Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 019856/001.

Names and composition

"SINEMET CR" is the commercial name of a drug composed of CARBIDOPA and LEVODOPA.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019856/001 SINEMET CR CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 50MG and 200MG
019856/002 SINEMET CR CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 25MG and 100MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017555/001 SINEMET CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 10MG and 100MG
017555/002 SINEMET CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 250MG
017555/003 SINEMET CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
019856/001 SINEMET CR CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 50MG and 200MG
019856/002 SINEMET CR CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
073381/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 10MG and 100MG
073382/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
073383/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 250MG
073586/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 10MG and 100MG
073587/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
073589/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
073607/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 250MG
073618/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 10MG and 100MG
073620/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 250MG
074080/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 10MG and 100MG
074080/002 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
074080/003 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 250MG
074260/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 10MG and 100MG
074260/002 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
074260/003 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 250MG
075091/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 50MG and 200MG
075091/002 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
076212/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
076212/002 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 50MG and 200MG
076521/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
076521/002 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 50MG and 200MG
076643/001 CARBILEV CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, FOR SUSPENSION/ORAL 10MG and 100MG
076643/002 CARBILEV CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, FOR SUSPENSION/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
076643/003 CARBILEV CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, FOR SUSPENSION/ORAL 25MG and 250MG
076663/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 50MG and 200MG
076699/001 PARCOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 10MG and 100MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
076699/002 PARCOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 25MG and 100MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
076699/003 PARCOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 25MG and 250MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
077120/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 10MG and 100MG
077120/002 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
077120/003 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 250MG
077828/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
077828/002 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 50MG and 200MG
078536/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 10MG and 100MG
078536/002 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
078536/003 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 250MG
078690/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 10MG and 100MG
078690/002 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
078690/003 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 25MG and 250MG
078893/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 10MG and 100MG
078893/002 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
078893/003 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 25MG and 250MG
090324/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 10MG and 100MG
090324/002 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
090324/003 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 250MG
090631/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 10MG and 100MG
090631/002 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
090631/003 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 25MG and 250MG
202323/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
202323/002 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 50MG and 200MG
203312/001 RYTARY CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 23.75MG and 95MG
203312/002 RYTARY CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 36.25MG and 145MG
203312/003 RYTARY CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 48.75MG and 195MG
203312/004 RYTARY CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 61.25MG and 245MG
203952/001 DUOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA SUSPENSION/ENTERAL 4.63MG per ML and 20MG per ML

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Answered questions

What does increasing dopamine levels do to the human body?
Sinemet CR increases dopamine levels in the brain, and I was just wondering...what does this do?? Asked by Lacresha Schmiedeskamp 1 year ago.

Sinemet is used in the treatment of Parkinson's Disease (PD), which is a movement disorder which causes slowness of movement (bradykinesia), as well as rigidity, a resting tremor, and postural instability. PD is caused by a lack of dopamine production from a group of neurons in a part of the brain called the substantia nigra. This disrupts a complicated neural network that regulates movement, leading to the symptoms of the disease. Because the primary chemical imbalance causing PD is a lack of dopamine, Sinemet is used to replace the depleted dopamine supplies and allow those with PD to have more normal movement. Everything in the brain is a balance, though. What I mean by that is that there is a "right" amount of each neurotransmitter. So, not only can too little of a given neurotransmitter, such as dopamine, cause problems, but too much can also cause problems. You can see evidence of this when those with PD are over-medicated. Rather than the rigidity and slowness of movement caused by decreased dopamine, they can have writhing, uncoordinated movements (choreiform movements). Excess dopamine has also been identified in many psychotic disorders. The point of this somewhat rambling paragraph is that increased dopamine is only helpful if there is a decreased supply to start with. Hope that's helpful. Answered by Juliana Capestro 1 year ago.

Just because we can explain processes doesn't mean they become less meaningful. We know that sunsets are caused by the rotation of the Earth, we know how we develop in utero, how galaxies are formed, how the phases of the moon happen, etc.does that make these things any less beautiful? NO. Same goes for emotions. Answered by Bernice Golish 1 year ago.


What does Sinemet consist of & what is CR?
Asked by Corrine Valotta 1 year ago.

sinemet consists of levodopa & carbidopa . Used for contrlling the symptoms of parkinsons disease ."CR" stands for control release. Answered by Sulema Rause 1 year ago.


Why wouldn't the drug Sinemet be in the 2010 Physician's Desk Reference (64th ed.)?
On the market for decades??????? Not true. I just found the marketing start date of Sinemet was 06/01/2009. Source: http://www.drugs.com/pro/sinemet-cr.html Asked by Heather Ratzlaff 1 year ago.

