Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 018893/001.

Names and composition

"SODIUM ACETATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER" is the commercial name of a drug composed of SODIUM ACETATE ANHYDROUS.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018893/001 SODIUM ACETATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER SODIUM ACETATE ANHYDROUS INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2MEQ per ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018893/001 SODIUM ACETATE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER SODIUM ACETATE ANHYDROUS INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2MEQ per ML

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Answered questions

How do you do the Sodium Acetate (handwarmers) reactoin?
i have some quite old sodium acetate and am trying to make the super saturated solution the you can do the exothermic reaction with. Ive tried using science websites and followed the instructions but when it cools it just becomes unsaturated again and leaves alot of sodium acetate in my beaker. Has anyone done it... Asked by Mia Ruhter 1 year ago.

i have some quite old sodium acetate and am trying to make the super saturated solution the you can do the exothermic reaction with. Ive tried using science websites and followed the instructions but when it cools it just becomes unsaturated again and leaves alot of sodium acetate in my beaker. Has anyone done it and can they give me help? ive tried a few times now with no luck. Answered by Zina Sperber 1 year ago.

In my view, for this to work your solution and its container must be scrupulously clean and the surface of the container very smooth. Your problem is probably twofold. Firstly, your sodium acetate solution is likely to contain traces of dust or dirt which will act as nucleation sites for crystallization. Secondly, glass surfaces themselves provide nucleation sites for crystallization because of the surface irregularities, microscopic trapped air pockets, etc. Commercial handwarmers overcome this second problem by containing the solution in plastic which does not have the same nucleation-initiating properties. Answered by Warner Oser 1 year ago.


Sodium acetate handwarmers - why does flexing the aluminium disk get the whole thing to change state?
Asked by Tabatha Chisem 1 year ago.

bear with me. Sodium Acetate is a special chemical because it FREEZES at ROOM TEMPERATURE. But then why isn't it frozen when you hold it in your hand? Because of another of its' specialties: Sodium Acetate can be supercooled. That means that it can be below its freezing level and still be a liquid if there are no impurities within it to trigger the reaction. I have read few essays on how flexing the aluminum gets the whole thing to change states. One said that there were frozen NaCH3COO- [sodium acetate] trapped within the ridges of it, and another said that that simple 'click' of the aluminum is enough movement to set the reaction in place. The same essay suggested that hitting the solution with a hammer would give the same results. I haven't tried it. Try the experiment yourself! The basic 'baking soda vinegar' experiment produces CO2, H2O, and NaCH3CHOO, that's Carbon dioxide, water, and sodium acetate! Here are some numbers I've worked out, you may want to check the ratios: 3.31505 vinegar(HCH3COO)+4.63733 baking soda(NaHCO3, sodium bicarbonate)=4.5279 sodium acetate(NaCH3COO)+1 water(H2O)+2.42941 carbon dioxide(CO2). Thence mix 3.31505 g. vinegar with 4.63733 g. baking soda. The carbon dioxide will be a gas, so it will bubble out of the solution. The proceeding solution should be placed in the sun until it weighs ~4.528 grams. You now have Sodium Acetate! Now you have to heat your sodium acetate solution so you can supersaturate it in water. What does that mean? You know when you put salt in water and mix until it is SATURATED, or if you put any more it will just sink to the bottom and not mix with the water? That same thing can happen to the sodium acetate. We, however, are going to heat it, so you can add more sodium acetate and less water. I can't get the ratio of water:NaCH3COO but you get the idea. To supersaturate it, heat water and add the dry Na acetate to it. Now put the supersaturated, heated solution somewhere, but keep it all along in a clean container with plastic wrap over it, so that no impurities set off the reaction. Let it cool to room temperature, it should remain in liquid state, this is called a supercooled solution. Now drop a dry crystal [doesn't matter how small] of sodium acetate to the solution. It all freezes. When it freezes, it becomes cold. It loses its heat. It releases its heat, which you feel. In fact, when water freezes, it also releases heat. ..WOW way too much for one night! Answered by Vicente Snelson 1 year ago.

