Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 017555/001.

Names and composition

"SINEMET" is the commercial name of a drug composed of CARBIDOPA and LEVODOPA.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017555/001 SINEMET CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 10MG and 100MG
017555/002 SINEMET CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 250MG
017555/003 SINEMET CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 100MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017555/001 SINEMET CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 10MG and 100MG
017555/002 SINEMET CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 250MG
017555/003 SINEMET CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
019856/001 SINEMET CR CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 50MG and 200MG
019856/002 SINEMET CR CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
073381/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 10MG and 100MG
073382/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
073383/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 250MG
073586/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 10MG and 100MG
073587/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
073589/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
073607/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 250MG
073618/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 10MG and 100MG
073620/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 250MG
074080/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 10MG and 100MG
074080/002 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
074080/003 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 250MG
074260/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 10MG and 100MG
074260/002 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
074260/003 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 250MG
075091/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 50MG and 200MG
075091/002 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
076212/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
076212/002 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 50MG and 200MG
076521/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
076521/002 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 50MG and 200MG
076643/001 CARBILEV CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, FOR SUSPENSION/ORAL 10MG and 100MG
076643/002 CARBILEV CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, FOR SUSPENSION/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
076643/003 CARBILEV CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, FOR SUSPENSION/ORAL 25MG and 250MG
076663/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 50MG and 200MG
076699/001 PARCOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 10MG and 100MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
076699/002 PARCOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 25MG and 100MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
076699/003 PARCOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 25MG and 250MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
077120/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 10MG and 100MG
077120/002 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
077120/003 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 250MG
077828/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
077828/002 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 50MG and 200MG
078536/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 10MG and 100MG
078536/002 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
078536/003 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 250MG
078690/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 10MG and 100MG
078690/002 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
078690/003 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 25MG and 250MG
078893/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 10MG and 100MG
078893/002 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
078893/003 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 25MG and 250MG
090324/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 10MG and 100MG
090324/002 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
090324/003 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 250MG
090631/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 10MG and 100MG
090631/002 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
090631/003 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 25MG and 250MG
202323/001 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 25MG and 100MG
202323/002 CARBIDOPA AND LEVODOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 50MG and 200MG
203312/001 RYTARY CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 23.75MG and 95MG
203312/002 RYTARY CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 36.25MG and 145MG
203312/003 RYTARY CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 48.75MG and 195MG
203312/004 RYTARY CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 61.25MG and 245MG
203952/001 DUOPA CARBIDOPA; LEVODOPA SUSPENSION/ENTERAL 4.63MG per ML and 20MG per ML

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Answered questions

Sinemet does it help parkinson's Disease?
Asked by Joselyn Capriotti 1 year ago.

I was diagnosed 6 years ago and take sinemet. It is the primary drug that keeps me moving. I couldn't imagine not having it. There is one downside and that is the dyskinesias that can occur as a side effect. All things considered, I wouldn't even thing of giving it up though. Answered by Dolores Piccuillo 1 year ago.

My son-in-law has taken this med for about a year now! We all know when he skips a dose! So Yes I think its working for him, he is a young one only 32 and has it. So any new meds or reports that come out I'm right one it. Answered by Fonda Hammonds 1 year ago.


Amount of sinemet to be taken for parkinson's disease?
my husband has been taking three sinemet pills for three months and the dr. wants to add one more sinemet pill plus another drug(amantadine) 2 a day to see how he reacts. I have heard that you should take more of the sinemet first before you start adding other drugs. This is a new dr. and we spent about fifteen... Asked by Albertina Romie 1 year ago.

my husband has been taking three sinemet pills for three months and the dr. wants to add one more sinemet pill plus another drug(amantadine) 2 a day to see how he reacts. I have heard that you should take more of the sinemet first before you start adding other drugs. This is a new dr. and we spent about fifteen minutes with him. I know that how the drugs are managed is very import in pd. Any help will be appreciated. Answered by Loura Noey 1 year ago.

