Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 020829/002.

Names and composition

"SINGULAIR" is the commercial name of a drug composed of MONTELUKAST SODIUM.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020829/002 SINGULAIR MONTELUKAST SODIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
020830/001 SINGULAIR MONTELUKAST SODIUM TABLET, CHEWABLE/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE
020830/002 SINGULAIR MONTELUKAST SODIUM TABLET, CHEWABLE/ORAL EQ 4MG BASE
021409/001 SINGULAIR MONTELUKAST SODIUM GRANULE/ORAL EQ 4MG BASE per PACKET

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020829/002 SINGULAIR MONTELUKAST SODIUM TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
020830/001 SINGULAIR MONTELUKAST SODIUM TABLET, CHEWABLE/ORAL EQ 5MG BASE
020830/002 SINGULAIR MONTELUKAST SODIUM TABLET, CHEWABLE/ORAL EQ 4MG BASE
021409/001 SINGULAIR MONTELUKAST SODIUM GRANULE/ORAL EQ 4MG BASE per PACKET
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Answered questions

Does singulair work?
has anyone used it Asked by Chester Waeyaert 1 year ago.

Whether or not Singulair works will depend on what is causing your asthma. Singulair is a wonderful medication for excersise, and aspirin induced ashma. Singulair belongs to a group of medications known as leukotriene inhibitors. These medications block the actions of leukotrienes (chemicals in the body that cause inflammation that leads to asthma attacks). It is important to note that Singulair is NOT a rescue inhaler, and should not be used in an acute attack. Singulairs purpose is to reduce the prevelance of asthma attacks, not stop one already in progress. There are 5 main groups of medications that are used in asthma management: 1.) Bronchodilators (beta adrenergic, and anticholinergic agents) - offers short term relief in an acute situation, as well as long-term maintenance (depending on the specific drug) 2.) Inhaled corticosteroids (often used in moderate-severe cases of asthma- have a wide range of side effects) 3.) Methylxanthines (really only ever see this used in acute situations within a hospital setting) 4.) Antileukotrienes (e.g. Singulair) - often used in children to avoid prescribing steroids; also very beneficial for excersise, and aspirin induced asthma 5.) Mast cell stabilizers (prevent mast cells from degranulating and releasing histamine -which causes inflammation- in the body) You should keep a daily asthma log that records peak flows, incidents of breathing difficulty, and ability to perform daily activities and share this with your doctor. A log like this will help you keep track of your symptoms and evaluate whether or not Singulair is helping. Answered by Nannette Bockrath 1 year ago.

One of the best meds to use for Asthma is advair. It is a bronchodilator and corticosteroid. Singulair targets a specific receptor in the airway and is not for everyone. It works in about 1/3 of the people who take it and most insurance companies have a high copay for it. Advair is very effective and many people who use it have great outcomes with their breathing problems. I would recommend Allegra with Advair 250/50. This is an excellent combination. Answered by Hang Huft 1 year ago.

I have been using Singulair for years. It works pretty well. I still have asthma and allergy problems, but I am better than I was. When I went on it, I always felt like I had fluid in my lungs. Now I don't. Answered by Kym Sandstede 1 year ago.

It may work if you use it on a short time basis. Long term though I don't know. Best is to get the nutrition your body craves. Mostly fruit and veggies, uncooked. Some whole grains. Lean meats. Organic products are best. Cost more but I think our bodies are worth it. You may be surprised if your asthma gets better. All diseases are caused by non-nutrition by yourself or who came before you. Answered by Modesta Teske 1 year ago.

yeah it works. when I stop taking it it's kinda disastrous. it makes me healthy :) Answered by Tiera Balentine 1 year ago.

i really don't think that it works we use Alltel it is awesome hope that i help:D Answered by Ardith Piker 1 year ago.


Asthma-pros and cons of Singulair?
Hi, I'm just wondering If any of you have any opinions or views on the pros and cons of the drug- Singulair (Montelukast) I know Singulair is a leukototriene receptor antagonists. I have Asthma; it's always been pretty well controlled until recently. Around February this year my Asthma started to get... Asked by Pa Otinger 1 year ago.