Because it's not really a state or phase change. When you heat the solution, it raises the solubility and the sodium acetate dissolves. When it cools, what you hopefully end up with is a supersaturated solution. Supersaturated solutions are usually pretty difficult to produce and maintain. Supersaturated means that the solution is holding more solute at the temperature where it is than what it should be able to hold. So they're pretty rare to come across, so enjoy this example. Anyway......the dissolving process for sodium acetate is endothermic, so the precipitation process is exothermic. What you're getting out is a "heat of solution" - in reverse. So.....you're not REALLY changing phase liquid to solid.....you're taking lots of sodium acetate dissolved in a little water and precipitating it out. When you do, the heat that was absorbed in the dissolving process is released again. Cool item, those hand warmers. I use them in my classes. Answered by Don Joyal 1 year ago.

Aluminium Disk Answered by Corey Norgard 1 year ago.

The supersaturated solution inside requires some sort of impetus in order to "crash out." The clicking of the disk inside provides the energy of initiation that causes crystalization; the reaction is thermodynamically "downhill," being exothermic and all. It's just that a certain amount of energy is required to get the ball rolling- and that is imparted by the disk. Yay. Answered by Fidela Soward 1 year ago.

Why do people ask these extremely difficult questions here. Have you seen the typical questions, answers, spelling, smart-asses, arguments and basically "people with no lives" who exist in this realm". Wouldn't you be more likely to get a meaningful answer by going to the library and doing a small modicum of research on the subject at hand or better yet going to a professor at the local university to ask your seemingly impossible to answer. It seems like you are one of the smartest people on the planet or just making this crap up. Either way there is no possible way for 99.9% of the cretins who visit this website to understand the vocabulary of you question let alone give you a coherent answer. Answered by Bambi Mitra 1 year ago.


Questions about hot ice experiment?
I have to do a science project on "hot ice" for school. If any of you have seen the video on youtube, you'll know what I am talking about. I'll post the link below anyways though. I was unsure of how much sodium acetate and water I will need. I was hoping someone who has done this experiment or... Asked by Rebbeca Cutlip 1 year ago.

Try This dear..... Prepare the Sodium Acetate or Hot Ice 1.In a saucepan or large beaker, add baking soda to the vinegar, a little at a time and stirring between additions. The baking soda and vinegar react to form sodium acetate and carbon dioxide gas. If you don't add the baking soda slowly, you'll essentially get a baking soda and vinegar volcano, which would overflow your container. You've made the sodium acetate, but it is too dilute to be very useful, so you need to remove most of the water. Here is the reaction between the baking soda and vinegar to produce the sodium acetate: Na+[HCO3]– + CH3–COOH → CH3–COO– Na+ + H2O + CO2 2.Boil the solution to concentrate the sodium acetate. You could just remove the solution from heat once you have 100-150 ml of solution remaining, but the easiest way to get good results is to simply boil the solution until a crystal skin or film starts to form on the surface. This took me about an hour on the stove over medium heat. If you use lower heat you are less likely to get yellow or brown liguid, but it will take longer. If discoloration occurs, it's okay. 3.Once you remove the sodium acetate solution from heat, immediately cover it to prevent any further evaporation. I poured my solution into a separate container and covered it with plastic wrap. You should not have any crystals in your solution. If you do have crystals, stir a very small amount of water or vinegar into the solution, just sufficient to dissolve the crystals. 4.Place the covered container of sodium acetate solution in the refrigerator to chill. Activities Involving Hot Ice The sodium acetate in the solution in the refrigerator is an example of a supercooled liquid. That is, the sodium acetate exists in liquid form below its usual melting point. You can initiate crystallization by adding a small crystal of sodium acetate or possibly even by touching the surface of the sodium acetate solution with a spoon or finger. The crystallization is an example of an exothermic process. Heat is released as the 'ice' forms. To demonstrate supercooling, crystallization, and heat release you could: •Drop a crystal into the container of cooled sodium acetate solution. The sodium acetate will crystallize within seconds, working outward from where you added the crystal. The crystal acts as a nucleation site or seed for rapid crystal growth. Although the solution just came out of the refrigerator, if you touch the container you will find it is now warm or hot. •Pour the solution onto a shallow dish. If the hot ice does not spontaneously begin crystallization, you can touch it with a crystal of sodium acetate (you can usually scrape a small amount of sodium acetate from the side of the container you used earlier). The crystallization will progress from the dish up toward where you are pouring the liquid. You can construct towers of hot ice. The towers will be warm to the touch. •You can re-melt sodium acetate and re-use it for demonstrations. --------------------------------------... You can make hot ice yourself from baking soda and clear vinegar. I've got written instructions and a video tutorial to show you how to do it. In the lab, you could make hot ice from sodium bicarbonate and weak acetic acid (1 L 6% acetic acid, 84 grams sodium bicarbonate) or from acetic acid and sodium hydroxide (dangerous! 60 ml water, 60 ml glacial acetic acid, 40 g sodium hydroxide). The mixture is boiled down and prepared the same as the homemade version. You can also buy sodium acetate (or sodium acetate anhydrous) and sodium acetate trihydrate. Sodium acetate trihydrate can be melted and used as-is. Convert sodium acetate anhydrous to sodium acetate trihydrate by dissolving it in water and cooking it down to remove the excess water. Answered by Stephane Dahlman 1 year ago.