As to not being in the print version of the PDR, there are many drugs that are used that are not. Most are medications that have been available for long periods of time and are almost always filled generically. I bet the combination of carbidopa/levodopa is in there. As to your statement that Sinemet has only been on the market for 6 months. please read your own source. On the right side of the screen is a tab at the top regarding FDA approval. Sinemet was first approved for use by the FDA in May of 1975 and Sinemet CR was first approved by the FDA in May 1991. Between my work in a pharmacy, medical school and two residencies i have both written and filled many prescriptions for both Sinemet and Sinemet Cr over the last 20 years. Answered by Nakisha Davoren 1 year ago.

Sinemet has actually been on the market for decades in the US, despite your link. And the PDR used to be a valuable drug reference. For the past decade or so, though, cheap drugs that don't make a good profit for the pharmaceutical companies are often dropped like a hot potato. It only includes the drugs pharmaceutical companies want (and will pay) to advertise. Answered by Bibi Addleman 1 year ago.


Sinemet does it help parkinson's Disease?
Asked by Missy Kolakowski 1 year ago.

I was diagnosed 6 years ago and take sinemet. It is the primary drug that keeps me moving. I couldn't imagine not having it. There is one downside and that is the dyskinesias that can occur as a side effect. All things considered, I wouldn't even thing of giving it up though. Answered by Merlin Jannusch 1 year ago.

My son-in-law has taken this med for about a year now! We all know when he skips a dose! So Yes I think its working for him, he is a young one only 32 and has it. So any new meds or reports that come out I'm right one it. Answered by Herman Able 1 year ago.


Looking for infor. for the mads are : sinemet er,requip,comtan?
Asked by Nathanial Winsley 1 year ago.

The combination of levodopa and carbidopa is used to treat the symptoms of Parkinson's disease and Parkinson's-like symptoms that may develop after encephalitis (swelling of the brain) or injury to the nervous system caused by carbon monoxide poisoning or manganese poisoning. Parkinson's symptoms, including tremors (shaking), stiffness, and slowness of movement, are caused by a lack of dopamine, a natural substance usually found in the brain. Levodopa is in a class of medications called central nervous system agents. It works by being converted to dopamine in the brain. Carbidopa is in a class of medications called decarboxylase inhibitors. It works by preventing levodopa from being broken down before it reaches the brain. This allows for a lower dose of levodopa, which causes less nausea and vomiting. Ropinirole is used alone or with other medications to treat the symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD; a disorder of the nervous system that causes difficulties with movement, muscle control, and balance), including shaking of parts of the body, stiffness, slowed movements, and problems with balance. Ropinirole is also used to treat restless legs syndrome (RLS; a condition that causes discomfort in the legs and a strong urge to move the legs, especially at night and when sitting or lying down). Ropinirole is in a class of medications called dopamine agonists. It works by acting in place of dopamine, a natural substance in the brain that is needed to control movement. Entacapone is an inhibitor of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT). It is used in combination with levodopa and carbidopa (Sinemet) to treat the end-of-dose 'wearing-off' symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Entacapone helps the levodopa and carbidopa work better by allowing more of it to reach the brain, where it has its effects. Please see the web pages for more details on Levodopa and Carbidopa (generic name) Sinemet CR (brand name), Ropinirole (generic name) Requip (brand name), Entacapone (generic name) and Comtan (brand name) Answered by Judie Marbray 1 year ago.

Sinemet is a drug used to help the tremors of Parkinsons diesase. Comitin, is a heart drug, used to lower blood pressure. Answered by Nikole Bogen 1 year ago.


Please i need help...?
My dad has 78 years old and he is suffering from Parkinson 10 years ago. His basic medicent is Sinemet (half dose 125 mg) each 3 hours from 6 Am till 8 Pm and LP100 one tablet before sleeping. We tried before Rivotril, Madopar.... But his doctor prefer Sinemet. But every day he is suffering about 5 hours Trembling... Asked by Hugh Henderosn 1 year ago.

My dad has 78 years old and he is suffering from Parkinson 10 years ago. His basic medicent is Sinemet (half dose 125 mg) each 3 hours from 6 Am till 8 Pm and LP100 one tablet before sleeping. We tried before Rivotril, Madopar.... But his doctor prefer Sinemet. But every day he is suffering about 5 hours Trembling of hands, arms, legs, jaw and face and Slowness of movement; and somtimes 2 to 3 hours countinous mouvement without stoping. But when it stops there are side effects because of big amount of medicent in his body: he keeps involuntary mounvements but he feels well at these periods and he can walk normaly... Please i need urgent help and can we do surgey at this age....And what are the medicents that may help... Answered by Antone Godbee 1 year ago.