Actually for newly diagnosed Parkinson's patients, Sinemet (levodopa-carbidopa) is not the first choice as often. Rasagiline or Azilect has been shown to slow the progress of the disease in a more unique way than Sinemet and is often used first. Amantadine is a totally different animal and some people have found benefit from its use for PD Amantadine is an anti-viral which increases the release of dopamine. It has the ability to amplify the effects of dopamine. It is often used as adjunct therapy for advanced stages of dyskinesia. There are downsides to the medication which you can find online or ask the doctor to review with you since sometimes docs have a tendency to overlook contraindications. Amantadine is often used in early stage PD where it is the Sinemet which is beginning to be moved to a later stage. Not knowing your husbands current symptoms, I would not want to second guess his doctor, nor am I qualified to do so. But I do believe strongly that every patient and hie/her caregiver(s) should maintain an informative dialogue with the doctor(s) treating PD. Please do not be afraid to interact with the doctor. Many docs recognize that PD is a journey which involves the patient, the family, and the medical care people as one team. Doctors also recognize that diet, exercise, massage therapy, nutritional supplements are also part of the treatment. Help on this journey does not rest solely in the prescription bottle. We also do not know the dosage to the pills he is taking. They vary from very week to rather strong. Usually the doctor selects a dosage and then observes the patient about 3 months later to see if the dosage needs tweaking. I think there were symptoms which your husband's doctor saw that made him think that Amantadine should be tried. I can be reached through Yahoo Answers and through Contact Us at the site below. Please take a look and feel free to write. Answered by Bettye Thome 1 year ago.


My husband has parkinson's disease-wasn't in very good shape until he started taking sinemet.?
Got a lot better in the four months or so that he took 25/100 . new neurologist said that he should be walking a lot better than he was and put him on 6 tablets of same dosage-said that he probably has lewy body because the larger dose of sinemet should have hada rapid response and didn't. He was doing better... Asked by Amiee Furgason 1 year ago.

Got a lot better in the four months or so that he took 25/100 . new neurologist said that he should be walking a lot better than he was and put him on 6 tablets of same dosage-said that he probably has lewy body because the larger dose of sinemet should have hada rapid response and didn't. He was doing better when he was on just 3 sinemet pills daily.He had an eeg and ct scan for my husband to find out just what is going on. I didn't agree with some of the answers that my husband gave the dr. Like seeing sm. animals or maybe thinking you see something that may not really be there. My husband has never told us about seeing these things. I wonder if he wants to tell the dr. what he wants to hear or just not communicating with us. I need to get a proper diagnosis. Heard that a geriatric specialist might help-what exactly is that? Need help with this. Answered by Renato Wiscount 1 year ago.


Possible skin reaction to Sinemet?
I have taken Sinemet now for the past 5 days. It is being tried for Dystonia. Anyway, I have noticed more nausea than normal, which I can deal with. My Methotrexate still makes me sick to my stomach after being on it for years. I have broken out with some new rashes though, and am wondering if it is from the... Asked by Myrna Marinaro 1 year ago.

I have taken Sinemet now for the past 5 days. It is being tried for Dystonia. Anyway, I have noticed more nausea than normal, which I can deal with. My Methotrexate still makes me sick to my stomach after being on it for years. I have broken out with some new rashes though, and am wondering if it is from the Sinemet. I go to the Neurologist this afternoon for my Botox, and will ask him about it then, but if I am breaking out from the Sinemet, would it be something that my body could adjust to over time? Answered by Cinda Guerin 1 year ago.

I doubt this is an allergic reaction to the Sinemet, but could be possible. I've yet to see rashes in my patients who are on this medication. However....if the rashes started ONLY after being on Sinemet, then I would ask to trial off of it for a couple of weeks, and see if the rashes subside. Another medication that you might want to use in place of that would be "Cogentin." (Benztropine Mesylate Oral). It will work for Dystonia as well. Ask your doc. Best of luck! Answered by Kylee Gasson 1 year ago.