Why baking soda and vinegar explodes?
Asked by Marlo Spadafora 1 year ago.

NaHCO3 + CH3COOH react very vigorously ro produce Sodium acetate, water and copious amounts od CO2 gas. In a closed container, like a plastic bottle, the CO2 gas will build up a very high pressure and cause the container to explode Answered by Bernetta Clifton 1 year ago.


I have a question for a material or chemical engineer?
I have a small warm pack for massages that is clear plastic with a clear fluid inside. There is a metal disc inside that you flex back and forth to activate the heat. This makes the clear liquid turn opaque and warms up. To reactive, you boil the warm pack for 5 minutes until the inside fluid turns clear.What... Asked by Sheba Dorsey 1 year ago.

I have a small warm pack for massages that is clear plastic with a clear fluid inside. There is a metal disc inside that you flex back and forth to activate the heat. This makes the clear liquid turn opaque and warms up. To reactive, you boil the warm pack for 5 minutes until the inside fluid turns clear. What fluid is contained in this? What does the flexing of the metal disc do? Thanks in advance! Answered by Beulah Seekamp 1 year ago.

Your heat pack probably contains Sodium Acetate. Flexing a metal "trigger" within the sealed container causes a few molecules of liquid to crystallize. These few molecule start a whole chain reaction which starts a chain reaction causing the supercooled solution to change from a liquid to a solid as crystals form. This phase change causes the pack to give out heat. When the heat pack contents crystallize, its temperature returns its freezing point, and then you can recycle it by boiling. When they pack is boiled, the crystals dissolve in their own water of crystallization so the heat pack returns back to a liquid state. I hope this was helpful! Answered by Santos Barthelemy 1 year ago.


Percent yield error?????
We put 1.25 g of baking soda ina weigh boat (small plastic container) then into a beaker the we added 8ml of vinegar waited for it to react heated up the beaker waited for the water to evaporate then we waited for it to cool and got 1.21 g of sodium acetate solid the theoretical yield is 1.22 so we got 99.18% yield... Asked by Ria Horelick 1 year ago.

We put 1.25 g of baking soda ina weigh boat (small plastic container) then into a beaker the we added 8ml of vinegar waited for it to react heated up the beaker waited for the water to evaporate then we waited for it to cool and got 1.21 g of sodium acetate solid the theoretical yield is 1.22 so we got 99.18% yield one error we found is that some powder was left on the weigh boat when we transferred it to the beaker but we need to find another that would cause the percent yield to be too small please help Answered by Hayley Mansfield 1 year ago.