Haha. You would do a little border wall paper that has a flower pattern! That style of wall paper is effortless to do. You are in a position to do it inside the middle of the partitions or at the top near the ceiling. You can place the doilies at the tank of the bathroom with a decorative potpourri box with the potpourri in it. Get a few type of picture association to hold at the wall. Have your shower curtain cross along side the subject. Simply don't forget what your grandma's relaxation room gave the look of and cross from there. You can do a decorative cleansing cleaning soap dish that includes the ones little ornamental soaps. Foolish your buddies are going to tease you once they come over. I am hoping I helped. Answered by Joeann Alcocer 1 year ago.


Does sinemetCR effect the thyroid gland?
i've been taking sinemetCR for a couple of weeks now and my thyroid has been acting up has this happened to anyone taking sinemetCR? i have restless legs syndrome that's why i've been prescribed this medication please help Asked by Waneta Estimable 1 year ago.

GENERIC NAME: LEVODOPA WITH CARBIDOPA - ORAL SUSTAINED RELEASE (lee-voh-DOE-puh WITH car-beh-DOE-puh) BRAND NAME(S): Sinemet CR Medication Uses | How To Use | Side Effects | Precautions | Drug Interactions | Overdose | Notes | Missed Dose | Storage USES: This medication is used to treat symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Carbidopa is used to make levodopa more effective. Carbidopa has no effect when given alone. HOW TO USE: Take this drug as directed. It may take a few weeks before the full benefits of this medication are observed. If you are changing from plain levodopa to this drug, levodopa must be discontinued for 8 hours before taking this combination drug. If stomach upset occurs, this drug may be taken with food or milk. Consult with your doctor. Do not crush or chew the tablets. The 50/200mg strength tablets may be broken in half. Do not break the 25/100mg strength tablets in half; doing so will change the drug's release system and may increase the possibility of side effects. SIDE EFFECTS: May cause drowsiness, dizziness, headache, loss of appetite, stomach upset, nausea, vision changes, or trembling of the hands. These should subside as your body adjusts to the medication. If these symptoms persist or become bothersome, inform your doctor. Notify your doctor if you develop any of these serious effects while taking this medication: vomiting, difficulty swallowing, difficulty urinating, uncontrollable movements (especially twitching of the eyelid), chest pain, irregular heartbeat, skin rash, mental/mood changes. May cause darkening of the urine or sweat. This is not harmful and will disappear when the medication is stopped. May cause dizziness especially when rising quickly from a seated or lying position. Change positions slowly and be careful on stairs. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist. PRECAUTIONS: This medication can cause false results in urine glucose testing in diabetes. TesTape should be used to test urine for accurate results. Tell your doctor your medical history, especially of: glaucoma, skin cancer, breathing problems, heart disease, gland problems (e.g., diabetes, thyroid), kidney disease, liver disease, ulcers, depressions, blood disorders. This drug should be used during pregnancy only if clearly needed. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. Levodopa appears in breast milk. Do not take this medication if you are breast-feeding. Answered by Angle Biser 1 year ago.

The thyroid gland is based on the entrance of the throat, underneath the Adam’s apple. It includes 2 lobes that lie on both facet of the windpipe, joined in entrance by means of an isthmus. The thyroid gland secretes hormones to keep watch over many metabolic procedures, adding progress and vigor expenditure. Hypothyroidism way the thyroid gland is underactive and fails to secrete ample hormones into the bloodstream. This factors the individual’s metabolism to sluggish down. Answered by Shana Maddin 1 year ago.


Best and latest medical tretment of parkinson,?
drug names of parkinson disease Asked by Nestor Lobstein 1 year ago.