Hi, I'm just wondering If any of you have any opinions or views on the pros and cons of the drug- Singulair (Montelukast) I know Singulair is a leukototriene receptor antagonists. I have Asthma; it's always been pretty well controlled until recently. Around February this year my Asthma started to get worse. I don’t think this is due to the pollen as there wasn’t much around in February and my hay fever isn’t that bad, I would consider it to be mild and please no suggestions to take local honey, it’s a myth! .. I am a Nurse so I am pretty clued up about Asthma (so please no comments about trying to explain to me what Asthma is!) I have a lousy GP who doesn’t seem to have much knowledge regarding Asthma and as soon as you go in the surgery room he starts looking at his watch and tries to ‘fob me off’ with, “just continue with your medication Rhianna” I also seem to be a victim of the, 'lottery postcode' I have repeatedly asked to be referred to a respiratory therapist but have been told there is a year’s waiting list....So I figured I’d do my own research and just go along to the GP and ask this drug is suitable! I currently take Serevent 50 micrograms twice daily and Flixotide 500 micrograms twice daily. Although my GP disagrees I think this is a high dose considering my Asthma is not THAT severe and he has not demonstrated any reason why I need to continue taking this high dosage combination of inhalers. I don’t want to take oral steroids as I feel this is not beneficial in the long run and will put me at risk from Osteoporosis and weight gain. The only times I have been hospitalised for Asthma is when I have had a chest infection following a cold. I have considered the possibility my Asthma could appear to be worsening as a result of gastric reflux. The strange thing is, my peak flow is excellent, I am only 5ft and my normal peak flow is 550; which considering my height is good! I just get this tight feeling in my chest. I live on antihistamines which I really don’t think will do me any good in the long run either. I don’t agree with drugs like Kenalog which (in my opinion) is uncontrolled high dosage of steroids which can lead to other complications. My GP did suggest the use of this drug; I just find the idea abhorrent. Anyway. ...I have read about Singulair being effective, is this drug only suitable to some people or in some situations? I seem to have a hard time convincing my Doctor that my Asthma is not that bad; I don’t understand why he thinks it is. Sorry to rant on and hope my GP isn’t somewhere reading this!! Any comments much appreciated. Rhianna x Answered by Ashly Blacker 1 year ago.

I feel your pain. I've had asthma for 14 years now and have seen several doctors. The truth is, there is no known cure for asthma at the moment. But the symptoms can be prevented. It really depends on what causes your brother's asthma. Mine is usually dust and hot weather. But I think the universal method is using the control inhaler. I cured my Asthma the natural way? Answered by Patience Voetsch 1 year ago.


Singulair... HELP?
i was prescribed because my asthma was not controlled (not on controller except singulair) and i had asthma Asked by Carin Claridge 1 year ago.

I am going to stop taking the medicine even tho it has not been authorized by my physian. i have been taking this medicine for not even a month at first i started out with stomach pains figured they would go away... no biggie.... now i am sitting he practically crying in pain from a sinus headache that i have had since last night my asthma has even worsened a little. it is very painful and i do not like it. basically is this enough to stop taking the medicine and if so what other medicine do you reccomend... i have exercise induced asthma and exercise daily.... also about 3 days after i started takiing the medicine i had a mild asthma attack....... Answered by Willard Entsminger 1 year ago.

Singulair® helps to reduce asthma symptoms (coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, or chest tightness) and control your asthma. It does not provide instant relief and cannot be used to treat a sudden asthma attack. It works only when used on a regular basis to help reduce inflammation and prevent asthma attacks. Montelukast is effective in adults and children. This drug is also helpful in improving seasonal allergies, like hay fever. Generic montelukast tablets or chewable tablets are not yet available. What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine? They need to know if you have any of these conditions: •an acute asthma attack •are on corticosteroid therapy, like prednisone or inhalers •liver disease, like hepatitis •phenylketonuria •an unusual or allergic reaction to montelukast, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives •pregnant or trying to get pregnant •breast-feeding How should I use this medicine? Take montelukast by mouth. You may take your tablets with food. Take montelukast every day at roughly the same time, even on days when you are not having asthma or allergy symptoms. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Do not take your medicine more often than directed. What if I miss a dose? If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the previous dose. Do not use double or extra doses. What drug(s) may interact with montelukast? •carbamazepine •cerivastatin •paclitaxel •phenobarbital •phenytoin •repaglinide •rifabutin •rifampin •rosiglitazone •troglitazone Tell your prescriber or health care professional about all other medicines you are taking, including non-prescription medicines. Also tell your prescriber or health care professional if you are a frequent user of drinks with caffeine or alcohol, if you smoke, or if you use illegal drugs. These may affect the way your medicine works. Check with your health care professional before stopping or starting any of your medicines. What side effects may I notice from using montelukast? Side effects that you should report to your prescriber or health care professional as soon as possible: Rare or uncommon: •a feeling of pins and needles or numbness of arms and legs •dark brown or yellow urine •diarrhea •easy bruising or bleeding •edema or swelling of the legs or ankles •fatigue or weakness •fever •flu-like illness •muscle aches or cramps •seizure or convulsion •skin rash and itching •severe stomach pain •swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and/or throat, which may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing •vomiting •wheezing or continued coughing •yellowing of the eyes or skin Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your prescriber or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome): •cough •difficulty sleeping •dizziness •drowsiness •headache •heartburn •hoarseness or sore throat •indigestion or stomach upset •muscle aches or cramps •nausea •runny nose •unusual dreams What should I watch for while taking montelukast? Montelukast is only used to help prevent asthma attacks; it is not used as a "quick-relief" medicine to treat an asthma attack. Therefore, you should always have your "quick-relief" medicine with you to treat an asthma attack. Talk with your prescriber about what you should do if you have an acute asthma attack. Tell your prescriber or health care professional if your symptoms do not improve or if your asthma gets worse. If you find that your medicines become less effective in treating your asthma, you should contact your health care professional as soon as possible. Do not to stop taking or decrease the use of your other asthma treatments, including steroids, when starting montelukast unless otherwise directed by their health care prescriber. Follow your prescriber's directions exactly. Answered by Lakendra Weissgerber 1 year ago.

