Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 016774/001.

Names and composition

"SERENTIL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of MESORIDAZINE BESYLATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016774/001 SERENTIL MESORIDAZINE BESYLATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
016774/002 SERENTIL MESORIDAZINE BESYLATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE
016774/003 SERENTIL MESORIDAZINE BESYLATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 50MG BASE
016774/004 SERENTIL MESORIDAZINE BESYLATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 100MG BASE
016775/001 SERENTIL MESORIDAZINE BESYLATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 25MG BASE per ML
016997/001 SERENTIL MESORIDAZINE BESYLATE CONCENTRATE/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE per ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016774/001 SERENTIL MESORIDAZINE BESYLATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
016774/002 SERENTIL MESORIDAZINE BESYLATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE
016774/003 SERENTIL MESORIDAZINE BESYLATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 50MG BASE
016774/004 SERENTIL MESORIDAZINE BESYLATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 100MG BASE
016775/001 SERENTIL MESORIDAZINE BESYLATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 25MG BASE per ML
016997/001 SERENTIL MESORIDAZINE BESYLATE CONCENTRATE/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE per ML

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Answered questions

What types of side effects have you had from Geodon?
I just started on this medication after trying others but, the side effects I read about really scare me. I would like to hear the pros and cons from others who have taken it. Thanks! Asked by Lily Nipp 2 years ago.

Most important fact about this drug: In some people with heart problems or a slow heartbeat, Geodon can cause serious and potentially fatal heartbeat irregularities. The chance of a problem is greater if you are taking a water pill (diuretic) or a medication that prolongs a part of the heartbeat known as the QT interval. Many of the drugs prescribed for heartbeat irregularities prolong the QT interval and should never be combined with Geodon. Other drugs to avoid when taking Geodon include Anzemet, Avelox, Halfan, Inapsine, Lariam, Mellaril, Nebupent, Orap, Orlaam, Pentam, Probucol, Prograf, Serentil, Tequin, Thorazine, Trisenox, and Zagam. If you're uncertain about the risks of any drug you're taking, be sure to check with your doctor before combining it with Geodon. Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Geodon. More common side effects may include: Accidental injury, cold symptoms, constipation, cough, diarrhea, dizziness, drowsiness, dry mouth, indigestion, muscle tightness, nausea, rash, stuffy and runny nose, upper respiratory infection, vision problems, weakness Other side effects may include: Abdominal pain, abnormal body movements, abnormal ejaculation, abnormal secretion of milk, abnormal walk, abnormally low cholesterol, agitation, amnesia, anemia, bleeding gums, bleeding in the eye, blood clots, blood disorders, blood in urine, body spasms, breast development in males, bruising or purple spots, cataracts, chest pain, chills, clogged bowels, confusion, conjunctivitis (pinkeye), coordination problems, decreased blood flow to the heart, delirium, difficulty breathing, difficulty swallowing, difficulty with orgasm, double vision, dry eyes, enlarged heart, eyelid inflammation, female sexual problems, fever, flank pain, flu-like symptoms, fungal infections, gout, hair loss, heavy menstruation, heavy uterine or vaginal bleeding, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, hives, hostility, impotence, increased reflexes, increased sensitivity to touch or sound, inflammation of the cornea, inflammation of the heart, involuntary or jerky movements, irregular heartbeat, liver problems, lockjaw, loss of appetite, loss of menstruation, low blood sugar, low blood pressure, low body temperature, lymph disorders, male sexual problems, muscle disorders, muscle pain, muscle weakness, nighttime urination, nosebleed, pneumonia, prickling or tingling sensation, rapid heartbeat, rectal bleeding, rigid muscle movement, ringing in ears, rolling of the eyeballs, sensitivity to sunlight, skin problems, slow heartbeat, slowed movement, speech problems, stroke, sudden drop in blood pressure upon standing up, swelling in the arms and legs, swelling in the face, swollen lymph nodes, swollen tongue, tarry stools, tendon inflammation, thirst, throat spasms, thyroid disorders, tremor, twitching, uncontrolled eye movement, urination decrease or increase, vaginal bleeding, vein inflammation, vertigo, vision disorders, vomiting, vomiting or spitting blood, yellowed skin and eyes, weight gain, white spots in the mouth. Special warnings about this medication: Remember that Geodon can cause dangerous--even fatal--heartbeat irregularities. Warning signs include dizziness, palpitations, and fainting. Tell your doctor immediately if you experience any of these symptoms. Be careful to avoid drugs that prolong the QT interval of the heartbeat. Check with your doctor before combining any other medication with Geodon. Particularly during the first few days of therapy, Geodon can cause low blood pressure, with accompanying dizziness, fainting, and rapid heartbeat. Tell your doctor if you experience any of these side effects. To minimize such problems, your doctor will increase your dose gradually. If you are prone to low blood pressure, take blood pressure medicine, become dehydrated, or have heart disease or poor circulation in the brain, use Geodon with caution. Geodon may cause drowsiness and can impair your judgment, thinking, and motor skills. Use caution while driving and don't operate potentially dangerous machinery until you know how this drug affects you. Geodon poses a very slight risk of seizures, especially if you are over age 65, have a history of seizures, or have Alzheimer's disease. Drugs such as Geodon sometimes cause a condition called Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome. Symptoms include high fever, muscle rigidity, irregular pulse or blood pressure, rapid heartbeat, excessive perspiration, and changes in heart rhythm. If these symptoms appear, tell your doctor immediately. You'll need to stop taking Geodon while the condition is under treatment. There also is the risk of developing tardive dyskinesia, a condition marked by slow, rhythmical, involuntary movements. This problem is more likely to occur in mature adults, especially older women. When it does, use of Geodon is usually stopped. Geodon can suppress the cough reflex; you may have trouble clearing your airway. Some people taking Geodon also develop a rash. Tell your doctor when this happens. If the rash doesn't clear up with treatment, you may have to discontinue the drug. Other antipsychotic medications have been known to interfere with the body's temperature-regulating mechanism, causing the body to overheat. Although this problem has not occurred with Geodon, caution is still advisable. Avoid exposure to extreme heat, strenuous exercise, and dehydration. There also is a remote chance that this medication may cause abnormal, prolonged and painful erections. Remember that you must never combine Geodon with any drug that prolongs the part of the heartbeat known as the QT interval (see "Most important fact about this drug"). Check with your doctor or pharmacist if you have any doubts about a drug you're taking. If Geodon is taken with certain other drugs, the effects of either could be increased, decreased, or altered. It is especially important to check with your doctor before combining Geodon with the following: Carbamazepine (Tegretol) Certain blood pressure medications Drugs that boost the effects of dopamine such as Mirapex, Parlodel, Permax, and Requip Drugs that affect the brain and nervous system, such as sedatives, tranquilizers, and antidepressants Ketoconazole (Nizoral) Levodopa (Larodopa, Sinemet) Answered by Clara Delancey 2 years ago.

I have been on geodon for several weeks now. I have experienced paranoia and also headaches about an hour before it is time to take it again. I have also had increased energy and for that it has been a lifesaver for me as all other anti-psychotics have created exhaustion. I love this medication despite the few ill effects. It has truly made me feel more normal again. Answered by Michal Belliston 2 years ago.

Be careful. I took Geodon last year while in the hospital for med management. I did well on it, so my Psychiatrist increased my dosage to the maximum level. I experienced heart palpitations. I was very scared and the hospital didn't believe me. They performed an emergency EKG the next day, but not until my I called my mother and she threatened to call the police unless the hospital took action and called my doctor. Make sure you and your loved ones monitor this drug VERY CLOSELY. Answered by See Zacek 2 years ago.

I only took it twice, and it gave me horrible anxiety. I already had some anxiety to begin with, but it was absolutely awful, so awful that I couldn't take it anymore. Answered by Londa Mcquesten 2 years ago.


Medical Professionals if possible: Side effects of Geodon, interfering with daily life? Doc on vacation.?
Was just hypoglycemia acting up. Geodon is making me really sensitive to it, have to eat every couple of hours and avoid caffeine and I should be fine... Odd because I havent had any problems with it since I was about 16.. Anyways thanks for your answer Asked by Nenita Bonillo 2 years ago.

Hi, My doctor is on vacation so im hoping some medical professionals here may be able to answer my questions. I started the medication at 60mg once a day about a week ago. the first day I couldnt focus on anything and got very tired. At that point I decided to take it at night and it helps me sleep, so I disregard all of those instant side effects. But yesterday about mid-day I started to feel very shaky, my hands got very cold, and my muscles felt really stiff. Later that day It started to get hard to do precise movements with my fingers and my muscles started to burn. This is the point I figured it was just not eating enough that day, or the meds wearing off before my next dose.. So I took my pill early(about 5pm) and went to bed. Well this morning I wake up fine.. about 2 hours up and I feel like I did yesterday with everything and im freezing but im sweating.. Any ideas? I dont want to go to the hospital because it costs $$ that I dont have. Answered by Zetta Krigbaum 2 years ago.

Hi, I am a doctor.. Most important fact about Geodon In some people with heart problems or a slow heartbeat, Geodon can cause serious and potentially fatal heartbeat irregularities. The chance of a problem is greater if you are taking a water pill (diuretic) or a medication that prolongs a part of the heartbeat known as the QT interval. Many of the drugs prescribed for heartbeat irregularities prolong the QT interval and should never be combined with Geodon. Other drugs to avoid when taking Geodon include Anzemet, Avelox, Halfan, Inapsine, Lariam, Mellaril, Nebupent, Orap, Orlaam, Pentam, Probucol, Prograf, Serentil, Tequin, Thorazine, Trisenox, and Zagam. If you're uncertain about the risks of any drug you're taking, be sure to check with your doctor before combining it with Geodon. How should you take Geodon? Geodon capsules should be taken twice a day with food. --If you miss a dose... Take it as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the one you missed and go back to your regular schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once. --Storage instructions... Store at room temperature. What side effects may occur? Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Geodon. More common side effects may include: Accidental injury, cold symptoms, constipation, cough, diarrhea, dizziness, drowsiness, dry mouth, headache, indigestion, involuntary muscle contractions, muscle tightness, nausea, rash, stuffy and runny nose, upper respiratory infection, vision problems, vomiting, weakness Remember that Geodon can cause dangerous--even fatal--heartbeat irregularities. Warning signs include dizziness, palpitations, and fainting. Tell your doctor immediately if you experience any of these symptoms. Be careful to avoid drugs that prolong the QT interval of the heartbeat. Check with your doctor before combining any other medication with Geodon. Well, your sumptoms can be caused by the drug.. when you get the symptoms next time, try to be calm and try ot concentrate.. do not panic.. If still the symptoms persist, I'm afraid you would have to goto the doctor.. If you want more info, feel free to write to me or visit www.medicguide.org This is a free site done by me and other doctors to answer health querries for free. Answered by Ma Trevarthen 2 years ago.

Masturbation is the system of bringing approximately a voluntary pleasure of the sexual facilities following mainly by means of the release of semen.Materbation is natural in younger guys,baby.The facet outcome of masterbation may be very harmful in long run if those turn out to be habbit is also Infertility,Continuous headache and backache. Dizziness and lack of reminiscence.Unable to participate in any heavy bodily or intellectual paintings. Answered by Maryland Dittmer 2 years ago.


What to do , When the doctors running out medications to treat Bipolar Disorder?
BEEN ON THE FOLLOWING MEDICATIONS THEY ALL HAD SOMETHING THEY DID OR DIDN'T WORK OR MADE ME FEEL SICKER , WHAT TO DO : GEODON , ABILIFY, TOPOMAX, LAMICTAL , LITHIUM, SEROQUEL, HALDOL,MELLARIL, SERENTIL, STELAZINE, DEPAKOTE , NEURONTIN , LEXAPRO, ZOLOFT , EFFEXOR, PAMELOR , ATIVAN... Asked by Jessica Heaston 2 years ago.

BEEN ON THE FOLLOWING MEDICATIONS THEY ALL HAD SOMETHING THEY DID OR DIDN'T WORK OR MADE ME FEEL SICKER , WHAT TO DO : GEODON , ABILIFY, TOPOMAX, LAMICTAL , LITHIUM, SEROQUEL, HALDOL, MELLARIL, SERENTIL, STELAZINE, DEPAKOTE , NEURONTIN , LEXAPRO, ZOLOFT , EFFEXOR, PAMELOR , ATIVAN , TRANXENE, TRAZADONE ??? Answered by Shantay Fash 2 years ago.

Trileptal, tegretol ... Don't know of course your exact history the key is usually getting just the right dose and combination and it's a real *#&$ trying to figure that out. Don't ever let them add/subtract make more than one change at a time, that helps to pinpoint better what is better and worse. Sometimes two meds at a 'substandard' dose do more than one med at what is usually a therapeutic dose. People are so different. My son's doc insists that 7.5 mg of abilify at 260 lbs can't possibly do anything for him, but 10mg makes him twitchy and 5mg does nothing -- 7.5 means the difference between holes in my wall and no holes in my wall -- that was his 'miracle med'. of course it's different for everyone. Getting exact dosing can be the trick. Most antidepressants won't work until you get a good mood stabilizer on board, wellbutrin actually has a different action that is often less of a trigger in bipolar. Takes a while but too many possible combinations to give up yet. Sometimes doses need tweaking rather than crossing the med off the list as not working. And electroshock therapy isn't the nightmare it was earlier in the century. I'd like to see what's happening with the magnet therapy, haven't checked on it lately -- get an MRI you'll feel better, for a day or two anyway. Answered by Lizzette Kauk 2 years ago.

Wow, you've really tried a lot. It's so hard sometimes to find the right ones without side effects, or with side effects mild enough that they are tolerable. How about Wellbutrin, Tegratol, Trileptal, Buspar? There is a medication called Clozapine (Clozaril) that is an anti-psychotic that has helped people when nothing else did. It can have very serious side effects though and requires frequent blood tests. It's pretty much only used for severe psychotic features that have not responded to anything else. The truth is, most meds are going to have some side effects and none will eliminate symptoms altogether. When effective, they will reduce the frequency and severity of symptoms and make the illness more manageable. Also, some of the milder side effects will often go away after your body adjusts to the meds. Other meds take 4-6 weeks to be fully effective. If you have tried all of these, you already know this stuff. It might be worth sitting down and making a list of all the meds you have tried, how long you took them, what dosage you were on, what side effects you had (the best you can remember anyway...I know I always have trouble remembering the dosages of past meds) and taking a good look at it. Figure out which meds made things worse/caused intolerable side effects and see which ones are left. It may be that the right combination of some of those medications will be effective for you. The good thing is, they will continue to develop new medications with less side effects. The more they learn about the biology of bipolar, the more they will be able to directly treat what's going wrong. It's also important to have a very regular sleep schedule, eat a healthy balanced diet, get exercise, avoid mood altering substances...and personally, I think, get some sort of cognitive behavioral therapy. I highly recommend trying a therapy called DBT. It's helped me make some real changes in my life where all other therapy and even meds have fallen short. Medication isn't magic...if only it were that easy. But they can help you to be stabilized to the point where you can work on the other aspects. When the symptoms are out of control, it's very hard to do the things you know will help (work out, eat right, not abuse substances, etc.) Is it possible that it is not bipolar, but something else that is similar in symptoms? Answered by Assunta Butkovich 2 years ago.

My brother is bi-polar manic depressive.....he is 50 and he feels best when he is on his Prozac with the Lithium..atleast he can function like a real person. Are you taking the meds separately or combining several to get best results? You aren't drinking beer with the drugs are you? That will defeat the purpose and it is not a wise decision to do both at the same time. Answered by Dona Welch 2 years ago.

I have heard that the VNS ((vagus nerve stimulation)) can help people with depression Answered by Hans Lydic 2 years ago.

That's pretty much all of them. I would focus on behavior therapies to help recognize symptoms of mania etc. Answered by Marylyn Buford 2 years ago.

celexa is a new one and there is at least 1 more new one out I know..just don't know the name...VNS is supposed to be 75% success rate...check it out Answered by Carroll Bubak 2 years ago.

sounds like you need something besides just medication ... yoga and meditation can do amazing things... Answered by Moriah Ramagano 2 years ago.


If you take antibiotics and you get a real bad headache from it would you stop?
The medicine is call Erythromycin base 500 Asked by Nelson Davalos 2 years ago.

Side Effects of This Medicine: Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur: Fever; headache, nausea; skin rash, redness, or itching; stomach pain (severe); unusual tiredness or weakness; vomiting; yellow eyes or skin-with erythromycin estolate (rare with other erythromycins) Pain, swelling, or redness at place of injection Fainting (repeated); irregular or slow heartbeat; loss of hearing (temporary) Other medicines—Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking or receiving erythromycins, it is especially important that your health care professional know if you are taking any of the following: Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Amiodarone (e.g., Cordarone) or Anabolic steroids (nandrolone [e.g., Anabolin], oxandrolone [e.g., Anavar], oxymetholone [e.g., Anadrol], stanozolol [e.g., Winstrol]) or Androgens (male hormones) or Antithyroid agents (medicine for overactive thyroid) or Carmustine (e.g., BiCNU) or Chloroquine (e.g., Aralen) or Dantrolene (e.g., Dantrium) or Daunorubicin (e.g., Cerubidine) or Disulfiram (e.g., Antabuse) or Divalproex (e.g., Depakote) or Estrogens (female hormones) or Etretinate (e.g., Tegison) or Gold salts (medicine for arthritis) or Hydroxychloroquine (e.g., Plaquenil) or Mercaptopurine (e.g., Purinethol) or Methotrexate (e.g., Mexate) or Methyldopa (e.g., Aldomet) or Naltrexone (e.g., Trexan) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Oral contraceptives (birth control pills) containing estrogen or Other anti-infectives by mouth or by injection (medicine for infection) or Phenothiazines (acetophenazine [e.g., Tindal], chlorpromazine [e.g., Thorazine], fluphenazine [e.g., Prolixin], mesoridazine [e.g., Serentil], perphenazine [e.g., Trilafon], prochlorperazine [e.g., Compazine], promazine [e.g., Sparine], promethazine [e.g., Phenergan], thioridazine [e.g., Mellaril], trifluoperazine [e.g., Stelazine], triflupromazine [e.g., Vesprin], trimeprazine [e.g., Temaril]) or Phenytoin (e.g., Dilantin) or Plicamycin (e.g., Mithracin) or Valproic acid (e.g., Depakene)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins, especially erythromycin estolate, may increase the chance of liver problems Aminophylline (e.g., Somophyllin) or Caffeine (e.g., NoDoz) or Oxtriphylline (e.g., Choledyl) or Theophylline (e.g., Somophyllin-T, Theo-Dur)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the chance of side effects from aminophylline, caffeine, oxtriphylline, or theophylline Astemizole (e.g., Hismanal) or Terfenadine (e.g., Seldane)—Use of astemizole or terfenadine with erythromycins may cause heart problems, such as an irregular heartbeat; these medicines should not be used together Carbamazepine (e.g., Tegretol)—Use of carbamazepine with erythromycin may increase the side effects of carbamazepine or increase the chance of liver problems Chloramphenicol (e.g., Chloromycetin) or Clindamycin (e.g., Cleocin) or Lincomycin (e.g., Lincocin)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may decrease the effectiveness of these other antibiotics Cyclosporine (e.g., Sandimmune) or Warfarin (e.g., Coumadin)—Use of any of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the side effects of these medicines Other medical problems—The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of erythromycins. Answered by Gerri Borland 2 years ago.

I'd page my doctor right away to ask if the headache is actually related to the medication and not something happening by chance. Only your doctor can advise you whether you should take a medication or not--remember also to tell the doctor the names of the other medications you're on to make sure there's not an interaction. Answered by Zandra Verlin 2 years ago.

It is not likely that the antibiotic is giving you the headache. You have to finish your antibiotics, as long as you don't have a life threatening reaction. Take some Tylenol for your head. If it is really bothering you, you should ask your parents, anyway. Answered by Yen Letofsky 2 years ago.

in case you get a headache because of the fact of taking the medicine and as you think of you're clearing up now, you are able to desire to not proceed taking the medicine. Drink countless comfortable beverages, shop hydrated to have sufficient kidney filtration. Answered by Corrinne Mcmeel 2 years ago.

Headaches aren't a side effect to this drug (in a general sense). Don't stop taking it unless the prescribing doctor says so. Answered by Johnny Smejkal 2 years ago.


What are the side effects to Paxil?
My doctor put me on Paxil for my anxiety and told me that it would help me with depression as well. I don't think I'm depressed nor do I feel depressed (have been in the past) but do suffer from anxiety disorder. And today I took my first Paxil pill and lots of stuff running through my head. I feel... Asked by Naida Kluge 2 years ago.

My doctor put me on Paxil for my anxiety and told me that it would help me with depression as well. I don't think I'm depressed nor do I feel depressed (have been in the past) but do suffer from anxiety disorder. And today I took my first Paxil pill and lots of stuff running through my head. I feel angry...I feel mad.... this is not my persona at all. I'm a very happy person, especially around my family. And ironically today, has not been a good day. Very angry and no reason that I can think of. Unsure if its a side effect and i'm trying to be optimistic about takign this medication. Any input would be appreciated. Answered by Leighann Stieger 2 years ago.

If the pills are making you angry.... I personally wouldn't take them anymore! Especially if you don't feel depressed to begin with. As far as your question about the side effects of Paxil....... If you have any of the following serious side effects, stop taking paroxetine and contact your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical treatment: an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); an irregular heartbeat or pulse; low blood pressure (dizziness, weakness); high blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision); unusual bleeding or bruising; or fever or chills. Less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take paroxetine and talk to your doctor if you experience headache; sleepiness or insomnia; weakness; nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation; decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm; dry mouth; tremor, nervousness, anxiety trouble concentrating; or changes in appetite or weight. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect paroxetine? Do not take paroxetine together with pimozide (Orap), thioridazine (Mellaril), or a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), selegeline (Eldepryl), or tranylcypromine (Parnate). You must wait at least 14 days after stopping an MAOI before you can take paroxetine. You must wait 5 weeks after stopping paroxetine before you can take thioridazine (Mellaril). Before taking paroxetine, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following medicines: tryptophan; warfarin (Coumadin); digoxin (Lanoxin); or lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith, others); theophylline (Theobid, Theolair, Theochron, Elixophyllin, and others); other SSRIs such as fluoxetine (Prozac), fluvoxamine (Luvox), sertraline (Zoloft), and others; a tricyclic antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil), imipramine (Tofranil), doxepin (Sinequan), nortriptyline (Pamelor), and others; aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), ketoprofen (Oruvail), and others; a phenothiazine such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), mesoridazine (Serentil), perphenazine (Trilafon), prochlorperazine (Compazine), and others; almotriptan (Axert), frovatriptan (Frova), sumatriptan (Imitrex), naratriptan (Amerge), rizatriptan (Maxalt), or zolmitriptan (Zomig); heart rhythm medication such as flecainide (Tambocor), propafenone (Rhythmol), and others; or cimetidine (Tagamet, Tagamet HB). If you are using any of the medicines listed above, you may not be able to take paroxetine, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring. Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with paroxetine. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using paroxetine. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. * Doctors usually don't have the time to tell you all of this. Although it is very important information you should know. Good Luck! <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>... . Answered by Annabelle Zeman 2 years ago.

Less likely that all these symptoms are side effects of Paxil. I think you should try to change medicine. Try Zolofit in consultation with your doctor. Based on experience of my clients , Forgetfulness , Weight Gain , Sexual side effect can be attributed to Paxil. Answered by Alexander Pfahlert 2 years ago.

If things don't improve in the next couple of days you need to ask your doctor to switch your medication. I know quite a few people who have taken Paxil (myself included) and it seemed to only make things worse. I know personally, I wanted to kill myself while taking it and I was never that depressed before. Answered by Tanner Cannon 2 years ago.

paxil is a medication that has a well known amount of side effects but the symptoms that you describe are strange. I believe that it is effecting your emotions and some well known depression medications due cause bad stimulunt reactions. Please contact your psychologist because these emotions are irregular.Until then discontinue the medication. Answered by Albina Krupicka 2 years ago.

It interferes with your ability to ejaculate. Answered by Debi Krallis 2 years ago.


Has anyone experienced Blackouts while using Prozac?
A very good friend on mine is experiencing total black-outs from using 80 mg of Prozac a day. I have advised them to stop taking it and contact their physician. Anyone else seeing this with this medication??? Asked by Corrine Hanington 2 years ago.

Prozac 10 mg-green, elliptical, scored tablets Prozac 10 mg-green capsules Prozac 20 mg-green and white capsules Prozac 40 mg-green and orange capsules Prozac 20 mg/5 mL oral solution-mint flavored solution Prozac Weekly 90 mg-green and clear capsules What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if an overdose is suspected. Symptoms of a fluoxetine overdose include nausea, vomiting, tremor, agitation, seizures, drowsiness, hyperactivity, and enlarged pupils. (back to top) What should I avoid while taking fluoxetine? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Fluoxetine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness or dizziness while taking fluoxetine. (back to top) What are the possible side effects of fluoxetine? If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking fluoxetine and contact your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical treatment: an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); an irregular heartbeat or pulse; low blood pressure (dizziness, weakness); high blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision); chills or fever; unusual bleeding or bruising; a rash or hives. If you experience any of the following less serious side effects, continue taking fluoxetine and talk to your doctor: headache, tremor, nervousness, or anxiety; difficulty concentrating; nausea, diarrhea, dry mouth, or changes in appetite or weight; weakness; increased sweating; sleepiness or insomnia; or decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. (back to top) What other drugs will affect fluoxetine? Do not take fluoxetine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) during the last 2 weeks. Serious, and sometimes fatal, reactions have occurred when these medicines have been used together. Also, do not take fluoxetine if you are taking thioridazine (Mellaril). Dangerous, even fatal irregular heartbeats may occur if these medicines are taken together. You must wait 5 weeks after stopping fluoxetine before taking thioridazine (Mellaril). Before taking fluoxetine, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines: a benzodiazepine such as diazepam (Valium), alprazolam (Xanax), chlordiazepoxide (Librium), clorazepate (Tranxene), temazepam (Restoril), triazolam (Halcion), and others; a tricyclic antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil), imipramine (Tofranil), doxepin (Sinequan), nortriptyline (Pamelor), and others; St. John's wort; a phenothiazine such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), mesoridazine (Serentil), perphenazine (Trilafon), prochlorperazine (Compazine), and others; lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith, others) or haloperidol (Haldol); almotriptan (Axert), frovatriptan (Frova), sumatriptan (Imitrex), naratriptan (Amerge), rizatriptan (Maxalt), or zolmitriptan (Zomig); carbamazepine (Tegretol) or phenytoin (Dilantin); warfarin (Coumadin); or digoxin (Lanoxin). You may not be able to take fluoxetine, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you are taking any of the medicines listed above. Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with fluoxetine. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. (back to top) Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has additional information about fluoxetine written for health professionals that you may read. Answered by Marianela Omullan 2 years ago.

Prozac can cause "light headedness" which usually happens if you stand up quickly. Your friend's symptoms sound more pronounced. I recommend that he call his psychiatrist immediately and be evaluated. There are many other equally effective medications that he could use. It is important that he does not quit taking the medication without talking with his doctor. Answered by Monet Bryce 2 years ago.

i take 40 mg of Prozac everyday and have never experienced any blackouts,your friend needs to talk to his doctor they may have to change their dosage or change to a different kind of medicine Answered by Neomi Siwiec 2 years ago.