The Food and Drug Administration approved Azilect (rasagiline), a new molecular entity, for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. The drug is a monoamine oxidase type--B (MAO-B) inhibitor that blocks the breakdown of dopamine, a chemical that sends information to the parts of the brain that control movement and coordination. Another New Treatment On May 9, 2007, FDA announced the approval of Neupro (rotigotine transdermal system), a skin patch designed to treat symptoms of early Parkinson's disease. Rotigotine is a drug not previously approved in the United States. Neupro, manufactured by Schwarz Bioscience of Research Triangle Park, N.C., is the first transdermal patch approved for the treatment of symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Rotigotine is a member of the dopamine agonist class of drugs and is delivered continuously through the skin (transdermal) using a silicone-based patch that is replaced every 24 hours. A dopamine agonist works by activating dopamine receptors in the body, mimicking the effect of the neurotransmitter dopamine. Other Alternatives: A Brain "Pacemaker" FDA approved an important tool for controlling Parkinson's tremors. The Activa Tremor Control Therapy consists of a wire surgically implanted deep within the brain and connected to a pulse generator, similar to a cardiac pacemaker, implanted near the collarbone. Whenever a tremor begins, patients can activate the device by passing a hand-held magnet over the generator. The system delivers a mild electrical stimulation that blocks the dysfunctional brain signals that cause tremor. Effects are often dramatic. "Before the implant, patients can't raise a glass of water or a spoonful of food to their mouths without spilling it or striking themselves in the face," says William Koller, M.D., neurology chairman at Kansas University Medical Center. "Within hours, these same patients are sipping tea from a cup and eating peas with a fork, with no signs of their disability." Surgery Options A brain operation shown to be helpful for many Parkinson's patients, especially those in late stages of the disease, is called pallidotomy. Doctors are not sure why the procedure works, but an October 1997 report in the New England Journal of Medicine stated that half of the patients in a pallidotomy study at Toronto Hospital, who before the surgery needed help in eating, dressing, and personal hygiene, were able to resume these activities independently. The study cautioned, however, that some of the surgery's effects diminished after two years and that the long-term effectiveness of the procedure still is unknown. Answered by Tamekia Woodlock 1 year ago.

The Parkinson's Reversing Breakthrough? Answered by Lean Paulauskas 1 year ago.

Isradipine is a medicine that has recently shown to possibly stop Parkinson's disease in it's tracks. The stardard treatments are Levadopa (L-dopa), Carbadopa, Simemet. Answered by Caryl Rumler 1 year ago.

I help the right for someone to chosen, yet previous due time period abortions are really out of the question. through then a lady must have already favourite what she became gonna do. except medically mandatory previous due time period abortions must be banned. convinced I suggested it banned. I help options no longer abortions... Answered by Timika Kostiuk 1 year ago.


How are proteins in plants and animals different?
Asked by Levi Early 1 year ago.

In short, most animal tissues are bound together in an extracellular matrix by a triple helix of protein known as collagen. Plant and fungal cells are bound together in tissues or aggregations by other molecules, such as pectin Plant versus Animal Protein For more detail read below.. ANIMAL PROTEIN Sources are meats of all kinds, butter, cheese, milk, cottage, cheese, yogurt, and eggs. In brief, protein is composed of Amino acids. If one is on Sinemet CR, which is an amino acid, any food that has protein in it, naturally has other amino acids in it. If this food is consumed at the same time, the amino acids in the protein food will compete with the amino acid in the l-dopa in the Sinemet CR. This results in either less l-dopa crossing the brain barrier, which makes the medication less effective, or slower at alleviating the symptoms. In order to get full benefit out of the medication, it is recommended that a person take their medication at least half an hour before eating any protein. This allows time for the medication to pass through the stomach, and into the small intestine, where it has to go in order to be assimilated into the blood stream, and on past the blood-brain barrier into the brain where it can be used. In addition, according to my Neurologist, "delayed stomach emptying" is a "given" with people with Parkinson's Disease, which can further delay the benefits of the medication if foods, especially protein foods, are taken too soon after Sinemet CR. My original Neurologist told me to take my medication with food to start with, in order to help with nausea, and that the nausea would decline in a month or so, as my body adjusted to the medication. Instead, it took 2 years to adjust. Only, I was told 4 years later that it was because I was over prescribed to start with. *Red meats, organ meats in particular, contain Vitamin B-12 which is necessary for our health. Plants on the other hand, with one exception do not contain B-12. Comfrey does, but lately there seems to be some question about its safety. For years, we grew comfrey, and made a tea out of it. It is recommended by doctors that vegetarians take B-12, and some published articles estimate that up to 50% of this continent's population is deficient in B-12. A lot of the symptoms of a B-12 deficiency are similar to those of an iron deficiency anemia. Many times going undetected as a result. Any meat that I eat, I cut it up into tiny bits, and chew it up so that my stomach has less work to do in order to process it, and even then, it takes longer to pass through my body. Hamburger stew and other ground meats are easier to digest, and pass through my body faster (especially when ground), and do not seem to create the same problems. A recommended serving of meat the size of the palm of your hand has been suggested. PLANT PROTEIN Nuts and seeds on the other hand, I either grind up, or chew real good before swallowing, as well as putting them in my "smoothy" in the morning. There seems to be little or no problems with either the medication or evacuation that I can find. So, I try to get as much of my protein as I can from plant source rather than animal, even though, I am told they are not a complete protein. So far I have not lost too much muscle mass in the last 4 to 5 years. There is some concern that a lot of antibiotics are being fed to farm animals, and when these animals are slaughtered, some of their body parts are processed, and fed back to live animals as a protein additive to their grain. While the processed additive is otherwise a fit food, there is concern regarding the build up of antibiotics. Also, there are reports which infer that animal protein creates a loss of calcium in the human body. In as much as these two above items have not been proved, or unproved, I have decided to use as much plant protein in my diet as well as vitamin B-12 when needed as I can. Just in case! The above article is not meant to diagnosis, treat or, in anyway be construed as medical advice, or to replace the advice of a Physician, it is the result of my own experiences, which WORKS4ME. Plant protein seems less apt to interfere with Sinemet CR. Answered by Devin Wynkoop 1 year ago.