Sorry your child had a bad reaction. Check out the warnings on virtually any medication, though, and you'll find similar lists. The idea is that the "common side effects" are either quite uncommon or mild enough to be worth the good the medication does. My daughter was at the emergency room on a regular basis for severe asthma and had pneumonia twice before she started Singulair. On Singulair and one other medication, she's a different -- way healthier -- kid. She does have a side effect ... it's harder for her to fall asleep (which falls under insomnia)). But I'd easily rather have it take her an extra half hour to fall asleep than to worry about her being rushed to the ER a couple times a month to be put on oxygen. It's always worth knowing what potential side effects are so you can be on the lookout for them. Sorry they happened to your daughter. But it doesn't mean that no one should take singulair, or even that it's any more dangerous than any other medication. My daughter's actually allergic to penicillin ... which can potentially even be fatal. that doesn't mean that penicillin's not right for my other kids. These are issues people have to take up with their doctors about what is the right medication for their own individual child. Answered by Philip Szumiesz 1 year ago.

Singular will not help in treating sinus infections, and if you are getting or have an infection your asthma will get worse (no matter if you are on the singular or not). The stomach pains are a reason to stop the medication if you cannot tolerate them; however you may have stomach problems from sinus drainage into your stomach (from the infection). I think it is a poor idea to stop taking a medication without the consent of your physician. At the very least, you need to call and inform your physician because he or she will need to change your medications to control the inflammation from your asthma attack. You may also need antibiotics if you do have a bacterial sinus infection. Your doctor may put you on an inhaled corticosteriod, a beta2-agonist bronchodilator or a short acting bronchodilator. Answered by Shasta Vermilya 1 year ago.

yeah stop taking it, may i ask you why did they prescribe it to you in the first place. Answered by Julianna Botts 1 year ago.


Is Singulair a mild steroid?
I am taking a medication called Singulair, and it's 10mg once at 8pm, and it's prescribed by my family doctor for asthma prevention. Here are a few questions below.1.) Would Singulair be considered a mild steroid that passes oxygen to open the lungs?2.) Does asthma prevention mean I have asthma? Or... Asked by Catrice Leiter 1 year ago.

I am taking a medication called Singulair, and it's 10mg once at 8pm, and it's prescribed by my family doctor for asthma prevention. Here are a few questions below. 1.) Would Singulair be considered a mild steroid that passes oxygen to open the lungs? 2.) Does asthma prevention mean I have asthma? Or does it mean that it prevents me from getting asthma from now to the future? Thank you, Answered by Sterling Obnegon 1 year ago.

Singulair is a leukotriene (loo-koe-TRY-een) inhibitor. Leukotrienes are chemicals your body releases when you breathe in an allergen (such as pollen). These chemicals cause swelling in your lungs and tightening of the muscles around your airways, which can result in asthma symptoms. It is NOT a steroid. Singulair is used to prevent asthma attacks in adults and children as young as 12 months old. Singulair is also used to prevent exercise-induced bronchospasm in adults and children who are at least 6 years old. Singulair is also used to treat symptoms of year-round (perennial) allergies in adults and children who are at least 6 months old. It is also used to treat symptoms of seasonal allergies in adults and children who are at least 2 years old. Answered by Odelia Pinzone 1 year ago.