Yes but don't go off cold turkey. Talk to your doctor. Answered by Elicia Hemmings 2 years ago.

No I haven't Answered by Vernita Jilek 2 years ago.

Yes i see this also so i stopped taking it Answered by Pia Kennison 2 years ago.

Only a doctor should be telling him whats what. Answered by Elmo Guagenti 2 years ago.


Psychiatric Medication?
What are the most common kind/names of psychiatric medications for adults with mental/psychological disorders and illnesses? Thank you for your help! Asked by Laticia Mayeaux 2 years ago.

hun that is a long list...but here goes: Abilify, Adapin, Adderall, Alepam, Alertec, Aloperidin, Alplax, Alprax, Alprazolam, Alviz, Alzolam, Amantadine, Ambien, Amisulpride, Amitriptyline, Amoxapine, Anafranil, Anatensol, Ansial, Ansiced, Antabus, Antabuse, Antideprin, Anxiron, Apo-Alpraz, Apo-Primidone, Apo-Sertral, Aponal, Apozepam, Aripiprazole, Aropax, Artane, Asendin, Asendis, Asentra, Ativan, Atomoxetine, Aurorix, Aventyl, Axoren Beneficat, Bimaran, Bioperidolo, Biston, Brotopon, Bespar, Bupropion, Buspar, Buspimen, Buspinol, Buspirone, Buspisal Calepsin, Calcium carbonate, Calcium carbimide, Calmax, Carbamazepine, Carbatrol, Carbolith, Celexa, Chlordiazepoxide, Chlorpromazine, Cibalith-S, Cipralex, Citalopram, Clomipramine, Clonazepam, Clozapine, Clozaril, Concerta, Constan, Convulex, Cylert Dalmane, Dapotum, Defanyl, Demolox, Depakene, Depakote, Deprax, Deprilept, Deroxat, Desipramine, Desirel, Desoxyn, Desyrel, Dexedrine, Dextroamphetamine, Dextrostat, Diapam, Diazepam, Dilantin, Disulfiram, Divalproex, Dogmatil, Doxepin, Dozic, Duralith Edronax, Efectin, Effexor (Efexor), Eglonyl, Einalon S, Elavil, Endep, Epanutin, Epitol, Equetro, Escitalopram, Eskalith, Eskazinyl, Eskazine, Etrafon, Eukystol Faverin, Fazaclo, Fevarin, Finlepsin, Fludecate, Flunanthate, Fluoxetine, Fluphenazine, Flurazepam, Fluvoxamine, Focalin Geodon, Gladem Halcion, Halomonth, Haldol, Haloperidol, Halosten Imipramine, Imovane Janimine, Jatroneural Kalma, Keselan, Klonopin Lamotrigine, Largactil, Levomepromazine, Levoprome, Leponex, Lexapro, Libritabs, Librium, Linton, Liskantin, Lithane, Lithium, Lithizine, Lithobid, Lithonate, Lithotabs, Lorazepam, Loxapac, Loxapine, Loxitane, Ludiomil, Lunesta, Lustral, Luvox, Lyogen, Lecital Manegan, Manerix, Maprotiline, Mellaril, Melleretten, Melleril, Meresa, Mesoridazine, Metadate, Methamphetamine, Methotrimeprazine, Methylin, Methylphenidate, Minitran, Moclobemide, Modafinil, Modalina, Modecate, Moditen, Molipaxin, Moxadil, Murelax, Myidone, Mylepsinum, Mysoline Nardil, Narol, Navane, Nefazodone, Neoperidol, Norebox, Normison, Norpramine, Nortriptyline, Novodorm Olanzapine, Omca, Orap, Oxazepam Pamelor, Parnate, Paroxetine, Paxil, Peluces, Pemoline, Permitil, Perphenazine, Pertofrane, Phenelzine, Phenytoin, Pimozide, Piportil, Pipotiazine, Pragmarel, Primidone, Prolift, Prolixin, Protriptyline, Provigil, Prozac, Prysoline, Psymion Quetiapine Ralozam, Reboxetine, Resimatil, Restoril, Restyl, Rhotrimine, Risperdal, Risperidone, Rispolept, Ritalin, Rivotril, Rubifen Sediten, Seduxen, Selecten, Serax, Serenace, Serepax, Serenase, Serentil, Seresta, Serlain, Serlift, Seroquel, Seroxat, Sertan, Sertraline, Serzone, Sevinol, Sideril, Sigaperidol, Sinequan, Sinqualone, Sinquan, Sirtal, Solanax, Solian, Solvex, Songar, Stazepin, Stelazine, Stilnox, Stimuloton, Strattera, Sulpiride, Sulpiride Ratiopharm, Sulpiride Neurazpharm, Surmontil, Symbyax, Symmetrel Tafil, Tavor, Taxagon, Tegretol, Telesmin, Temazepam, Temesta, Temposil, Terfluzine, Thioridazine, Thiothixene, Thombran, Thorazine, Timonil, Tofranil, Trancin, Tranax, Trankimazin, Tranquinal, Tranylcypromine, Trazalon, Trazodone, Trazonil, Trialodine, Triazolam, Trifluoperazine, Trihexane, Trihexyphenidyl, Trilafon, Trimipramine, Triptil, Trittico, Tryptanol Valium, Valproate, Valproic acid, Valrelease, Venlafaxine, Vestra, Vigicer, Vivactil Wellbutrin Xanax, Xanor, Xydep Zamhexal, Zeldox, Zimovane, Zispin, Ziprasidone, Zolarem, Zoldac, Zoloft, Zolpidem, Zonalon, Zopiclone, Zydis, Zyprexa The site listed below also has a list of medications and what type they are...hope this helps! (not real sure why i would get a thumbs down on this answer?) Answered by Cris Mcvicker 2 years ago.

I feel that there is always a natural alternative and some people think they need to take antidepressants etc. Because they do not know what is really wrong with them. All to many times doctor's prescribe these meds instead of seeking out the true issue's. I can't see how it would aid spiritual work only confuse it and hinder it. Like I said I so believe there is always a natural alternative. Prescription drugs mean dependency on a man made substance and stops the user from making life changes to enhance there well being. BB Tink Answered by Carola Flugum 2 years ago.

(I use the brand names here, because they are easier to type and remember) Antidepressants (mostly SSRIs) : Lexapro (most likely the top selling psychiatric medication currently), Prozac, Zoloft, Wellbutrin... Antianxiety: Xanax (it should not be prescribed so much; very risky), Ativan, Klonopin, Valium... I should include atypical antipsychotics and anticonvulsants, but I can't think of them right now. The top two catagories are by far the most common anyway and cover a large number of disorders. Answered by Lori Vanochten 2 years ago.

The website crazymeds.us has been one I've found extremely helpful. It lists all the meds according to their class and when you click on them it gives all the uses and side effects. They also have a board where you can get other people's experiences with each med and each disorder/illness. Answered by Mari Mulanax 2 years ago.

The most popular medication for anti-psychotics are Abilify(the newest), Risperdal, Geodon, & Haldol(the oldest. Each one has it's own side effects and sometime you have to try more then one to get the best results. P.S. The web site crazy meds is OK, but it is one sided(the scary side only). Answered by Kindra Golembeski 2 years ago.

Depends on the problem, there are many different kind. Some used together, and most used alone. Only a Dr. can evaluate you and give you the right meds. SOmetimes it takes a while to find the right one. Answered by Lucas Monette 2 years ago.


Does evening primrose oil affect the potency of birth control pills?
i'm asking because my dermy told me to take evening primrose to help heal my active eczema. thanks in advance! Asked by Sheila Cadwallader 2 years ago.

My herbal guide doesn't say that it does. It is also used for pms, among other things. It does interact with the following medications: compazine, mellaril, navane, permitil, phenergan, prolixin, serentil, stelazine, thorazine and trilafon. If you take any of these medications, you shouldn't use evening primrose. Answered by Kaleigh Gilpin 2 years ago.

The only way that is 100% is not having sex or having a hystorectomy. BC can fail, it is a small chance but it can fail. Condoms can fail. Pullout method fails often and isn't a BC method at all. Even woman who get their tubes tied could still become pregnant it is just a small chance. I have to say most of my neices and nephews are BC babies. For some reason BC really just doesn't work for my sisters at all and they have tried different forms. But they are suppose to be pretty good but you have to take them everyday on time and it takes 3 months to build up in your system so it is best to use other protection during that time. Antibiotics can knock out the BC so you need extra protection at that time as well. If you switch pills to another type you need to use protection for atleast a month to give your body time to adjust. Answered by Bridget Monaldi 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: does evening primrose oil affect the potency of birth control pills? i'm asking because my dermy told me to take evening primrose to help heal my active eczema. thanks in advance! Answered by Son Sekerak 2 years ago.

I believe so, better stay away jsut to be safe. Try something else to help with your eczema Answered by Caprice Zschoche 2 years ago.


What meds are prescribed for schizophrenia?
Asked by Kenny Kucinski 2 years ago.

ANTIPSYCHOTIC. List of Antipsychotic Medications chlorpromazine -Thorazine chlorprothixene -Taractan clozapine -Clozaril fluphenazine -Permitil, Prolixin haloperidol- Haldol loxapine- Loxitane mesoridazine -Serentil molindone Lidone, -Moban olanzapine -Zyprexa perphenazine -Trilafon quetiapine -Seroquel risperidone -Risperdal thioridazine- Mellaril thiothixene -Navane trifluoperazine -Stelazine trifluopromazine -Vesprin ziprasidone -Geodon paliperidone- Invega Answered by Antionette Putcha 2 years ago.

All the antipsychotics can be used for schizophenia, I take chlorpromazine at night and proclorperazine during the day, but the doctor at the hospital does not like me taking 2 antipsychotics. Answered by Tereasa Grow 2 years ago.

I've heard a lot of people talking about abilify recently Answered by Stuart Stuck 2 years ago.

Risperidal Sereoquel ( i take this one ) Haldol Answered by Minnie Kleve 2 years ago.

well i only know respiradal lol cause im on it they use it for that too. Answered by Steffanie Aita 2 years ago.


What types of side effects have you had from Geodon?
I just started on this medication after trying others but, the side effects I read about really scare me. I would like to hear the pros and cons from others who have taken it. Thanks! Asked by Darrin Koves 2 years ago.

Most important fact about this drug: In some people with heart problems or a slow heartbeat, Geodon can cause serious and potentially fatal heartbeat irregularities. The chance of a problem is greater if you are taking a water pill (diuretic) or a medication that prolongs a part of the heartbeat known as the QT interval. Many of the drugs prescribed for heartbeat irregularities prolong the QT interval and should never be combined with Geodon. Other drugs to avoid when taking Geodon include Anzemet, Avelox, Halfan, Inapsine, Lariam, Mellaril, Nebupent, Orap, Orlaam, Pentam, Probucol, Prograf, Serentil, Tequin, Thorazine, Trisenox, and Zagam. If you're uncertain about the risks of any drug you're taking, be sure to check with your doctor before combining it with Geodon. Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Geodon. More common side effects may include: Accidental injury, cold symptoms, constipation, cough, diarrhea, dizziness, drowsiness, dry mouth, indigestion, muscle tightness, nausea, rash, stuffy and runny nose, upper respiratory infection, vision problems, weakness Other side effects may include: Abdominal pain, abnormal body movements, abnormal ejaculation, abnormal secretion of milk, abnormal walk, abnormally low cholesterol, agitation, amnesia, anemia, bleeding gums, bleeding in the eye, blood clots, blood disorders, blood in urine, body spasms, breast development in males, bruising or purple spots, cataracts, chest pain, chills, clogged bowels, confusion, conjunctivitis (pinkeye), coordination problems, decreased blood flow to the heart, delirium, difficulty breathing, difficulty swallowing, difficulty with orgasm, double vision, dry eyes, enlarged heart, eyelid inflammation, female sexual problems, fever, flank pain, flu-like symptoms, fungal infections, gout, hair loss, heavy menstruation, heavy uterine or vaginal bleeding, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, hives, hostility, impotence, increased reflexes, increased sensitivity to touch or sound, inflammation of the cornea, inflammation of the heart, involuntary or jerky movements, irregular heartbeat, liver problems, lockjaw, loss of appetite, loss of menstruation, low blood sugar, low blood pressure, low body temperature, lymph disorders, male sexual problems, muscle disorders, muscle pain, muscle weakness, nighttime urination, nosebleed, pneumonia, prickling or tingling sensation, rapid heartbeat, rectal bleeding, rigid muscle movement, ringing in ears, rolling of the eyeballs, sensitivity to sunlight, skin problems, slow heartbeat, slowed movement, speech problems, stroke, sudden drop in blood pressure upon standing up, swelling in the arms and legs, swelling in the face, swollen lymph nodes, swollen tongue, tarry stools, tendon inflammation, thirst, throat spasms, thyroid disorders, tremor, twitching, uncontrolled eye movement, urination decrease or increase, vaginal bleeding, vein inflammation, vertigo, vision disorders, vomiting, vomiting or spitting blood, yellowed skin and eyes, weight gain, white spots in the mouth. Special warnings about this medication: Remember that Geodon can cause dangerous--even fatal--heartbeat irregularities. Warning signs include dizziness, palpitations, and fainting. Tell your doctor immediately if you experience any of these symptoms. Be careful to avoid drugs that prolong the QT interval of the heartbeat. Check with your doctor before combining any other medication with Geodon. Particularly during the first few days of therapy, Geodon can cause low blood pressure, with accompanying dizziness, fainting, and rapid heartbeat. Tell your doctor if you experience any of these side effects. To minimize such problems, your doctor will increase your dose gradually. If you are prone to low blood pressure, take blood pressure medicine, become dehydrated, or have heart disease or poor circulation in the brain, use Geodon with caution. Geodon may cause drowsiness and can impair your judgment, thinking, and motor skills. Use caution while driving and don't operate potentially dangerous machinery until you know how this drug affects you. Geodon poses a very slight risk of seizures, especially if you are over age 65, have a history of seizures, or have Alzheimer's disease. Drugs such as Geodon sometimes cause a condition called Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome. Symptoms include high fever, muscle rigidity, irregular pulse or blood pressure, rapid heartbeat, excessive perspiration, and changes in heart rhythm. If these symptoms appear, tell your doctor immediately. You'll need to stop taking Geodon while the condition is under treatment. There also is the risk of developing tardive dyskinesia, a condition marked by slow, rhythmical, involuntary movements. This problem is more likely to occur in mature adults, especially older women. When it does, use of Geodon is usually stopped. Geodon can suppress the cough reflex; you may have trouble clearing your airway. Some people taking Geodon also develop a rash. Tell your doctor when this happens. If the rash doesn't clear up with treatment, you may have to discontinue the drug. Other antipsychotic medications have been known to interfere with the body's temperature-regulating mechanism, causing the body to overheat. Although this problem has not occurred with Geodon, caution is still advisable. Avoid exposure to extreme heat, strenuous exercise, and dehydration. There also is a remote chance that this medication may cause abnormal, prolonged and painful erections. Remember that you must never combine Geodon with any drug that prolongs the part of the heartbeat known as the QT interval (see "Most important fact about this drug"). Check with your doctor or pharmacist if you have any doubts about a drug you're taking. If Geodon is taken with certain other drugs, the effects of either could be increased, decreased, or altered. It is especially important to check with your doctor before combining Geodon with the following: Carbamazepine (Tegretol) Certain blood pressure medications Drugs that boost the effects of dopamine such as Mirapex, Parlodel, Permax, and Requip Drugs that affect the brain and nervous system, such as sedatives, tranquilizers, and antidepressants Ketoconazole (Nizoral) Levodopa (Larodopa, Sinemet) Answered by Philomena Saturnio 2 years ago.

I have been on geodon for several weeks now. I have experienced paranoia and also headaches about an hour before it is time to take it again. I have also had increased energy and for that it has been a lifesaver for me as all other anti-psychotics have created exhaustion. I love this medication despite the few ill effects. It has truly made me feel more normal again. Answered by Arlie Gather 2 years ago.

Be careful. I took Geodon last year while in the hospital for med management. I did well on it, so my Psychiatrist increased my dosage to the maximum level. I experienced heart palpitations. I was very scared and the hospital didn't believe me. They performed an emergency EKG the next day, but not until my I called my mother and she threatened to call the police unless the hospital took action and called my doctor. Make sure you and your loved ones monitor this drug VERY CLOSELY. Answered by Mauro Finley 2 years ago.

I only took it twice, and it gave me horrible anxiety. I already had some anxiety to begin with, but it was absolutely awful, so awful that I couldn't take it anymore. Answered by Laquita Hackborn 2 years ago.


Medical Professionals if possible: Side effects of Geodon, interfering with daily life? Doc on vacation.?
Was just hypoglycemia acting up. Geodon is making me really sensitive to it, have to eat every couple of hours and avoid caffeine and I should be fine... Odd because I havent had any problems with it since I was about 16.. Anyways thanks for your answer Asked by Rosena Siner 2 years ago.

Hi, My doctor is on vacation so im hoping some medical professionals here may be able to answer my questions. I started the medication at 60mg once a day about a week ago. the first day I couldnt focus on anything and got very tired. At that point I decided to take it at night and it helps me sleep, so I disregard all of those instant side effects. But yesterday about mid-day I started to feel very shaky, my hands got very cold, and my muscles felt really stiff. Later that day It started to get hard to do precise movements with my fingers and my muscles started to burn. This is the point I figured it was just not eating enough that day, or the meds wearing off before my next dose.. So I took my pill early(about 5pm) and went to bed. Well this morning I wake up fine.. about 2 hours up and I feel like I did yesterday with everything and im freezing but im sweating.. Any ideas? I dont want to go to the hospital because it costs $$ that I dont have. Answered by Jaye Yengich 2 years ago.

Hi, I am a doctor.. Most important fact about Geodon In some people with heart problems or a slow heartbeat, Geodon can cause serious and potentially fatal heartbeat irregularities. The chance of a problem is greater if you are taking a water pill (diuretic) or a medication that prolongs a part of the heartbeat known as the QT interval. Many of the drugs prescribed for heartbeat irregularities prolong the QT interval and should never be combined with Geodon. Other drugs to avoid when taking Geodon include Anzemet, Avelox, Halfan, Inapsine, Lariam, Mellaril, Nebupent, Orap, Orlaam, Pentam, Probucol, Prograf, Serentil, Tequin, Thorazine, Trisenox, and Zagam. If you're uncertain about the risks of any drug you're taking, be sure to check with your doctor before combining it with Geodon. How should you take Geodon? Geodon capsules should be taken twice a day with food. --If you miss a dose... Take it as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the one you missed and go back to your regular schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once. --Storage instructions... Store at room temperature. What side effects may occur? Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Geodon. More common side effects may include: Accidental injury, cold symptoms, constipation, cough, diarrhea, dizziness, drowsiness, dry mouth, headache, indigestion, involuntary muscle contractions, muscle tightness, nausea, rash, stuffy and runny nose, upper respiratory infection, vision problems, vomiting, weakness Remember that Geodon can cause dangerous--even fatal--heartbeat irregularities. Warning signs include dizziness, palpitations, and fainting. Tell your doctor immediately if you experience any of these symptoms. Be careful to avoid drugs that prolong the QT interval of the heartbeat. Check with your doctor before combining any other medication with Geodon. Well, your sumptoms can be caused by the drug.. when you get the symptoms next time, try to be calm and try ot concentrate.. do not panic.. If still the symptoms persist, I'm afraid you would have to goto the doctor.. If you want more info, feel free to write to me or visit www.medicguide.org This is a free site done by me and other doctors to answer health querries for free. Answered by Alfreda Helfritz 2 years ago.

Masturbation is the system of bringing approximately a voluntary pleasure of the sexual facilities following mainly by means of the release of semen.Materbation is natural in younger guys,baby.The facet outcome of masterbation may be very harmful in long run if those turn out to be habbit is also Infertility,Continuous headache and backache. Dizziness and lack of reminiscence.Unable to participate in any heavy bodily or intellectual paintings. Answered by Elna Hooks 2 years ago.


What to do , When the doctors running out medications to treat Bipolar Disorder?
BEEN ON THE FOLLOWING MEDICATIONS THEY ALL HAD SOMETHING THEY DID OR DIDN'T WORK OR MADE ME FEEL SICKER , WHAT TO DO : GEODON , ABILIFY, TOPOMAX, LAMICTAL , LITHIUM, SEROQUEL, HALDOL,MELLARIL, SERENTIL, STELAZINE, DEPAKOTE , NEURONTIN , LEXAPRO, ZOLOFT , EFFEXOR, PAMELOR , ATIVAN... Asked by Madonna Hersman 2 years ago.

BEEN ON THE FOLLOWING MEDICATIONS THEY ALL HAD SOMETHING THEY DID OR DIDN'T WORK OR MADE ME FEEL SICKER , WHAT TO DO : GEODON , ABILIFY, TOPOMAX, LAMICTAL , LITHIUM, SEROQUEL, HALDOL, MELLARIL, SERENTIL, STELAZINE, DEPAKOTE , NEURONTIN , LEXAPRO, ZOLOFT , EFFEXOR, PAMELOR , ATIVAN , TRANXENE, TRAZADONE ??? Answered by Elvira Jerabek 2 years ago.

Trileptal, tegretol ... Don't know of course your exact history the key is usually getting just the right dose and combination and it's a real *#&$ trying to figure that out. Don't ever let them add/subtract make more than one change at a time, that helps to pinpoint better what is better and worse. Sometimes two meds at a 'substandard' dose do more than one med at what is usually a therapeutic dose. People are so different. My son's doc insists that 7.5 mg of abilify at 260 lbs can't possibly do anything for him, but 10mg makes him twitchy and 5mg does nothing -- 7.5 means the difference between holes in my wall and no holes in my wall -- that was his 'miracle med'. of course it's different for everyone. Getting exact dosing can be the trick. Most antidepressants won't work until you get a good mood stabilizer on board, wellbutrin actually has a different action that is often less of a trigger in bipolar. Takes a while but too many possible combinations to give up yet. Sometimes doses need tweaking rather than crossing the med off the list as not working. And electroshock therapy isn't the nightmare it was earlier in the century. I'd like to see what's happening with the magnet therapy, haven't checked on it lately -- get an MRI you'll feel better, for a day or two anyway. Answered by Anika Crookshanks 2 years ago.

Wow, you've really tried a lot. It's so hard sometimes to find the right ones without side effects, or with side effects mild enough that they are tolerable. How about Wellbutrin, Tegratol, Trileptal, Buspar? There is a medication called Clozapine (Clozaril) that is an anti-psychotic that has helped people when nothing else did. It can have very serious side effects though and requires frequent blood tests. It's pretty much only used for severe psychotic features that have not responded to anything else. The truth is, most meds are going to have some side effects and none will eliminate symptoms altogether. When effective, they will reduce the frequency and severity of symptoms and make the illness more manageable. Also, some of the milder side effects will often go away after your body adjusts to the meds. Other meds take 4-6 weeks to be fully effective. If you have tried all of these, you already know this stuff. It might be worth sitting down and making a list of all the meds you have tried, how long you took them, what dosage you were on, what side effects you had (the best you can remember anyway...I know I always have trouble remembering the dosages of past meds) and taking a good look at it. Figure out which meds made things worse/caused intolerable side effects and see which ones are left. It may be that the right combination of some of those medications will be effective for you. The good thing is, they will continue to develop new medications with less side effects. The more they learn about the biology of bipolar, the more they will be able to directly treat what's going wrong. It's also important to have a very regular sleep schedule, eat a healthy balanced diet, get exercise, avoid mood altering substances...and personally, I think, get some sort of cognitive behavioral therapy. I highly recommend trying a therapy called DBT. It's helped me make some real changes in my life where all other therapy and even meds have fallen short. Medication isn't magic...if only it were that easy. But they can help you to be stabilized to the point where you can work on the other aspects. When the symptoms are out of control, it's very hard to do the things you know will help (work out, eat right, not abuse substances, etc.) Is it possible that it is not bipolar, but something else that is similar in symptoms? Answered by Eula Dweck 2 years ago.

My brother is bi-polar manic depressive.....he is 50 and he feels best when he is on his Prozac with the Lithium..atleast he can function like a real person. Are you taking the meds separately or combining several to get best results? You aren't drinking beer with the drugs are you? That will defeat the purpose and it is not a wise decision to do both at the same time. Answered by Estelle Trocchio 2 years ago.

I have heard that the VNS ((vagus nerve stimulation)) can help people with depression Answered by Maryann Karlovich 2 years ago.

That's pretty much all of them. I would focus on behavior therapies to help recognize symptoms of mania etc. Answered by Bao Oosterhof 2 years ago.

celexa is a new one and there is at least 1 more new one out I know..just don't know the name...VNS is supposed to be 75% success rate...check it out Answered by Ferne Boehmer 2 years ago.

sounds like you need something besides just medication ... yoga and meditation can do amazing things... Answered by Dean Brickle 2 years ago.


If you take antibiotics and you get a real bad headache from it would you stop?
The medicine is call Erythromycin base 500 Asked by Takisha Schlipf 2 years ago.

Side Effects of This Medicine: Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur: Fever; headache, nausea; skin rash, redness, or itching; stomach pain (severe); unusual tiredness or weakness; vomiting; yellow eyes or skin-with erythromycin estolate (rare with other erythromycins) Pain, swelling, or redness at place of injection Fainting (repeated); irregular or slow heartbeat; loss of hearing (temporary) Other medicines—Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking or receiving erythromycins, it is especially important that your health care professional know if you are taking any of the following: Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Amiodarone (e.g., Cordarone) or Anabolic steroids (nandrolone [e.g., Anabolin], oxandrolone [e.g., Anavar], oxymetholone [e.g., Anadrol], stanozolol [e.g., Winstrol]) or Androgens (male hormones) or Antithyroid agents (medicine for overactive thyroid) or Carmustine (e.g., BiCNU) or Chloroquine (e.g., Aralen) or Dantrolene (e.g., Dantrium) or Daunorubicin (e.g., Cerubidine) or Disulfiram (e.g., Antabuse) or Divalproex (e.g., Depakote) or Estrogens (female hormones) or Etretinate (e.g., Tegison) or Gold salts (medicine for arthritis) or Hydroxychloroquine (e.g., Plaquenil) or Mercaptopurine (e.g., Purinethol) or Methotrexate (e.g., Mexate) or Methyldopa (e.g., Aldomet) or Naltrexone (e.g., Trexan) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Oral contraceptives (birth control pills) containing estrogen or Other anti-infectives by mouth or by injection (medicine for infection) or Phenothiazines (acetophenazine [e.g., Tindal], chlorpromazine [e.g., Thorazine], fluphenazine [e.g., Prolixin], mesoridazine [e.g., Serentil], perphenazine [e.g., Trilafon], prochlorperazine [e.g., Compazine], promazine [e.g., Sparine], promethazine [e.g., Phenergan], thioridazine [e.g., Mellaril], trifluoperazine [e.g., Stelazine], triflupromazine [e.g., Vesprin], trimeprazine [e.g., Temaril]) or Phenytoin (e.g., Dilantin) or Plicamycin (e.g., Mithracin) or Valproic acid (e.g., Depakene)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins, especially erythromycin estolate, may increase the chance of liver problems Aminophylline (e.g., Somophyllin) or Caffeine (e.g., NoDoz) or Oxtriphylline (e.g., Choledyl) or Theophylline (e.g., Somophyllin-T, Theo-Dur)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the chance of side effects from aminophylline, caffeine, oxtriphylline, or theophylline Astemizole (e.g., Hismanal) or Terfenadine (e.g., Seldane)—Use of astemizole or terfenadine with erythromycins may cause heart problems, such as an irregular heartbeat; these medicines should not be used together Carbamazepine (e.g., Tegretol)—Use of carbamazepine with erythromycin may increase the side effects of carbamazepine or increase the chance of liver problems Chloramphenicol (e.g., Chloromycetin) or Clindamycin (e.g., Cleocin) or Lincomycin (e.g., Lincocin)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may decrease the effectiveness of these other antibiotics Cyclosporine (e.g., Sandimmune) or Warfarin (e.g., Coumadin)—Use of any of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the side effects of these medicines Other medical problems—The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of erythromycins. Answered by Stefani Dallas 2 years ago.

