Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 017376/001.

Names and composition

"SEPTRA" is the commercial name of a drug composed of SULFAMETHOXAZOLE and TRIMETHOPRIM.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017376/001 SEPTRA SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 400MG and 80MG
017598/001 SEPTRA SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM SUSPENSION/ORAL 200MG per 5ML and 40MG per 5ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018452/001 SEPTRA SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 80MG per ML and 16MG per ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017376/001 SEPTRA SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 400MG and 80MG
017376/002 SEPTRA DS SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 800MG and 160MG
017377/001 BACTRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 400MG and 80MG
017377/002 BACTRIM DS SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 800MG and 160MG
017560/001 BACTRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM SUSPENSION/ORAL 200MG per 5ML and 40MG per 5ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
017560/002 BACTRIM PEDIATRIC SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM SUSPENSION/ORAL 200MG per 5ML and 40MG per 5ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
017598/001 SEPTRA SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM SUSPENSION/ORAL 200MG per 5ML and 40MG per 5ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
017598/002 SEPTRA GRAPE SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM SUSPENSION/ORAL 200MG per 5ML and 40MG per 5ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018242/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 400MG and 80MG
018242/002 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 800MG and 160MG
018374/001 BACTRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 80MG per ML and 16MG per ML
018452/001 SEPTRA SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 80MG per ML and 16MG per ML
018598/003 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 400MG and 80MG
018598/004 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM DOUBLE STRENGTH SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 800MG and 160MG
018615/001 SULFATRIM PEDIATRIC SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM SUSPENSION/ORAL 200MG per 5ML and 40MG per 5ML
018615/002 SULFATRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM SUSPENSION/ORAL 200MG per 5ML and 40MG per 5ML
018812/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM SUSPENSION/ORAL 200MG per 5ML and 40MG per 5ML
018812/002 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM SUSPENSION/ORAL 200MG per 5ML and 40MG per 5ML
018852/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 400MG and 80MG
018854/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM DOUBLE STRENGTH SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 800MG and 160MG
018946/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 400MG and 80MG
018946/002 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 800MG and 160MG
070000/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 800MG and 160MG
070002/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 400MG and 80MG
070006/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 400MG and 80MG
070007/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM DOUBLE STRENGTH SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 800MG and 160MG
070022/001 SULFAMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 400MG and 80MG
070028/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM SUSPENSION/ORAL 200MG per 5ML and 40MG per 5ML
070030/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SINGLE STRENGTH SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 400MG and 80MG
070032/001 SULFAMETHOPRIM-DS SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 800MG and 160MG
070034/001 COTRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 400MG and 80MG
070037/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM DOUBLE STRENGTH SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 800MG and 160MG
070048/001 COTRIM D.S. SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 800MG and 160MG
070063/001 SULMEPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM SUSPENSION/ORAL 200MG per 5ML and 40MG per 5ML
070064/001 SULMEPRIM PEDIATRIC SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM SUSPENSION/ORAL 200MG per 5ML and 40MG per 5ML
070065/002 SULFATRIM-SS SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 400MG and 80MG
070066/001 SULFATRIM-DS SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 800MG and 160MG
070203/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 400MG and 80MG
070204/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 800MG and 160MG
070215/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 400MG and 80MG
070216/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 800MG and 160MG
070223/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 80MG per ML and 16MG per ML
070627/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 80MG per ML and 16MG per ML
070628/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 80MG per ML and 16MG per ML
070889/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 400MG and 80MG
070890/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 800MG and 160MG
071016/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 400MG and 80MG
071017/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 800MG and 160MG
071299/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 400MG and 80MG
071300/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 800MG and 160MG
071341/001 SULFAMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM Injectable/ Injection 80MG per ML and 16MG per ML
071556/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 80MG per ML and 16MG per ML
071815/001 UROPLUS SS SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 400MG and 80MG
071816/001 UROPLUS DS SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 800MG and 160MG
072289/001 TRIMETH/SULFA SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM SUSPENSION/ORAL 200MG per 5ML and 40MG per 5ML
072383/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 80MG per ML and 16MG per ML
072398/001 TRIMETH/SULFA SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM SUSPENSION/ORAL 200MG per 5ML and 40MG per 5ML
072399/001 TRIMETH/SULFA SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM SUSPENSION/ORAL 200MG per 5ML and 40MG per 5ML
072408/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 400MG and 80MG
072417/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM DOUBLE STRENGTH SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 800MG and 160MG
072768/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 400MG and 80MG
072769/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM DOUBLE STRENGTH SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 800MG and 160MG
073199/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 80MG per ML and 16MG per ML
073303/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 80MG per ML and 16MG per ML
074650/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM SUSPENSION/ORAL 200MG per 5ML and 40MG per 5ML
076817/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 400MG and 80MG
076817/002 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 800MG and 160MG
076899/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 400MG and 80MG
076899/002 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 800MG and 160MG
077612/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM SUSPENSION/ORAL 200MG per 5ML and 40MG per 5ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
077785/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM SUSPENSION/ORAL 200MG per 5ML and 40MG per 5ML
078060/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 800MG and 160MG
078060/002 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 400MG and 80MG
090624/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 400MG and 80MG
090624/002 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 800MG and 160MG
090828/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 800MG and 160MG
090828/002 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM TABLET/ORAL 400MG and 80MG
091348/001 SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM SULFAMETHOXAZOLE; TRIMETHOPRIM SUSPENSION/ORAL 200MG per 5ML and 40MG per 5ML