It's a topical steroid, meaning it really only works where it touches (the airways). It's use is to decrease inflammation in the airways. This inflammation is a key feature of asthma and COPD. It means you either have asthma or COPD. For a formal diagnosis you need to do a spirometry test, blow into a special tube. The preventer part is to prevent asthma/COPD attacks, by reducing the inflammation. Answered by Meg Ahsan 1 year ago.

i think it is to help your path ways clear and open, where asthma would be a constriction of bronchial air ways. Answered by Albertina Yasutomi 1 year ago.


Has anyone took the drug singulair for asthma while pregnant. i am 6 months pregnant.?
I haven't needed it until now, but my asthma is getting worse. Asked by Milford Prins 1 year ago.

Singulair is a class B, meaning that it is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Talk to your doctor before you take it, just to be sure. A lot of pregnant women experience shortness of breath. It's usually from displacement of abdominal organs because of the size of the growing baby. This might be what you're noticing instead of your asthma getting worse, but either way it's definitely something to talk to your doctor about. I had to use a rescue inhaler while I was pregnant. Singulair is safer than that....albuterol is a class C meaning it has been shown to cause harm. So if taking the singulair means that you don't need the rescue inhaler as much, then it's definitely a good idea. Answered by Chet Estwick 1 year ago.

your asthma meds have steroids in it and steroids makes the baby's lungs develop faster so in a way it helps the baby in case you go in labor early Answered by Dee Buchtel 1 year ago.

i have asthma and i took ventolin and becotide throughout pregnancy go see ur gp and they will prescirbe u with probaby a new inhaler. it doesnt affect the baby. Answered by Willie Mcthune 1 year ago.


Dose singulair have antihisamine in it?
what is the difference between cetirizine and singulair? Asked by Willian Mihatsch 1 year ago.

No Singulair, a trade name of Montelukast, is a leukotriene receptor antagonist (LTRA) used for the maintenance treatment of asthma and to relieve symptoms of seasonal allergies. It is usually administered orally. Montelukast is a CysLT1 antagonist; that it blocks the action of leukotriene D4 (and secondary ligands LTC4 and LTE4) on the cysteinyl leukotriene receptor CysLT1 in the lungs and bronchial tubes by binding to it. This reduces the bronchoconstriction otherwise caused by the leukotriene and results in less inflammation. Because of its method of operation, it is not useful for the treatment of acute asthma attacks. Again because of its very specific focus of operation, it does not interact with other asthma medications such as theophylline. Cetirizine , a second-generation antihistamine, is a major metabolite of hydroxyzine, and a racemic selective H1 receptor inverse agonist used in the treatment of allergies, hay fever, angioedema, and urticaria.. Answered by Mariella Deshpande 1 year ago.

Singulair IS an antihistamine - but not in the sense that people acquaint antihistamines. People use the word "antihistamine" in a tight sense that refers to certain groups of medications. But when defining "histamine" - Histamine is a chemical that our body releases when it needs help correcting a shortage of some very important substances like water, salt or potassium. Histamines tell the brain that we need to increase our water intake. Antihistamines block the signal that histamines send to the brain. They tell the brain that the problem has been corrected so that the brain will turn off the "pain" sign. But the underlying cause hasn't really been corrected, and as soon as the antihistamine wears off, the "pain" sign will come right back on. It isn't strictly limited to pain. The word "pain" is used here to exemplify any symptom such as asthma in this case, although it could also indicate actual pain in many other instances. Answered by Hannah Heckathorn 1 year ago.


Does Singulair break up mucus?
Sooo I've been sick for 2 months now. After several trips to the doctor nothing helped. Finally, I was put on singulair and taking prilosec. So now I'm actually coughing up green stuff. Before it was clear. Now I'm getting on the z pack. Just wondering if the singulair opened stuff up and if this junk... Asked by Aurore Lofts 1 year ago.

Sooo I've been sick for 2 months now. After several trips to the doctor nothing helped. Finally, I was put on singulair and taking prilosec. So now I'm actually coughing up green stuff. Before it was clear. Now I'm getting on the z pack. Just wondering if the singulair opened stuff up and if this junk was waiting to come out this whole time? Praying this is it. So tired of coughing. Answered by Kyung Mcglaun 1 year ago.

Singulair could have done that. Its primary function is opening up your airways. Most people don't see much success with Singulair, but if it works for you, keep doing it. Although, I recommend using mucinex D too (if the pharmacist/doctor says it doesn't conflict with your other medicine). Zepac is pretty weak, so if that doesn't do the job, they might put you on another antibiotic. Talk to your doctor about Advair if this doesn't resolve itself soon. It's a very good drug for this kind of thing, it's usually only used on people with asthma or copd, but it's very effective for your issue. It's not the kind of thing you want to be on long term, but a month or two one it would be great for you. Answered by Clair Eschrich 1 year ago.