i'm undecided precisely what you're in seek of for right here. this question could desire to be replied many techniques. Animal protein incorporates 'complete proteins' and plant protein isn't 'complete'. Plant protein comes from flowers whilst animal protein comes from animals...that on my own is a distinction. ingesting the two techniques could be wholesome if performed marvelous. i'm undecided what else i could desire to upload without you being extra specific. Answered by Corina Hannibal 1 year ago.

They aren't. You need 20 different amino acids to make all of the protein you need, and you can gain all of those from meat, but plants often have incomplete sets of amino acids. Think about it like this: Herbivores eat plants, and you eat the herbivore. The amino acids are unchanged, just rearranged! Answered by Cecil Huezo 1 year ago.


What does increasing dopamine levels do to the human body?
Sinemet CR increases dopamine levels in the brain, and I was just wondering...what does this do?? Asked by Vivienne Vacca 1 year ago.

Sinemet is used in the treatment of Parkinson's Disease (PD), which is a movement disorder which causes slowness of movement (bradykinesia), as well as rigidity, a resting tremor, and postural instability. PD is caused by a lack of dopamine production from a group of neurons in a part of the brain called the substantia nigra. This disrupts a complicated neural network that regulates movement, leading to the symptoms of the disease. Because the primary chemical imbalance causing PD is a lack of dopamine, Sinemet is used to replace the depleted dopamine supplies and allow those with PD to have more normal movement. Everything in the brain is a balance, though. What I mean by that is that there is a "right" amount of each neurotransmitter. So, not only can too little of a given neurotransmitter, such as dopamine, cause problems, but too much can also cause problems. You can see evidence of this when those with PD are over-medicated. Rather than the rigidity and slowness of movement caused by decreased dopamine, they can have writhing, uncoordinated movements (choreiform movements). Excess dopamine has also been identified in many psychotic disorders. The point of this somewhat rambling paragraph is that increased dopamine is only helpful if there is a decreased supply to start with. Hope that's helpful. Answered by Sharmaine Apuzzo 1 year ago.

Just because we can explain processes doesn't mean they become less meaningful. We know that sunsets are caused by the rotation of the Earth, we know how we develop in utero, how galaxies are formed, how the phases of the moon happen, etc.does that make these things any less beautiful? NO. Same goes for emotions. Answered by Louella Ollhoff 1 year ago.


What does Sinemet consist of & what is CR?
Asked by Tennille Kakos 1 year ago.

sinemet consists of levodopa & carbidopa . Used for contrlling the symptoms of parkinsons disease ."CR" stands for control release. Answered by Kortney Denery 1 year ago.


Why wouldn't the drug Sinemet be in the 2010 Physician's Desk Reference (64th ed.)?
On the market for decades??????? Not true. I just found the marketing start date of Sinemet was 06/01/2009. Source: http://www.drugs.com/pro/sinemet-cr.html Asked by Caroyln Mak 1 year ago.

As to not being in the print version of the PDR, there are many drugs that are used that are not. Most are medications that have been available for long periods of time and are almost always filled generically. I bet the combination of carbidopa/levodopa is in there. As to your statement that Sinemet has only been on the market for 6 months. please read your own source. On the right side of the screen is a tab at the top regarding FDA approval. Sinemet was first approved for use by the FDA in May of 1975 and Sinemet CR was first approved by the FDA in May 1991. Between my work in a pharmacy, medical school and two residencies i have both written and filled many prescriptions for both Sinemet and Sinemet Cr over the last 20 years. Answered by Roy Elery 1 year ago.

Sinemet has actually been on the market for decades in the US, despite your link. And the PDR used to be a valuable drug reference. For the past decade or so, though, cheap drugs that don't make a good profit for the pharmaceutical companies are often dropped like a hot potato. It only includes the drugs pharmaceutical companies want (and will pay) to advertise. Answered by Inga Burmaster 1 year ago.


Sinemet does it help parkinson's Disease?
Asked by Bruno Freniere 1 year ago.

I was diagnosed 6 years ago and take sinemet. It is the primary drug that keeps me moving. I couldn't imagine not having it. There is one downside and that is the dyskinesias that can occur as a side effect. All things considered, I wouldn't even thing of giving it up though. Answered by Demetria Growden 1 year ago.