Your % error is 99.2% (significant figures = 3) It is possible that the bubbles (CO2) carried off some liquid containing dissolved salts causing the loss of some of the reactants and products. Some small amount of solids were on the walls of the beaker and were not transferred to the weighing boat. All in all the recovery was very good! Answered by Dexter Nease 1 year ago.

Wow one hundred and one.5%! There might desire to be some masterful chemistry going on in that lab. What they say: "why grant a hundred% once you may desire to flow all of the technique and supply a hundred and one.5%!" :) heavily, i could recheck your calculations. Or redo between the essential measurements, according to probability those concerning weighing specific gadgets, this time with out palms or sleeves on the stability. Answered by Lessie Litchfield 1 year ago.


Would you feed this to your cat?
Yes it is Merrick. I was at my mom's and was about to eat what looked like a beef stew. She puts her left over dog food in a plastic container and then in the fridge. When I asked her if I could have the rest of the beef stew she said I don't have any what are you talking about. I couldn't believe it was dog... Asked by Katharyn Peppin 1 year ago.

Would you feed this to your cats and what kind of canned food do you think it is? Ingredients: Chicken, Chicken Broth, Turkey Liver, Fresh Red Jacket New Potatoes, Fresh Carrots, Fresh Snow Peas, Fresh Whole Red Delicious Apples, Potato Starch-modified, Olive Oil, Calcium Carbonate, Potassium Chloride, Tricalcium Phosphate, Cassia Gum, Carrageenan, Flax Seed Oil (For Omega -3), Poultry Seasoning (Thyme, Sage, Rosemary) Choline Chloride, Salt, Taurine, Mixed Tocopherols, Vitamin E Supplement, Yucca Schidigera Extract, Zinc Amino Acid Complex, Iron Amino Acid Complex, Manganese Amino Acid Complex, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Copper Amino Acid Complex,d-Calcium Pantothenate, Vitamin A Acetate, Niacin, Lecithin, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Riboflavin Supplement, Folic Acid, Ethylenediamine Dihydriodide, Cobalt Glucoheptanate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Biotin,Thiamine Mononitrate, Sodium Selenite. Answered by Alysia Countis 1 year ago.

Yes it is Merrick. I was at my mom's and was about to eat what looked like a beef stew. She puts her left over dog food in a plastic container and then in the fridge. When I asked her if I could have the rest of the beef stew she said I don't have any what are you talking about. I couldn't believe it was dog food. LOL Answered by Carisa Etsitty 1 year ago.

if I'm not mistaken this is a merrick food? (gosh I need a life if I'm right) yes, I have given it to my cat, he liked merrick for a short bit (but he gets sick of it quick, he is VERY finicky and the only food he hasn't turned down ever yet is fussie cat). no by products, no meal, and meat is the first ingredient. good food :) Answered by Stella Turnner 1 year ago.

At least its a food of the high quality foods- no grains and no animal by products. I would guess it's probably wellnes, merrick or halo - or an other brand of the same quality. I would feed it if my cat's would eat canned cat food :( the only one they eat at all is beneful lol - a dog food. therefore I keep the amount low and they nourish on kibbles. And yes - I tried almost all canned cat foods - before I tried the beneful dog food just as a joke like "Ya don't like canned cat food - what ya think about this wet food for dogs ..." And they left not a single spot within their food bowl when I fed that the first time. Answered by Isiah Albert 1 year ago.

Yes I probably would feed that to my cats if that's the order the ingredients are in. Sounds like a good brand? Answered by Preston Snover 1 year ago.

It sounds very healthy I think it would be ok for your cat to eat it but then again if its dog food there might be big pieces of meat or whatever in it and the cat would find it hard to swallow and choke... Answered by Leeanne Pesqueira 1 year ago.

ya cats can almost eat anything , they are strong by nature. by the way my cat loves burger king Answered by Zulma Belkowski 1 year ago.

I see lots of vitamins and proteins so that's good(: Answered by Elva Frankforter 1 year ago.

I would :D if only I had a cat Answered by Colleen Stsauveur 1 year ago.