I'd page my doctor right away to ask if the headache is actually related to the medication and not something happening by chance. Only your doctor can advise you whether you should take a medication or not--remember also to tell the doctor the names of the other medications you're on to make sure there's not an interaction. Answered by Mona Kuchel 2 years ago.

It is not likely that the antibiotic is giving you the headache. You have to finish your antibiotics, as long as you don't have a life threatening reaction. Take some Tylenol for your head. If it is really bothering you, you should ask your parents, anyway. Answered by Toby Loewen 2 years ago.

in case you get a headache because of the fact of taking the medicine and as you think of you're clearing up now, you are able to desire to not proceed taking the medicine. Drink countless comfortable beverages, shop hydrated to have sufficient kidney filtration. Answered by Tristan Sobolik 2 years ago.

Headaches aren't a side effect to this drug (in a general sense). Don't stop taking it unless the prescribing doctor says so. Answered by Eldridge Cardinas 2 years ago.


What are the side effects to Paxil?
My doctor put me on Paxil for my anxiety and told me that it would help me with depression as well. I don't think I'm depressed nor do I feel depressed (have been in the past) but do suffer from anxiety disorder. And today I took my first Paxil pill and lots of stuff running through my head. I feel... Asked by Jesse Levin 2 years ago.

My doctor put me on Paxil for my anxiety and told me that it would help me with depression as well. I don't think I'm depressed nor do I feel depressed (have been in the past) but do suffer from anxiety disorder. And today I took my first Paxil pill and lots of stuff running through my head. I feel angry...I feel mad.... this is not my persona at all. I'm a very happy person, especially around my family. And ironically today, has not been a good day. Very angry and no reason that I can think of. Unsure if its a side effect and i'm trying to be optimistic about takign this medication. Any input would be appreciated. Answered by Star Stumbo 2 years ago.

If the pills are making you angry.... I personally wouldn't take them anymore! Especially if you don't feel depressed to begin with. As far as your question about the side effects of Paxil....... If you have any of the following serious side effects, stop taking paroxetine and contact your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical treatment: an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); an irregular heartbeat or pulse; low blood pressure (dizziness, weakness); high blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision); unusual bleeding or bruising; or fever or chills. Less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take paroxetine and talk to your doctor if you experience headache; sleepiness or insomnia; weakness; nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation; decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm; dry mouth; tremor, nervousness, anxiety trouble concentrating; or changes in appetite or weight. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect paroxetine? Do not take paroxetine together with pimozide (Orap), thioridazine (Mellaril), or a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), selegeline (Eldepryl), or tranylcypromine (Parnate). You must wait at least 14 days after stopping an MAOI before you can take paroxetine. You must wait 5 weeks after stopping paroxetine before you can take thioridazine (Mellaril). Before taking paroxetine, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following medicines: tryptophan; warfarin (Coumadin); digoxin (Lanoxin); or lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith, others); theophylline (Theobid, Theolair, Theochron, Elixophyllin, and others); other SSRIs such as fluoxetine (Prozac), fluvoxamine (Luvox), sertraline (Zoloft), and others; a tricyclic antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil), imipramine (Tofranil), doxepin (Sinequan), nortriptyline (Pamelor), and others; aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), ketoprofen (Oruvail), and others; a phenothiazine such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), mesoridazine (Serentil), perphenazine (Trilafon), prochlorperazine (Compazine), and others; almotriptan (Axert), frovatriptan (Frova), sumatriptan (Imitrex), naratriptan (Amerge), rizatriptan (Maxalt), or zolmitriptan (Zomig); heart rhythm medication such as flecainide (Tambocor), propafenone (Rhythmol), and others; or cimetidine (Tagamet, Tagamet HB). If you are using any of the medicines listed above, you may not be able to take paroxetine, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring. Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with paroxetine. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using paroxetine. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. * Doctors usually don't have the time to tell you all of this. Although it is very important information you should know. Good Luck! <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>... . Answered by Gene Crombie 2 years ago.

Less likely that all these symptoms are side effects of Paxil. I think you should try to change medicine. Try Zolofit in consultation with your doctor. Based on experience of my clients , Forgetfulness , Weight Gain , Sexual side effect can be attributed to Paxil. Answered by Robbyn Holznecht 2 years ago.

If things don't improve in the next couple of days you need to ask your doctor to switch your medication. I know quite a few people who have taken Paxil (myself included) and it seemed to only make things worse. I know personally, I wanted to kill myself while taking it and I was never that depressed before. Answered by Marcelino Angello 2 years ago.

paxil is a medication that has a well known amount of side effects but the symptoms that you describe are strange. I believe that it is effecting your emotions and some well known depression medications due cause bad stimulunt reactions. Please contact your psychologist because these emotions are irregular.Until then discontinue the medication. Answered by Sina Titsworth 2 years ago.

It interferes with your ability to ejaculate. Answered by Tristan Melfi 2 years ago.


Has anyone experienced Blackouts while using Prozac?
A very good friend on mine is experiencing total black-outs from using 80 mg of Prozac a day. I have advised them to stop taking it and contact their physician. Anyone else seeing this with this medication??? Asked by Vern Caliz 2 years ago.

Prozac 10 mg-green, elliptical, scored tablets Prozac 10 mg-green capsules Prozac 20 mg-green and white capsules Prozac 40 mg-green and orange capsules Prozac 20 mg/5 mL oral solution-mint flavored solution Prozac Weekly 90 mg-green and clear capsules What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if an overdose is suspected. Symptoms of a fluoxetine overdose include nausea, vomiting, tremor, agitation, seizures, drowsiness, hyperactivity, and enlarged pupils. (back to top) What should I avoid while taking fluoxetine? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Fluoxetine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness or dizziness while taking fluoxetine. (back to top) What are the possible side effects of fluoxetine? If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking fluoxetine and contact your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical treatment: an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); an irregular heartbeat or pulse; low blood pressure (dizziness, weakness); high blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision); chills or fever; unusual bleeding or bruising; a rash or hives. If you experience any of the following less serious side effects, continue taking fluoxetine and talk to your doctor: headache, tremor, nervousness, or anxiety; difficulty concentrating; nausea, diarrhea, dry mouth, or changes in appetite or weight; weakness; increased sweating; sleepiness or insomnia; or decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. (back to top) What other drugs will affect fluoxetine? Do not take fluoxetine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) during the last 2 weeks. Serious, and sometimes fatal, reactions have occurred when these medicines have been used together. Also, do not take fluoxetine if you are taking thioridazine (Mellaril). Dangerous, even fatal irregular heartbeats may occur if these medicines are taken together. You must wait 5 weeks after stopping fluoxetine before taking thioridazine (Mellaril). Before taking fluoxetine, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines: a benzodiazepine such as diazepam (Valium), alprazolam (Xanax), chlordiazepoxide (Librium), clorazepate (Tranxene), temazepam (Restoril), triazolam (Halcion), and others; a tricyclic antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil), imipramine (Tofranil), doxepin (Sinequan), nortriptyline (Pamelor), and others; St. John's wort; a phenothiazine such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), mesoridazine (Serentil), perphenazine (Trilafon), prochlorperazine (Compazine), and others; lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith, others) or haloperidol (Haldol); almotriptan (Axert), frovatriptan (Frova), sumatriptan (Imitrex), naratriptan (Amerge), rizatriptan (Maxalt), or zolmitriptan (Zomig); carbamazepine (Tegretol) or phenytoin (Dilantin); warfarin (Coumadin); or digoxin (Lanoxin). You may not be able to take fluoxetine, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you are taking any of the medicines listed above. Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with fluoxetine. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. (back to top) Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has additional information about fluoxetine written for health professionals that you may read. Answered by Casey Kilmartin 2 years ago.

Prozac can cause "light headedness" which usually happens if you stand up quickly. Your friend's symptoms sound more pronounced. I recommend that he call his psychiatrist immediately and be evaluated. There are many other equally effective medications that he could use. It is important that he does not quit taking the medication without talking with his doctor. Answered by Bebe Rawson 2 years ago.

i take 40 mg of Prozac everyday and have never experienced any blackouts,your friend needs to talk to his doctor they may have to change their dosage or change to a different kind of medicine Answered by Tressie Mulling 2 years ago.

Yes but don't go off cold turkey. Talk to your doctor. Answered by Diamond Lasik 2 years ago.

No I haven't Answered by Dalila Spicuzza 2 years ago.

Yes i see this also so i stopped taking it Answered by Donny Neely 2 years ago.

Only a doctor should be telling him whats what. Answered by Jackeline Emerling 2 years ago.


Psychiatric Medication?
What are the most common kind/names of psychiatric medications for adults with mental/psychological disorders and illnesses? Thank you for your help! Asked by Yolando Bringham 2 years ago.

hun that is a long list...but here goes: Abilify, Adapin, Adderall, Alepam, Alertec, Aloperidin, Alplax, Alprax, Alprazolam, Alviz, Alzolam, Amantadine, Ambien, Amisulpride, Amitriptyline, Amoxapine, Anafranil, Anatensol, Ansial, Ansiced, Antabus, Antabuse, Antideprin, Anxiron, Apo-Alpraz, Apo-Primidone, Apo-Sertral, Aponal, Apozepam, Aripiprazole, Aropax, Artane, Asendin, Asendis, Asentra, Ativan, Atomoxetine, Aurorix, Aventyl, Axoren Beneficat, Bimaran, Bioperidolo, Biston, Brotopon, Bespar, Bupropion, Buspar, Buspimen, Buspinol, Buspirone, Buspisal Calepsin, Calcium carbonate, Calcium carbimide, Calmax, Carbamazepine, Carbatrol, Carbolith, Celexa, Chlordiazepoxide, Chlorpromazine, Cibalith-S, Cipralex, Citalopram, Clomipramine, Clonazepam, Clozapine, Clozaril, Concerta, Constan, Convulex, Cylert Dalmane, Dapotum, Defanyl, Demolox, Depakene, Depakote, Deprax, Deprilept, Deroxat, Desipramine, Desirel, Desoxyn, Desyrel, Dexedrine, Dextroamphetamine, Dextrostat, Diapam, Diazepam, Dilantin, Disulfiram, Divalproex, Dogmatil, Doxepin, Dozic, Duralith Edronax, Efectin, Effexor (Efexor), Eglonyl, Einalon S, Elavil, Endep, Epanutin, Epitol, Equetro, Escitalopram, Eskalith, Eskazinyl, Eskazine, Etrafon, Eukystol Faverin, Fazaclo, Fevarin, Finlepsin, Fludecate, Flunanthate, Fluoxetine, Fluphenazine, Flurazepam, Fluvoxamine, Focalin Geodon, Gladem Halcion, Halomonth, Haldol, Haloperidol, Halosten Imipramine, Imovane Janimine, Jatroneural Kalma, Keselan, Klonopin Lamotrigine, Largactil, Levomepromazine, Levoprome, Leponex, Lexapro, Libritabs, Librium, Linton, Liskantin, Lithane, Lithium, Lithizine, Lithobid, Lithonate, Lithotabs, Lorazepam, Loxapac, Loxapine, Loxitane, Ludiomil, Lunesta, Lustral, Luvox, Lyogen, Lecital Manegan, Manerix, Maprotiline, Mellaril, Melleretten, Melleril, Meresa, Mesoridazine, Metadate, Methamphetamine, Methotrimeprazine, Methylin, Methylphenidate, Minitran, Moclobemide, Modafinil, Modalina, Modecate, Moditen, Molipaxin, Moxadil, Murelax, Myidone, Mylepsinum, Mysoline Nardil, Narol, Navane, Nefazodone, Neoperidol, Norebox, Normison, Norpramine, Nortriptyline, Novodorm Olanzapine, Omca, Orap, Oxazepam Pamelor, Parnate, Paroxetine, Paxil, Peluces, Pemoline, Permitil, Perphenazine, Pertofrane, Phenelzine, Phenytoin, Pimozide, Piportil, Pipotiazine, Pragmarel, Primidone, Prolift, Prolixin, Protriptyline, Provigil, Prozac, Prysoline, Psymion Quetiapine Ralozam, Reboxetine, Resimatil, Restoril, Restyl, Rhotrimine, Risperdal, Risperidone, Rispolept, Ritalin, Rivotril, Rubifen Sediten, Seduxen, Selecten, Serax, Serenace, Serepax, Serenase, Serentil, Seresta, Serlain, Serlift, Seroquel, Seroxat, Sertan, Sertraline, Serzone, Sevinol, Sideril, Sigaperidol, Sinequan, Sinqualone, Sinquan, Sirtal, Solanax, Solian, Solvex, Songar, Stazepin, Stelazine, Stilnox, Stimuloton, Strattera, Sulpiride, Sulpiride Ratiopharm, Sulpiride Neurazpharm, Surmontil, Symbyax, Symmetrel Tafil, Tavor, Taxagon, Tegretol, Telesmin, Temazepam, Temesta, Temposil, Terfluzine, Thioridazine, Thiothixene, Thombran, Thorazine, Timonil, Tofranil, Trancin, Tranax, Trankimazin, Tranquinal, Tranylcypromine, Trazalon, Trazodone, Trazonil, Trialodine, Triazolam, Trifluoperazine, Trihexane, Trihexyphenidyl, Trilafon, Trimipramine, Triptil, Trittico, Tryptanol Valium, Valproate, Valproic acid, Valrelease, Venlafaxine, Vestra, Vigicer, Vivactil Wellbutrin Xanax, Xanor, Xydep Zamhexal, Zeldox, Zimovane, Zispin, Ziprasidone, Zolarem, Zoldac, Zoloft, Zolpidem, Zonalon, Zopiclone, Zydis, Zyprexa The site listed below also has a list of medications and what type they are...hope this helps! (not real sure why i would get a thumbs down on this answer?) Answered by Nancey Betancourt 2 years ago.

I feel that there is always a natural alternative and some people think they need to take antidepressants etc. Because they do not know what is really wrong with them. All to many times doctor's prescribe these meds instead of seeking out the true issue's. I can't see how it would aid spiritual work only confuse it and hinder it. Like I said I so believe there is always a natural alternative. Prescription drugs mean dependency on a man made substance and stops the user from making life changes to enhance there well being. BB Tink Answered by Troy Leiter 2 years ago.

(I use the brand names here, because they are easier to type and remember) Antidepressants (mostly SSRIs) : Lexapro (most likely the top selling psychiatric medication currently), Prozac, Zoloft, Wellbutrin... Antianxiety: Xanax (it should not be prescribed so much; very risky), Ativan, Klonopin, Valium... I should include atypical antipsychotics and anticonvulsants, but I can't think of them right now. The top two catagories are by far the most common anyway and cover a large number of disorders. Answered by Nanette Oard 2 years ago.

The website crazymeds.us has been one I've found extremely helpful. It lists all the meds according to their class and when you click on them it gives all the uses and side effects. They also have a board where you can get other people's experiences with each med and each disorder/illness. Answered by Evelina Readus 2 years ago.

The most popular medication for anti-psychotics are Abilify(the newest), Risperdal, Geodon, & Haldol(the oldest. Each one has it's own side effects and sometime you have to try more then one to get the best results. P.S. The web site crazy meds is OK, but it is one sided(the scary side only). Answered by Antoine Paladini 2 years ago.

Depends on the problem, there are many different kind. Some used together, and most used alone. Only a Dr. can evaluate you and give you the right meds. SOmetimes it takes a while to find the right one. Answered by Lonny Treon 2 years ago.


Does evening primrose oil affect the potency of birth control pills?
i'm asking because my dermy told me to take evening primrose to help heal my active eczema. thanks in advance! Asked by Ami Hanf 2 years ago.

My herbal guide doesn't say that it does. It is also used for pms, among other things. It does interact with the following medications: compazine, mellaril, navane, permitil, phenergan, prolixin, serentil, stelazine, thorazine and trilafon. If you take any of these medications, you shouldn't use evening primrose. Answered by Lizzie Guritz 2 years ago.

The only way that is 100% is not having sex or having a hystorectomy. BC can fail, it is a small chance but it can fail. Condoms can fail. Pullout method fails often and isn't a BC method at all. Even woman who get their tubes tied could still become pregnant it is just a small chance. I have to say most of my neices and nephews are BC babies. For some reason BC really just doesn't work for my sisters at all and they have tried different forms. But they are suppose to be pretty good but you have to take them everyday on time and it takes 3 months to build up in your system so it is best to use other protection during that time. Antibiotics can knock out the BC so you need extra protection at that time as well. If you switch pills to another type you need to use protection for atleast a month to give your body time to adjust. Answered by Lizeth Runyan 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: does evening primrose oil affect the potency of birth control pills? i'm asking because my dermy told me to take evening primrose to help heal my active eczema. thanks in advance! Answered by Lue Radisovich 2 years ago.

I believe so, better stay away jsut to be safe. Try something else to help with your eczema Answered by Kristie Jankowski 2 years ago.


What meds are prescribed for schizophrenia?
Asked by Dagny Mellgren 2 years ago.

ANTIPSYCHOTIC. List of Antipsychotic Medications chlorpromazine -Thorazine chlorprothixene -Taractan clozapine -Clozaril fluphenazine -Permitil, Prolixin haloperidol- Haldol loxapine- Loxitane mesoridazine -Serentil molindone Lidone, -Moban olanzapine -Zyprexa perphenazine -Trilafon quetiapine -Seroquel risperidone -Risperdal thioridazine- Mellaril thiothixene -Navane trifluoperazine -Stelazine trifluopromazine -Vesprin ziprasidone -Geodon paliperidone- Invega Answered by Asuncion Bignell 2 years ago.

All the antipsychotics can be used for schizophenia, I take chlorpromazine at night and proclorperazine during the day, but the doctor at the hospital does not like me taking 2 antipsychotics. Answered by Leona Heisner 2 years ago.

I've heard a lot of people talking about abilify recently Answered by Riley Jonathan 2 years ago.

Risperidal Sereoquel ( i take this one ) Haldol Answered by Marine Antoniuk 2 years ago.

well i only know respiradal lol cause im on it they use it for that too. Answered by Zenia Allcock 2 years ago.


What types of side effects have you had from Geodon?
I just started on this medication after trying others but, the side effects I read about really scare me. I would like to hear the pros and cons from others who have taken it. Thanks! Asked by Austin Familia 2 years ago.

Most important fact about this drug: In some people with heart problems or a slow heartbeat, Geodon can cause serious and potentially fatal heartbeat irregularities. The chance of a problem is greater if you are taking a water pill (diuretic) or a medication that prolongs a part of the heartbeat known as the QT interval. Many of the drugs prescribed for heartbeat irregularities prolong the QT interval and should never be combined with Geodon. Other drugs to avoid when taking Geodon include Anzemet, Avelox, Halfan, Inapsine, Lariam, Mellaril, Nebupent, Orap, Orlaam, Pentam, Probucol, Prograf, Serentil, Tequin, Thorazine, Trisenox, and Zagam. If you're uncertain about the risks of any drug you're taking, be sure to check with your doctor before combining it with Geodon. Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Geodon. More common side effects may include: Accidental injury, cold symptoms, constipation, cough, diarrhea, dizziness, drowsiness, dry mouth, indigestion, muscle tightness, nausea, rash, stuffy and runny nose, upper respiratory infection, vision problems, weakness Other side effects may include: Abdominal pain, abnormal body movements, abnormal ejaculation, abnormal secretion of milk, abnormal walk, abnormally low cholesterol, agitation, amnesia, anemia, bleeding gums, bleeding in the eye, blood clots, blood disorders, blood in urine, body spasms, breast development in males, bruising or purple spots, cataracts, chest pain, chills, clogged bowels, confusion, conjunctivitis (pinkeye), coordination problems, decreased blood flow to the heart, delirium, difficulty breathing, difficulty swallowing, difficulty with orgasm, double vision, dry eyes, enlarged heart, eyelid inflammation, female sexual problems, fever, flank pain, flu-like symptoms, fungal infections, gout, hair loss, heavy menstruation, heavy uterine or vaginal bleeding, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, hives, hostility, impotence, increased reflexes, increased sensitivity to touch or sound, inflammation of the cornea, inflammation of the heart, involuntary or jerky movements, irregular heartbeat, liver problems, lockjaw, loss of appetite, loss of menstruation, low blood sugar, low blood pressure, low body temperature, lymph disorders, male sexual problems, muscle disorders, muscle pain, muscle weakness, nighttime urination, nosebleed, pneumonia, prickling or tingling sensation, rapid heartbeat, rectal bleeding, rigid muscle movement, ringing in ears, rolling of the eyeballs, sensitivity to sunlight, skin problems, slow heartbeat, slowed movement, speech problems, stroke, sudden drop in blood pressure upon standing up, swelling in the arms and legs, swelling in the face, swollen lymph nodes, swollen tongue, tarry stools, tendon inflammation, thirst, throat spasms, thyroid disorders, tremor, twitching, uncontrolled eye movement, urination decrease or increase, vaginal bleeding, vein inflammation, vertigo, vision disorders, vomiting, vomiting or spitting blood, yellowed skin and eyes, weight gain, white spots in the mouth. Special warnings about this medication: Remember that Geodon can cause dangerous--even fatal--heartbeat irregularities. Warning signs include dizziness, palpitations, and fainting. Tell your doctor immediately if you experience any of these symptoms. Be careful to avoid drugs that prolong the QT interval of the heartbeat. Check with your doctor before combining any other medication with Geodon. Particularly during the first few days of therapy, Geodon can cause low blood pressure, with accompanying dizziness, fainting, and rapid heartbeat. Tell your doctor if you experience any of these side effects. To minimize such problems, your doctor will increase your dose gradually. If you are prone to low blood pressure, take blood pressure medicine, become dehydrated, or have heart disease or poor circulation in the brain, use Geodon with caution. Geodon may cause drowsiness and can impair your judgment, thinking, and motor skills. Use caution while driving and don't operate potentially dangerous machinery until you know how this drug affects you. Geodon poses a very slight risk of seizures, especially if you are over age 65, have a history of seizures, or have Alzheimer's disease. Drugs such as Geodon sometimes cause a condition called Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome. Symptoms include high fever, muscle rigidity, irregular pulse or blood pressure, rapid heartbeat, excessive perspiration, and changes in heart rhythm. If these symptoms appear, tell your doctor immediately. You'll need to stop taking Geodon while the condition is under treatment. There also is the risk of developing tardive dyskinesia, a condition marked by slow, rhythmical, involuntary movements. This problem is more likely to occur in mature adults, especially older women. When it does, use of Geodon is usually stopped. Geodon can suppress the cough reflex; you may have trouble clearing your airway. Some people taking Geodon also develop a rash. Tell your doctor when this happens. If the rash doesn't clear up with treatment, you may have to discontinue the drug. Other antipsychotic medications have been known to interfere with the body's temperature-regulating mechanism, causing the body to overheat. Although this problem has not occurred with Geodon, caution is still advisable. Avoid exposure to extreme heat, strenuous exercise, and dehydration. There also is a remote chance that this medication may cause abnormal, prolonged and painful erections. Remember that you must never combine Geodon with any drug that prolongs the part of the heartbeat known as the QT interval (see "Most important fact about this drug"). Check with your doctor or pharmacist if you have any doubts about a drug you're taking. If Geodon is taken with certain other drugs, the effects of either could be increased, decreased, or altered. It is especially important to check with your doctor before combining Geodon with the following: Carbamazepine (Tegretol) Certain blood pressure medications Drugs that boost the effects of dopamine such as Mirapex, Parlodel, Permax, and Requip Drugs that affect the brain and nervous system, such as sedatives, tranquilizers, and antidepressants Ketoconazole (Nizoral) Levodopa (Larodopa, Sinemet) Answered by Yuki Runk 2 years ago.

I have been on geodon for several weeks now. I have experienced paranoia and also headaches about an hour before it is time to take it again. I have also had increased energy and for that it has been a lifesaver for me as all other anti-psychotics have created exhaustion. I love this medication despite the few ill effects. It has truly made me feel more normal again. Answered by Onie Caravetta 2 years ago.

Be careful. I took Geodon last year while in the hospital for med management. I did well on it, so my Psychiatrist increased my dosage to the maximum level. I experienced heart palpitations. I was very scared and the hospital didn't believe me. They performed an emergency EKG the next day, but not until my I called my mother and she threatened to call the police unless the hospital took action and called my doctor. Make sure you and your loved ones monitor this drug VERY CLOSELY. Answered by Terese Sheetz 2 years ago.

I only took it twice, and it gave me horrible anxiety. I already had some anxiety to begin with, but it was absolutely awful, so awful that I couldn't take it anymore. Answered by Joetta Gabrelcik 2 years ago.


Medical Professionals if possible: Side effects of Geodon, interfering with daily life? Doc on vacation.?
Was just hypoglycemia acting up. Geodon is making me really sensitive to it, have to eat every couple of hours and avoid caffeine and I should be fine... Odd because I havent had any problems with it since I was about 16.. Anyways thanks for your answer Asked by Jon Aversano 2 years ago.

Hi, My doctor is on vacation so im hoping some medical professionals here may be able to answer my questions. I started the medication at 60mg once a day about a week ago. the first day I couldnt focus on anything and got very tired. At that point I decided to take it at night and it helps me sleep, so I disregard all of those instant side effects. But yesterday about mid-day I started to feel very shaky, my hands got very cold, and my muscles felt really stiff. Later that day It started to get hard to do precise movements with my fingers and my muscles started to burn. This is the point I figured it was just not eating enough that day, or the meds wearing off before my next dose.. So I took my pill early(about 5pm) and went to bed. Well this morning I wake up fine.. about 2 hours up and I feel like I did yesterday with everything and im freezing but im sweating.. Any ideas? I dont want to go to the hospital because it costs $$ that I dont have. Answered by Barbera Kapsalis 2 years ago.