Get a second opinion. No one has to suffer through years and months of clogged nasal passages and tons of mucus drainage. You may have a chronic sinusitis in which case your nose feels clogged up all the time, or make sure it is not a pneumonia that causes difficulty of bleeding. Answered by Williemae Reischl 1 year ago.

what does it say on the box, ? Answered by Myesha Veto 1 year ago.


Does singulair work?
has anyone used it Asked by Courtney Comes 1 year ago.

Whether or not Singulair works will depend on what is causing your asthma. Singulair is a wonderful medication for excersise, and aspirin induced ashma. Singulair belongs to a group of medications known as leukotriene inhibitors. These medications block the actions of leukotrienes (chemicals in the body that cause inflammation that leads to asthma attacks). It is important to note that Singulair is NOT a rescue inhaler, and should not be used in an acute attack. Singulairs purpose is to reduce the prevelance of asthma attacks, not stop one already in progress. There are 5 main groups of medications that are used in asthma management: 1.) Bronchodilators (beta adrenergic, and anticholinergic agents) - offers short term relief in an acute situation, as well as long-term maintenance (depending on the specific drug) 2.) Inhaled corticosteroids (often used in moderate-severe cases of asthma- have a wide range of side effects) 3.) Methylxanthines (really only ever see this used in acute situations within a hospital setting) 4.) Antileukotrienes (e.g. Singulair) - often used in children to avoid prescribing steroids; also very beneficial for excersise, and aspirin induced asthma 5.) Mast cell stabilizers (prevent mast cells from degranulating and releasing histamine -which causes inflammation- in the body) You should keep a daily asthma log that records peak flows, incidents of breathing difficulty, and ability to perform daily activities and share this with your doctor. A log like this will help you keep track of your symptoms and evaluate whether or not Singulair is helping. Answered by Juliette Rossignol 1 year ago.

One of the best meds to use for Asthma is advair. It is a bronchodilator and corticosteroid. Singulair targets a specific receptor in the airway and is not for everyone. It works in about 1/3 of the people who take it and most insurance companies have a high copay for it. Advair is very effective and many people who use it have great outcomes with their breathing problems. I would recommend Allegra with Advair 250/50. This is an excellent combination. Answered by Eugenie Giebel 1 year ago.

I have been using Singulair for years. It works pretty well. I still have asthma and allergy problems, but I am better than I was. When I went on it, I always felt like I had fluid in my lungs. Now I don't. Answered by Sean Defrance 1 year ago.

It may work if you use it on a short time basis. Long term though I don't know. Best is to get the nutrition your body craves. Mostly fruit and veggies, uncooked. Some whole grains. Lean meats. Organic products are best. Cost more but I think our bodies are worth it. You may be surprised if your asthma gets better. All diseases are caused by non-nutrition by yourself or who came before you. Answered by Martin Eberspacher 1 year ago.

yeah it works. when I stop taking it it's kinda disastrous. it makes me healthy :) Answered by Minnie Bageant 1 year ago.

i really don't think that it works we use Alltel it is awesome hope that i help:D Answered by Elvin Sanluis 1 year ago.


Asthma-pros and cons of Singulair?
Hi, I'm just wondering If any of you have any opinions or views on the pros and cons of the drug- Singulair (Montelukast) I know Singulair is a leukototriene receptor antagonists. I have Asthma; it's always been pretty well controlled until recently. Around February this year my Asthma started to get... Asked by Eliza Solonar 1 year ago.