What does Sinemet consist of & what is CR?
Asked by Andre Grobmyer 1 year ago.

sinemet consists of levodopa & carbidopa . Used for contrlling the symptoms of parkinsons disease ."CR" stands for control release. Answered by Shantel Telecky 1 year ago.


Does antibiotics interfere with parkinsons medication "sinemet"?
Asked by Cristina Batz 1 year ago.

The following antibiotics interact with Sinemet. Here are their effects and what to watch for. Linezolid: Due to MAO inhibition (see note on MAO inhibitors), this agent is best avoided Penicillamine: May increase serum concentrations of levodopa; monitor for increased effect Spiramycin: May inhibit levodopa's antiparkinsonian effects; monitor for reduced effect Furazolidone: May increase the effect/toxicity of levodopa; hypertensive episodes have been reported; monitor If possible, these drugs should be avoided if you are taking Sinemet. Answered by Isabell Wadlinger 1 year ago.

The best person to answer this question would be a doctor or pharmacist. Don't just take the word of some anonymous person on the Internet! That said, the information that Walgreen's provides with my Sinemet prescription mentions a lot of medications to avoid, but no antibiotics are among them. But please ask a pharmacist or doctor before you take the antibiotic! Answered by Yajaira Bagwell 1 year ago.


Why wouldn't the drug Sinemet be in the 2010 Physician's Desk Reference (64th ed.)?
On the market for decades??????? Not true. I just found the marketing start date of Sinemet was 06/01/2009. Source: http://www.drugs.com/pro/sinemet-cr.html Asked by Chanda Badeaux 1 year ago.

As to not being in the print version of the PDR, there are many drugs that are used that are not. Most are medications that have been available for long periods of time and are almost always filled generically. I bet the combination of carbidopa/levodopa is in there. As to your statement that Sinemet has only been on the market for 6 months. please read your own source. On the right side of the screen is a tab at the top regarding FDA approval. Sinemet was first approved for use by the FDA in May of 1975 and Sinemet CR was first approved by the FDA in May 1991. Between my work in a pharmacy, medical school and two residencies i have both written and filled many prescriptions for both Sinemet and Sinemet Cr over the last 20 years. Answered by Marty Smarr 1 year ago.

Sinemet has actually been on the market for decades in the US, despite your link. And the PDR used to be a valuable drug reference. For the past decade or so, though, cheap drugs that don't make a good profit for the pharmaceutical companies are often dropped like a hot potato. It only includes the drugs pharmaceutical companies want (and will pay) to advertise. Answered by Patience Sturgell 1 year ago.


My husband has parkinson's and is taking sinemet His dr wants him to take comtan with it. Need to know more?
My dr. has recommended comtan but I don't like the side effects and he told me not to be upset because most of it never effects people. I always talk to the druggist or get a print out of side effects. I know the dr. gets upset with me but I want to know whats going on. Should I be upset? Maybe I worry too... Asked by Hershel Castner 1 year ago.

My dr. has recommended comtan but I don't like the side effects and he told me not to be upset because most of it never effects people. I always talk to the druggist or get a print out of side effects. I know the dr. gets upset with me but I want to know whats going on. Should I be upset? Maybe I worry too much? I don't know. Answered by Velma Marlborough 1 year ago.

Yeah, you worry too much but that's not always a bad thing. After all, this IS your husband. But the potential adverse reactions to Comtan aren't any worse than those for Sinemet. And Sinemet is a combination of levadopa and carbadopa while Comtan is only one medication. I sincerely doubt that your husband is the first patient his doctor prescribed Comtan for. The doctor has already has experience with the side effects most likely to appear. Is your husband able to speak? Has he expressed his own opinion about this? Sometimes it's not about what you want -- you're not the patient. Try getting involved in an activity other than your husband. Perhaps you need the break to keep things in perspective. Answered by Clelia Entriken 1 year ago.