Hi, I am a doctor.. Most important fact about Geodon In some people with heart problems or a slow heartbeat, Geodon can cause serious and potentially fatal heartbeat irregularities. The chance of a problem is greater if you are taking a water pill (diuretic) or a medication that prolongs a part of the heartbeat known as the QT interval. Many of the drugs prescribed for heartbeat irregularities prolong the QT interval and should never be combined with Geodon. Other drugs to avoid when taking Geodon include Anzemet, Avelox, Halfan, Inapsine, Lariam, Mellaril, Nebupent, Orap, Orlaam, Pentam, Probucol, Prograf, Serentil, Tequin, Thorazine, Trisenox, and Zagam. If you're uncertain about the risks of any drug you're taking, be sure to check with your doctor before combining it with Geodon. How should you take Geodon? Geodon capsules should be taken twice a day with food. --If you miss a dose... Take it as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the one you missed and go back to your regular schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once. --Storage instructions... Store at room temperature. What side effects may occur? Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Geodon. More common side effects may include: Accidental injury, cold symptoms, constipation, cough, diarrhea, dizziness, drowsiness, dry mouth, headache, indigestion, involuntary muscle contractions, muscle tightness, nausea, rash, stuffy and runny nose, upper respiratory infection, vision problems, vomiting, weakness Remember that Geodon can cause dangerous--even fatal--heartbeat irregularities. Warning signs include dizziness, palpitations, and fainting. Tell your doctor immediately if you experience any of these symptoms. Be careful to avoid drugs that prolong the QT interval of the heartbeat. Check with your doctor before combining any other medication with Geodon. Well, your sumptoms can be caused by the drug.. when you get the symptoms next time, try to be calm and try ot concentrate.. do not panic.. If still the symptoms persist, I'm afraid you would have to goto the doctor.. If you want more info, feel free to write to me or visit www.medicguide.org This is a free site done by me and other doctors to answer health querries for free. Answered by Krishna Kurnik 2 years ago.

Masturbation is the system of bringing approximately a voluntary pleasure of the sexual facilities following mainly by means of the release of semen.Materbation is natural in younger guys,baby.The facet outcome of masterbation may be very harmful in long run if those turn out to be habbit is also Infertility,Continuous headache and backache. Dizziness and lack of reminiscence.Unable to participate in any heavy bodily or intellectual paintings. Answered by Wm Garen 2 years ago.


What to do , When the doctors running out medications to treat Bipolar Disorder?
BEEN ON THE FOLLOWING MEDICATIONS THEY ALL HAD SOMETHING THEY DID OR DIDN'T WORK OR MADE ME FEEL SICKER , WHAT TO DO : GEODON , ABILIFY, TOPOMAX, LAMICTAL , LITHIUM, SEROQUEL, HALDOL,MELLARIL, SERENTIL, STELAZINE, DEPAKOTE , NEURONTIN , LEXAPRO, ZOLOFT , EFFEXOR, PAMELOR , ATIVAN... Asked by Silvana Rodenburg 2 years ago.

BEEN ON THE FOLLOWING MEDICATIONS THEY ALL HAD SOMETHING THEY DID OR DIDN'T WORK OR MADE ME FEEL SICKER , WHAT TO DO : GEODON , ABILIFY, TOPOMAX, LAMICTAL , LITHIUM, SEROQUEL, HALDOL, MELLARIL, SERENTIL, STELAZINE, DEPAKOTE , NEURONTIN , LEXAPRO, ZOLOFT , EFFEXOR, PAMELOR , ATIVAN , TRANXENE, TRAZADONE ??? Answered by Lakisha Aipperspach 2 years ago.

Trileptal, tegretol ... Don't know of course your exact history the key is usually getting just the right dose and combination and it's a real *#&$ trying to figure that out. Don't ever let them add/subtract make more than one change at a time, that helps to pinpoint better what is better and worse. Sometimes two meds at a 'substandard' dose do more than one med at what is usually a therapeutic dose. People are so different. My son's doc insists that 7.5 mg of abilify at 260 lbs can't possibly do anything for him, but 10mg makes him twitchy and 5mg does nothing -- 7.5 means the difference between holes in my wall and no holes in my wall -- that was his 'miracle med'. of course it's different for everyone. Getting exact dosing can be the trick. Most antidepressants won't work until you get a good mood stabilizer on board, wellbutrin actually has a different action that is often less of a trigger in bipolar. Takes a while but too many possible combinations to give up yet. Sometimes doses need tweaking rather than crossing the med off the list as not working. And electroshock therapy isn't the nightmare it was earlier in the century. I'd like to see what's happening with the magnet therapy, haven't checked on it lately -- get an MRI you'll feel better, for a day or two anyway. Answered by Remona Zylstra 2 years ago.

Wow, you've really tried a lot. It's so hard sometimes to find the right ones without side effects, or with side effects mild enough that they are tolerable. How about Wellbutrin, Tegratol, Trileptal, Buspar? There is a medication called Clozapine (Clozaril) that is an anti-psychotic that has helped people when nothing else did. It can have very serious side effects though and requires frequent blood tests. It's pretty much only used for severe psychotic features that have not responded to anything else. The truth is, most meds are going to have some side effects and none will eliminate symptoms altogether. When effective, they will reduce the frequency and severity of symptoms and make the illness more manageable. Also, some of the milder side effects will often go away after your body adjusts to the meds. Other meds take 4-6 weeks to be fully effective. If you have tried all of these, you already know this stuff. It might be worth sitting down and making a list of all the meds you have tried, how long you took them, what dosage you were on, what side effects you had (the best you can remember anyway...I know I always have trouble remembering the dosages of past meds) and taking a good look at it. Figure out which meds made things worse/caused intolerable side effects and see which ones are left. It may be that the right combination of some of those medications will be effective for you. The good thing is, they will continue to develop new medications with less side effects. The more they learn about the biology of bipolar, the more they will be able to directly treat what's going wrong. It's also important to have a very regular sleep schedule, eat a healthy balanced diet, get exercise, avoid mood altering substances...and personally, I think, get some sort of cognitive behavioral therapy. I highly recommend trying a therapy called DBT. It's helped me make some real changes in my life where all other therapy and even meds have fallen short. Medication isn't magic...if only it were that easy. But they can help you to be stabilized to the point where you can work on the other aspects. When the symptoms are out of control, it's very hard to do the things you know will help (work out, eat right, not abuse substances, etc.) Is it possible that it is not bipolar, but something else that is similar in symptoms? Answered by Rosemary Regner 2 years ago.

My brother is bi-polar manic depressive.....he is 50 and he feels best when he is on his Prozac with the Lithium..atleast he can function like a real person. Are you taking the meds separately or combining several to get best results? You aren't drinking beer with the drugs are you? That will defeat the purpose and it is not a wise decision to do both at the same time. Answered by Carri Nol 2 years ago.

I have heard that the VNS ((vagus nerve stimulation)) can help people with depression Answered by Rolf Boyanton 2 years ago.

That's pretty much all of them. I would focus on behavior therapies to help recognize symptoms of mania etc. Answered by Shirely Combee 2 years ago.

celexa is a new one and there is at least 1 more new one out I know..just don't know the name...VNS is supposed to be 75% success rate...check it out Answered by Tameika Dwornik 2 years ago.

sounds like you need something besides just medication ... yoga and meditation can do amazing things... Answered by Milan Rzasa 2 years ago.


If you take antibiotics and you get a real bad headache from it would you stop?
The medicine is call Erythromycin base 500 Asked by Curt Elland 2 years ago.

Side Effects of This Medicine: Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur: Fever; headache, nausea; skin rash, redness, or itching; stomach pain (severe); unusual tiredness or weakness; vomiting; yellow eyes or skin-with erythromycin estolate (rare with other erythromycins) Pain, swelling, or redness at place of injection Fainting (repeated); irregular or slow heartbeat; loss of hearing (temporary) Other medicines—Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking or receiving erythromycins, it is especially important that your health care professional know if you are taking any of the following: Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Amiodarone (e.g., Cordarone) or Anabolic steroids (nandrolone [e.g., Anabolin], oxandrolone [e.g., Anavar], oxymetholone [e.g., Anadrol], stanozolol [e.g., Winstrol]) or Androgens (male hormones) or Antithyroid agents (medicine for overactive thyroid) or Carmustine (e.g., BiCNU) or Chloroquine (e.g., Aralen) or Dantrolene (e.g., Dantrium) or Daunorubicin (e.g., Cerubidine) or Disulfiram (e.g., Antabuse) or Divalproex (e.g., Depakote) or Estrogens (female hormones) or Etretinate (e.g., Tegison) or Gold salts (medicine for arthritis) or Hydroxychloroquine (e.g., Plaquenil) or Mercaptopurine (e.g., Purinethol) or Methotrexate (e.g., Mexate) or Methyldopa (e.g., Aldomet) or Naltrexone (e.g., Trexan) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Oral contraceptives (birth control pills) containing estrogen or Other anti-infectives by mouth or by injection (medicine for infection) or Phenothiazines (acetophenazine [e.g., Tindal], chlorpromazine [e.g., Thorazine], fluphenazine [e.g., Prolixin], mesoridazine [e.g., Serentil], perphenazine [e.g., Trilafon], prochlorperazine [e.g., Compazine], promazine [e.g., Sparine], promethazine [e.g., Phenergan], thioridazine [e.g., Mellaril], trifluoperazine [e.g., Stelazine], triflupromazine [e.g., Vesprin], trimeprazine [e.g., Temaril]) or Phenytoin (e.g., Dilantin) or Plicamycin (e.g., Mithracin) or Valproic acid (e.g., Depakene)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins, especially erythromycin estolate, may increase the chance of liver problems Aminophylline (e.g., Somophyllin) or Caffeine (e.g., NoDoz) or Oxtriphylline (e.g., Choledyl) or Theophylline (e.g., Somophyllin-T, Theo-Dur)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the chance of side effects from aminophylline, caffeine, oxtriphylline, or theophylline Astemizole (e.g., Hismanal) or Terfenadine (e.g., Seldane)—Use of astemizole or terfenadine with erythromycins may cause heart problems, such as an irregular heartbeat; these medicines should not be used together Carbamazepine (e.g., Tegretol)—Use of carbamazepine with erythromycin may increase the side effects of carbamazepine or increase the chance of liver problems Chloramphenicol (e.g., Chloromycetin) or Clindamycin (e.g., Cleocin) or Lincomycin (e.g., Lincocin)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may decrease the effectiveness of these other antibiotics Cyclosporine (e.g., Sandimmune) or Warfarin (e.g., Coumadin)—Use of any of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the side effects of these medicines Other medical problems—The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of erythromycins. Answered by Jesus Dellagatta 2 years ago.

I'd page my doctor right away to ask if the headache is actually related to the medication and not something happening by chance. Only your doctor can advise you whether you should take a medication or not--remember also to tell the doctor the names of the other medications you're on to make sure there's not an interaction. Answered by Madlyn Ribot 2 years ago.

It is not likely that the antibiotic is giving you the headache. You have to finish your antibiotics, as long as you don't have a life threatening reaction. Take some Tylenol for your head. If it is really bothering you, you should ask your parents, anyway. Answered by Jacquiline Lifsey 2 years ago.

in case you get a headache because of the fact of taking the medicine and as you think of you're clearing up now, you are able to desire to not proceed taking the medicine. Drink countless comfortable beverages, shop hydrated to have sufficient kidney filtration. Answered by Wilburn Gilgour 2 years ago.

Headaches aren't a side effect to this drug (in a general sense). Don't stop taking it unless the prescribing doctor says so. Answered by Michel Kissi 2 years ago.


What are the side effects to Paxil?
My doctor put me on Paxil for my anxiety and told me that it would help me with depression as well. I don't think I'm depressed nor do I feel depressed (have been in the past) but do suffer from anxiety disorder. And today I took my first Paxil pill and lots of stuff running through my head. I feel... Asked by Shelby Baize 2 years ago.

My doctor put me on Paxil for my anxiety and told me that it would help me with depression as well. I don't think I'm depressed nor do I feel depressed (have been in the past) but do suffer from anxiety disorder. And today I took my first Paxil pill and lots of stuff running through my head. I feel angry...I feel mad.... this is not my persona at all. I'm a very happy person, especially around my family. And ironically today, has not been a good day. Very angry and no reason that I can think of. Unsure if its a side effect and i'm trying to be optimistic about takign this medication. Any input would be appreciated. Answered by Alisia Burgoyne 2 years ago.

If the pills are making you angry.... I personally wouldn't take them anymore! Especially if you don't feel depressed to begin with. As far as your question about the side effects of Paxil....... If you have any of the following serious side effects, stop taking paroxetine and contact your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical treatment: an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); an irregular heartbeat or pulse; low blood pressure (dizziness, weakness); high blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision); unusual bleeding or bruising; or fever or chills. Less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take paroxetine and talk to your doctor if you experience headache; sleepiness or insomnia; weakness; nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation; decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm; dry mouth; tremor, nervousness, anxiety trouble concentrating; or changes in appetite or weight. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect paroxetine? Do not take paroxetine together with pimozide (Orap), thioridazine (Mellaril), or a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), selegeline (Eldepryl), or tranylcypromine (Parnate). You must wait at least 14 days after stopping an MAOI before you can take paroxetine. You must wait 5 weeks after stopping paroxetine before you can take thioridazine (Mellaril). Before taking paroxetine, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following medicines: tryptophan; warfarin (Coumadin); digoxin (Lanoxin); or lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith, others); theophylline (Theobid, Theolair, Theochron, Elixophyllin, and others); other SSRIs such as fluoxetine (Prozac), fluvoxamine (Luvox), sertraline (Zoloft), and others; a tricyclic antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil), imipramine (Tofranil), doxepin (Sinequan), nortriptyline (Pamelor), and others; aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), ketoprofen (Oruvail), and others; a phenothiazine such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), mesoridazine (Serentil), perphenazine (Trilafon), prochlorperazine (Compazine), and others; almotriptan (Axert), frovatriptan (Frova), sumatriptan (Imitrex), naratriptan (Amerge), rizatriptan (Maxalt), or zolmitriptan (Zomig); heart rhythm medication such as flecainide (Tambocor), propafenone (Rhythmol), and others; or cimetidine (Tagamet, Tagamet HB). If you are using any of the medicines listed above, you may not be able to take paroxetine, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring. Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with paroxetine. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using paroxetine. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. * Doctors usually don't have the time to tell you all of this. Although it is very important information you should know. Good Luck! <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>... . Answered by Carline Andes 2 years ago.

Less likely that all these symptoms are side effects of Paxil. I think you should try to change medicine. Try Zolofit in consultation with your doctor. Based on experience of my clients , Forgetfulness , Weight Gain , Sexual side effect can be attributed to Paxil. Answered by Mertie Pluta 2 years ago.

If things don't improve in the next couple of days you need to ask your doctor to switch your medication. I know quite a few people who have taken Paxil (myself included) and it seemed to only make things worse. I know personally, I wanted to kill myself while taking it and I was never that depressed before. Answered by Nenita Matteson 2 years ago.

paxil is a medication that has a well known amount of side effects but the symptoms that you describe are strange. I believe that it is effecting your emotions and some well known depression medications due cause bad stimulunt reactions. Please contact your psychologist because these emotions are irregular.Until then discontinue the medication. Answered by Ashley Aman 2 years ago.

It interferes with your ability to ejaculate. Answered by Johnie Musty 2 years ago.


Has anyone experienced Blackouts while using Prozac?
A very good friend on mine is experiencing total black-outs from using 80 mg of Prozac a day. I have advised them to stop taking it and contact their physician. Anyone else seeing this with this medication??? Asked by Estelle Landvatter 2 years ago.

Prozac 10 mg-green, elliptical, scored tablets Prozac 10 mg-green capsules Prozac 20 mg-green and white capsules Prozac 40 mg-green and orange capsules Prozac 20 mg/5 mL oral solution-mint flavored solution Prozac Weekly 90 mg-green and clear capsules What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if an overdose is suspected. Symptoms of a fluoxetine overdose include nausea, vomiting, tremor, agitation, seizures, drowsiness, hyperactivity, and enlarged pupils. (back to top) What should I avoid while taking fluoxetine? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Fluoxetine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness or dizziness while taking fluoxetine. (back to top) What are the possible side effects of fluoxetine? If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking fluoxetine and contact your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical treatment: an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); an irregular heartbeat or pulse; low blood pressure (dizziness, weakness); high blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision); chills or fever; unusual bleeding or bruising; a rash or hives. If you experience any of the following less serious side effects, continue taking fluoxetine and talk to your doctor: headache, tremor, nervousness, or anxiety; difficulty concentrating; nausea, diarrhea, dry mouth, or changes in appetite or weight; weakness; increased sweating; sleepiness or insomnia; or decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. (back to top) What other drugs will affect fluoxetine? Do not take fluoxetine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) during the last 2 weeks. Serious, and sometimes fatal, reactions have occurred when these medicines have been used together. Also, do not take fluoxetine if you are taking thioridazine (Mellaril). Dangerous, even fatal irregular heartbeats may occur if these medicines are taken together. You must wait 5 weeks after stopping fluoxetine before taking thioridazine (Mellaril). Before taking fluoxetine, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines: a benzodiazepine such as diazepam (Valium), alprazolam (Xanax), chlordiazepoxide (Librium), clorazepate (Tranxene), temazepam (Restoril), triazolam (Halcion), and others; a tricyclic antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil), imipramine (Tofranil), doxepin (Sinequan), nortriptyline (Pamelor), and others; St. John's wort; a phenothiazine such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), mesoridazine (Serentil), perphenazine (Trilafon), prochlorperazine (Compazine), and others; lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith, others) or haloperidol (Haldol); almotriptan (Axert), frovatriptan (Frova), sumatriptan (Imitrex), naratriptan (Amerge), rizatriptan (Maxalt), or zolmitriptan (Zomig); carbamazepine (Tegretol) or phenytoin (Dilantin); warfarin (Coumadin); or digoxin (Lanoxin). You may not be able to take fluoxetine, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you are taking any of the medicines listed above. Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with fluoxetine. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. (back to top) Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has additional information about fluoxetine written for health professionals that you may read. Answered by Dorathy Amderson 2 years ago.

Prozac can cause "light headedness" which usually happens if you stand up quickly. Your friend's symptoms sound more pronounced. I recommend that he call his psychiatrist immediately and be evaluated. There are many other equally effective medications that he could use. It is important that he does not quit taking the medication without talking with his doctor. Answered by Hollis Piercy 2 years ago.

i take 40 mg of Prozac everyday and have never experienced any blackouts,your friend needs to talk to his doctor they may have to change their dosage or change to a different kind of medicine Answered by Christeen Theisen 2 years ago.

Yes but don't go off cold turkey. Talk to your doctor. Answered by Angelo Turne 2 years ago.

No I haven't Answered by Blair Ballreich 2 years ago.

Yes i see this also so i stopped taking it Answered by Isa Purrington 2 years ago.

Only a doctor should be telling him whats what. Answered by Julius Jeanty 2 years ago.


Psychiatric Medication?
What are the most common kind/names of psychiatric medications for adults with mental/psychological disorders and illnesses? Thank you for your help! Asked by Allegra Rincones 2 years ago.

hun that is a long list...but here goes: Abilify, Adapin, Adderall, Alepam, Alertec, Aloperidin, Alplax, Alprax, Alprazolam, Alviz, Alzolam, Amantadine, Ambien, Amisulpride, Amitriptyline, Amoxapine, Anafranil, Anatensol, Ansial, Ansiced, Antabus, Antabuse, Antideprin, Anxiron, Apo-Alpraz, Apo-Primidone, Apo-Sertral, Aponal, Apozepam, Aripiprazole, Aropax, Artane, Asendin, Asendis, Asentra, Ativan, Atomoxetine, Aurorix, Aventyl, Axoren Beneficat, Bimaran, Bioperidolo, Biston, Brotopon, Bespar, Bupropion, Buspar, Buspimen, Buspinol, Buspirone, Buspisal Calepsin, Calcium carbonate, Calcium carbimide, Calmax, Carbamazepine, Carbatrol, Carbolith, Celexa, Chlordiazepoxide, Chlorpromazine, Cibalith-S, Cipralex, Citalopram, Clomipramine, Clonazepam, Clozapine, Clozaril, Concerta, Constan, Convulex, Cylert Dalmane, Dapotum, Defanyl, Demolox, Depakene, Depakote, Deprax, Deprilept, Deroxat, Desipramine, Desirel, Desoxyn, Desyrel, Dexedrine, Dextroamphetamine, Dextrostat, Diapam, Diazepam, Dilantin, Disulfiram, Divalproex, Dogmatil, Doxepin, Dozic, Duralith Edronax, Efectin, Effexor (Efexor), Eglonyl, Einalon S, Elavil, Endep, Epanutin, Epitol, Equetro, Escitalopram, Eskalith, Eskazinyl, Eskazine, Etrafon, Eukystol Faverin, Fazaclo, Fevarin, Finlepsin, Fludecate, Flunanthate, Fluoxetine, Fluphenazine, Flurazepam, Fluvoxamine, Focalin Geodon, Gladem Halcion, Halomonth, Haldol, Haloperidol, Halosten Imipramine, Imovane Janimine, Jatroneural Kalma, Keselan, Klonopin Lamotrigine, Largactil, Levomepromazine, Levoprome, Leponex, Lexapro, Libritabs, Librium, Linton, Liskantin, Lithane, Lithium, Lithizine, Lithobid, Lithonate, Lithotabs, Lorazepam, Loxapac, Loxapine, Loxitane, Ludiomil, Lunesta, Lustral, Luvox, Lyogen, Lecital Manegan, Manerix, Maprotiline, Mellaril, Melleretten, Melleril, Meresa, Mesoridazine, Metadate, Methamphetamine, Methotrimeprazine, Methylin, Methylphenidate, Minitran, Moclobemide, Modafinil, Modalina, Modecate, Moditen, Molipaxin, Moxadil, Murelax, Myidone, Mylepsinum, Mysoline Nardil, Narol, Navane, Nefazodone, Neoperidol, Norebox, Normison, Norpramine, Nortriptyline, Novodorm Olanzapine, Omca, Orap, Oxazepam Pamelor, Parnate, Paroxetine, Paxil, Peluces, Pemoline, Permitil, Perphenazine, Pertofrane, Phenelzine, Phenytoin, Pimozide, Piportil, Pipotiazine, Pragmarel, Primidone, Prolift, Prolixin, Protriptyline, Provigil, Prozac, Prysoline, Psymion Quetiapine Ralozam, Reboxetine, Resimatil, Restoril, Restyl, Rhotrimine, Risperdal, Risperidone, Rispolept, Ritalin, Rivotril, Rubifen Sediten, Seduxen, Selecten, Serax, Serenace, Serepax, Serenase, Serentil, Seresta, Serlain, Serlift, Seroquel, Seroxat, Sertan, Sertraline, Serzone, Sevinol, Sideril, Sigaperidol, Sinequan, Sinqualone, Sinquan, Sirtal, Solanax, Solian, Solvex, Songar, Stazepin, Stelazine, Stilnox, Stimuloton, Strattera, Sulpiride, Sulpiride Ratiopharm, Sulpiride Neurazpharm, Surmontil, Symbyax, Symmetrel Tafil, Tavor, Taxagon, Tegretol, Telesmin, Temazepam, Temesta, Temposil, Terfluzine, Thioridazine, Thiothixene, Thombran, Thorazine, Timonil, Tofranil, Trancin, Tranax, Trankimazin, Tranquinal, Tranylcypromine, Trazalon, Trazodone, Trazonil, Trialodine, Triazolam, Trifluoperazine, Trihexane, Trihexyphenidyl, Trilafon, Trimipramine, Triptil, Trittico, Tryptanol Valium, Valproate, Valproic acid, Valrelease, Venlafaxine, Vestra, Vigicer, Vivactil Wellbutrin Xanax, Xanor, Xydep Zamhexal, Zeldox, Zimovane, Zispin, Ziprasidone, Zolarem, Zoldac, Zoloft, Zolpidem, Zonalon, Zopiclone, Zydis, Zyprexa The site listed below also has a list of medications and what type they are...hope this helps! (not real sure why i would get a thumbs down on this answer?) Answered by Genna Weatherly 2 years ago.

I feel that there is always a natural alternative and some people think they need to take antidepressants etc. Because they do not know what is really wrong with them. All to many times doctor's prescribe these meds instead of seeking out the true issue's. I can't see how it would aid spiritual work only confuse it and hinder it. Like I said I so believe there is always a natural alternative. Prescription drugs mean dependency on a man made substance and stops the user from making life changes to enhance there well being. BB Tink Answered by Carlton Sessler 2 years ago.

(I use the brand names here, because they are easier to type and remember) Antidepressants (mostly SSRIs) : Lexapro (most likely the top selling psychiatric medication currently), Prozac, Zoloft, Wellbutrin... Antianxiety: Xanax (it should not be prescribed so much; very risky), Ativan, Klonopin, Valium... I should include atypical antipsychotics and anticonvulsants, but I can't think of them right now. The top two catagories are by far the most common anyway and cover a large number of disorders. Answered by Jenna Behrenwald 2 years ago.

The website crazymeds.us has been one I've found extremely helpful. It lists all the meds according to their class and when you click on them it gives all the uses and side effects. They also have a board where you can get other people's experiences with each med and each disorder/illness. Answered by Awilda Kannady 2 years ago.

The most popular medication for anti-psychotics are Abilify(the newest), Risperdal, Geodon, & Haldol(the oldest. Each one has it's own side effects and sometime you have to try more then one to get the best results. P.S. The web site crazy meds is OK, but it is one sided(the scary side only). Answered by Cleo Minzy 2 years ago.

Depends on the problem, there are many different kind. Some used together, and most used alone. Only a Dr. can evaluate you and give you the right meds. SOmetimes it takes a while to find the right one. Answered by Lashunda Obas 2 years ago.


Does evening primrose oil affect the potency of birth control pills?
i'm asking because my dermy told me to take evening primrose to help heal my active eczema. thanks in advance! Asked by Ossie Hilgeman 2 years ago.

My herbal guide doesn't say that it does. It is also used for pms, among other things. It does interact with the following medications: compazine, mellaril, navane, permitil, phenergan, prolixin, serentil, stelazine, thorazine and trilafon. If you take any of these medications, you shouldn't use evening primrose. Answered by Lakiesha Cavallaro 2 years ago.

The only way that is 100% is not having sex or having a hystorectomy. BC can fail, it is a small chance but it can fail. Condoms can fail. Pullout method fails often and isn't a BC method at all. Even woman who get their tubes tied could still become pregnant it is just a small chance. I have to say most of my neices and nephews are BC babies. For some reason BC really just doesn't work for my sisters at all and they have tried different forms. But they are suppose to be pretty good but you have to take them everyday on time and it takes 3 months to build up in your system so it is best to use other protection during that time. Antibiotics can knock out the BC so you need extra protection at that time as well. If you switch pills to another type you need to use protection for atleast a month to give your body time to adjust. Answered by Ossie Motte 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: does evening primrose oil affect the potency of birth control pills? i'm asking because my dermy told me to take evening primrose to help heal my active eczema. thanks in advance! Answered by Kortney Vales 2 years ago.

I believe so, better stay away jsut to be safe. Try something else to help with your eczema Answered by Fannie Eschenbach 2 years ago.


What meds are prescribed for schizophrenia?
Asked by Vernia Cosenza 2 years ago.

ANTIPSYCHOTIC. List of Antipsychotic Medications chlorpromazine -Thorazine chlorprothixene -Taractan clozapine -Clozaril fluphenazine -Permitil, Prolixin haloperidol- Haldol loxapine- Loxitane mesoridazine -Serentil molindone Lidone, -Moban olanzapine -Zyprexa perphenazine -Trilafon quetiapine -Seroquel risperidone -Risperdal thioridazine- Mellaril thiothixene -Navane trifluoperazine -Stelazine trifluopromazine -Vesprin ziprasidone -Geodon paliperidone- Invega Answered by Daniele Sleva 2 years ago.