Hi, I'm just wondering If any of you have any opinions or views on the pros and cons of the drug- Singulair (Montelukast) I know Singulair is a leukototriene receptor antagonists. I have Asthma; it's always been pretty well controlled until recently. Around February this year my Asthma started to get worse. I don’t think this is due to the pollen as there wasn’t much around in February and my hay fever isn’t that bad, I would consider it to be mild and please no suggestions to take local honey, it’s a myth! .. I am a Nurse so I am pretty clued up about Asthma (so please no comments about trying to explain to me what Asthma is!) I have a lousy GP who doesn’t seem to have much knowledge regarding Asthma and as soon as you go in the surgery room he starts looking at his watch and tries to ‘fob me off’ with, “just continue with your medication Rhianna” I also seem to be a victim of the, 'lottery postcode' I have repeatedly asked to be referred to a respiratory therapist but have been told there is a year’s waiting list....So I figured I’d do my own research and just go along to the GP and ask this drug is suitable! I currently take Serevent 50 micrograms twice daily and Flixotide 500 micrograms twice daily. Although my GP disagrees I think this is a high dose considering my Asthma is not THAT severe and he has not demonstrated any reason why I need to continue taking this high dosage combination of inhalers. I don’t want to take oral steroids as I feel this is not beneficial in the long run and will put me at risk from Osteoporosis and weight gain. The only times I have been hospitalised for Asthma is when I have had a chest infection following a cold. I have considered the possibility my Asthma could appear to be worsening as a result of gastric reflux. The strange thing is, my peak flow is excellent, I am only 5ft and my normal peak flow is 550; which considering my height is good! I just get this tight feeling in my chest. I live on antihistamines which I really don’t think will do me any good in the long run either. I don’t agree with drugs like Kenalog which (in my opinion) is uncontrolled high dosage of steroids which can lead to other complications. My GP did suggest the use of this drug; I just find the idea abhorrent. Anyway. ...I have read about Singulair being effective, is this drug only suitable to some people or in some situations? I seem to have a hard time convincing my Doctor that my Asthma is not that bad; I don’t understand why he thinks it is. Sorry to rant on and hope my GP isn’t somewhere reading this!! Any comments much appreciated. Rhianna x Answered by Kristyn Huesso 1 year ago.

I feel your pain. I've had asthma for 14 years now and have seen several doctors. The truth is, there is no known cure for asthma at the moment. But the symptoms can be prevented. It really depends on what causes your brother's asthma. Mine is usually dust and hot weather. But I think the universal method is using the control inhaler. I cured my Asthma the natural way? Answered by Beaulah Magelssen 1 year ago.


Singulair... HELP?
i was prescribed because my asthma was not controlled (not on controller except singulair) and i had asthma Asked by Eusebia Schellhorn 1 year ago.

I am going to stop taking the medicine even tho it has not been authorized by my physian. i have been taking this medicine for not even a month at first i started out with stomach pains figured they would go away... no biggie.... now i am sitting he practically crying in pain from a sinus headache that i have had since last night my asthma has even worsened a little. it is very painful and i do not like it. basically is this enough to stop taking the medicine and if so what other medicine do you reccomend... i have exercise induced asthma and exercise daily.... also about 3 days after i started takiing the medicine i had a mild asthma attack....... Answered by Elba Kazanjian 1 year ago.

Singulair® helps to reduce asthma symptoms (coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, or chest tightness) and control your asthma. It does not provide instant relief and cannot be used to treat a sudden asthma attack. It works only when used on a regular basis to help reduce inflammation and prevent asthma attacks. Montelukast is effective in adults and children. This drug is also helpful in improving seasonal allergies, like hay fever. Generic montelukast tablets or chewable tablets are not yet available. What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine? They need to know if you have any of these conditions: •an acute asthma attack •are on corticosteroid therapy, like prednisone or inhalers •liver disease, like hepatitis •phenylketonuria •an unusual or allergic reaction to montelukast, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives •pregnant or trying to get pregnant •breast-feeding How should I use this medicine? Take montelukast by mouth. You may take your tablets with food. Take montelukast every day at roughly the same time, even on days when you are not having asthma or allergy symptoms. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Do not take your medicine more often than directed. What if I miss a dose? If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the previous dose. Do not use double or extra doses. What drug(s) may interact with montelukast? •carbamazepine •cerivastatin •paclitaxel •phenobarbital •phenytoin •repaglinide •rifabutin •rifampin •rosiglitazone •troglitazone Tell your prescriber or health care professional about all other medicines you are taking, including non-prescription medicines. Also tell your prescriber or health care professional if you are a frequent user of drinks with caffeine or alcohol, if you smoke, or if you use illegal drugs. These may affect the way your medicine works. Check with your health care professional before stopping or starting any of your medicines. What side effects may I notice from using montelukast? Side effects that you should report to your prescriber or health care professional as soon as possible: Rare or uncommon: •a feeling of pins and needles or numbness of arms and legs •dark brown or yellow urine •diarrhea •easy bruising or bleeding •edema or swelling of the legs or ankles •fatigue or weakness •fever •flu-like illness •muscle aches or cramps •seizure or convulsion •skin rash and itching •severe stomach pain •swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and/or throat, which may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing •vomiting •wheezing or continued coughing •yellowing of the eyes or skin Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your prescriber or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome): •cough •difficulty sleeping •dizziness •drowsiness •headache •heartburn •hoarseness or sore throat •indigestion or stomach upset •muscle aches or cramps •nausea •runny nose •unusual dreams What should I watch for while taking montelukast? Montelukast is only used to help prevent asthma attacks; it is not used as a "quick-relief" medicine to treat an asthma attack. Therefore, you should always have your "quick-relief" medicine with you to treat an asthma attack. Talk with your prescriber about what you should do if you have an acute asthma attack. Tell your prescriber or health care professional if your symptoms do not improve or if your asthma gets worse. If you find that your medicines become less effective in treating your asthma, you should contact your health care professional as soon as possible. Do not to stop taking or decrease the use of your other asthma treatments, including steroids, when starting montelukast unless otherwise directed by their health care prescriber. Follow your prescriber's directions exactly. Answered by Elfriede Bowersock 1 year ago.