If you REALLY want to see your doctor get upset, start treating your husband with water and salt. I'm not saying this as a joke. There is evidence that Parkinson's Disease is caused by dehydration. By correcting the insufficient water level, he could make a complete recovery, assuming that no permanent damage has been done. Doctors don't like to talk about dehydration - it's in direct competition with them. Most health problems that aren't inherited or injury-related are caused by dehydration, and many of these can be reversed or even cured by drinking more water - this includes the "incurable" diseases. Click on the links below to learn more. I wish you the best. Answered by Beverlee Brevig 1 year ago.


Sinemet does it help parkinson's Disease?
Asked by Patti Snowball 1 year ago.

I was diagnosed 6 years ago and take sinemet. It is the primary drug that keeps me moving. I couldn't imagine not having it. There is one downside and that is the dyskinesias that can occur as a side effect. All things considered, I wouldn't even thing of giving it up though. Answered by Terisa Farrin 1 year ago.

My son-in-law has taken this med for about a year now! We all know when he skips a dose! So Yes I think its working for him, he is a young one only 32 and has it. So any new meds or reports that come out I'm right one it. Answered by Benton Drummond 1 year ago.


Amount of sinemet to be taken for parkinson's disease?
my husband has been taking three sinemet pills for three months and the dr. wants to add one more sinemet pill plus another drug(amantadine) 2 a day to see how he reacts. I have heard that you should take more of the sinemet first before you start adding other drugs. This is a new dr. and we spent about fifteen... Asked by Beckie Kuilan 1 year ago.

my husband has been taking three sinemet pills for three months and the dr. wants to add one more sinemet pill plus another drug(amantadine) 2 a day to see how he reacts. I have heard that you should take more of the sinemet first before you start adding other drugs. This is a new dr. and we spent about fifteen minutes with him. I know that how the drugs are managed is very import in pd. Any help will be appreciated. Answered by Sharika Fiscal 1 year ago.

Actually for newly diagnosed Parkinson's patients, Sinemet (levodopa-carbidopa) is not the first choice as often. Rasagiline or Azilect has been shown to slow the progress of the disease in a more unique way than Sinemet and is often used first. Amantadine is a totally different animal and some people have found benefit from its use for PD Amantadine is an anti-viral which increases the release of dopamine. It has the ability to amplify the effects of dopamine. It is often used as adjunct therapy for advanced stages of dyskinesia. There are downsides to the medication which you can find online or ask the doctor to review with you since sometimes docs have a tendency to overlook contraindications. Amantadine is often used in early stage PD where it is the Sinemet which is beginning to be moved to a later stage. Not knowing your husbands current symptoms, I would not want to second guess his doctor, nor am I qualified to do so. But I do believe strongly that every patient and hie/her caregiver(s) should maintain an informative dialogue with the doctor(s) treating PD. Please do not be afraid to interact with the doctor. Many docs recognize that PD is a journey which involves the patient, the family, and the medical care people as one team. Doctors also recognize that diet, exercise, massage therapy, nutritional supplements are also part of the treatment. Help on this journey does not rest solely in the prescription bottle. We also do not know the dosage to the pills he is taking. They vary from very week to rather strong. Usually the doctor selects a dosage and then observes the patient about 3 months later to see if the dosage needs tweaking. I think there were symptoms which your husband's doctor saw that made him think that Amantadine should be tried. I can be reached through Yahoo Answers and through Contact Us at the site below. Please take a look and feel free to write. Answered by Cleo Beaufait 1 year ago.


My husband has parkinson's disease-wasn't in very good shape until he started taking sinemet.?
Got a lot better in the four months or so that he took 25/100 . new neurologist said that he should be walking a lot better than he was and put him on 6 tablets of same dosage-said that he probably has lewy body because the larger dose of sinemet should have hada rapid response and didn't. He was doing better... Asked by Miquel Bavier 1 year ago.