All the antipsychotics can be used for schizophenia, I take chlorpromazine at night and proclorperazine during the day, but the doctor at the hospital does not like me taking 2 antipsychotics. Answered by Minnie Traylor 2 years ago.

I've heard a lot of people talking about abilify recently Answered by Sierra Bluth 2 years ago.

Risperidal Sereoquel ( i take this one ) Haldol Answered by Trinidad Muenkel 2 years ago.

well i only know respiradal lol cause im on it they use it for that too. Answered by Tod Nunnally 2 years ago.


What types of side effects have you had from Geodon?
I just started on this medication after trying others but, the side effects I read about really scare me. I would like to hear the pros and cons from others who have taken it. Thanks! Asked by Palmer Fatula 2 years ago.

Most important fact about this drug: In some people with heart problems or a slow heartbeat, Geodon can cause serious and potentially fatal heartbeat irregularities. The chance of a problem is greater if you are taking a water pill (diuretic) or a medication that prolongs a part of the heartbeat known as the QT interval. Many of the drugs prescribed for heartbeat irregularities prolong the QT interval and should never be combined with Geodon. Other drugs to avoid when taking Geodon include Anzemet, Avelox, Halfan, Inapsine, Lariam, Mellaril, Nebupent, Orap, Orlaam, Pentam, Probucol, Prograf, Serentil, Tequin, Thorazine, Trisenox, and Zagam. If you're uncertain about the risks of any drug you're taking, be sure to check with your doctor before combining it with Geodon. Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Geodon. More common side effects may include: Accidental injury, cold symptoms, constipation, cough, diarrhea, dizziness, drowsiness, dry mouth, indigestion, muscle tightness, nausea, rash, stuffy and runny nose, upper respiratory infection, vision problems, weakness Other side effects may include: Abdominal pain, abnormal body movements, abnormal ejaculation, abnormal secretion of milk, abnormal walk, abnormally low cholesterol, agitation, amnesia, anemia, bleeding gums, bleeding in the eye, blood clots, blood disorders, blood in urine, body spasms, breast development in males, bruising or purple spots, cataracts, chest pain, chills, clogged bowels, confusion, conjunctivitis (pinkeye), coordination problems, decreased blood flow to the heart, delirium, difficulty breathing, difficulty swallowing, difficulty with orgasm, double vision, dry eyes, enlarged heart, eyelid inflammation, female sexual problems, fever, flank pain, flu-like symptoms, fungal infections, gout, hair loss, heavy menstruation, heavy uterine or vaginal bleeding, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, hives, hostility, impotence, increased reflexes, increased sensitivity to touch or sound, inflammation of the cornea, inflammation of the heart, involuntary or jerky movements, irregular heartbeat, liver problems, lockjaw, loss of appetite, loss of menstruation, low blood sugar, low blood pressure, low body temperature, lymph disorders, male sexual problems, muscle disorders, muscle pain, muscle weakness, nighttime urination, nosebleed, pneumonia, prickling or tingling sensation, rapid heartbeat, rectal bleeding, rigid muscle movement, ringing in ears, rolling of the eyeballs, sensitivity to sunlight, skin problems, slow heartbeat, slowed movement, speech problems, stroke, sudden drop in blood pressure upon standing up, swelling in the arms and legs, swelling in the face, swollen lymph nodes, swollen tongue, tarry stools, tendon inflammation, thirst, throat spasms, thyroid disorders, tremor, twitching, uncontrolled eye movement, urination decrease or increase, vaginal bleeding, vein inflammation, vertigo, vision disorders, vomiting, vomiting or spitting blood, yellowed skin and eyes, weight gain, white spots in the mouth. Special warnings about this medication: Remember that Geodon can cause dangerous--even fatal--heartbeat irregularities. Warning signs include dizziness, palpitations, and fainting. Tell your doctor immediately if you experience any of these symptoms. Be careful to avoid drugs that prolong the QT interval of the heartbeat. Check with your doctor before combining any other medication with Geodon. Particularly during the first few days of therapy, Geodon can cause low blood pressure, with accompanying dizziness, fainting, and rapid heartbeat. Tell your doctor if you experience any of these side effects. To minimize such problems, your doctor will increase your dose gradually. If you are prone to low blood pressure, take blood pressure medicine, become dehydrated, or have heart disease or poor circulation in the brain, use Geodon with caution. Geodon may cause drowsiness and can impair your judgment, thinking, and motor skills. Use caution while driving and don't operate potentially dangerous machinery until you know how this drug affects you. Geodon poses a very slight risk of seizures, especially if you are over age 65, have a history of seizures, or have Alzheimer's disease. Drugs such as Geodon sometimes cause a condition called Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome. Symptoms include high fever, muscle rigidity, irregular pulse or blood pressure, rapid heartbeat, excessive perspiration, and changes in heart rhythm. If these symptoms appear, tell your doctor immediately. You'll need to stop taking Geodon while the condition is under treatment. There also is the risk of developing tardive dyskinesia, a condition marked by slow, rhythmical, involuntary movements. This problem is more likely to occur in mature adults, especially older women. When it does, use of Geodon is usually stopped. Geodon can suppress the cough reflex; you may have trouble clearing your airway. Some people taking Geodon also develop a rash. Tell your doctor when this happens. If the rash doesn't clear up with treatment, you may have to discontinue the drug. Other antipsychotic medications have been known to interfere with the body's temperature-regulating mechanism, causing the body to overheat. Although this problem has not occurred with Geodon, caution is still advisable. Avoid exposure to extreme heat, strenuous exercise, and dehydration. There also is a remote chance that this medication may cause abnormal, prolonged and painful erections. Remember that you must never combine Geodon with any drug that prolongs the part of the heartbeat known as the QT interval (see "Most important fact about this drug"). Check with your doctor or pharmacist if you have any doubts about a drug you're taking. If Geodon is taken with certain other drugs, the effects of either could be increased, decreased, or altered. It is especially important to check with your doctor before combining Geodon with the following: Carbamazepine (Tegretol) Certain blood pressure medications Drugs that boost the effects of dopamine such as Mirapex, Parlodel, Permax, and Requip Drugs that affect the brain and nervous system, such as sedatives, tranquilizers, and antidepressants Ketoconazole (Nizoral) Levodopa (Larodopa, Sinemet) Answered by Mirta Panko 2 years ago.

I have been on geodon for several weeks now. I have experienced paranoia and also headaches about an hour before it is time to take it again. I have also had increased energy and for that it has been a lifesaver for me as all other anti-psychotics have created exhaustion. I love this medication despite the few ill effects. It has truly made me feel more normal again. Answered by Georgianna Dudzic 2 years ago.

Be careful. I took Geodon last year while in the hospital for med management. I did well on it, so my Psychiatrist increased my dosage to the maximum level. I experienced heart palpitations. I was very scared and the hospital didn't believe me. They performed an emergency EKG the next day, but not until my I called my mother and she threatened to call the police unless the hospital took action and called my doctor. Make sure you and your loved ones monitor this drug VERY CLOSELY. Answered by Ela Kerstetter 2 years ago.

I only took it twice, and it gave me horrible anxiety. I already had some anxiety to begin with, but it was absolutely awful, so awful that I couldn't take it anymore. Answered by Loriann Brophy 2 years ago.


Medical Professionals if possible: Side effects of Geodon, interfering with daily life? Doc on vacation.?
Was just hypoglycemia acting up. Geodon is making me really sensitive to it, have to eat every couple of hours and avoid caffeine and I should be fine... Odd because I havent had any problems with it since I was about 16.. Anyways thanks for your answer Asked by Catherine Sharrar 2 years ago.

Hi, My doctor is on vacation so im hoping some medical professionals here may be able to answer my questions. I started the medication at 60mg once a day about a week ago. the first day I couldnt focus on anything and got very tired. At that point I decided to take it at night and it helps me sleep, so I disregard all of those instant side effects. But yesterday about mid-day I started to feel very shaky, my hands got very cold, and my muscles felt really stiff. Later that day It started to get hard to do precise movements with my fingers and my muscles started to burn. This is the point I figured it was just not eating enough that day, or the meds wearing off before my next dose.. So I took my pill early(about 5pm) and went to bed. Well this morning I wake up fine.. about 2 hours up and I feel like I did yesterday with everything and im freezing but im sweating.. Any ideas? I dont want to go to the hospital because it costs $$ that I dont have. Answered by Rosana Higgenbotham 2 years ago.

Hi, I am a doctor.. Most important fact about Geodon In some people with heart problems or a slow heartbeat, Geodon can cause serious and potentially fatal heartbeat irregularities. The chance of a problem is greater if you are taking a water pill (diuretic) or a medication that prolongs a part of the heartbeat known as the QT interval. Many of the drugs prescribed for heartbeat irregularities prolong the QT interval and should never be combined with Geodon. Other drugs to avoid when taking Geodon include Anzemet, Avelox, Halfan, Inapsine, Lariam, Mellaril, Nebupent, Orap, Orlaam, Pentam, Probucol, Prograf, Serentil, Tequin, Thorazine, Trisenox, and Zagam. If you're uncertain about the risks of any drug you're taking, be sure to check with your doctor before combining it with Geodon. How should you take Geodon? Geodon capsules should be taken twice a day with food. --If you miss a dose... Take it as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the one you missed and go back to your regular schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once. --Storage instructions... Store at room temperature. What side effects may occur? Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Geodon. More common side effects may include: Accidental injury, cold symptoms, constipation, cough, diarrhea, dizziness, drowsiness, dry mouth, headache, indigestion, involuntary muscle contractions, muscle tightness, nausea, rash, stuffy and runny nose, upper respiratory infection, vision problems, vomiting, weakness Remember that Geodon can cause dangerous--even fatal--heartbeat irregularities. Warning signs include dizziness, palpitations, and fainting. Tell your doctor immediately if you experience any of these symptoms. Be careful to avoid drugs that prolong the QT interval of the heartbeat. Check with your doctor before combining any other medication with Geodon. Well, your sumptoms can be caused by the drug.. when you get the symptoms next time, try to be calm and try ot concentrate.. do not panic.. If still the symptoms persist, I'm afraid you would have to goto the doctor.. If you want more info, feel free to write to me or visit www.medicguide.org This is a free site done by me and other doctors to answer health querries for free. Answered by Valerie Bevis 2 years ago.

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What to do , When the doctors running out medications to treat Bipolar Disorder?
BEEN ON THE FOLLOWING MEDICATIONS THEY ALL HAD SOMETHING THEY DID OR DIDN'T WORK OR MADE ME FEEL SICKER , WHAT TO DO : GEODON , ABILIFY, TOPOMAX, LAMICTAL , LITHIUM, SEROQUEL, HALDOL,MELLARIL, SERENTIL, STELAZINE, DEPAKOTE , NEURONTIN , LEXAPRO, ZOLOFT , EFFEXOR, PAMELOR , ATIVAN... Asked by Lorenzo Tagle 2 years ago.

BEEN ON THE FOLLOWING MEDICATIONS THEY ALL HAD SOMETHING THEY DID OR DIDN'T WORK OR MADE ME FEEL SICKER , WHAT TO DO : GEODON , ABILIFY, TOPOMAX, LAMICTAL , LITHIUM, SEROQUEL, HALDOL, MELLARIL, SERENTIL, STELAZINE, DEPAKOTE , NEURONTIN , LEXAPRO, ZOLOFT , EFFEXOR, PAMELOR , ATIVAN , TRANXENE, TRAZADONE ??? Answered by Palma Safar 2 years ago.

Trileptal, tegretol ... Don't know of course your exact history the key is usually getting just the right dose and combination and it's a real *#&$ trying to figure that out. Don't ever let them add/subtract make more than one change at a time, that helps to pinpoint better what is better and worse. Sometimes two meds at a 'substandard' dose do more than one med at what is usually a therapeutic dose. People are so different. My son's doc insists that 7.5 mg of abilify at 260 lbs can't possibly do anything for him, but 10mg makes him twitchy and 5mg does nothing -- 7.5 means the difference between holes in my wall and no holes in my wall -- that was his 'miracle med'. of course it's different for everyone. Getting exact dosing can be the trick. Most antidepressants won't work until you get a good mood stabilizer on board, wellbutrin actually has a different action that is often less of a trigger in bipolar. Takes a while but too many possible combinations to give up yet. Sometimes doses need tweaking rather than crossing the med off the list as not working. And electroshock therapy isn't the nightmare it was earlier in the century. I'd like to see what's happening with the magnet therapy, haven't checked on it lately -- get an MRI you'll feel better, for a day or two anyway. Answered by Eddie Kipka 2 years ago.

Wow, you've really tried a lot. It's so hard sometimes to find the right ones without side effects, or with side effects mild enough that they are tolerable. How about Wellbutrin, Tegratol, Trileptal, Buspar? There is a medication called Clozapine (Clozaril) that is an anti-psychotic that has helped people when nothing else did. It can have very serious side effects though and requires frequent blood tests. It's pretty much only used for severe psychotic features that have not responded to anything else. The truth is, most meds are going to have some side effects and none will eliminate symptoms altogether. When effective, they will reduce the frequency and severity of symptoms and make the illness more manageable. Also, some of the milder side effects will often go away after your body adjusts to the meds. Other meds take 4-6 weeks to be fully effective. If you have tried all of these, you already know this stuff. It might be worth sitting down and making a list of all the meds you have tried, how long you took them, what dosage you were on, what side effects you had (the best you can remember anyway...I know I always have trouble remembering the dosages of past meds) and taking a good look at it. Figure out which meds made things worse/caused intolerable side effects and see which ones are left. It may be that the right combination of some of those medications will be effective for you. The good thing is, they will continue to develop new medications with less side effects. The more they learn about the biology of bipolar, the more they will be able to directly treat what's going wrong. It's also important to have a very regular sleep schedule, eat a healthy balanced diet, get exercise, avoid mood altering substances...and personally, I think, get some sort of cognitive behavioral therapy. I highly recommend trying a therapy called DBT. It's helped me make some real changes in my life where all other therapy and even meds have fallen short. Medication isn't magic...if only it were that easy. But they can help you to be stabilized to the point where you can work on the other aspects. When the symptoms are out of control, it's very hard to do the things you know will help (work out, eat right, not abuse substances, etc.) Is it possible that it is not bipolar, but something else that is similar in symptoms? Answered by Delfina Serfling 2 years ago.

My brother is bi-polar manic depressive.....he is 50 and he feels best when he is on his Prozac with the Lithium..atleast he can function like a real person. Are you taking the meds separately or combining several to get best results? You aren't drinking beer with the drugs are you? That will defeat the purpose and it is not a wise decision to do both at the same time. Answered by Tricia Bires 2 years ago.

I have heard that the VNS ((vagus nerve stimulation)) can help people with depression Answered by Catina Ozzella 2 years ago.

That's pretty much all of them. I would focus on behavior therapies to help recognize symptoms of mania etc. Answered by Angelica Hosendove 2 years ago.

celexa is a new one and there is at least 1 more new one out I know..just don't know the name...VNS is supposed to be 75% success rate...check it out Answered by Frances Dellapina 2 years ago.

sounds like you need something besides just medication ... yoga and meditation can do amazing things... Answered by Shira Ciardullo 2 years ago.


If you take antibiotics and you get a real bad headache from it would you stop?
The medicine is call Erythromycin base 500 Asked by Brady Gisin 2 years ago.

Side Effects of This Medicine: Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur: Fever; headache, nausea; skin rash, redness, or itching; stomach pain (severe); unusual tiredness or weakness; vomiting; yellow eyes or skin-with erythromycin estolate (rare with other erythromycins) Pain, swelling, or redness at place of injection Fainting (repeated); irregular or slow heartbeat; loss of hearing (temporary) Other medicines—Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking or receiving erythromycins, it is especially important that your health care professional know if you are taking any of the following: Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Amiodarone (e.g., Cordarone) or Anabolic steroids (nandrolone [e.g., Anabolin], oxandrolone [e.g., Anavar], oxymetholone [e.g., Anadrol], stanozolol [e.g., Winstrol]) or Androgens (male hormones) or Antithyroid agents (medicine for overactive thyroid) or Carmustine (e.g., BiCNU) or Chloroquine (e.g., Aralen) or Dantrolene (e.g., Dantrium) or Daunorubicin (e.g., Cerubidine) or Disulfiram (e.g., Antabuse) or Divalproex (e.g., Depakote) or Estrogens (female hormones) or Etretinate (e.g., Tegison) or Gold salts (medicine for arthritis) or Hydroxychloroquine (e.g., Plaquenil) or Mercaptopurine (e.g., Purinethol) or Methotrexate (e.g., Mexate) or Methyldopa (e.g., Aldomet) or Naltrexone (e.g., Trexan) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Oral contraceptives (birth control pills) containing estrogen or Other anti-infectives by mouth or by injection (medicine for infection) or Phenothiazines (acetophenazine [e.g., Tindal], chlorpromazine [e.g., Thorazine], fluphenazine [e.g., Prolixin], mesoridazine [e.g., Serentil], perphenazine [e.g., Trilafon], prochlorperazine [e.g., Compazine], promazine [e.g., Sparine], promethazine [e.g., Phenergan], thioridazine [e.g., Mellaril], trifluoperazine [e.g., Stelazine], triflupromazine [e.g., Vesprin], trimeprazine [e.g., Temaril]) or Phenytoin (e.g., Dilantin) or Plicamycin (e.g., Mithracin) or Valproic acid (e.g., Depakene)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins, especially erythromycin estolate, may increase the chance of liver problems Aminophylline (e.g., Somophyllin) or Caffeine (e.g., NoDoz) or Oxtriphylline (e.g., Choledyl) or Theophylline (e.g., Somophyllin-T, Theo-Dur)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the chance of side effects from aminophylline, caffeine, oxtriphylline, or theophylline Astemizole (e.g., Hismanal) or Terfenadine (e.g., Seldane)—Use of astemizole or terfenadine with erythromycins may cause heart problems, such as an irregular heartbeat; these medicines should not be used together Carbamazepine (e.g., Tegretol)—Use of carbamazepine with erythromycin may increase the side effects of carbamazepine or increase the chance of liver problems Chloramphenicol (e.g., Chloromycetin) or Clindamycin (e.g., Cleocin) or Lincomycin (e.g., Lincocin)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may decrease the effectiveness of these other antibiotics Cyclosporine (e.g., Sandimmune) or Warfarin (e.g., Coumadin)—Use of any of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the side effects of these medicines Other medical problems—The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of erythromycins. Answered by Jeanie Aniello 2 years ago.

I'd page my doctor right away to ask if the headache is actually related to the medication and not something happening by chance. Only your doctor can advise you whether you should take a medication or not--remember also to tell the doctor the names of the other medications you're on to make sure there's not an interaction. Answered by Georgie Roya 2 years ago.

It is not likely that the antibiotic is giving you the headache. You have to finish your antibiotics, as long as you don't have a life threatening reaction. Take some Tylenol for your head. If it is really bothering you, you should ask your parents, anyway. Answered by Angla Armold 2 years ago.

in case you get a headache because of the fact of taking the medicine and as you think of you're clearing up now, you are able to desire to not proceed taking the medicine. Drink countless comfortable beverages, shop hydrated to have sufficient kidney filtration. Answered by Jamar Eash 2 years ago.

Headaches aren't a side effect to this drug (in a general sense). Don't stop taking it unless the prescribing doctor says so. Answered by Alva Cruden 2 years ago.


What are the side effects to Paxil?
My doctor put me on Paxil for my anxiety and told me that it would help me with depression as well. I don't think I'm depressed nor do I feel depressed (have been in the past) but do suffer from anxiety disorder. And today I took my first Paxil pill and lots of stuff running through my head. I feel... Asked by Maire Winship 2 years ago.

My doctor put me on Paxil for my anxiety and told me that it would help me with depression as well. I don't think I'm depressed nor do I feel depressed (have been in the past) but do suffer from anxiety disorder. And today I took my first Paxil pill and lots of stuff running through my head. I feel angry...I feel mad.... this is not my persona at all. I'm a very happy person, especially around my family. And ironically today, has not been a good day. Very angry and no reason that I can think of. Unsure if its a side effect and i'm trying to be optimistic about takign this medication. Any input would be appreciated. Answered by Elvia Harriman 2 years ago.

If the pills are making you angry.... I personally wouldn't take them anymore! Especially if you don't feel depressed to begin with. As far as your question about the side effects of Paxil....... If you have any of the following serious side effects, stop taking paroxetine and contact your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical treatment: an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); an irregular heartbeat or pulse; low blood pressure (dizziness, weakness); high blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision); unusual bleeding or bruising; or fever or chills. Less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take paroxetine and talk to your doctor if you experience headache; sleepiness or insomnia; weakness; nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation; decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm; dry mouth; tremor, nervousness, anxiety trouble concentrating; or changes in appetite or weight. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect paroxetine? Do not take paroxetine together with pimozide (Orap), thioridazine (Mellaril), or a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), selegeline (Eldepryl), or tranylcypromine (Parnate). You must wait at least 14 days after stopping an MAOI before you can take paroxetine. You must wait 5 weeks after stopping paroxetine before you can take thioridazine (Mellaril). Before taking paroxetine, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following medicines: tryptophan; warfarin (Coumadin); digoxin (Lanoxin); or lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith, others); theophylline (Theobid, Theolair, Theochron, Elixophyllin, and others); other SSRIs such as fluoxetine (Prozac), fluvoxamine (Luvox), sertraline (Zoloft), and others; a tricyclic antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil), imipramine (Tofranil), doxepin (Sinequan), nortriptyline (Pamelor), and others; aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), ketoprofen (Oruvail), and others; a phenothiazine such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), mesoridazine (Serentil), perphenazine (Trilafon), prochlorperazine (Compazine), and others; almotriptan (Axert), frovatriptan (Frova), sumatriptan (Imitrex), naratriptan (Amerge), rizatriptan (Maxalt), or zolmitriptan (Zomig); heart rhythm medication such as flecainide (Tambocor), propafenone (Rhythmol), and others; or cimetidine (Tagamet, Tagamet HB). If you are using any of the medicines listed above, you may not be able to take paroxetine, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring. Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with paroxetine. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using paroxetine. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. * Doctors usually don't have the time to tell you all of this. Although it is very important information you should know. Good Luck! <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>... . Answered by Pauletta Plana 2 years ago.

Less likely that all these symptoms are side effects of Paxil. I think you should try to change medicine. Try Zolofit in consultation with your doctor. Based on experience of my clients , Forgetfulness , Weight Gain , Sexual side effect can be attributed to Paxil. Answered by Lyndsay Marksbury 2 years ago.

If things don't improve in the next couple of days you need to ask your doctor to switch your medication. I know quite a few people who have taken Paxil (myself included) and it seemed to only make things worse. I know personally, I wanted to kill myself while taking it and I was never that depressed before. Answered by Lashaun Chaloux 2 years ago.

paxil is a medication that has a well known amount of side effects but the symptoms that you describe are strange. I believe that it is effecting your emotions and some well known depression medications due cause bad stimulunt reactions. Please contact your psychologist because these emotions are irregular.Until then discontinue the medication. Answered by Jeannette Mcginity 2 years ago.

It interferes with your ability to ejaculate. Answered by Cassondra Vanlaere 2 years ago.


Has anyone experienced Blackouts while using Prozac?
A very good friend on mine is experiencing total black-outs from using 80 mg of Prozac a day. I have advised them to stop taking it and contact their physician. Anyone else seeing this with this medication??? Asked by Branda Camaj 2 years ago.

Prozac 10 mg-green, elliptical, scored tablets Prozac 10 mg-green capsules Prozac 20 mg-green and white capsules Prozac 40 mg-green and orange capsules Prozac 20 mg/5 mL oral solution-mint flavored solution Prozac Weekly 90 mg-green and clear capsules What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if an overdose is suspected. Symptoms of a fluoxetine overdose include nausea, vomiting, tremor, agitation, seizures, drowsiness, hyperactivity, and enlarged pupils. (back to top) What should I avoid while taking fluoxetine? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Fluoxetine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness or dizziness while taking fluoxetine. (back to top) What are the possible side effects of fluoxetine? If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking fluoxetine and contact your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical treatment: an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); an irregular heartbeat or pulse; low blood pressure (dizziness, weakness); high blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision); chills or fever; unusual bleeding or bruising; a rash or hives. If you experience any of the following less serious side effects, continue taking fluoxetine and talk to your doctor: headache, tremor, nervousness, or anxiety; difficulty concentrating; nausea, diarrhea, dry mouth, or changes in appetite or weight; weakness; increased sweating; sleepiness or insomnia; or decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. (back to top) What other drugs will affect fluoxetine? Do not take fluoxetine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) during the last 2 weeks. Serious, and sometimes fatal, reactions have occurred when these medicines have been used together. Also, do not take fluoxetine if you are taking thioridazine (Mellaril). Dangerous, even fatal irregular heartbeats may occur if these medicines are taken together. You must wait 5 weeks after stopping fluoxetine before taking thioridazine (Mellaril). Before taking fluoxetine, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines: a benzodiazepine such as diazepam (Valium), alprazolam (Xanax), chlordiazepoxide (Librium), clorazepate (Tranxene), temazepam (Restoril), triazolam (Halcion), and others; a tricyclic antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil), imipramine (Tofranil), doxepin (Sinequan), nortriptyline (Pamelor), and others; St. John's wort; a phenothiazine such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), mesoridazine (Serentil), perphenazine (Trilafon), prochlorperazine (Compazine), and others; lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith, others) or haloperidol (Haldol); almotriptan (Axert), frovatriptan (Frova), sumatriptan (Imitrex), naratriptan (Amerge), rizatriptan (Maxalt), or zolmitriptan (Zomig); carbamazepine (Tegretol) or phenytoin (Dilantin); warfarin (Coumadin); or digoxin (Lanoxin). You may not be able to take fluoxetine, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you are taking any of the medicines listed above. Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with fluoxetine. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. (back to top) Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has additional information about fluoxetine written for health professionals that you may read. Answered by Lelah Hendrie 2 years ago.

Prozac can cause "light headedness" which usually happens if you stand up quickly. Your friend's symptoms sound more pronounced. I recommend that he call his psychiatrist immediately and be evaluated. There are many other equally effective medications that he could use. It is important that he does not quit taking the medication without talking with his doctor. Answered by Evelin Husk 2 years ago.

i take 40 mg of Prozac everyday and have never experienced any blackouts,your friend needs to talk to his doctor they may have to change their dosage or change to a different kind of medicine Answered by Casimira Leviner 2 years ago.

Yes but don't go off cold turkey. Talk to your doctor. Answered by Margot Semmler 2 years ago.

No I haven't Answered by Lashay Mamros 2 years ago.

Yes i see this also so i stopped taking it Answered by Maude Cipolloni 2 years ago.

Only a doctor should be telling him whats what. Answered by Troy Platte 2 years ago.


