how do you make a dirt bomb Asked by Lolita Bolek 1 year ago.

The word "best" in this context is meaningless. By best do you mean "highest yield", "least volatile" or "simplest"? I'm going to assume you're an honest person wanting to make a bomb for a classroom experiment so I'm going to assume you mean best = safest. My bomb will explode but it won't take your arm off or do any damage. Take a tub like a margarine tub or similar small plastic container with a lid. Half fill the container with water. Next take something like sodium bicarbonate (here in the UK it retails under the brand name Andrews and is used as an antacid). Put a generous quantity wrapped up in tissue paper and taped to the inside of the tub. Make sure the water doesn't come into contact with the sodium bicarbonate and secure the lid. To arm your bomb simply turn the tub upside down and place it lid down on the ground and walk away from it. After a few seconds to a minute or two the pressure from the released CO2 will build up until it explodes. The explosion will be so small that even if you are holding it when it explodes it won't hurt you but it will demonstrate the principle behind explosives safely. Edit: Ah, well in that case, it would be highly irresponsible of me to help you. If you're writing fiction make something up as it would be very irresponsible of you to put realistic methods of making bombs into a book and if you're planning a terrorist attack, I urge you don't. It invariably ends badly for everyone especially the terrorist. Answered by Shirley Harkey 1 year ago.

chemical? as opposed to what.. nuclear? Answered by Tristan Carriker 1 year ago.

why do you want to know? Answered by Eliza Struble 1 year ago.


Questions about hot ice experiment?
I have to do a science project on "hot ice" for school. If any of you have seen the video on youtube, you'll know what I am talking about. I'll post the link below anyways though. I was unsure of how much sodium acetate and water I will need. I was hoping someone who has done this experiment or... Asked by Linette Tuttle 1 year ago.

Try This dear..... Prepare the Sodium Acetate or Hot Ice 1.In a saucepan or large beaker, add baking soda to the vinegar, a little at a time and stirring between additions. The baking soda and vinegar react to form sodium acetate and carbon dioxide gas. If you don't add the baking soda slowly, you'll essentially get a baking soda and vinegar volcano, which would overflow your container. You've made the sodium acetate, but it is too dilute to be very useful, so you need to remove most of the water. Here is the reaction between the baking soda and vinegar to produce the sodium acetate: Na+[HCO3]– + CH3–COOH → CH3–COO– Na+ + H2O + CO2 2.Boil the solution to concentrate the sodium acetate. You could just remove the solution from heat once you have 100-150 ml of solution remaining, but the easiest way to get good results is to simply boil the solution until a crystal skin or film starts to form on the surface. This took me about an hour on the stove over medium heat. If you use lower heat you are less likely to get yellow or brown liguid, but it will take longer. If discoloration occurs, it's okay. 3.Once you remove the sodium acetate solution from heat, immediately cover it to prevent any further evaporation. I poured my solution into a separate container and covered it with plastic wrap. You should not have any crystals in your solution. If you do have crystals, stir a very small amount of water or vinegar into the solution, just sufficient to dissolve the crystals. 4.Place the covered container of sodium acetate solution in the refrigerator to chill. Activities Involving Hot Ice The sodium acetate in the solution in the refrigerator is an example of a supercooled liquid. That is, the sodium acetate exists in liquid form below its usual melting point. You can initiate crystallization by adding a small crystal of sodium acetate or possibly even by touching the surface of the sodium acetate solution with a spoon or finger. The crystallization is an example of an exothermic process. Heat is released as the 'ice' forms. To demonstrate supercooling, crystallization, and heat release you could: •Drop a crystal into the container of cooled sodium acetate solution. The sodium acetate will crystallize within seconds, working outward from where you added the crystal. The crystal acts as a nucleation site or seed for rapid crystal growth. Although the solution just came out of the refrigerator, if you touch the container you will find it is now warm or hot. •Pour the solution onto a shallow dish. If the hot ice does not spontaneously begin crystallization, you can touch it with a crystal of sodium acetate (you can usually scrape a small amount of sodium acetate from the side of the container you used earlier). The crystallization will progress from the dish up toward where you are pouring the liquid. You can construct towers of hot ice. The towers will be warm to the touch. •You can re-melt sodium acetate and re-use it for demonstrations. --------------------------------------... You can make hot ice yourself from baking soda and clear vinegar. I've got written instructions and a video tutorial to show you how to do it. In the lab, you could make hot ice from sodium bicarbonate and weak acetic acid (1 L 6% acetic acid, 84 grams sodium bicarbonate) or from acetic acid and sodium hydroxide (dangerous! 60 ml water, 60 ml glacial acetic acid, 40 g sodium hydroxide). The mixture is boiled down and prepared the same as the homemade version. You can also buy sodium acetate (or sodium acetate anhydrous) and sodium acetate trihydrate. Sodium acetate trihydrate can be melted and used as-is. Convert sodium acetate anhydrous to sodium acetate trihydrate by dissolving it in water and cooking it down to remove the excess water. Answered by Etsuko Dunlap 1 year ago.


Chemistry homework help please!!!!?
ok so for my chemistry class I had to do a "hands on" experiment at home, but I don't have all the materials you need. can someone please help me out with these two questions?----------This is the lab and the procedure----------one disposable plastic (not polystyrene—also referred to as... Asked by Essie Foscue 1 year ago.

ok so for my chemistry class I had to do a "hands on" experiment at home, but I don't have all the materials you need. can someone please help me out with these two questions? ----------This is the lab and the procedure---------- one disposable plastic (not polystyrene—also referred to as Styrofoam™) cup one disposable plastic spoon (plastic fork or knife may be used) thermometer (if you have one) measuring cup and spoon newspaper (Use it to cover the countertop next to the kitchen sink. This could get a little messy!) baking soda vinegar Procedure: Measure two tablespoons of baking soda and pour it into the clean, dry plastic cup. Measure out one cup of vinegar. If you have a thermometer, place it in the measuring cup of liquid and write down the initial temperature. Grasping the plastic cup near the bottom with one hand, pour the liquid into the plastic cup with your other hand. Continue to grasp the cup as you stir the solution gently with the plastic spoon. Observe any temperature change felt through the plastic cup. If you have a thermometer, record the temperature change as you stir the solution very gently. When you are done making observations, it is safe to pour the solution down the sink and to dispose of the plastic cup and spoon in the trash. Be sure to wash the measuring spoon, measuring cup, and thermometer before putting them away. --------------------------------------... ok so the two questions are: 1) Describe the chemical combination that you investigated in the hands-on lab activity. Also describe any observations from the investigation, including the temperature change of the container. 2) Based on your observations, was the reaction that you investigated endothermic or exothermic? Explain your answer in complete sentences. (to avoid any confusion you don't actually have to do the lab lol) Thanks! Answered by Maegan Priestley 1 year ago.


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