Sorry your child had a bad reaction. Check out the warnings on virtually any medication, though, and you'll find similar lists. The idea is that the "common side effects" are either quite uncommon or mild enough to be worth the good the medication does. My daughter was at the emergency room on a regular basis for severe asthma and had pneumonia twice before she started Singulair. On Singulair and one other medication, she's a different -- way healthier -- kid. She does have a side effect ... it's harder for her to fall asleep (which falls under insomnia)). But I'd easily rather have it take her an extra half hour to fall asleep than to worry about her being rushed to the ER a couple times a month to be put on oxygen. It's always worth knowing what potential side effects are so you can be on the lookout for them. Sorry they happened to your daughter. But it doesn't mean that no one should take singulair, or even that it's any more dangerous than any other medication. My daughter's actually allergic to penicillin ... which can potentially even be fatal. that doesn't mean that penicillin's not right for my other kids. These are issues people have to take up with their doctors about what is the right medication for their own individual child. Answered by Jane Schanno 1 year ago.

Singular will not help in treating sinus infections, and if you are getting or have an infection your asthma will get worse (no matter if you are on the singular or not). The stomach pains are a reason to stop the medication if you cannot tolerate them; however you may have stomach problems from sinus drainage into your stomach (from the infection). I think it is a poor idea to stop taking a medication without the consent of your physician. At the very least, you need to call and inform your physician because he or she will need to change your medications to control the inflammation from your asthma attack. You may also need antibiotics if you do have a bacterial sinus infection. Your doctor may put you on an inhaled corticosteriod, a beta2-agonist bronchodilator or a short acting bronchodilator. Answered by Meridith Bidell 1 year ago.

yeah stop taking it, may i ask you why did they prescribe it to you in the first place. Answered by Ilse Erichson 1 year ago.


Is Singulair a mild steroid?
I am taking a medication called Singulair, and it's 10mg once at 8pm, and it's prescribed by my family doctor for asthma prevention. Here are a few questions below.1.) Would Singulair be considered a mild steroid that passes oxygen to open the lungs?2.) Does asthma prevention mean I have asthma? Or... Asked by Gabrielle Zinz 1 year ago.

I am taking a medication called Singulair, and it's 10mg once at 8pm, and it's prescribed by my family doctor for asthma prevention. Here are a few questions below. 1.) Would Singulair be considered a mild steroid that passes oxygen to open the lungs? 2.) Does asthma prevention mean I have asthma? Or does it mean that it prevents me from getting asthma from now to the future? Thank you, Answered by Eura Cedillo 1 year ago.

Singulair is a leukotriene (loo-koe-TRY-een) inhibitor. Leukotrienes are chemicals your body releases when you breathe in an allergen (such as pollen). These chemicals cause swelling in your lungs and tightening of the muscles around your airways, which can result in asthma symptoms. It is NOT a steroid. Singulair is used to prevent asthma attacks in adults and children as young as 12 months old. Singulair is also used to prevent exercise-induced bronchospasm in adults and children who are at least 6 years old. Singulair is also used to treat symptoms of year-round (perennial) allergies in adults and children who are at least 6 months old. It is also used to treat symptoms of seasonal allergies in adults and children who are at least 2 years old. Answered by Reggie Hoopii 1 year ago.

It's a topical steroid, meaning it really only works where it touches (the airways). It's use is to decrease inflammation in the airways. This inflammation is a key feature of asthma and COPD. It means you either have asthma or COPD. For a formal diagnosis you need to do a spirometry test, blow into a special tube. The preventer part is to prevent asthma/COPD attacks, by reducing the inflammation. Answered by Adrienne Keath 1 year ago.

i think it is to help your path ways clear and open, where asthma would be a constriction of bronchial air ways. Answered by Lesley Quiel 1 year ago.


Has anyone took the drug singulair for asthma while pregnant. i am 6 months pregnant.?
I haven't needed it until now, but my asthma is getting worse. Asked by Eleni Scheidel 1 year ago.