My son-in-law has taken this med for about a year now! We all know when he skips a dose! So Yes I think its working for him, he is a young one only 32 and has it. So any new meds or reports that come out I'm right one it. Answered by Joni Kettler 1 year ago.


Looking for infor. for the mads are : sinemet er,requip,comtan?
Asked by Alvina Heck 1 year ago.

The combination of levodopa and carbidopa is used to treat the symptoms of Parkinson's disease and Parkinson's-like symptoms that may develop after encephalitis (swelling of the brain) or injury to the nervous system caused by carbon monoxide poisoning or manganese poisoning. Parkinson's symptoms, including tremors (shaking), stiffness, and slowness of movement, are caused by a lack of dopamine, a natural substance usually found in the brain. Levodopa is in a class of medications called central nervous system agents. It works by being converted to dopamine in the brain. Carbidopa is in a class of medications called decarboxylase inhibitors. It works by preventing levodopa from being broken down before it reaches the brain. This allows for a lower dose of levodopa, which causes less nausea and vomiting. Ropinirole is used alone or with other medications to treat the symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD; a disorder of the nervous system that causes difficulties with movement, muscle control, and balance), including shaking of parts of the body, stiffness, slowed movements, and problems with balance. Ropinirole is also used to treat restless legs syndrome (RLS; a condition that causes discomfort in the legs and a strong urge to move the legs, especially at night and when sitting or lying down). Ropinirole is in a class of medications called dopamine agonists. It works by acting in place of dopamine, a natural substance in the brain that is needed to control movement. Entacapone is an inhibitor of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT). It is used in combination with levodopa and carbidopa (Sinemet) to treat the end-of-dose 'wearing-off' symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Entacapone helps the levodopa and carbidopa work better by allowing more of it to reach the brain, where it has its effects. Please see the web pages for more details on Levodopa and Carbidopa (generic name) Sinemet CR (brand name), Ropinirole (generic name) Requip (brand name), Entacapone (generic name) and Comtan (brand name) Answered by Kathey Tidball 1 year ago.

Sinemet is a drug used to help the tremors of Parkinsons diesase. Comitin, is a heart drug, used to lower blood pressure. Answered by Deena Stotler 1 year ago.


Please i need help...?
My dad has 78 years old and he is suffering from Parkinson 10 years ago. His basic medicent is Sinemet (half dose 125 mg) each 3 hours from 6 Am till 8 Pm and LP100 one tablet before sleeping. We tried before Rivotril, Madopar.... But his doctor prefer Sinemet. But every day he is suffering about 5 hours Trembling... Asked by Cordell Gelrud 1 year ago.

My dad has 78 years old and he is suffering from Parkinson 10 years ago. His basic medicent is Sinemet (half dose 125 mg) each 3 hours from 6 Am till 8 Pm and LP100 one tablet before sleeping. We tried before Rivotril, Madopar.... But his doctor prefer Sinemet. But every day he is suffering about 5 hours Trembling of hands, arms, legs, jaw and face and Slowness of movement; and somtimes 2 to 3 hours countinous mouvement without stoping. But when it stops there are side effects because of big amount of medicent in his body: he keeps involuntary mounvements but he feels well at these periods and he can walk normaly... Please i need urgent help and can we do surgey at this age....And what are the medicents that may help... Answered by Robbyn Naccari 1 year ago.

Haha. You would do a little border wall paper that has a flower pattern! That style of wall paper is effortless to do. You are in a position to do it inside the middle of the partitions or at the top near the ceiling. You can place the doilies at the tank of the bathroom with a decorative potpourri box with the potpourri in it. Get a few type of picture association to hold at the wall. Have your shower curtain cross along side the subject. Simply don't forget what your grandma's relaxation room gave the look of and cross from there. You can do a decorative cleansing cleaning soap dish that includes the ones little ornamental soaps. Foolish your buddies are going to tease you once they come over. I am hoping I helped. Answered by Vincenza Stobierski 1 year ago.


Does sinemetCR effect the thyroid gland?
i've been taking sinemetCR for a couple of weeks now and my thyroid has been acting up has this happened to anyone taking sinemetCR? i have restless legs syndrome that's why i've been prescribed this medication please help Asked by Sharon Chadburn 1 year ago.