Got a lot better in the four months or so that he took 25/100 . new neurologist said that he should be walking a lot better than he was and put him on 6 tablets of same dosage-said that he probably has lewy body because the larger dose of sinemet should have hada rapid response and didn't. He was doing better when he was on just 3 sinemet pills daily.He had an eeg and ct scan for my husband to find out just what is going on. I didn't agree with some of the answers that my husband gave the dr. Like seeing sm. animals or maybe thinking you see something that may not really be there. My husband has never told us about seeing these things. I wonder if he wants to tell the dr. what he wants to hear or just not communicating with us. I need to get a proper diagnosis. Heard that a geriatric specialist might help-what exactly is that? Need help with this. Answered by Velia Estrado 1 year ago.


Possible skin reaction to Sinemet?
I have taken Sinemet now for the past 5 days. It is being tried for Dystonia. Anyway, I have noticed more nausea than normal, which I can deal with. My Methotrexate still makes me sick to my stomach after being on it for years. I have broken out with some new rashes though, and am wondering if it is from the... Asked by Charolette Chalfant 1 year ago.

I have taken Sinemet now for the past 5 days. It is being tried for Dystonia. Anyway, I have noticed more nausea than normal, which I can deal with. My Methotrexate still makes me sick to my stomach after being on it for years. I have broken out with some new rashes though, and am wondering if it is from the Sinemet. I go to the Neurologist this afternoon for my Botox, and will ask him about it then, but if I am breaking out from the Sinemet, would it be something that my body could adjust to over time? Answered by Reina Wintersmith 1 year ago.

I doubt this is an allergic reaction to the Sinemet, but could be possible. I've yet to see rashes in my patients who are on this medication. However....if the rashes started ONLY after being on Sinemet, then I would ask to trial off of it for a couple of weeks, and see if the rashes subside. Another medication that you might want to use in place of that would be "Cogentin." (Benztropine Mesylate Oral). It will work for Dystonia as well. Ask your doc. Best of luck! Answered by Floria Draffen 1 year ago.


What does Sinemet consist of & what is CR?
Asked by Calvin Yeasted 1 year ago.

sinemet consists of levodopa & carbidopa . Used for contrlling the symptoms of parkinsons disease ."CR" stands for control release. Answered by Britt Dople 1 year ago.


Does antibiotics interfere with parkinsons medication "sinemet"?
Asked by Stephen Bojorquez 1 year ago.

The following antibiotics interact with Sinemet. Here are their effects and what to watch for. Linezolid: Due to MAO inhibition (see note on MAO inhibitors), this agent is best avoided Penicillamine: May increase serum concentrations of levodopa; monitor for increased effect Spiramycin: May inhibit levodopa's antiparkinsonian effects; monitor for reduced effect Furazolidone: May increase the effect/toxicity of levodopa; hypertensive episodes have been reported; monitor If possible, these drugs should be avoided if you are taking Sinemet. Answered by Anglea Skene 1 year ago.

The best person to answer this question would be a doctor or pharmacist. Don't just take the word of some anonymous person on the Internet! That said, the information that Walgreen's provides with my Sinemet prescription mentions a lot of medications to avoid, but no antibiotics are among them. But please ask a pharmacist or doctor before you take the antibiotic! Answered by Rosalinda Aiona 1 year ago.


Why wouldn't the drug Sinemet be in the 2010 Physician's Desk Reference (64th ed.)?
On the market for decades??????? Not true. I just found the marketing start date of Sinemet was 06/01/2009. Source: http://www.drugs.com/pro/sinemet-cr.html Asked by Allan Lazo 1 year ago.

As to not being in the print version of the PDR, there are many drugs that are used that are not. Most are medications that have been available for long periods of time and are almost always filled generically. I bet the combination of carbidopa/levodopa is in there. As to your statement that Sinemet has only been on the market for 6 months. please read your own source. On the right side of the screen is a tab at the top regarding FDA approval. Sinemet was first approved for use by the FDA in May of 1975 and Sinemet CR was first approved by the FDA in May 1991. Between my work in a pharmacy, medical school and two residencies i have both written and filled many prescriptions for both Sinemet and Sinemet Cr over the last 20 years. Answered by Santiago Baldridge 1 year ago.