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Answered questions

What is the drug septra used for?
what is septra? Asked by Rex Quartaro 1 year ago.

Septra is a Sulfa based antibiotic,also used as Bactrim and it is used for treating bacterial infections.It is dangerous for pregnant women to take because it is supposed to cause failure to thrive condition in infants. Given to kill mild to very serious bacteria.It's great for treating urinary tract infections to strep to bronchitis and other bacterial lung infections. Also used in treatment of some condition associated with HIV. Answered by Gordon Paradowski 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: what is the drug septra used for? what is septra? Answered by Blythe Roses 1 year ago.

Septa is a sulfa based antibiotic. It is used to treat infections. Answered by Kamilah Tuminello 1 year ago.

Cocaine? That's bad, really, really bad to even be asking this question. You have a disease which is called addiction, and need help before you continue killing yourself. If your doc knows that you have this problem, ask him/her about the effects while you GET HELP for yourself...good luck. Answered by Jonelle Hickam 1 year ago.

I believe its an antibiotic used for ut infections. Answered by Randa Rabelo 1 year ago.

what is the side effect Answered by Aja Piechocki 1 year ago.


What are the long term effects of Bactrim/Septra.?
My mother (she's 50) has been on Bactrim for several years now due to reoccurent UTI caused by a bladder ulcer. What are the major concerns for taking this over the long term (other than bacteria resistant infections) Also she had an episode of tachycardia (160-172) for an hour and the next day she checked... Asked by Sharee Crossley 1 year ago.

My mother (she's 50) has been on Bactrim for several years now due to reoccurent UTI caused by a bladder ulcer. What are the major concerns for taking this over the long term (other than bacteria resistant infections) Also she had an episode of tachycardia (160-172) for an hour and the next day she checked her B/P and it was 86/72. Her pulse is usually in the 60's and her B/P is normally 110/70-ish. Could this have anything to do with her long term Bactrim use? (And yes I already told her to go to the Dr.'s, she is there at this moment...I am just trying to find out for my own information) Thank you everyone who answers. Answered by Cherrie Gidcumb 1 year ago.