Psychiatric Medication?
What are the most common kind/names of psychiatric medications for adults with mental/psychological disorders and illnesses? Thank you for your help! Asked by Numbers Bergerson 2 years ago.

hun that is a long list...but here goes: Abilify, Adapin, Adderall, Alepam, Alertec, Aloperidin, Alplax, Alprax, Alprazolam, Alviz, Alzolam, Amantadine, Ambien, Amisulpride, Amitriptyline, Amoxapine, Anafranil, Anatensol, Ansial, Ansiced, Antabus, Antabuse, Antideprin, Anxiron, Apo-Alpraz, Apo-Primidone, Apo-Sertral, Aponal, Apozepam, Aripiprazole, Aropax, Artane, Asendin, Asendis, Asentra, Ativan, Atomoxetine, Aurorix, Aventyl, Axoren Beneficat, Bimaran, Bioperidolo, Biston, Brotopon, Bespar, Bupropion, Buspar, Buspimen, Buspinol, Buspirone, Buspisal Calepsin, Calcium carbonate, Calcium carbimide, Calmax, Carbamazepine, Carbatrol, Carbolith, Celexa, Chlordiazepoxide, Chlorpromazine, Cibalith-S, Cipralex, Citalopram, Clomipramine, Clonazepam, Clozapine, Clozaril, Concerta, Constan, Convulex, Cylert Dalmane, Dapotum, Defanyl, Demolox, Depakene, Depakote, Deprax, Deprilept, Deroxat, Desipramine, Desirel, Desoxyn, Desyrel, Dexedrine, Dextroamphetamine, Dextrostat, Diapam, Diazepam, Dilantin, Disulfiram, Divalproex, Dogmatil, Doxepin, Dozic, Duralith Edronax, Efectin, Effexor (Efexor), Eglonyl, Einalon S, Elavil, Endep, Epanutin, Epitol, Equetro, Escitalopram, Eskalith, Eskazinyl, Eskazine, Etrafon, Eukystol Faverin, Fazaclo, Fevarin, Finlepsin, Fludecate, Flunanthate, Fluoxetine, Fluphenazine, Flurazepam, Fluvoxamine, Focalin Geodon, Gladem Halcion, Halomonth, Haldol, Haloperidol, Halosten Imipramine, Imovane Janimine, Jatroneural Kalma, Keselan, Klonopin Lamotrigine, Largactil, Levomepromazine, Levoprome, Leponex, Lexapro, Libritabs, Librium, Linton, Liskantin, Lithane, Lithium, Lithizine, Lithobid, Lithonate, Lithotabs, Lorazepam, Loxapac, Loxapine, Loxitane, Ludiomil, Lunesta, Lustral, Luvox, Lyogen, Lecital Manegan, Manerix, Maprotiline, Mellaril, Melleretten, Melleril, Meresa, Mesoridazine, Metadate, Methamphetamine, Methotrimeprazine, Methylin, Methylphenidate, Minitran, Moclobemide, Modafinil, Modalina, Modecate, Moditen, Molipaxin, Moxadil, Murelax, Myidone, Mylepsinum, Mysoline Nardil, Narol, Navane, Nefazodone, Neoperidol, Norebox, Normison, Norpramine, Nortriptyline, Novodorm Olanzapine, Omca, Orap, Oxazepam Pamelor, Parnate, Paroxetine, Paxil, Peluces, Pemoline, Permitil, Perphenazine, Pertofrane, Phenelzine, Phenytoin, Pimozide, Piportil, Pipotiazine, Pragmarel, Primidone, Prolift, Prolixin, Protriptyline, Provigil, Prozac, Prysoline, Psymion Quetiapine Ralozam, Reboxetine, Resimatil, Restoril, Restyl, Rhotrimine, Risperdal, Risperidone, Rispolept, Ritalin, Rivotril, Rubifen Sediten, Seduxen, Selecten, Serax, Serenace, Serepax, Serenase, Serentil, Seresta, Serlain, Serlift, Seroquel, Seroxat, Sertan, Sertraline, Serzone, Sevinol, Sideril, Sigaperidol, Sinequan, Sinqualone, Sinquan, Sirtal, Solanax, Solian, Solvex, Songar, Stazepin, Stelazine, Stilnox, Stimuloton, Strattera, Sulpiride, Sulpiride Ratiopharm, Sulpiride Neurazpharm, Surmontil, Symbyax, Symmetrel Tafil, Tavor, Taxagon, Tegretol, Telesmin, Temazepam, Temesta, Temposil, Terfluzine, Thioridazine, Thiothixene, Thombran, Thorazine, Timonil, Tofranil, Trancin, Tranax, Trankimazin, Tranquinal, Tranylcypromine, Trazalon, Trazodone, Trazonil, Trialodine, Triazolam, Trifluoperazine, Trihexane, Trihexyphenidyl, Trilafon, Trimipramine, Triptil, Trittico, Tryptanol Valium, Valproate, Valproic acid, Valrelease, Venlafaxine, Vestra, Vigicer, Vivactil Wellbutrin Xanax, Xanor, Xydep Zamhexal, Zeldox, Zimovane, Zispin, Ziprasidone, Zolarem, Zoldac, Zoloft, Zolpidem, Zonalon, Zopiclone, Zydis, Zyprexa The site listed below also has a list of medications and what type they are...hope this helps! (not real sure why i would get a thumbs down on this answer?) Answered by Elsy Evetts 2 years ago.

I feel that there is always a natural alternative and some people think they need to take antidepressants etc. Because they do not know what is really wrong with them. All to many times doctor's prescribe these meds instead of seeking out the true issue's. I can't see how it would aid spiritual work only confuse it and hinder it. Like I said I so believe there is always a natural alternative. Prescription drugs mean dependency on a man made substance and stops the user from making life changes to enhance there well being. BB Tink Answered by Dennis Tepfer 2 years ago.

(I use the brand names here, because they are easier to type and remember) Antidepressants (mostly SSRIs) : Lexapro (most likely the top selling psychiatric medication currently), Prozac, Zoloft, Wellbutrin... Antianxiety: Xanax (it should not be prescribed so much; very risky), Ativan, Klonopin, Valium... I should include atypical antipsychotics and anticonvulsants, but I can't think of them right now. The top two catagories are by far the most common anyway and cover a large number of disorders. Answered by Dannie Kauble 2 years ago.

The website crazymeds.us has been one I've found extremely helpful. It lists all the meds according to their class and when you click on them it gives all the uses and side effects. They also have a board where you can get other people's experiences with each med and each disorder/illness. Answered by Jenell Rondinelli 2 years ago.

The most popular medication for anti-psychotics are Abilify(the newest), Risperdal, Geodon, & Haldol(the oldest. Each one has it's own side effects and sometime you have to try more then one to get the best results. P.S. The web site crazy meds is OK, but it is one sided(the scary side only). Answered by Shela Thrift 2 years ago.

Depends on the problem, there are many different kind. Some used together, and most used alone. Only a Dr. can evaluate you and give you the right meds. SOmetimes it takes a while to find the right one. Answered by Luna Litrenta 2 years ago.


Does evening primrose oil affect the potency of birth control pills?
i'm asking because my dermy told me to take evening primrose to help heal my active eczema. thanks in advance! Asked by Melissa Fieldhouse 2 years ago.

My herbal guide doesn't say that it does. It is also used for pms, among other things. It does interact with the following medications: compazine, mellaril, navane, permitil, phenergan, prolixin, serentil, stelazine, thorazine and trilafon. If you take any of these medications, you shouldn't use evening primrose. Answered by Lee Raimondi 2 years ago.

The only way that is 100% is not having sex or having a hystorectomy. BC can fail, it is a small chance but it can fail. Condoms can fail. Pullout method fails often and isn't a BC method at all. Even woman who get their tubes tied could still become pregnant it is just a small chance. I have to say most of my neices and nephews are BC babies. For some reason BC really just doesn't work for my sisters at all and they have tried different forms. But they are suppose to be pretty good but you have to take them everyday on time and it takes 3 months to build up in your system so it is best to use other protection during that time. Antibiotics can knock out the BC so you need extra protection at that time as well. If you switch pills to another type you need to use protection for atleast a month to give your body time to adjust. Answered by Una Ottis 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: does evening primrose oil affect the potency of birth control pills? i'm asking because my dermy told me to take evening primrose to help heal my active eczema. thanks in advance! Answered by Karyn Rushdan 2 years ago.

I believe so, better stay away jsut to be safe. Try something else to help with your eczema Answered by Madison Battersby 2 years ago.


What meds are prescribed for schizophrenia?
Asked by Conchita Palitti 2 years ago.

ANTIPSYCHOTIC. List of Antipsychotic Medications chlorpromazine -Thorazine chlorprothixene -Taractan clozapine -Clozaril fluphenazine -Permitil, Prolixin haloperidol- Haldol loxapine- Loxitane mesoridazine -Serentil molindone Lidone, -Moban olanzapine -Zyprexa perphenazine -Trilafon quetiapine -Seroquel risperidone -Risperdal thioridazine- Mellaril thiothixene -Navane trifluoperazine -Stelazine trifluopromazine -Vesprin ziprasidone -Geodon paliperidone- Invega Answered by Moon Laflam 2 years ago.

All the antipsychotics can be used for schizophenia, I take chlorpromazine at night and proclorperazine during the day, but the doctor at the hospital does not like me taking 2 antipsychotics. Answered by Bryanna Vanhaitsma 2 years ago.

I've heard a lot of people talking about abilify recently Answered by Valerie Sarraga 2 years ago.

Risperidal Sereoquel ( i take this one ) Haldol Answered by Etta Helgren 2 years ago.

well i only know respiradal lol cause im on it they use it for that too. Answered by Jospeh Brulotte 2 years ago.


What types of side effects have you had from Geodon?
I just started on this medication after trying others but, the side effects I read about really scare me. I would like to hear the pros and cons from others who have taken it. Thanks! Asked by Cecelia Gigante 2 years ago.

Most important fact about this drug: In some people with heart problems or a slow heartbeat, Geodon can cause serious and potentially fatal heartbeat irregularities. The chance of a problem is greater if you are taking a water pill (diuretic) or a medication that prolongs a part of the heartbeat known as the QT interval. Many of the drugs prescribed for heartbeat irregularities prolong the QT interval and should never be combined with Geodon. Other drugs to avoid when taking Geodon include Anzemet, Avelox, Halfan, Inapsine, Lariam, Mellaril, Nebupent, Orap, Orlaam, Pentam, Probucol, Prograf, Serentil, Tequin, Thorazine, Trisenox, and Zagam. If you're uncertain about the risks of any drug you're taking, be sure to check with your doctor before combining it with Geodon. Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Geodon. More common side effects may include: Accidental injury, cold symptoms, constipation, cough, diarrhea, dizziness, drowsiness, dry mouth, indigestion, muscle tightness, nausea, rash, stuffy and runny nose, upper respiratory infection, vision problems, weakness Other side effects may include: Abdominal pain, abnormal body movements, abnormal ejaculation, abnormal secretion of milk, abnormal walk, abnormally low cholesterol, agitation, amnesia, anemia, bleeding gums, bleeding in the eye, blood clots, blood disorders, blood in urine, body spasms, breast development in males, bruising or purple spots, cataracts, chest pain, chills, clogged bowels, confusion, conjunctivitis (pinkeye), coordination problems, decreased blood flow to the heart, delirium, difficulty breathing, difficulty swallowing, difficulty with orgasm, double vision, dry eyes, enlarged heart, eyelid inflammation, female sexual problems, fever, flank pain, flu-like symptoms, fungal infections, gout, hair loss, heavy menstruation, heavy uterine or vaginal bleeding, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, hives, hostility, impotence, increased reflexes, increased sensitivity to touch or sound, inflammation of the cornea, inflammation of the heart, involuntary or jerky movements, irregular heartbeat, liver problems, lockjaw, loss of appetite, loss of menstruation, low blood sugar, low blood pressure, low body temperature, lymph disorders, male sexual problems, muscle disorders, muscle pain, muscle weakness, nighttime urination, nosebleed, pneumonia, prickling or tingling sensation, rapid heartbeat, rectal bleeding, rigid muscle movement, ringing in ears, rolling of the eyeballs, sensitivity to sunlight, skin problems, slow heartbeat, slowed movement, speech problems, stroke, sudden drop in blood pressure upon standing up, swelling in the arms and legs, swelling in the face, swollen lymph nodes, swollen tongue, tarry stools, tendon inflammation, thirst, throat spasms, thyroid disorders, tremor, twitching, uncontrolled eye movement, urination decrease or increase, vaginal bleeding, vein inflammation, vertigo, vision disorders, vomiting, vomiting or spitting blood, yellowed skin and eyes, weight gain, white spots in the mouth. Special warnings about this medication: Remember that Geodon can cause dangerous--even fatal--heartbeat irregularities. Warning signs include dizziness, palpitations, and fainting. Tell your doctor immediately if you experience any of these symptoms. Be careful to avoid drugs that prolong the QT interval of the heartbeat. Check with your doctor before combining any other medication with Geodon. Particularly during the first few days of therapy, Geodon can cause low blood pressure, with accompanying dizziness, fainting, and rapid heartbeat. Tell your doctor if you experience any of these side effects. To minimize such problems, your doctor will increase your dose gradually. If you are prone to low blood pressure, take blood pressure medicine, become dehydrated, or have heart disease or poor circulation in the brain, use Geodon with caution. Geodon may cause drowsiness and can impair your judgment, thinking, and motor skills. Use caution while driving and don't operate potentially dangerous machinery until you know how this drug affects you. Geodon poses a very slight risk of seizures, especially if you are over age 65, have a history of seizures, or have Alzheimer's disease. Drugs such as Geodon sometimes cause a condition called Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome. Symptoms include high fever, muscle rigidity, irregular pulse or blood pressure, rapid heartbeat, excessive perspiration, and changes in heart rhythm. If these symptoms appear, tell your doctor immediately. You'll need to stop taking Geodon while the condition is under treatment. There also is the risk of developing tardive dyskinesia, a condition marked by slow, rhythmical, involuntary movements. This problem is more likely to occur in mature adults, especially older women. When it does, use of Geodon is usually stopped. Geodon can suppress the cough reflex; you may have trouble clearing your airway. Some people taking Geodon also develop a rash. Tell your doctor when this happens. If the rash doesn't clear up with treatment, you may have to discontinue the drug. Other antipsychotic medications have been known to interfere with the body's temperature-regulating mechanism, causing the body to overheat. Although this problem has not occurred with Geodon, caution is still advisable. Avoid exposure to extreme heat, strenuous exercise, and dehydration. There also is a remote chance that this medication may cause abnormal, prolonged and painful erections. Remember that you must never combine Geodon with any drug that prolongs the part of the heartbeat known as the QT interval (see "Most important fact about this drug"). Check with your doctor or pharmacist if you have any doubts about a drug you're taking. If Geodon is taken with certain other drugs, the effects of either could be increased, decreased, or altered. It is especially important to check with your doctor before combining Geodon with the following: Carbamazepine (Tegretol) Certain blood pressure medications Drugs that boost the effects of dopamine such as Mirapex, Parlodel, Permax, and Requip Drugs that affect the brain and nervous system, such as sedatives, tranquilizers, and antidepressants Ketoconazole (Nizoral) Levodopa (Larodopa, Sinemet) Answered by Whitney Shettle 2 years ago.

I have been on geodon for several weeks now. I have experienced paranoia and also headaches about an hour before it is time to take it again. I have also had increased energy and for that it has been a lifesaver for me as all other anti-psychotics have created exhaustion. I love this medication despite the few ill effects. It has truly made me feel more normal again. Answered by Natosha Coulas 2 years ago.

Be careful. I took Geodon last year while in the hospital for med management. I did well on it, so my Psychiatrist increased my dosage to the maximum level. I experienced heart palpitations. I was very scared and the hospital didn't believe me. They performed an emergency EKG the next day, but not until my I called my mother and she threatened to call the police unless the hospital took action and called my doctor. Make sure you and your loved ones monitor this drug VERY CLOSELY. Answered by Kecia Lovelace 2 years ago.

I only took it twice, and it gave me horrible anxiety. I already had some anxiety to begin with, but it was absolutely awful, so awful that I couldn't take it anymore. Answered by Lilia Ryley 2 years ago.


Medical Professionals if possible: Side effects of Geodon, interfering with daily life? Doc on vacation.?
Was just hypoglycemia acting up. Geodon is making me really sensitive to it, have to eat every couple of hours and avoid caffeine and I should be fine... Odd because I havent had any problems with it since I was about 16.. Anyways thanks for your answer Asked by Hal Jesko 2 years ago.

Hi, My doctor is on vacation so im hoping some medical professionals here may be able to answer my questions. I started the medication at 60mg once a day about a week ago. the first day I couldnt focus on anything and got very tired. At that point I decided to take it at night and it helps me sleep, so I disregard all of those instant side effects. But yesterday about mid-day I started to feel very shaky, my hands got very cold, and my muscles felt really stiff. Later that day It started to get hard to do precise movements with my fingers and my muscles started to burn. This is the point I figured it was just not eating enough that day, or the meds wearing off before my next dose.. So I took my pill early(about 5pm) and went to bed. Well this morning I wake up fine.. about 2 hours up and I feel like I did yesterday with everything and im freezing but im sweating.. Any ideas? I dont want to go to the hospital because it costs $$ that I dont have. Answered by Marina Wingett 2 years ago.

Hi, I am a doctor.. Most important fact about Geodon In some people with heart problems or a slow heartbeat, Geodon can cause serious and potentially fatal heartbeat irregularities. The chance of a problem is greater if you are taking a water pill (diuretic) or a medication that prolongs a part of the heartbeat known as the QT interval. Many of the drugs prescribed for heartbeat irregularities prolong the QT interval and should never be combined with Geodon. Other drugs to avoid when taking Geodon include Anzemet, Avelox, Halfan, Inapsine, Lariam, Mellaril, Nebupent, Orap, Orlaam, Pentam, Probucol, Prograf, Serentil, Tequin, Thorazine, Trisenox, and Zagam. If you're uncertain about the risks of any drug you're taking, be sure to check with your doctor before combining it with Geodon. How should you take Geodon? Geodon capsules should be taken twice a day with food. --If you miss a dose... Take it as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the one you missed and go back to your regular schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once. --Storage instructions... Store at room temperature. What side effects may occur? Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Geodon. More common side effects may include: Accidental injury, cold symptoms, constipation, cough, diarrhea, dizziness, drowsiness, dry mouth, headache, indigestion, involuntary muscle contractions, muscle tightness, nausea, rash, stuffy and runny nose, upper respiratory infection, vision problems, vomiting, weakness Remember that Geodon can cause dangerous--even fatal--heartbeat irregularities. Warning signs include dizziness, palpitations, and fainting. Tell your doctor immediately if you experience any of these symptoms. Be careful to avoid drugs that prolong the QT interval of the heartbeat. Check with your doctor before combining any other medication with Geodon. Well, your sumptoms can be caused by the drug.. when you get the symptoms next time, try to be calm and try ot concentrate.. do not panic.. If still the symptoms persist, I'm afraid you would have to goto the doctor.. If you want more info, feel free to write to me or visit www.medicguide.org This is a free site done by me and other doctors to answer health querries for free. Answered by Tianna Mendoza 2 years ago.

Masturbation is the system of bringing approximately a voluntary pleasure of the sexual facilities following mainly by means of the release of semen.Materbation is natural in younger guys,baby.The facet outcome of masterbation may be very harmful in long run if those turn out to be habbit is also Infertility,Continuous headache and backache. Dizziness and lack of reminiscence.Unable to participate in any heavy bodily or intellectual paintings. Answered by Lonny Ramm 2 years ago.


What to do , When the doctors running out medications to treat Bipolar Disorder?
BEEN ON THE FOLLOWING MEDICATIONS THEY ALL HAD SOMETHING THEY DID OR DIDN'T WORK OR MADE ME FEEL SICKER , WHAT TO DO : GEODON , ABILIFY, TOPOMAX, LAMICTAL , LITHIUM, SEROQUEL, HALDOL,MELLARIL, SERENTIL, STELAZINE, DEPAKOTE , NEURONTIN , LEXAPRO, ZOLOFT , EFFEXOR, PAMELOR , ATIVAN... Asked by Zandra Kullmann 2 years ago.

BEEN ON THE FOLLOWING MEDICATIONS THEY ALL HAD SOMETHING THEY DID OR DIDN'T WORK OR MADE ME FEEL SICKER , WHAT TO DO : GEODON , ABILIFY, TOPOMAX, LAMICTAL , LITHIUM, SEROQUEL, HALDOL, MELLARIL, SERENTIL, STELAZINE, DEPAKOTE , NEURONTIN , LEXAPRO, ZOLOFT , EFFEXOR, PAMELOR , ATIVAN , TRANXENE, TRAZADONE ??? Answered by Sadie Kale 2 years ago.

Trileptal, tegretol ... Don't know of course your exact history the key is usually getting just the right dose and combination and it's a real *#&$ trying to figure that out. Don't ever let them add/subtract make more than one change at a time, that helps to pinpoint better what is better and worse. Sometimes two meds at a 'substandard' dose do more than one med at what is usually a therapeutic dose. People are so different. My son's doc insists that 7.5 mg of abilify at 260 lbs can't possibly do anything for him, but 10mg makes him twitchy and 5mg does nothing -- 7.5 means the difference between holes in my wall and no holes in my wall -- that was his 'miracle med'. of course it's different for everyone. Getting exact dosing can be the trick. Most antidepressants won't work until you get a good mood stabilizer on board, wellbutrin actually has a different action that is often less of a trigger in bipolar. Takes a while but too many possible combinations to give up yet. Sometimes doses need tweaking rather than crossing the med off the list as not working. And electroshock therapy isn't the nightmare it was earlier in the century. I'd like to see what's happening with the magnet therapy, haven't checked on it lately -- get an MRI you'll feel better, for a day or two anyway. Answered by Sung Hunson 2 years ago.

Wow, you've really tried a lot. It's so hard sometimes to find the right ones without side effects, or with side effects mild enough that they are tolerable. How about Wellbutrin, Tegratol, Trileptal, Buspar? There is a medication called Clozapine (Clozaril) that is an anti-psychotic that has helped people when nothing else did. It can have very serious side effects though and requires frequent blood tests. It's pretty much only used for severe psychotic features that have not responded to anything else. The truth is, most meds are going to have some side effects and none will eliminate symptoms altogether. When effective, they will reduce the frequency and severity of symptoms and make the illness more manageable. Also, some of the milder side effects will often go away after your body adjusts to the meds. Other meds take 4-6 weeks to be fully effective. If you have tried all of these, you already know this stuff. It might be worth sitting down and making a list of all the meds you have tried, how long you took them, what dosage you were on, what side effects you had (the best you can remember anyway...I know I always have trouble remembering the dosages of past meds) and taking a good look at it. Figure out which meds made things worse/caused intolerable side effects and see which ones are left. It may be that the right combination of some of those medications will be effective for you. The good thing is, they will continue to develop new medications with less side effects. The more they learn about the biology of bipolar, the more they will be able to directly treat what's going wrong. It's also important to have a very regular sleep schedule, eat a healthy balanced diet, get exercise, avoid mood altering substances...and personally, I think, get some sort of cognitive behavioral therapy. I highly recommend trying a therapy called DBT. It's helped me make some real changes in my life where all other therapy and even meds have fallen short. Medication isn't magic...if only it were that easy. But they can help you to be stabilized to the point where you can work on the other aspects. When the symptoms are out of control, it's very hard to do the things you know will help (work out, eat right, not abuse substances, etc.) Is it possible that it is not bipolar, but something else that is similar in symptoms? Answered by Arie Butman 2 years ago.

My brother is bi-polar manic depressive.....he is 50 and he feels best when he is on his Prozac with the Lithium..atleast he can function like a real person. Are you taking the meds separately or combining several to get best results? You aren't drinking beer with the drugs are you? That will defeat the purpose and it is not a wise decision to do both at the same time. Answered by Vallie Muldrew 2 years ago.

I have heard that the VNS ((vagus nerve stimulation)) can help people with depression Answered by Delila Daller 2 years ago.

That's pretty much all of them. I would focus on behavior therapies to help recognize symptoms of mania etc. Answered by Loni Goolsbee 2 years ago.

celexa is a new one and there is at least 1 more new one out I know..just don't know the name...VNS is supposed to be 75% success rate...check it out Answered by Catina Wunderly 2 years ago.

sounds like you need something besides just medication ... yoga and meditation can do amazing things... Answered by Sharee Tomey 2 years ago.


If you take antibiotics and you get a real bad headache from it would you stop?
The medicine is call Erythromycin base 500 Asked by Titus Schnitzler 2 years ago.

Side Effects of This Medicine: Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur: Fever; headache, nausea; skin rash, redness, or itching; stomach pain (severe); unusual tiredness or weakness; vomiting; yellow eyes or skin-with erythromycin estolate (rare with other erythromycins) Pain, swelling, or redness at place of injection Fainting (repeated); irregular or slow heartbeat; loss of hearing (temporary) Other medicines—Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking or receiving erythromycins, it is especially important that your health care professional know if you are taking any of the following: Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Amiodarone (e.g., Cordarone) or Anabolic steroids (nandrolone [e.g., Anabolin], oxandrolone [e.g., Anavar], oxymetholone [e.g., Anadrol], stanozolol [e.g., Winstrol]) or Androgens (male hormones) or Antithyroid agents (medicine for overactive thyroid) or Carmustine (e.g., BiCNU) or Chloroquine (e.g., Aralen) or Dantrolene (e.g., Dantrium) or Daunorubicin (e.g., Cerubidine) or Disulfiram (e.g., Antabuse) or Divalproex (e.g., Depakote) or Estrogens (female hormones) or Etretinate (e.g., Tegison) or Gold salts (medicine for arthritis) or Hydroxychloroquine (e.g., Plaquenil) or Mercaptopurine (e.g., Purinethol) or Methotrexate (e.g., Mexate) or Methyldopa (e.g., Aldomet) or Naltrexone (e.g., Trexan) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Oral contraceptives (birth control pills) containing estrogen or Other anti-infectives by mouth or by injection (medicine for infection) or Phenothiazines (acetophenazine [e.g., Tindal], chlorpromazine [e.g., Thorazine], fluphenazine [e.g., Prolixin], mesoridazine [e.g., Serentil], perphenazine [e.g., Trilafon], prochlorperazine [e.g., Compazine], promazine [e.g., Sparine], promethazine [e.g., Phenergan], thioridazine [e.g., Mellaril], trifluoperazine [e.g., Stelazine], triflupromazine [e.g., Vesprin], trimeprazine [e.g., Temaril]) or Phenytoin (e.g., Dilantin) or Plicamycin (e.g., Mithracin) or Valproic acid (e.g., Depakene)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins, especially erythromycin estolate, may increase the chance of liver problems Aminophylline (e.g., Somophyllin) or Caffeine (e.g., NoDoz) or Oxtriphylline (e.g., Choledyl) or Theophylline (e.g., Somophyllin-T, Theo-Dur)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the chance of side effects from aminophylline, caffeine, oxtriphylline, or theophylline Astemizole (e.g., Hismanal) or Terfenadine (e.g., Seldane)—Use of astemizole or terfenadine with erythromycins may cause heart problems, such as an irregular heartbeat; these medicines should not be used together Carbamazepine (e.g., Tegretol)—Use of carbamazepine with erythromycin may increase the side effects of carbamazepine or increase the chance of liver problems Chloramphenicol (e.g., Chloromycetin) or Clindamycin (e.g., Cleocin) or Lincomycin (e.g., Lincocin)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may decrease the effectiveness of these other antibiotics Cyclosporine (e.g., Sandimmune) or Warfarin (e.g., Coumadin)—Use of any of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the side effects of these medicines Other medical problems—The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of erythromycins. Answered by Arnold Steenhard 2 years ago.