GENERIC NAME: LEVODOPA WITH CARBIDOPA - ORAL SUSTAINED RELEASE (lee-voh-DOE-puh WITH car-beh-DOE-puh) BRAND NAME(S): Sinemet CR Medication Uses | How To Use | Side Effects | Precautions | Drug Interactions | Overdose | Notes | Missed Dose | Storage USES: This medication is used to treat symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Carbidopa is used to make levodopa more effective. Carbidopa has no effect when given alone. HOW TO USE: Take this drug as directed. It may take a few weeks before the full benefits of this medication are observed. If you are changing from plain levodopa to this drug, levodopa must be discontinued for 8 hours before taking this combination drug. If stomach upset occurs, this drug may be taken with food or milk. Consult with your doctor. Do not crush or chew the tablets. The 50/200mg strength tablets may be broken in half. Do not break the 25/100mg strength tablets in half; doing so will change the drug's release system and may increase the possibility of side effects. SIDE EFFECTS: May cause drowsiness, dizziness, headache, loss of appetite, stomach upset, nausea, vision changes, or trembling of the hands. These should subside as your body adjusts to the medication. If these symptoms persist or become bothersome, inform your doctor. Notify your doctor if you develop any of these serious effects while taking this medication: vomiting, difficulty swallowing, difficulty urinating, uncontrollable movements (especially twitching of the eyelid), chest pain, irregular heartbeat, skin rash, mental/mood changes. May cause darkening of the urine or sweat. This is not harmful and will disappear when the medication is stopped. May cause dizziness especially when rising quickly from a seated or lying position. Change positions slowly and be careful on stairs. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist. PRECAUTIONS: This medication can cause false results in urine glucose testing in diabetes. TesTape should be used to test urine for accurate results. Tell your doctor your medical history, especially of: glaucoma, skin cancer, breathing problems, heart disease, gland problems (e.g., diabetes, thyroid), kidney disease, liver disease, ulcers, depressions, blood disorders. This drug should be used during pregnancy only if clearly needed. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. Levodopa appears in breast milk. Do not take this medication if you are breast-feeding. Answered by Clarence Johniken 1 year ago.

The thyroid gland is based on the entrance of the throat, underneath the Adam’s apple. It includes 2 lobes that lie on both facet of the windpipe, joined in entrance by means of an isthmus. The thyroid gland secretes hormones to keep watch over many metabolic procedures, adding progress and vigor expenditure. Hypothyroidism way the thyroid gland is underactive and fails to secrete ample hormones into the bloodstream. This factors the individual’s metabolism to sluggish down. Answered by Clotilde Vangieson 1 year ago.


Best and latest medical tretment of parkinson,?
drug names of parkinson disease Asked by Marguerita Ruppel 1 year ago.

The Food and Drug Administration approved Azilect (rasagiline), a new molecular entity, for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. The drug is a monoamine oxidase type--B (MAO-B) inhibitor that blocks the breakdown of dopamine, a chemical that sends information to the parts of the brain that control movement and coordination. Another New Treatment On May 9, 2007, FDA announced the approval of Neupro (rotigotine transdermal system), a skin patch designed to treat symptoms of early Parkinson's disease. Rotigotine is a drug not previously approved in the United States. Neupro, manufactured by Schwarz Bioscience of Research Triangle Park, N.C., is the first transdermal patch approved for the treatment of symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Rotigotine is a member of the dopamine agonist class of drugs and is delivered continuously through the skin (transdermal) using a silicone-based patch that is replaced every 24 hours. A dopamine agonist works by activating dopamine receptors in the body, mimicking the effect of the neurotransmitter dopamine. Other Alternatives: A Brain "Pacemaker" FDA approved an important tool for controlling Parkinson's tremors. The Activa Tremor Control Therapy consists of a wire surgically implanted deep within the brain and connected to a pulse generator, similar to a cardiac pacemaker, implanted near the collarbone. Whenever a tremor begins, patients can activate the device by passing a hand-held magnet over the generator. The system delivers a mild electrical stimulation that blocks the dysfunctional brain signals that cause tremor. Effects are often dramatic. "Before the implant, patients can't raise a glass of water or a spoonful of food to their mouths without spilling it or striking themselves in the face," says William Koller, M.D., neurology chairman at Kansas University Medical Center. "Within hours, these same patients are sipping tea from a cup and eating peas with a fork, with no signs of their disability." Surgery Options A brain operation shown to be helpful for many Parkinson's patients, especially those in late stages of the disease, is called pallidotomy. Doctors are not sure why the procedure works, but an October 1997 report in the New England Journal of Medicine stated that half of the patients in a pallidotomy study at Toronto Hospital, who before the surgery needed help in eating, dressing, and personal hygiene, were able to resume these activities independently. The study cautioned, however, that some of the surgery's effects diminished after two years and that the long-term effectiveness of the procedure still is unknown. Answered by Jenise Coullard 1 year ago.

The Parkinson's Reversing Breakthrough? Answered by Dixie Cowlin 1 year ago.