Sinemet has actually been on the market for decades in the US, despite your link. And the PDR used to be a valuable drug reference. For the past decade or so, though, cheap drugs that don't make a good profit for the pharmaceutical companies are often dropped like a hot potato. It only includes the drugs pharmaceutical companies want (and will pay) to advertise. Answered by Karon Ratner 1 year ago.


My husband has parkinson's and is taking sinemet His dr wants him to take comtan with it. Need to know more?
My dr. has recommended comtan but I don't like the side effects and he told me not to be upset because most of it never effects people. I always talk to the druggist or get a print out of side effects. I know the dr. gets upset with me but I want to know whats going on. Should I be upset? Maybe I worry too... Asked by Tianna Dement 1 year ago.

My dr. has recommended comtan but I don't like the side effects and he told me not to be upset because most of it never effects people. I always talk to the druggist or get a print out of side effects. I know the dr. gets upset with me but I want to know whats going on. Should I be upset? Maybe I worry too much? I don't know. Answered by Yong Sliker 1 year ago.

Yeah, you worry too much but that's not always a bad thing. After all, this IS your husband. But the potential adverse reactions to Comtan aren't any worse than those for Sinemet. And Sinemet is a combination of levadopa and carbadopa while Comtan is only one medication. I sincerely doubt that your husband is the first patient his doctor prescribed Comtan for. The doctor has already has experience with the side effects most likely to appear. Is your husband able to speak? Has he expressed his own opinion about this? Sometimes it's not about what you want -- you're not the patient. Try getting involved in an activity other than your husband. Perhaps you need the break to keep things in perspective. Answered by Halley Yoshida 1 year ago.

If you REALLY want to see your doctor get upset, start treating your husband with water and salt. I'm not saying this as a joke. There is evidence that Parkinson's Disease is caused by dehydration. By correcting the insufficient water level, he could make a complete recovery, assuming that no permanent damage has been done. Doctors don't like to talk about dehydration - it's in direct competition with them. Most health problems that aren't inherited or injury-related are caused by dehydration, and many of these can be reversed or even cured by drinking more water - this includes the "incurable" diseases. Click on the links below to learn more. I wish you the best. Answered by Alia Bottum 1 year ago.


Sinemet does it help parkinson's Disease?
Asked by Prudence Vogelsang 1 year ago.

I was diagnosed 6 years ago and take sinemet. It is the primary drug that keeps me moving. I couldn't imagine not having it. There is one downside and that is the dyskinesias that can occur as a side effect. All things considered, I wouldn't even thing of giving it up though. Answered by Maryln Elison 1 year ago.

My son-in-law has taken this med for about a year now! We all know when he skips a dose! So Yes I think its working for him, he is a young one only 32 and has it. So any new meds or reports that come out I'm right one it. Answered by Michelina Bellazer 1 year ago.


Amount of sinemet to be taken for parkinson's disease?
my husband has been taking three sinemet pills for three months and the dr. wants to add one more sinemet pill plus another drug(amantadine) 2 a day to see how he reacts. I have heard that you should take more of the sinemet first before you start adding other drugs. This is a new dr. and we spent about fifteen... Asked by Arron Fellers 1 year ago.

my husband has been taking three sinemet pills for three months and the dr. wants to add one more sinemet pill plus another drug(amantadine) 2 a day to see how he reacts. I have heard that you should take more of the sinemet first before you start adding other drugs. This is a new dr. and we spent about fifteen minutes with him. I know that how the drugs are managed is very import in pd. Any help will be appreciated. Answered by Fred Rylowicz 1 year ago.