I'd page my doctor right away to ask if the headache is actually related to the medication and not something happening by chance. Only your doctor can advise you whether you should take a medication or not--remember also to tell the doctor the names of the other medications you're on to make sure there's not an interaction. Answered by Denisha Papasergi 2 years ago.

It is not likely that the antibiotic is giving you the headache. You have to finish your antibiotics, as long as you don't have a life threatening reaction. Take some Tylenol for your head. If it is really bothering you, you should ask your parents, anyway. Answered by Lesley Maquis 2 years ago.

in case you get a headache because of the fact of taking the medicine and as you think of you're clearing up now, you are able to desire to not proceed taking the medicine. Drink countless comfortable beverages, shop hydrated to have sufficient kidney filtration. Answered by Nicol Moreman 2 years ago.

Headaches aren't a side effect to this drug (in a general sense). Don't stop taking it unless the prescribing doctor says so. Answered by Antonietta Masoud 2 years ago.


What are the side effects to Paxil?
My doctor put me on Paxil for my anxiety and told me that it would help me with depression as well. I don't think I'm depressed nor do I feel depressed (have been in the past) but do suffer from anxiety disorder. And today I took my first Paxil pill and lots of stuff running through my head. I feel... Asked by Caryn Devazier 2 years ago.

My doctor put me on Paxil for my anxiety and told me that it would help me with depression as well. I don't think I'm depressed nor do I feel depressed (have been in the past) but do suffer from anxiety disorder. And today I took my first Paxil pill and lots of stuff running through my head. I feel angry...I feel mad.... this is not my persona at all. I'm a very happy person, especially around my family. And ironically today, has not been a good day. Very angry and no reason that I can think of. Unsure if its a side effect and i'm trying to be optimistic about takign this medication. Any input would be appreciated. Answered by Lesley Hawelu 2 years ago.

If the pills are making you angry.... I personally wouldn't take them anymore! Especially if you don't feel depressed to begin with. As far as your question about the side effects of Paxil....... If you have any of the following serious side effects, stop taking paroxetine and contact your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical treatment: an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); an irregular heartbeat or pulse; low blood pressure (dizziness, weakness); high blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision); unusual bleeding or bruising; or fever or chills. Less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take paroxetine and talk to your doctor if you experience headache; sleepiness or insomnia; weakness; nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation; decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm; dry mouth; tremor, nervousness, anxiety trouble concentrating; or changes in appetite or weight. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect paroxetine? Do not take paroxetine together with pimozide (Orap), thioridazine (Mellaril), or a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), selegeline (Eldepryl), or tranylcypromine (Parnate). You must wait at least 14 days after stopping an MAOI before you can take paroxetine. You must wait 5 weeks after stopping paroxetine before you can take thioridazine (Mellaril). Before taking paroxetine, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following medicines: tryptophan; warfarin (Coumadin); digoxin (Lanoxin); or lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith, others); theophylline (Theobid, Theolair, Theochron, Elixophyllin, and others); other SSRIs such as fluoxetine (Prozac), fluvoxamine (Luvox), sertraline (Zoloft), and others; a tricyclic antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil), imipramine (Tofranil), doxepin (Sinequan), nortriptyline (Pamelor), and others; aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), ketoprofen (Oruvail), and others; a phenothiazine such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), mesoridazine (Serentil), perphenazine (Trilafon), prochlorperazine (Compazine), and others; almotriptan (Axert), frovatriptan (Frova), sumatriptan (Imitrex), naratriptan (Amerge), rizatriptan (Maxalt), or zolmitriptan (Zomig); heart rhythm medication such as flecainide (Tambocor), propafenone (Rhythmol), and others; or cimetidine (Tagamet, Tagamet HB). If you are using any of the medicines listed above, you may not be able to take paroxetine, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring. Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with paroxetine. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using paroxetine. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. * Doctors usually don't have the time to tell you all of this. Although it is very important information you should know. Good Luck! <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>... . Answered by Lashandra Leysath 2 years ago.

Less likely that all these symptoms are side effects of Paxil. I think you should try to change medicine. Try Zolofit in consultation with your doctor. Based on experience of my clients , Forgetfulness , Weight Gain , Sexual side effect can be attributed to Paxil. Answered by Kareem Haine 2 years ago.

If things don't improve in the next couple of days you need to ask your doctor to switch your medication. I know quite a few people who have taken Paxil (myself included) and it seemed to only make things worse. I know personally, I wanted to kill myself while taking it and I was never that depressed before. Answered by Alica Gutsche 2 years ago.

paxil is a medication that has a well known amount of side effects but the symptoms that you describe are strange. I believe that it is effecting your emotions and some well known depression medications due cause bad stimulunt reactions. Please contact your psychologist because these emotions are irregular.Until then discontinue the medication. Answered by Emery Iopa 2 years ago.

It interferes with your ability to ejaculate. Answered by Yukiko Okazaki 2 years ago.


Has anyone experienced Blackouts while using Prozac?
A very good friend on mine is experiencing total black-outs from using 80 mg of Prozac a day. I have advised them to stop taking it and contact their physician. Anyone else seeing this with this medication??? Asked by Silva Shorten 2 years ago.

Prozac 10 mg-green, elliptical, scored tablets Prozac 10 mg-green capsules Prozac 20 mg-green and white capsules Prozac 40 mg-green and orange capsules Prozac 20 mg/5 mL oral solution-mint flavored solution Prozac Weekly 90 mg-green and clear capsules What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if an overdose is suspected. Symptoms of a fluoxetine overdose include nausea, vomiting, tremor, agitation, seizures, drowsiness, hyperactivity, and enlarged pupils. (back to top) What should I avoid while taking fluoxetine? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Fluoxetine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness or dizziness while taking fluoxetine. (back to top) What are the possible side effects of fluoxetine? If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking fluoxetine and contact your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical treatment: an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); an irregular heartbeat or pulse; low blood pressure (dizziness, weakness); high blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision); chills or fever; unusual bleeding or bruising; a rash or hives. If you experience any of the following less serious side effects, continue taking fluoxetine and talk to your doctor: headache, tremor, nervousness, or anxiety; difficulty concentrating; nausea, diarrhea, dry mouth, or changes in appetite or weight; weakness; increased sweating; sleepiness or insomnia; or decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. (back to top) What other drugs will affect fluoxetine? Do not take fluoxetine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) during the last 2 weeks. Serious, and sometimes fatal, reactions have occurred when these medicines have been used together. Also, do not take fluoxetine if you are taking thioridazine (Mellaril). Dangerous, even fatal irregular heartbeats may occur if these medicines are taken together. You must wait 5 weeks after stopping fluoxetine before taking thioridazine (Mellaril). Before taking fluoxetine, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines: a benzodiazepine such as diazepam (Valium), alprazolam (Xanax), chlordiazepoxide (Librium), clorazepate (Tranxene), temazepam (Restoril), triazolam (Halcion), and others; a tricyclic antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil), imipramine (Tofranil), doxepin (Sinequan), nortriptyline (Pamelor), and others; St. John's wort; a phenothiazine such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), mesoridazine (Serentil), perphenazine (Trilafon), prochlorperazine (Compazine), and others; lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith, others) or haloperidol (Haldol); almotriptan (Axert), frovatriptan (Frova), sumatriptan (Imitrex), naratriptan (Amerge), rizatriptan (Maxalt), or zolmitriptan (Zomig); carbamazepine (Tegretol) or phenytoin (Dilantin); warfarin (Coumadin); or digoxin (Lanoxin). You may not be able to take fluoxetine, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you are taking any of the medicines listed above. Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with fluoxetine. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. (back to top) Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has additional information about fluoxetine written for health professionals that you may read. Answered by Morris Virula 2 years ago.

Prozac can cause "light headedness" which usually happens if you stand up quickly. Your friend's symptoms sound more pronounced. I recommend that he call his psychiatrist immediately and be evaluated. There are many other equally effective medications that he could use. It is important that he does not quit taking the medication without talking with his doctor. Answered by Hosea Zhong 2 years ago.

i take 40 mg of Prozac everyday and have never experienced any blackouts,your friend needs to talk to his doctor they may have to change their dosage or change to a different kind of medicine Answered by Myesha Ulwelling 2 years ago.

Yes but don't go off cold turkey. Talk to your doctor. Answered by Darrell Kuhle 2 years ago.

No I haven't Answered by Ashlie Archambault 2 years ago.

Yes i see this also so i stopped taking it Answered by Tatiana Lautz 2 years ago.

Only a doctor should be telling him whats what. Answered by Maris Llaneza 2 years ago.


Psychiatric Medication?
What are the most common kind/names of psychiatric medications for adults with mental/psychological disorders and illnesses? Thank you for your help! Asked by Jayme Allsbrook 2 years ago.

hun that is a long list...but here goes: Abilify, Adapin, Adderall, Alepam, Alertec, Aloperidin, Alplax, Alprax, Alprazolam, Alviz, Alzolam, Amantadine, Ambien, Amisulpride, Amitriptyline, Amoxapine, Anafranil, Anatensol, Ansial, Ansiced, Antabus, Antabuse, Antideprin, Anxiron, Apo-Alpraz, Apo-Primidone, Apo-Sertral, Aponal, Apozepam, Aripiprazole, Aropax, Artane, Asendin, Asendis, Asentra, Ativan, Atomoxetine, Aurorix, Aventyl, Axoren Beneficat, Bimaran, Bioperidolo, Biston, Brotopon, Bespar, Bupropion, Buspar, Buspimen, Buspinol, Buspirone, Buspisal Calepsin, Calcium carbonate, Calcium carbimide, Calmax, Carbamazepine, Carbatrol, Carbolith, Celexa, Chlordiazepoxide, Chlorpromazine, Cibalith-S, Cipralex, Citalopram, Clomipramine, Clonazepam, Clozapine, Clozaril, Concerta, Constan, Convulex, Cylert Dalmane, Dapotum, Defanyl, Demolox, Depakene, Depakote, Deprax, Deprilept, Deroxat, Desipramine, Desirel, Desoxyn, Desyrel, Dexedrine, Dextroamphetamine, Dextrostat, Diapam, Diazepam, Dilantin, Disulfiram, Divalproex, Dogmatil, Doxepin, Dozic, Duralith Edronax, Efectin, Effexor (Efexor), Eglonyl, Einalon S, Elavil, Endep, Epanutin, Epitol, Equetro, Escitalopram, Eskalith, Eskazinyl, Eskazine, Etrafon, Eukystol Faverin, Fazaclo, Fevarin, Finlepsin, Fludecate, Flunanthate, Fluoxetine, Fluphenazine, Flurazepam, Fluvoxamine, Focalin Geodon, Gladem Halcion, Halomonth, Haldol, Haloperidol, Halosten Imipramine, Imovane Janimine, Jatroneural Kalma, Keselan, Klonopin Lamotrigine, Largactil, Levomepromazine, Levoprome, Leponex, Lexapro, Libritabs, Librium, Linton, Liskantin, Lithane, Lithium, Lithizine, Lithobid, Lithonate, Lithotabs, Lorazepam, Loxapac, Loxapine, Loxitane, Ludiomil, Lunesta, Lustral, Luvox, Lyogen, Lecital Manegan, Manerix, Maprotiline, Mellaril, Melleretten, Melleril, Meresa, Mesoridazine, Metadate, Methamphetamine, Methotrimeprazine, Methylin, Methylphenidate, Minitran, Moclobemide, Modafinil, Modalina, Modecate, Moditen, Molipaxin, Moxadil, Murelax, Myidone, Mylepsinum, Mysoline Nardil, Narol, Navane, Nefazodone, Neoperidol, Norebox, Normison, Norpramine, Nortriptyline, Novodorm Olanzapine, Omca, Orap, Oxazepam Pamelor, Parnate, Paroxetine, Paxil, Peluces, Pemoline, Permitil, Perphenazine, Pertofrane, Phenelzine, Phenytoin, Pimozide, Piportil, Pipotiazine, Pragmarel, Primidone, Prolift, Prolixin, Protriptyline, Provigil, Prozac, Prysoline, Psymion Quetiapine Ralozam, Reboxetine, Resimatil, Restoril, Restyl, Rhotrimine, Risperdal, Risperidone, Rispolept, Ritalin, Rivotril, Rubifen Sediten, Seduxen, Selecten, Serax, Serenace, Serepax, Serenase, Serentil, Seresta, Serlain, Serlift, Seroquel, Seroxat, Sertan, Sertraline, Serzone, Sevinol, Sideril, Sigaperidol, Sinequan, Sinqualone, Sinquan, Sirtal, Solanax, Solian, Solvex, Songar, Stazepin, Stelazine, Stilnox, Stimuloton, Strattera, Sulpiride, Sulpiride Ratiopharm, Sulpiride Neurazpharm, Surmontil, Symbyax, Symmetrel Tafil, Tavor, Taxagon, Tegretol, Telesmin, Temazepam, Temesta, Temposil, Terfluzine, Thioridazine, Thiothixene, Thombran, Thorazine, Timonil, Tofranil, Trancin, Tranax, Trankimazin, Tranquinal, Tranylcypromine, Trazalon, Trazodone, Trazonil, Trialodine, Triazolam, Trifluoperazine, Trihexane, Trihexyphenidyl, Trilafon, Trimipramine, Triptil, Trittico, Tryptanol Valium, Valproate, Valproic acid, Valrelease, Venlafaxine, Vestra, Vigicer, Vivactil Wellbutrin Xanax, Xanor, Xydep Zamhexal, Zeldox, Zimovane, Zispin, Ziprasidone, Zolarem, Zoldac, Zoloft, Zolpidem, Zonalon, Zopiclone, Zydis, Zyprexa The site listed below also has a list of medications and what type they are...hope this helps! (not real sure why i would get a thumbs down on this answer?) Answered by Valery Shakespeare 2 years ago.

I feel that there is always a natural alternative and some people think they need to take antidepressants etc. Because they do not know what is really wrong with them. All to many times doctor's prescribe these meds instead of seeking out the true issue's. I can't see how it would aid spiritual work only confuse it and hinder it. Like I said I so believe there is always a natural alternative. Prescription drugs mean dependency on a man made substance and stops the user from making life changes to enhance there well being. BB Tink Answered by Nadine Waiau 2 years ago.

(I use the brand names here, because they are easier to type and remember) Antidepressants (mostly SSRIs) : Lexapro (most likely the top selling psychiatric medication currently), Prozac, Zoloft, Wellbutrin... Antianxiety: Xanax (it should not be prescribed so much; very risky), Ativan, Klonopin, Valium... I should include atypical antipsychotics and anticonvulsants, but I can't think of them right now. The top two catagories are by far the most common anyway and cover a large number of disorders. Answered by Alex Nogueira 2 years ago.

The website crazymeds.us has been one I've found extremely helpful. It lists all the meds according to their class and when you click on them it gives all the uses and side effects. They also have a board where you can get other people's experiences with each med and each disorder/illness. Answered by Vella Atengco 2 years ago.

The most popular medication for anti-psychotics are Abilify(the newest), Risperdal, Geodon, & Haldol(the oldest. Each one has it's own side effects and sometime you have to try more then one to get the best results. P.S. The web site crazy meds is OK, but it is one sided(the scary side only). Answered by Johna Raysor 2 years ago.

Depends on the problem, there are many different kind. Some used together, and most used alone. Only a Dr. can evaluate you and give you the right meds. SOmetimes it takes a while to find the right one. Answered by Peggie Vosquez 2 years ago.


Does evening primrose oil affect the potency of birth control pills?
i'm asking because my dermy told me to take evening primrose to help heal my active eczema. thanks in advance! Asked by Jolie Bisarra 2 years ago.

My herbal guide doesn't say that it does. It is also used for pms, among other things. It does interact with the following medications: compazine, mellaril, navane, permitil, phenergan, prolixin, serentil, stelazine, thorazine and trilafon. If you take any of these medications, you shouldn't use evening primrose. Answered by Mao Turns 2 years ago.

The only way that is 100% is not having sex or having a hystorectomy. BC can fail, it is a small chance but it can fail. Condoms can fail. Pullout method fails often and isn't a BC method at all. Even woman who get their tubes tied could still become pregnant it is just a small chance. I have to say most of my neices and nephews are BC babies. For some reason BC really just doesn't work for my sisters at all and they have tried different forms. But they are suppose to be pretty good but you have to take them everyday on time and it takes 3 months to build up in your system so it is best to use other protection during that time. Antibiotics can knock out the BC so you need extra protection at that time as well. If you switch pills to another type you need to use protection for atleast a month to give your body time to adjust. Answered by Consuelo Manley 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: does evening primrose oil affect the potency of birth control pills? i'm asking because my dermy told me to take evening primrose to help heal my active eczema. thanks in advance! Answered by Brigid Isome 2 years ago.

I believe so, better stay away jsut to be safe. Try something else to help with your eczema Answered by Johna Hartgerink 2 years ago.


What meds are prescribed for schizophrenia?
Asked by Elanor Fust 2 years ago.

ANTIPSYCHOTIC. List of Antipsychotic Medications chlorpromazine -Thorazine chlorprothixene -Taractan clozapine -Clozaril fluphenazine -Permitil, Prolixin haloperidol- Haldol loxapine- Loxitane mesoridazine -Serentil molindone Lidone, -Moban olanzapine -Zyprexa perphenazine -Trilafon quetiapine -Seroquel risperidone -Risperdal thioridazine- Mellaril thiothixene -Navane trifluoperazine -Stelazine trifluopromazine -Vesprin ziprasidone -Geodon paliperidone- Invega Answered by Milo Boudin 2 years ago.

All the antipsychotics can be used for schizophenia, I take chlorpromazine at night and proclorperazine during the day, but the doctor at the hospital does not like me taking 2 antipsychotics. Answered by Shelli Barter 2 years ago.

I've heard a lot of people talking about abilify recently Answered by Alex Laudeman 2 years ago.

Risperidal Sereoquel ( i take this one ) Haldol Answered by Brandie Eichhorn 2 years ago.

well i only know respiradal lol cause im on it they use it for that too. Answered by Merri Penick 2 years ago.


What types of side effects have you had from Geodon?
I just started on this medication after trying others but, the side effects I read about really scare me. I would like to hear the pros and cons from others who have taken it. Thanks! Asked by Mildred Clevenger 2 years ago.

Most important fact about this drug: In some people with heart problems or a slow heartbeat, Geodon can cause serious and potentially fatal heartbeat irregularities. The chance of a problem is greater if you are taking a water pill (diuretic) or a medication that prolongs a part of the heartbeat known as the QT interval. Many of the drugs prescribed for heartbeat irregularities prolong the QT interval and should never be combined with Geodon. Other drugs to avoid when taking Geodon include Anzemet, Avelox, Halfan, Inapsine, Lariam, Mellaril, Nebupent, Orap, Orlaam, Pentam, Probucol, Prograf, Serentil, Tequin, Thorazine, Trisenox, and Zagam. If you're uncertain about the risks of any drug you're taking, be sure to check with your doctor before combining it with Geodon. Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Geodon. More common side effects may include: Accidental injury, cold symptoms, constipation, cough, diarrhea, dizziness, drowsiness, dry mouth, indigestion, muscle tightness, nausea, rash, stuffy and runny nose, upper respiratory infection, vision problems, weakness Other side effects may include: Abdominal pain, abnormal body movements, abnormal ejaculation, abnormal secretion of milk, abnormal walk, abnormally low cholesterol, agitation, amnesia, anemia, bleeding gums, bleeding in the eye, blood clots, blood disorders, blood in urine, body spasms, breast development in males, bruising or purple spots, cataracts, chest pain, chills, clogged bowels, confusion, conjunctivitis (pinkeye), coordination problems, decreased blood flow to the heart, delirium, difficulty breathing, difficulty swallowing, difficulty with orgasm, double vision, dry eyes, enlarged heart, eyelid inflammation, female sexual problems, fever, flank pain, flu-like symptoms, fungal infections, gout, hair loss, heavy menstruation, heavy uterine or vaginal bleeding, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, hives, hostility, impotence, increased reflexes, increased sensitivity to touch or sound, inflammation of the cornea, inflammation of the heart, involuntary or jerky movements, irregular heartbeat, liver problems, lockjaw, loss of appetite, loss of menstruation, low blood sugar, low blood pressure, low body temperature, lymph disorders, male sexual problems, muscle disorders, muscle pain, muscle weakness, nighttime urination, nosebleed, pneumonia, prickling or tingling sensation, rapid heartbeat, rectal bleeding, rigid muscle movement, ringing in ears, rolling of the eyeballs, sensitivity to sunlight, skin problems, slow heartbeat, slowed movement, speech problems, stroke, sudden drop in blood pressure upon standing up, swelling in the arms and legs, swelling in the face, swollen lymph nodes, swollen tongue, tarry stools, tendon inflammation, thirst, throat spasms, thyroid disorders, tremor, twitching, uncontrolled eye movement, urination decrease or increase, vaginal bleeding, vein inflammation, vertigo, vision disorders, vomiting, vomiting or spitting blood, yellowed skin and eyes, weight gain, white spots in the mouth. Special warnings about this medication: Remember that Geodon can cause dangerous--even fatal--heartbeat irregularities. Warning signs include dizziness, palpitations, and fainting. Tell your doctor immediately if you experience any of these symptoms. Be careful to avoid drugs that prolong the QT interval of the heartbeat. Check with your doctor before combining any other medication with Geodon. Particularly during the first few days of therapy, Geodon can cause low blood pressure, with accompanying dizziness, fainting, and rapid heartbeat. Tell your doctor if you experience any of these side effects. To minimize such problems, your doctor will increase your dose gradually. If you are prone to low blood pressure, take blood pressure medicine, become dehydrated, or have heart disease or poor circulation in the brain, use Geodon with caution. Geodon may cause drowsiness and can impair your judgment, thinking, and motor skills. Use caution while driving and don't operate potentially dangerous machinery until you know how this drug affects you. Geodon poses a very slight risk of seizures, especially if you are over age 65, have a history of seizures, or have Alzheimer's disease. Drugs such as Geodon sometimes cause a condition called Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome. Symptoms include high fever, muscle rigidity, irregular pulse or blood pressure, rapid heartbeat, excessive perspiration, and changes in heart rhythm. If these symptoms appear, tell your doctor immediately. You'll need to stop taking Geodon while the condition is under treatment. There also is the risk of developing tardive dyskinesia, a condition marked by slow, rhythmical, involuntary movements. This problem is more likely to occur in mature adults, especially older women. When it does, use of Geodon is usually stopped. Geodon can suppress the cough reflex; you may have trouble clearing your airway. Some people taking Geodon also develop a rash. Tell your doctor when this happens. If the rash doesn't clear up with treatment, you may have to discontinue the drug. Other antipsychotic medications have been known to interfere with the body's temperature-regulating mechanism, causing the body to overheat. Although this problem has not occurred with Geodon, caution is still advisable. Avoid exposure to extreme heat, strenuous exercise, and dehydration. There also is a remote chance that this medication may cause abnormal, prolonged and painful erections. Remember that you must never combine Geodon with any drug that prolongs the part of the heartbeat known as the QT interval (see "Most important fact about this drug"). Check with your doctor or pharmacist if you have any doubts about a drug you're taking. If Geodon is taken with certain other drugs, the effects of either could be increased, decreased, or altered. It is especially important to check with your doctor before combining Geodon with the following: Carbamazepine (Tegretol) Certain blood pressure medications Drugs that boost the effects of dopamine such as Mirapex, Parlodel, Permax, and Requip Drugs that affect the brain and nervous system, such as sedatives, tranquilizers, and antidepressants Ketoconazole (Nizoral) Levodopa (Larodopa, Sinemet) Answered by Cynthia Center 2 years ago.

I have been on geodon for several weeks now. I have experienced paranoia and also headaches about an hour before it is time to take it again. I have also had increased energy and for that it has been a lifesaver for me as all other anti-psychotics have created exhaustion. I love this medication despite the few ill effects. It has truly made me feel more normal again. Answered by Emanuel Schwiesow 2 years ago.

Be careful. I took Geodon last year while in the hospital for med management. I did well on it, so my Psychiatrist increased my dosage to the maximum level. I experienced heart palpitations. I was very scared and the hospital didn't believe me. They performed an emergency EKG the next day, but not until my I called my mother and she threatened to call the police unless the hospital took action and called my doctor. Make sure you and your loved ones monitor this drug VERY CLOSELY. Answered by Princess Baetz 2 years ago.

I only took it twice, and it gave me horrible anxiety. I already had some anxiety to begin with, but it was absolutely awful, so awful that I couldn't take it anymore. Answered by Cassandra Speltz 2 years ago.


Medical Professionals if possible: Side effects of Geodon, interfering with daily life? Doc on vacation.?
Was just hypoglycemia acting up. Geodon is making me really sensitive to it, have to eat every couple of hours and avoid caffeine and I should be fine... Odd because I havent had any problems with it since I was about 16.. Anyways thanks for your answer Asked by Chanell Ruud 2 years ago.

Hi, My doctor is on vacation so im hoping some medical professionals here may be able to answer my questions. I started the medication at 60mg once a day about a week ago. the first day I couldnt focus on anything and got very tired. At that point I decided to take it at night and it helps me sleep, so I disregard all of those instant side effects. But yesterday about mid-day I started to feel very shaky, my hands got very cold, and my muscles felt really stiff. Later that day It started to get hard to do precise movements with my fingers and my muscles started to burn. This is the point I figured it was just not eating enough that day, or the meds wearing off before my next dose.. So I took my pill early(about 5pm) and went to bed. Well this morning I wake up fine.. about 2 hours up and I feel like I did yesterday with everything and im freezing but im sweating.. Any ideas? I dont want to go to the hospital because it costs $$ that I dont have. Answered by Yolonda Godoy 2 years ago.

Hi, I am a doctor.. Most important fact about Geodon In some people with heart problems or a slow heartbeat, Geodon can cause serious and potentially fatal heartbeat irregularities. The chance of a problem is greater if you are taking a water pill (diuretic) or a medication that prolongs a part of the heartbeat known as the QT interval. Many of the drugs prescribed for heartbeat irregularities prolong the QT interval and should never be combined with Geodon. Other drugs to avoid when taking Geodon include Anzemet, Avelox, Halfan, Inapsine, Lariam, Mellaril, Nebupent, Orap, Orlaam, Pentam, Probucol, Prograf, Serentil, Tequin, Thorazine, Trisenox, and Zagam. If you're uncertain about the risks of any drug you're taking, be sure to check with your doctor before combining it with Geodon. How should you take Geodon? Geodon capsules should be taken twice a day with food. --If you miss a dose... Take it as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the one you missed and go back to your regular schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once. --Storage instructions... Store at room temperature. What side effects may occur? Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Geodon. More common side effects may include: Accidental injury, cold symptoms, constipation, cough, diarrhea, dizziness, drowsiness, dry mouth, headache, indigestion, involuntary muscle contractions, muscle tightness, nausea, rash, stuffy and runny nose, upper respiratory infection, vision problems, vomiting, weakness Remember that Geodon can cause dangerous--even fatal--heartbeat irregularities. Warning signs include dizziness, palpitations, and fainting. Tell your doctor immediately if you experience any of these symptoms. Be careful to avoid drugs that prolong the QT interval of the heartbeat. Check with your doctor before combining any other medication with Geodon. Well, your sumptoms can be caused by the drug.. when you get the symptoms next time, try to be calm and try ot concentrate.. do not panic.. If still the symptoms persist, I'm afraid you would have to goto the doctor.. If you want more info, feel free to write to me or visit www.medicguide.org This is a free site done by me and other doctors to answer health querries for free. Answered by Bobbi Lavant 2 years ago.