Ummmm idk but maybe. Answered by Dewayne Odin 1 year ago.


If vinegar and baking soda were mixed together in a graduated cylinder?
Also are the gases that are released from the chemical reaction what causes the odor? Asked by Lorenza Horkley 1 year ago.

vinegar contains about 5% acetic acid by volume. acetic acid is CH3CO2H. (google that). it's the chemical that you smell. it's very pungent. Baking soda contains sodium bicarbonate. NaHCO3. That's about as odorless as table salt. You should know that if you've every been around baking soda. mix the two together and you get... 1 CH3CO2H + 1 NaHCO3 ---> 1 CH3CO2Na + 1 H2CO3 and that H2CO3 (carbonic acid) breaks down into H2O and CO2. Both are odorless. Sodium acetate (CH3CO2Na) is also very much odorless. The CO2 is the gas that evolves. H2O is liquid and sodium acetate stays dissolved in the water. So.. if you mix the right quantities of vinegar and baking soda, the odor will go away. And if you mix it slowly enough, it won't froth much either. (the frothing is due to the CO2 escaping fyi). And if you do this on a balance, then yes you could see the mass dropping as CO2 leaves the liquid and vacates into the atmosphere. how much? well... let's say you started with 25 mL of vinegar. 5% of that is 1.25 mL of acetic acid. Acetic acid has a density of 1.05 g/mL and a molar mass of 60.0 g/mole. so ... 1.25 mL acid x (1.05g / mL) x (1 mole / 60.0g) x (1 mole CO2 / 1 mole acid) x (44.0g CO2 / mole CO2) = 0.963g of CO2. and that would require... 1.25 mL acid x (1.05g / mL) x (1 mole / 60.0g) x (1 mole NaHCO3 / 1 mole acid) x (84.0g NaHCO3 / mole NaHCO3) = 1.84g baking soda ie.. you would start with about 26.8 g of vinegar and baking soda and end up loosing about 1 gram as the CO2 leaves (about 4% mass lost). Very observable with a balance. ******* as to whether or not this reaction is powerful. Indeed it can be. Depends on how much CO2 is produced and what the volume and resulting pressure is. There are 2-L plastic pop bottle rockets that are sold based on this reaction. And if you had a rigid enough container, you could cause an explosion and serious injury. And acetic acid is an acid and therefore needs to be treated with respect. It can dissolve skin and other tissues resulting in a chemical burn. ******* not a chemist, just a Ph.D. Chemical Engineer. Answered by Tristan Sexauer 1 year ago.

Foam would shoot out the top and cover everything in a frothy mess. This is the basis of the old "volcano" science fair project. Pile up some dirt around a tumbler, put some baking soda in the hole and a bit of red food coloring. When vinegar is added the "volcano" explodes. This is the reaction between a weak acid and the salt of a weak acid. Vinegar contains acetic acid, the weak acid. The Sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) is the salt. The reaction produces Sodium acetate, water and a gas, Carbon dioxide. CH3CO2H + NaHCO3 -> CH3CO2Na + H2O + CO2 The gas is what causes all the bubbles to form. Vinegar has enough organic material in it to enable permanent bubbles to form and this is where all the froth comes from. The reaction is basically a chemical explosion, but it isn't powerful and the chemicals used are harmless. Answered by Lecia Petroski 1 year ago.

You can't "see" the amount of mass, you could only read the volume in the cylinder. A reaction between a solid and liquid is difficult to measure visually, because the solid will have air trapped between its particles, which will be displaced by the liquid. This displaced gas will give faulty readings. What you would see is the evolution of CO2 in the cylinder, and most likely, a reduction in the volume compared to the sum of the volumes of soda and vinegar, both due to the reaction and due to gas displacement from the solid. Answered by Albert Bonnoitt 1 year ago.

Firstly, have you never before seen a baking soda and vinegar volcano before? Second, yes you could as the two, when mixed, expand rapidly creating a foam that has a terrible odor. Answered by Eliana Starich 1 year ago.


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