Actually for newly diagnosed Parkinson's patients, Sinemet (levodopa-carbidopa) is not the first choice as often. Rasagiline or Azilect has been shown to slow the progress of the disease in a more unique way than Sinemet and is often used first. Amantadine is a totally different animal and some people have found benefit from its use for PD Amantadine is an anti-viral which increases the release of dopamine. It has the ability to amplify the effects of dopamine. It is often used as adjunct therapy for advanced stages of dyskinesia. There are downsides to the medication which you can find online or ask the doctor to review with you since sometimes docs have a tendency to overlook contraindications. Amantadine is often used in early stage PD where it is the Sinemet which is beginning to be moved to a later stage. Not knowing your husbands current symptoms, I would not want to second guess his doctor, nor am I qualified to do so. But I do believe strongly that every patient and hie/her caregiver(s) should maintain an informative dialogue with the doctor(s) treating PD. Please do not be afraid to interact with the doctor. Many docs recognize that PD is a journey which involves the patient, the family, and the medical care people as one team. Doctors also recognize that diet, exercise, massage therapy, nutritional supplements are also part of the treatment. Help on this journey does not rest solely in the prescription bottle. We also do not know the dosage to the pills he is taking. They vary from very week to rather strong. Usually the doctor selects a dosage and then observes the patient about 3 months later to see if the dosage needs tweaking. I think there were symptoms which your husband's doctor saw that made him think that Amantadine should be tried. I can be reached through Yahoo Answers and through Contact Us at the site below. Please take a look and feel free to write. Answered by Cindie Eglin 1 year ago.


My husband has parkinson's disease-wasn't in very good shape until he started taking sinemet.?
Got a lot better in the four months or so that he took 25/100 . new neurologist said that he should be walking a lot better than he was and put him on 6 tablets of same dosage-said that he probably has lewy body because the larger dose of sinemet should have hada rapid response and didn't. He was doing better... Asked by Angelika Nevison 1 year ago.

Got a lot better in the four months or so that he took 25/100 . new neurologist said that he should be walking a lot better than he was and put him on 6 tablets of same dosage-said that he probably has lewy body because the larger dose of sinemet should have hada rapid response and didn't. He was doing better when he was on just 3 sinemet pills daily.He had an eeg and ct scan for my husband to find out just what is going on. I didn't agree with some of the answers that my husband gave the dr. Like seeing sm. animals or maybe thinking you see something that may not really be there. My husband has never told us about seeing these things. I wonder if he wants to tell the dr. what he wants to hear or just not communicating with us. I need to get a proper diagnosis. Heard that a geriatric specialist might help-what exactly is that? Need help with this. Answered by Tosha Eyman 1 year ago.


Possible skin reaction to Sinemet?
I have taken Sinemet now for the past 5 days. It is being tried for Dystonia. Anyway, I have noticed more nausea than normal, which I can deal with. My Methotrexate still makes me sick to my stomach after being on it for years. I have broken out with some new rashes though, and am wondering if it is from the... Asked by Elvin Doolan 1 year ago.

I have taken Sinemet now for the past 5 days. It is being tried for Dystonia. Anyway, I have noticed more nausea than normal, which I can deal with. My Methotrexate still makes me sick to my stomach after being on it for years. I have broken out with some new rashes though, and am wondering if it is from the Sinemet. I go to the Neurologist this afternoon for my Botox, and will ask him about it then, but if I am breaking out from the Sinemet, would it be something that my body could adjust to over time? Answered by Ethelene Orloski 1 year ago.

I doubt this is an allergic reaction to the Sinemet, but could be possible. I've yet to see rashes in my patients who are on this medication. However....if the rashes started ONLY after being on Sinemet, then I would ask to trial off of it for a couple of weeks, and see if the rashes subside. Another medication that you might want to use in place of that would be "Cogentin." (Benztropine Mesylate Oral). It will work for Dystonia as well. Ask your doc. Best of luck! Answered by Rosalyn Mcfolley 1 year ago.


What does Sinemet consist of & what is CR?
Asked by Tisha Pater 1 year ago.

sinemet consists of levodopa & carbidopa . Used for contrlling the symptoms of parkinsons disease ."CR" stands for control release. Answered by Lue Turri 1 year ago.


Does antibiotics interfere with parkinsons medication "sinemet"?
Asked by Wilhemina Drouin 1 year ago.