Isradipine is a medicine that has recently shown to possibly stop Parkinson's disease in it's tracks. The stardard treatments are Levadopa (L-dopa), Carbadopa, Simemet. Answered by Kathey Lichtig 1 year ago.

I help the right for someone to chosen, yet previous due time period abortions are really out of the question. through then a lady must have already favourite what she became gonna do. except medically mandatory previous due time period abortions must be banned. convinced I suggested it banned. I help options no longer abortions... Answered by Abdul Woelke 1 year ago.


How are proteins in plants and animals different?
Asked by Marylou Esselink 1 year ago.

In short, most animal tissues are bound together in an extracellular matrix by a triple helix of protein known as collagen. Plant and fungal cells are bound together in tissues or aggregations by other molecules, such as pectin Plant versus Animal Protein For more detail read below.. ANIMAL PROTEIN Sources are meats of all kinds, butter, cheese, milk, cottage, cheese, yogurt, and eggs. In brief, protein is composed of Amino acids. If one is on Sinemet CR, which is an amino acid, any food that has protein in it, naturally has other amino acids in it. If this food is consumed at the same time, the amino acids in the protein food will compete with the amino acid in the l-dopa in the Sinemet CR. This results in either less l-dopa crossing the brain barrier, which makes the medication less effective, or slower at alleviating the symptoms. In order to get full benefit out of the medication, it is recommended that a person take their medication at least half an hour before eating any protein. This allows time for the medication to pass through the stomach, and into the small intestine, where it has to go in order to be assimilated into the blood stream, and on past the blood-brain barrier into the brain where it can be used. In addition, according to my Neurologist, "delayed stomach emptying" is a "given" with people with Parkinson's Disease, which can further delay the benefits of the medication if foods, especially protein foods, are taken too soon after Sinemet CR. My original Neurologist told me to take my medication with food to start with, in order to help with nausea, and that the nausea would decline in a month or so, as my body adjusted to the medication. Instead, it took 2 years to adjust. Only, I was told 4 years later that it was because I was over prescribed to start with. *Red meats, organ meats in particular, contain Vitamin B-12 which is necessary for our health. Plants on the other hand, with one exception do not contain B-12. Comfrey does, but lately there seems to be some question about its safety. For years, we grew comfrey, and made a tea out of it. It is recommended by doctors that vegetarians take B-12, and some published articles estimate that up to 50% of this continent's population is deficient in B-12. A lot of the symptoms of a B-12 deficiency are similar to those of an iron deficiency anemia. Many times going undetected as a result. Any meat that I eat, I cut it up into tiny bits, and chew it up so that my stomach has less work to do in order to process it, and even then, it takes longer to pass through my body. Hamburger stew and other ground meats are easier to digest, and pass through my body faster (especially when ground), and do not seem to create the same problems. A recommended serving of meat the size of the palm of your hand has been suggested. PLANT PROTEIN Nuts and seeds on the other hand, I either grind up, or chew real good before swallowing, as well as putting them in my "smoothy" in the morning. There seems to be little or no problems with either the medication or evacuation that I can find. So, I try to get as much of my protein as I can from plant source rather than animal, even though, I am told they are not a complete protein. So far I have not lost too much muscle mass in the last 4 to 5 years. There is some concern that a lot of antibiotics are being fed to farm animals, and when these animals are slaughtered, some of their body parts are processed, and fed back to live animals as a protein additive to their grain. While the processed additive is otherwise a fit food, there is concern regarding the build up of antibiotics. Also, there are reports which infer that animal protein creates a loss of calcium in the human body. In as much as these two above items have not been proved, or unproved, I have decided to use as much plant protein in my diet as well as vitamin B-12 when needed as I can. Just in case! The above article is not meant to diagnosis, treat or, in anyway be construed as medical advice, or to replace the advice of a Physician, it is the result of my own experiences, which WORKS4ME. Plant protein seems less apt to interfere with Sinemet CR. Answered by Salina Ratti 1 year ago.

i'm undecided precisely what you're in seek of for right here. this question could desire to be replied many techniques. Animal protein incorporates 'complete proteins' and plant protein isn't 'complete'. Plant protein comes from flowers whilst animal protein comes from animals...that on my own is a distinction. ingesting the two techniques could be wholesome if performed marvelous. i'm undecided what else i could desire to upload without you being extra specific. Answered by Gracie Tydeman 1 year ago.

They aren't. You need 20 different amino acids to make all of the protein you need, and you can gain all of those from meat, but plants often have incomplete sets of amino acids. Think about it like this: Herbivores eat plants, and you eat the herbivore. The amino acids are unchanged, just rearranged! Answered by Glen Bokor 1 year ago.


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