Singulair is a class B, meaning that it is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Talk to your doctor before you take it, just to be sure. A lot of pregnant women experience shortness of breath. It's usually from displacement of abdominal organs because of the size of the growing baby. This might be what you're noticing instead of your asthma getting worse, but either way it's definitely something to talk to your doctor about. I had to use a rescue inhaler while I was pregnant. Singulair is safer than that....albuterol is a class C meaning it has been shown to cause harm. So if taking the singulair means that you don't need the rescue inhaler as much, then it's definitely a good idea. Answered by Glinda Huger 1 year ago.

your asthma meds have steroids in it and steroids makes the baby's lungs develop faster so in a way it helps the baby in case you go in labor early Answered by Janeen Boetcher 1 year ago.

i have asthma and i took ventolin and becotide throughout pregnancy go see ur gp and they will prescirbe u with probaby a new inhaler. it doesnt affect the baby. Answered by Dustin Kreiman 1 year ago.


Dose singulair have antihisamine in it?
what is the difference between cetirizine and singulair? Asked by Victor Belgrave 1 year ago.

No Singulair, a trade name of Montelukast, is a leukotriene receptor antagonist (LTRA) used for the maintenance treatment of asthma and to relieve symptoms of seasonal allergies. It is usually administered orally. Montelukast is a CysLT1 antagonist; that it blocks the action of leukotriene D4 (and secondary ligands LTC4 and LTE4) on the cysteinyl leukotriene receptor CysLT1 in the lungs and bronchial tubes by binding to it. This reduces the bronchoconstriction otherwise caused by the leukotriene and results in less inflammation. Because of its method of operation, it is not useful for the treatment of acute asthma attacks. Again because of its very specific focus of operation, it does not interact with other asthma medications such as theophylline. Cetirizine , a second-generation antihistamine, is a major metabolite of hydroxyzine, and a racemic selective H1 receptor inverse agonist used in the treatment of allergies, hay fever, angioedema, and urticaria.. Answered by Ling Feuer 1 year ago.

Singulair IS an antihistamine - but not in the sense that people acquaint antihistamines. People use the word "antihistamine" in a tight sense that refers to certain groups of medications. But when defining "histamine" - Histamine is a chemical that our body releases when it needs help correcting a shortage of some very important substances like water, salt or potassium. Histamines tell the brain that we need to increase our water intake. Antihistamines block the signal that histamines send to the brain. They tell the brain that the problem has been corrected so that the brain will turn off the "pain" sign. But the underlying cause hasn't really been corrected, and as soon as the antihistamine wears off, the "pain" sign will come right back on. It isn't strictly limited to pain. The word "pain" is used here to exemplify any symptom such as asthma in this case, although it could also indicate actual pain in many other instances. Answered by Spring Niedzwiecki 1 year ago.


Does Singulair break up mucus?
Sooo I've been sick for 2 months now. After several trips to the doctor nothing helped. Finally, I was put on singulair and taking prilosec. So now I'm actually coughing up green stuff. Before it was clear. Now I'm getting on the z pack. Just wondering if the singulair opened stuff up and if this junk... Asked by Bernard Kostek 1 year ago.

Sooo I've been sick for 2 months now. After several trips to the doctor nothing helped. Finally, I was put on singulair and taking prilosec. So now I'm actually coughing up green stuff. Before it was clear. Now I'm getting on the z pack. Just wondering if the singulair opened stuff up and if this junk was waiting to come out this whole time? Praying this is it. So tired of coughing. Answered by Candie Gearon 1 year ago.

Singulair could have done that. Its primary function is opening up your airways. Most people don't see much success with Singulair, but if it works for you, keep doing it. Although, I recommend using mucinex D too (if the pharmacist/doctor says it doesn't conflict with your other medicine). Zepac is pretty weak, so if that doesn't do the job, they might put you on another antibiotic. Talk to your doctor about Advair if this doesn't resolve itself soon. It's a very good drug for this kind of thing, it's usually only used on people with asthma or copd, but it's very effective for your issue. It's not the kind of thing you want to be on long term, but a month or two one it would be great for you. Answered by Laverna Melkonian 1 year ago.

Get a second opinion. No one has to suffer through years and months of clogged nasal passages and tons of mucus drainage. You may have a chronic sinusitis in which case your nose feels clogged up all the time, or make sure it is not a pneumonia that causes difficulty of bleeding. Answered by Rachel Forres 1 year ago.

what does it say on the box, ? Answered by Shawnda Wommack 1 year ago.


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