The following antibiotics interact with Sinemet. Here are their effects and what to watch for. Linezolid: Due to MAO inhibition (see note on MAO inhibitors), this agent is best avoided Penicillamine: May increase serum concentrations of levodopa; monitor for increased effect Spiramycin: May inhibit levodopa's antiparkinsonian effects; monitor for reduced effect Furazolidone: May increase the effect/toxicity of levodopa; hypertensive episodes have been reported; monitor If possible, these drugs should be avoided if you are taking Sinemet. Answered by Garland Alamos 1 year ago.

The best person to answer this question would be a doctor or pharmacist. Don't just take the word of some anonymous person on the Internet! That said, the information that Walgreen's provides with my Sinemet prescription mentions a lot of medications to avoid, but no antibiotics are among them. But please ask a pharmacist or doctor before you take the antibiotic! Answered by Roberta Corf 1 year ago.


Why wouldn't the drug Sinemet be in the 2010 Physician's Desk Reference (64th ed.)?
On the market for decades??????? Not true. I just found the marketing start date of Sinemet was 06/01/2009. Source: http://www.drugs.com/pro/sinemet-cr.html Asked by Neville Libre 1 year ago.

As to not being in the print version of the PDR, there are many drugs that are used that are not. Most are medications that have been available for long periods of time and are almost always filled generically. I bet the combination of carbidopa/levodopa is in there. As to your statement that Sinemet has only been on the market for 6 months. please read your own source. On the right side of the screen is a tab at the top regarding FDA approval. Sinemet was first approved for use by the FDA in May of 1975 and Sinemet CR was first approved by the FDA in May 1991. Between my work in a pharmacy, medical school and two residencies i have both written and filled many prescriptions for both Sinemet and Sinemet Cr over the last 20 years. Answered by Mercy Constantineau 1 year ago.

Sinemet has actually been on the market for decades in the US, despite your link. And the PDR used to be a valuable drug reference. For the past decade or so, though, cheap drugs that don't make a good profit for the pharmaceutical companies are often dropped like a hot potato. It only includes the drugs pharmaceutical companies want (and will pay) to advertise. Answered by Daisy Denzel 1 year ago.


My husband has parkinson's and is taking sinemet His dr wants him to take comtan with it. Need to know more?
My dr. has recommended comtan but I don't like the side effects and he told me not to be upset because most of it never effects people. I always talk to the druggist or get a print out of side effects. I know the dr. gets upset with me but I want to know whats going on. Should I be upset? Maybe I worry too... Asked by Ines Capper 1 year ago.

My dr. has recommended comtan but I don't like the side effects and he told me not to be upset because most of it never effects people. I always talk to the druggist or get a print out of side effects. I know the dr. gets upset with me but I want to know whats going on. Should I be upset? Maybe I worry too much? I don't know. Answered by Francine Georgelis 1 year ago.

Yeah, you worry too much but that's not always a bad thing. After all, this IS your husband. But the potential adverse reactions to Comtan aren't any worse than those for Sinemet. And Sinemet is a combination of levadopa and carbadopa while Comtan is only one medication. I sincerely doubt that your husband is the first patient his doctor prescribed Comtan for. The doctor has already has experience with the side effects most likely to appear. Is your husband able to speak? Has he expressed his own opinion about this? Sometimes it's not about what you want -- you're not the patient. Try getting involved in an activity other than your husband. Perhaps you need the break to keep things in perspective. Answered by Chaya Moag 1 year ago.

If you REALLY want to see your doctor get upset, start treating your husband with water and salt. I'm not saying this as a joke. There is evidence that Parkinson's Disease is caused by dehydration. By correcting the insufficient water level, he could make a complete recovery, assuming that no permanent damage has been done. Doctors don't like to talk about dehydration - it's in direct competition with them. Most health problems that aren't inherited or injury-related are caused by dehydration, and many of these can be reversed or even cured by drinking more water - this includes the "incurable" diseases. Click on the links below to learn more. I wish you the best. Answered by Domenica Delisi 1 year ago.


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