Masturbation is the system of bringing approximately a voluntary pleasure of the sexual facilities following mainly by means of the release of semen.Materbation is natural in younger guys,baby.The facet outcome of masterbation may be very harmful in long run if those turn out to be habbit is also Infertility,Continuous headache and backache. Dizziness and lack of reminiscence.Unable to participate in any heavy bodily or intellectual paintings. Answered by Alberta Stford 2 years ago.


What to do , When the doctors running out medications to treat Bipolar Disorder?
BEEN ON THE FOLLOWING MEDICATIONS THEY ALL HAD SOMETHING THEY DID OR DIDN'T WORK OR MADE ME FEEL SICKER , WHAT TO DO : GEODON , ABILIFY, TOPOMAX, LAMICTAL , LITHIUM, SEROQUEL, HALDOL,MELLARIL, SERENTIL, STELAZINE, DEPAKOTE , NEURONTIN , LEXAPRO, ZOLOFT , EFFEXOR, PAMELOR , ATIVAN... Asked by Dee Weisend 2 years ago.

BEEN ON THE FOLLOWING MEDICATIONS THEY ALL HAD SOMETHING THEY DID OR DIDN'T WORK OR MADE ME FEEL SICKER , WHAT TO DO : GEODON , ABILIFY, TOPOMAX, LAMICTAL , LITHIUM, SEROQUEL, HALDOL, MELLARIL, SERENTIL, STELAZINE, DEPAKOTE , NEURONTIN , LEXAPRO, ZOLOFT , EFFEXOR, PAMELOR , ATIVAN , TRANXENE, TRAZADONE ??? Answered by Miles Schatzman 2 years ago.

Trileptal, tegretol ... Don't know of course your exact history the key is usually getting just the right dose and combination and it's a real *#&$ trying to figure that out. Don't ever let them add/subtract make more than one change at a time, that helps to pinpoint better what is better and worse. Sometimes two meds at a 'substandard' dose do more than one med at what is usually a therapeutic dose. People are so different. My son's doc insists that 7.5 mg of abilify at 260 lbs can't possibly do anything for him, but 10mg makes him twitchy and 5mg does nothing -- 7.5 means the difference between holes in my wall and no holes in my wall -- that was his 'miracle med'. of course it's different for everyone. Getting exact dosing can be the trick. Most antidepressants won't work until you get a good mood stabilizer on board, wellbutrin actually has a different action that is often less of a trigger in bipolar. Takes a while but too many possible combinations to give up yet. Sometimes doses need tweaking rather than crossing the med off the list as not working. And electroshock therapy isn't the nightmare it was earlier in the century. I'd like to see what's happening with the magnet therapy, haven't checked on it lately -- get an MRI you'll feel better, for a day or two anyway. Answered by Casey Yeeloy 2 years ago.

Wow, you've really tried a lot. It's so hard sometimes to find the right ones without side effects, or with side effects mild enough that they are tolerable. How about Wellbutrin, Tegratol, Trileptal, Buspar? There is a medication called Clozapine (Clozaril) that is an anti-psychotic that has helped people when nothing else did. It can have very serious side effects though and requires frequent blood tests. It's pretty much only used for severe psychotic features that have not responded to anything else. The truth is, most meds are going to have some side effects and none will eliminate symptoms altogether. When effective, they will reduce the frequency and severity of symptoms and make the illness more manageable. Also, some of the milder side effects will often go away after your body adjusts to the meds. Other meds take 4-6 weeks to be fully effective. If you have tried all of these, you already know this stuff. It might be worth sitting down and making a list of all the meds you have tried, how long you took them, what dosage you were on, what side effects you had (the best you can remember anyway...I know I always have trouble remembering the dosages of past meds) and taking a good look at it. Figure out which meds made things worse/caused intolerable side effects and see which ones are left. It may be that the right combination of some of those medications will be effective for you. The good thing is, they will continue to develop new medications with less side effects. The more they learn about the biology of bipolar, the more they will be able to directly treat what's going wrong. It's also important to have a very regular sleep schedule, eat a healthy balanced diet, get exercise, avoid mood altering substances...and personally, I think, get some sort of cognitive behavioral therapy. I highly recommend trying a therapy called DBT. It's helped me make some real changes in my life where all other therapy and even meds have fallen short. Medication isn't magic...if only it were that easy. But they can help you to be stabilized to the point where you can work on the other aspects. When the symptoms are out of control, it's very hard to do the things you know will help (work out, eat right, not abuse substances, etc.) Is it possible that it is not bipolar, but something else that is similar in symptoms? Answered by Gilberte Faine 2 years ago.

My brother is bi-polar manic depressive.....he is 50 and he feels best when he is on his Prozac with the Lithium..atleast he can function like a real person. Are you taking the meds separately or combining several to get best results? You aren't drinking beer with the drugs are you? That will defeat the purpose and it is not a wise decision to do both at the same time. Answered by Edythe Autin 2 years ago.

I have heard that the VNS ((vagus nerve stimulation)) can help people with depression Answered by Elmo Collova 2 years ago.

That's pretty much all of them. I would focus on behavior therapies to help recognize symptoms of mania etc. Answered by Pasty Steins 2 years ago.

celexa is a new one and there is at least 1 more new one out I know..just don't know the name...VNS is supposed to be 75% success rate...check it out Answered by Aletha Spitler 2 years ago.

sounds like you need something besides just medication ... yoga and meditation can do amazing things... Answered by Leandro Voltaire 2 years ago.


If you take antibiotics and you get a real bad headache from it would you stop?
The medicine is call Erythromycin base 500 Asked by Ludivina Skwarek 2 years ago.

Side Effects of This Medicine: Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur: Fever; headache, nausea; skin rash, redness, or itching; stomach pain (severe); unusual tiredness or weakness; vomiting; yellow eyes or skin-with erythromycin estolate (rare with other erythromycins) Pain, swelling, or redness at place of injection Fainting (repeated); irregular or slow heartbeat; loss of hearing (temporary) Other medicines—Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking or receiving erythromycins, it is especially important that your health care professional know if you are taking any of the following: Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Amiodarone (e.g., Cordarone) or Anabolic steroids (nandrolone [e.g., Anabolin], oxandrolone [e.g., Anavar], oxymetholone [e.g., Anadrol], stanozolol [e.g., Winstrol]) or Androgens (male hormones) or Antithyroid agents (medicine for overactive thyroid) or Carmustine (e.g., BiCNU) or Chloroquine (e.g., Aralen) or Dantrolene (e.g., Dantrium) or Daunorubicin (e.g., Cerubidine) or Disulfiram (e.g., Antabuse) or Divalproex (e.g., Depakote) or Estrogens (female hormones) or Etretinate (e.g., Tegison) or Gold salts (medicine for arthritis) or Hydroxychloroquine (e.g., Plaquenil) or Mercaptopurine (e.g., Purinethol) or Methotrexate (e.g., Mexate) or Methyldopa (e.g., Aldomet) or Naltrexone (e.g., Trexan) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Oral contraceptives (birth control pills) containing estrogen or Other anti-infectives by mouth or by injection (medicine for infection) or Phenothiazines (acetophenazine [e.g., Tindal], chlorpromazine [e.g., Thorazine], fluphenazine [e.g., Prolixin], mesoridazine [e.g., Serentil], perphenazine [e.g., Trilafon], prochlorperazine [e.g., Compazine], promazine [e.g., Sparine], promethazine [e.g., Phenergan], thioridazine [e.g., Mellaril], trifluoperazine [e.g., Stelazine], triflupromazine [e.g., Vesprin], trimeprazine [e.g., Temaril]) or Phenytoin (e.g., Dilantin) or Plicamycin (e.g., Mithracin) or Valproic acid (e.g., Depakene)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins, especially erythromycin estolate, may increase the chance of liver problems Aminophylline (e.g., Somophyllin) or Caffeine (e.g., NoDoz) or Oxtriphylline (e.g., Choledyl) or Theophylline (e.g., Somophyllin-T, Theo-Dur)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the chance of side effects from aminophylline, caffeine, oxtriphylline, or theophylline Astemizole (e.g., Hismanal) or Terfenadine (e.g., Seldane)—Use of astemizole or terfenadine with erythromycins may cause heart problems, such as an irregular heartbeat; these medicines should not be used together Carbamazepine (e.g., Tegretol)—Use of carbamazepine with erythromycin may increase the side effects of carbamazepine or increase the chance of liver problems Chloramphenicol (e.g., Chloromycetin) or Clindamycin (e.g., Cleocin) or Lincomycin (e.g., Lincocin)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may decrease the effectiveness of these other antibiotics Cyclosporine (e.g., Sandimmune) or Warfarin (e.g., Coumadin)—Use of any of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the side effects of these medicines Other medical problems—The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of erythromycins. Answered by Galen Brenchley 2 years ago.

I'd page my doctor right away to ask if the headache is actually related to the medication and not something happening by chance. Only your doctor can advise you whether you should take a medication or not--remember also to tell the doctor the names of the other medications you're on to make sure there's not an interaction. Answered by Soledad Schlageter 2 years ago.

It is not likely that the antibiotic is giving you the headache. You have to finish your antibiotics, as long as you don't have a life threatening reaction. Take some Tylenol for your head. If it is really bothering you, you should ask your parents, anyway. Answered by Retha Vandine 2 years ago.

in case you get a headache because of the fact of taking the medicine and as you think of you're clearing up now, you are able to desire to not proceed taking the medicine. Drink countless comfortable beverages, shop hydrated to have sufficient kidney filtration. Answered by Shanti Febus 2 years ago.

Headaches aren't a side effect to this drug (in a general sense). Don't stop taking it unless the prescribing doctor says so. Answered by Myrtle Maddix 2 years ago.


What are the side effects to Paxil?
My doctor put me on Paxil for my anxiety and told me that it would help me with depression as well. I don't think I'm depressed nor do I feel depressed (have been in the past) but do suffer from anxiety disorder. And today I took my first Paxil pill and lots of stuff running through my head. I feel... Asked by Jasmin Haberstroh 2 years ago.

My doctor put me on Paxil for my anxiety and told me that it would help me with depression as well. I don't think I'm depressed nor do I feel depressed (have been in the past) but do suffer from anxiety disorder. And today I took my first Paxil pill and lots of stuff running through my head. I feel angry...I feel mad.... this is not my persona at all. I'm a very happy person, especially around my family. And ironically today, has not been a good day. Very angry and no reason that I can think of. Unsure if its a side effect and i'm trying to be optimistic about takign this medication. Any input would be appreciated. Answered by Georgiann Mcclaney 2 years ago.

If the pills are making you angry.... I personally wouldn't take them anymore! Especially if you don't feel depressed to begin with. As far as your question about the side effects of Paxil....... If you have any of the following serious side effects, stop taking paroxetine and contact your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical treatment: an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); an irregular heartbeat or pulse; low blood pressure (dizziness, weakness); high blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision); unusual bleeding or bruising; or fever or chills. Less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take paroxetine and talk to your doctor if you experience headache; sleepiness or insomnia; weakness; nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation; decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm; dry mouth; tremor, nervousness, anxiety trouble concentrating; or changes in appetite or weight. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect paroxetine? Do not take paroxetine together with pimozide (Orap), thioridazine (Mellaril), or a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), selegeline (Eldepryl), or tranylcypromine (Parnate). You must wait at least 14 days after stopping an MAOI before you can take paroxetine. You must wait 5 weeks after stopping paroxetine before you can take thioridazine (Mellaril). Before taking paroxetine, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following medicines: tryptophan; warfarin (Coumadin); digoxin (Lanoxin); or lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith, others); theophylline (Theobid, Theolair, Theochron, Elixophyllin, and others); other SSRIs such as fluoxetine (Prozac), fluvoxamine (Luvox), sertraline (Zoloft), and others; a tricyclic antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil), imipramine (Tofranil), doxepin (Sinequan), nortriptyline (Pamelor), and others; aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), ketoprofen (Oruvail), and others; a phenothiazine such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), mesoridazine (Serentil), perphenazine (Trilafon), prochlorperazine (Compazine), and others; almotriptan (Axert), frovatriptan (Frova), sumatriptan (Imitrex), naratriptan (Amerge), rizatriptan (Maxalt), or zolmitriptan (Zomig); heart rhythm medication such as flecainide (Tambocor), propafenone (Rhythmol), and others; or cimetidine (Tagamet, Tagamet HB). If you are using any of the medicines listed above, you may not be able to take paroxetine, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring. Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with paroxetine. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using paroxetine. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. * Doctors usually don't have the time to tell you all of this. Although it is very important information you should know. Good Luck! <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>... . Answered by Douglas Menasco 2 years ago.

Less likely that all these symptoms are side effects of Paxil. I think you should try to change medicine. Try Zolofit in consultation with your doctor. Based on experience of my clients , Forgetfulness , Weight Gain , Sexual side effect can be attributed to Paxil. Answered by Kenda Celi 2 years ago.

If things don't improve in the next couple of days you need to ask your doctor to switch your medication. I know quite a few people who have taken Paxil (myself included) and it seemed to only make things worse. I know personally, I wanted to kill myself while taking it and I was never that depressed before. Answered by Dulce Haraguchi 2 years ago.

paxil is a medication that has a well known amount of side effects but the symptoms that you describe are strange. I believe that it is effecting your emotions and some well known depression medications due cause bad stimulunt reactions. Please contact your psychologist because these emotions are irregular.Until then discontinue the medication. Answered by Solomon Porada 2 years ago.

It interferes with your ability to ejaculate. Answered by Dortha Mccue 2 years ago.


Has anyone experienced Blackouts while using Prozac?
A very good friend on mine is experiencing total black-outs from using 80 mg of Prozac a day. I have advised them to stop taking it and contact their physician. Anyone else seeing this with this medication??? Asked by Kareen Riederer 2 years ago.

Prozac 10 mg-green, elliptical, scored tablets Prozac 10 mg-green capsules Prozac 20 mg-green and white capsules Prozac 40 mg-green and orange capsules Prozac 20 mg/5 mL oral solution-mint flavored solution Prozac Weekly 90 mg-green and clear capsules What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if an overdose is suspected. Symptoms of a fluoxetine overdose include nausea, vomiting, tremor, agitation, seizures, drowsiness, hyperactivity, and enlarged pupils. (back to top) What should I avoid while taking fluoxetine? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Fluoxetine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness or dizziness while taking fluoxetine. (back to top) What are the possible side effects of fluoxetine? If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking fluoxetine and contact your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical treatment: an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); an irregular heartbeat or pulse; low blood pressure (dizziness, weakness); high blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision); chills or fever; unusual bleeding or bruising; a rash or hives. If you experience any of the following less serious side effects, continue taking fluoxetine and talk to your doctor: headache, tremor, nervousness, or anxiety; difficulty concentrating; nausea, diarrhea, dry mouth, or changes in appetite or weight; weakness; increased sweating; sleepiness or insomnia; or decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. (back to top) What other drugs will affect fluoxetine? Do not take fluoxetine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) during the last 2 weeks. Serious, and sometimes fatal, reactions have occurred when these medicines have been used together. Also, do not take fluoxetine if you are taking thioridazine (Mellaril). Dangerous, even fatal irregular heartbeats may occur if these medicines are taken together. You must wait 5 weeks after stopping fluoxetine before taking thioridazine (Mellaril). Before taking fluoxetine, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines: a benzodiazepine such as diazepam (Valium), alprazolam (Xanax), chlordiazepoxide (Librium), clorazepate (Tranxene), temazepam (Restoril), triazolam (Halcion), and others; a tricyclic antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil), imipramine (Tofranil), doxepin (Sinequan), nortriptyline (Pamelor), and others; St. John's wort; a phenothiazine such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), mesoridazine (Serentil), perphenazine (Trilafon), prochlorperazine (Compazine), and others; lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith, others) or haloperidol (Haldol); almotriptan (Axert), frovatriptan (Frova), sumatriptan (Imitrex), naratriptan (Amerge), rizatriptan (Maxalt), or zolmitriptan (Zomig); carbamazepine (Tegretol) or phenytoin (Dilantin); warfarin (Coumadin); or digoxin (Lanoxin). You may not be able to take fluoxetine, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you are taking any of the medicines listed above. Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with fluoxetine. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. (back to top) Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has additional information about fluoxetine written for health professionals that you may read. Answered by Lizeth Deangeles 2 years ago.

Prozac can cause "light headedness" which usually happens if you stand up quickly. Your friend's symptoms sound more pronounced. I recommend that he call his psychiatrist immediately and be evaluated. There are many other equally effective medications that he could use. It is important that he does not quit taking the medication without talking with his doctor. Answered by Alanna Trawick 2 years ago.

i take 40 mg of Prozac everyday and have never experienced any blackouts,your friend needs to talk to his doctor they may have to change their dosage or change to a different kind of medicine Answered by Kaitlyn Leadford 2 years ago.

Yes but don't go off cold turkey. Talk to your doctor. Answered by Bunny Steeves 2 years ago.

No I haven't Answered by Mac Brockwell 2 years ago.

Yes i see this also so i stopped taking it Answered by Vannessa Monger 2 years ago.

Only a doctor should be telling him whats what. Answered by Devora Susana 2 years ago.


Psychiatric Medication?
What are the most common kind/names of psychiatric medications for adults with mental/psychological disorders and illnesses? Thank you for your help! Asked by Fritz Dicks 2 years ago.

hun that is a long list...but here goes: Abilify, Adapin, Adderall, Alepam, Alertec, Aloperidin, Alplax, Alprax, Alprazolam, Alviz, Alzolam, Amantadine, Ambien, Amisulpride, Amitriptyline, Amoxapine, Anafranil, Anatensol, Ansial, Ansiced, Antabus, Antabuse, Antideprin, Anxiron, Apo-Alpraz, Apo-Primidone, Apo-Sertral, Aponal, Apozepam, Aripiprazole, Aropax, Artane, Asendin, Asendis, Asentra, Ativan, Atomoxetine, Aurorix, Aventyl, Axoren Beneficat, Bimaran, Bioperidolo, Biston, Brotopon, Bespar, Bupropion, Buspar, Buspimen, Buspinol, Buspirone, Buspisal Calepsin, Calcium carbonate, Calcium carbimide, Calmax, Carbamazepine, Carbatrol, Carbolith, Celexa, Chlordiazepoxide, Chlorpromazine, Cibalith-S, Cipralex, Citalopram, Clomipramine, Clonazepam, Clozapine, Clozaril, Concerta, Constan, Convulex, Cylert Dalmane, Dapotum, Defanyl, Demolox, Depakene, Depakote, Deprax, Deprilept, Deroxat, Desipramine, Desirel, Desoxyn, Desyrel, Dexedrine, Dextroamphetamine, Dextrostat, Diapam, Diazepam, Dilantin, Disulfiram, Divalproex, Dogmatil, Doxepin, Dozic, Duralith Edronax, Efectin, Effexor (Efexor), Eglonyl, Einalon S, Elavil, Endep, Epanutin, Epitol, Equetro, Escitalopram, Eskalith, Eskazinyl, Eskazine, Etrafon, Eukystol Faverin, Fazaclo, Fevarin, Finlepsin, Fludecate, Flunanthate, Fluoxetine, Fluphenazine, Flurazepam, Fluvoxamine, Focalin Geodon, Gladem Halcion, Halomonth, Haldol, Haloperidol, Halosten Imipramine, Imovane Janimine, Jatroneural Kalma, Keselan, Klonopin Lamotrigine, Largactil, Levomepromazine, Levoprome, Leponex, Lexapro, Libritabs, Librium, Linton, Liskantin, Lithane, Lithium, Lithizine, Lithobid, Lithonate, Lithotabs, Lorazepam, Loxapac, Loxapine, Loxitane, Ludiomil, Lunesta, Lustral, Luvox, Lyogen, Lecital Manegan, Manerix, Maprotiline, Mellaril, Melleretten, Melleril, Meresa, Mesoridazine, Metadate, Methamphetamine, Methotrimeprazine, Methylin, Methylphenidate, Minitran, Moclobemide, Modafinil, Modalina, Modecate, Moditen, Molipaxin, Moxadil, Murelax, Myidone, Mylepsinum, Mysoline Nardil, Narol, Navane, Nefazodone, Neoperidol, Norebox, Normison, Norpramine, Nortriptyline, Novodorm Olanzapine, Omca, Orap, Oxazepam Pamelor, Parnate, Paroxetine, Paxil, Peluces, Pemoline, Permitil, Perphenazine, Pertofrane, Phenelzine, Phenytoin, Pimozide, Piportil, Pipotiazine, Pragmarel, Primidone, Prolift, Prolixin, Protriptyline, Provigil, Prozac, Prysoline, Psymion Quetiapine Ralozam, Reboxetine, Resimatil, Restoril, Restyl, Rhotrimine, Risperdal, Risperidone, Rispolept, Ritalin, Rivotril, Rubifen Sediten, Seduxen, Selecten, Serax, Serenace, Serepax, Serenase, Serentil, Seresta, Serlain, Serlift, Seroquel, Seroxat, Sertan, Sertraline, Serzone, Sevinol, Sideril, Sigaperidol, Sinequan, Sinqualone, Sinquan, Sirtal, Solanax, Solian, Solvex, Songar, Stazepin, Stelazine, Stilnox, Stimuloton, Strattera, Sulpiride, Sulpiride Ratiopharm, Sulpiride Neurazpharm, Surmontil, Symbyax, Symmetrel Tafil, Tavor, Taxagon, Tegretol, Telesmin, Temazepam, Temesta, Temposil, Terfluzine, Thioridazine, Thiothixene, Thombran, Thorazine, Timonil, Tofranil, Trancin, Tranax, Trankimazin, Tranquinal, Tranylcypromine, Trazalon, Trazodone, Trazonil, Trialodine, Triazolam, Trifluoperazine, Trihexane, Trihexyphenidyl, Trilafon, Trimipramine, Triptil, Trittico, Tryptanol Valium, Valproate, Valproic acid, Valrelease, Venlafaxine, Vestra, Vigicer, Vivactil Wellbutrin Xanax, Xanor, Xydep Zamhexal, Zeldox, Zimovane, Zispin, Ziprasidone, Zolarem, Zoldac, Zoloft, Zolpidem, Zonalon, Zopiclone, Zydis, Zyprexa The site listed below also has a list of medications and what type they are...hope this helps! (not real sure why i would get a thumbs down on this answer?) Answered by Senaida Abdelal 2 years ago.

I feel that there is always a natural alternative and some people think they need to take antidepressants etc. Because they do not know what is really wrong with them. All to many times doctor's prescribe these meds instead of seeking out the true issue's. I can't see how it would aid spiritual work only confuse it and hinder it. Like I said I so believe there is always a natural alternative. Prescription drugs mean dependency on a man made substance and stops the user from making life changes to enhance there well being. BB Tink Answered by Wilburn Iuliucci 2 years ago.

(I use the brand names here, because they are easier to type and remember) Antidepressants (mostly SSRIs) : Lexapro (most likely the top selling psychiatric medication currently), Prozac, Zoloft, Wellbutrin... Antianxiety: Xanax (it should not be prescribed so much; very risky), Ativan, Klonopin, Valium... I should include atypical antipsychotics and anticonvulsants, but I can't think of them right now. The top two catagories are by far the most common anyway and cover a large number of disorders. Answered by Anjanette Akles 2 years ago.

The website crazymeds.us has been one I've found extremely helpful. It lists all the meds according to their class and when you click on them it gives all the uses and side effects. They also have a board where you can get other people's experiences with each med and each disorder/illness. Answered by Ingrid Anklam 2 years ago.

The most popular medication for anti-psychotics are Abilify(the newest), Risperdal, Geodon, & Haldol(the oldest. Each one has it's own side effects and sometime you have to try more then one to get the best results. P.S. The web site crazy meds is OK, but it is one sided(the scary side only). Answered by Erasmo Langehennig 2 years ago.

Depends on the problem, there are many different kind. Some used together, and most used alone. Only a Dr. can evaluate you and give you the right meds. SOmetimes it takes a while to find the right one. Answered by Allen Moniot 2 years ago.


Does evening primrose oil affect the potency of birth control pills?
i'm asking because my dermy told me to take evening primrose to help heal my active eczema. thanks in advance! Asked by Leo Ponder 2 years ago.

My herbal guide doesn't say that it does. It is also used for pms, among other things. It does interact with the following medications: compazine, mellaril, navane, permitil, phenergan, prolixin, serentil, stelazine, thorazine and trilafon. If you take any of these medications, you shouldn't use evening primrose. Answered by Devorah Copple 2 years ago.

The only way that is 100% is not having sex or having a hystorectomy. BC can fail, it is a small chance but it can fail. Condoms can fail. Pullout method fails often and isn't a BC method at all. Even woman who get their tubes tied could still become pregnant it is just a small chance. I have to say most of my neices and nephews are BC babies. For some reason BC really just doesn't work for my sisters at all and they have tried different forms. But they are suppose to be pretty good but you have to take them everyday on time and it takes 3 months to build up in your system so it is best to use other protection during that time. Antibiotics can knock out the BC so you need extra protection at that time as well. If you switch pills to another type you need to use protection for atleast a month to give your body time to adjust. Answered by Emilia Hugus 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: does evening primrose oil affect the potency of birth control pills? i'm asking because my dermy told me to take evening primrose to help heal my active eczema. thanks in advance! Answered by Ngoc Times 2 years ago.

I believe so, better stay away jsut to be safe. Try something else to help with your eczema Answered by Shaunta Ratner 2 years ago.


What meds are prescribed for schizophrenia?
Asked by Alexandria Baller 2 years ago.

ANTIPSYCHOTIC. List of Antipsychotic Medications chlorpromazine -Thorazine chlorprothixene -Taractan clozapine -Clozaril fluphenazine -Permitil, Prolixin haloperidol- Haldol loxapine- Loxitane mesoridazine -Serentil molindone Lidone, -Moban olanzapine -Zyprexa perphenazine -Trilafon quetiapine -Seroquel risperidone -Risperdal thioridazine- Mellaril thiothixene -Navane trifluoperazine -Stelazine trifluopromazine -Vesprin ziprasidone -Geodon paliperidone- Invega Answered by Mariano Rocray 2 years ago.

All the antipsychotics can be used for schizophenia, I take chlorpromazine at night and proclorperazine during the day, but the doctor at the hospital does not like me taking 2 antipsychotics. Answered by Theresia Cendejas 2 years ago.

I've heard a lot of people talking about abilify recently Answered by Brendan Kappelmann 2 years ago.

Risperidal Sereoquel ( i take this one ) Haldol Answered by Rosamaria Kocourek 2 years ago.

well i only know respiradal lol cause im on it they use it for that too. Answered by Gladys Selakovic 2 years ago.


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