Sulfamethoxazole (as in Bactrim, Septra, Septrin etc) Adverse effects and treatment Nausea, vomiting, anorexia, and diarrhoea are relatively common following the administration of sulfamethoxazole and other sulfonamides. Hypersensitivity reactions to sulfonamides have proved a problem. Fever is relatively common, and reactions involving the skin may include rashes, pruritis, photosensitivity reactions, exfoliative dermatitis, and erythema nodosum. Severe, potentially fatal, skin reactions including toxic epidermal necrolysis and the Stevens-Johnson syndrome have occurred in patients treated with sulfonamides. Dermatitis may also occur from contact of sulfonamides with the skin. Systemic lupus erythematosus, particularly exacerbation of pre-existing disease, has also been reported. Nephrotoxic reactions including interstitial nephritis and tubular necrosis, which may result in renal failure, have been attributed to hypersensitivity to sulfamethoxazole. Lumbar pain, haematuria, oliguria, and anuria may also occur due to crystallisation in the urine of sulfamethoxazole or its less soluble acetylated metabolite. The risk of crystalluria can be reduced by the administration of fluids to maintain a high urine output. If necessary, alkalinisation of the urine by administration of sodium bicarbonate may increase solubility and aid the elimination of sulfonamides. Blood disorders have occasionally occurred during treatment with the sulfonamides including sulfamethoxazole, and include agranulocytosis, aplastic anaemia, thrombocytopenia, leucopenia, hypothrombinaemia, and eosinophilia. Many of these effects on the blood may result from hypersensitivity reactions. Sulfonamides may rarely cause cyanosis due to methaemoglobinaemia. Acute haemolytic anaemia is a rare complication which may be associated with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. Other adverse effects which may be manifestations of a generalised hypersensitivity reaction to sulfonamides include a syndrome resembling serum sickness, liver necrosis, hepatomegaly and jaundice, myocarditis, pulmonary eosinophilia and fibrosing alveolitis, and vasculitis including polyarteritis nodosa. Anaphylaxis has been reported only very rarely. Other adverse reactions that have been reported after the administration of sulfamethoxazole or other sulfonamides include hypoglycaemia, hypothyrodism, neurological reactions including aseptic meningitis, ataxia, benign intracranial hypertension, convulsions, dizziness. drowsiness, fatigue, headache, insomnia, mental depression, peripheral or optic neuropathies, psychoses, tinnitus, vertigo, and pancreatitis. Sulfonamides may displace serum-bound biluribin, resulting in jaundice and kernicterus in premature neonates. As with other antimicrobials, sulfamethoxazole may cause alterations of the bacterial flora in the gastrointestinal tract. There is, therefore, the possibility, although it appears to be small, that pseudomembranous colitis may occur. Slow acetylators of sulfamethoxazole may be at greater risk of adverse reactions than fast acetylators. Precautions In patients receiving sulfamethoxazole, adequate fluid intake is necessary to reduce the risk of crystalluria; the daily urine output should be 1200 to 1500 mL or more. The administration of compounds which render the urine acidic may increase the risk of crystalluria; the risk may be reduced with alkaline urine. Treatment with sulfonamides should be discontinued immediately a rash appears because of the danger of severe allergic reactions such as the Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Sulfamethoxazole should be given with care to patients with renal or hepatic impairment and is contra-indicated in patients with severe renal or hepatic failure or with blood disorders. Dosage reduction may be necessary in renal impairment. Complete blood counts and urinalyses with microscopic examination should be carried out particularly during prolonged therapy. Sulfamethoxazole should not be given to patients with a history of hypersensitivity to sulfonamides as cross-sensitivity may occur between drugs of this group. Care is generally advisable in patients with a history of allergy or asthma. Caution is also needed in the elderly, who may be more likely to have other risk factors for reactions. Some authorities consider sulfamethoxazole to be contra-indicated in lupus erythematosus as it may exacerbate the condition. Patients with glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency may be at risk of haemolytic reactions. Sulfamethoxazole and other sulfonamides are not usually given to infants within 1 to 2 months of birth because of the risk of kernicterus; for the same reason, they are generally contra-indicated in women prior to delivery, and in breast-feeding mothers. Patients with Aids may be particularly prone to adverse reactions, especially when sulfamethoxazole is given in combination with trimethoprim as co-trimoxazole. Sulfonamides have been reported to interfere with some diagnostic tests, including those for urea, creatinine, and urinary glucose and urobilinogen. Answered by Jason Wardon 1 year ago.

I assume you know all the typical side effects such as hair loss (though not all chemo regimes cause hair loss), tiredness, nausea, depression etc- side effects vary from person to person. A few people breeze through it, others find it very difficult. It is three and a half years since I finished chemotherapy, and yes there can be some long term effects. I suffered a certain amount of mental confusion - what is often referred to as 'chemo brain' ; it affected my short term memory, including my memory for everyday words. Many chemo patients have amusing stories to tell about this; a few weeks after chemo ended I stood in a coffee shop struggling to remember the word for the sort of coffee I wanted - in the end I asked for 'unleaded'. The word decaff just wouldn't come. This can continue for some time after chemo ends; I still have attacks of 'chemo brain' but they are getting much fewer and far between. I had to leave a new job a year after chemo because I couldn't manage mental arithmetic and would get tearful trying. I don't have a problem with mental arithmetic now and I assume in time the occasional mental fogginess will end completely. Even if chemo brain never went away, I don't regret having chemotherapy. I'm fit and well and as far as I know cancer-free. Answered by Patrick Ebeid 1 year ago.

Septra Side Effects Answered by Scottie Mogush 1 year ago.

Wow! That's a long time to be on Septra for a UTI. I'm surprised it's still working for her. Hopefully she will get a good answer from her doctor. Answered by Lacresha Pouliotte 1 year ago.


Will taking Septra affect my birth control pills???
My dermatologist prescribed Septra for acne.... will taking this alter the effectiveness of my birth control pills? Only answer if you are completely sure! Thanks! Asked by Leonarda Huyett 1 year ago.

It can, septra is an antibiotic and all antibiotics can decrease the absorption of the oral contraceptives. Are you on septra SS (meaning the lower dose) if so it wouldn't be that big of a problem and how many times throughout the day do you take the septra. For antibacterial uses septra is always dosed twice daily but for acne uses it could be given just once daily. If it is once daily then I would suggest taking your birth control pill as far apart from the septra as you could preferably 9-12 hours apart. If it's dosed twice daily then I would take the birth control as close to the middle of the two as you could. Also make sure you take the septra w/ a lot of water and if you still have concerns simply take other precautions (condoms) during sexual activity to further decrease the chances of conception. Hope this helped. Answered by Marget Nygaro 1 year ago.


Will Septra DS help infection in your gums and teeth?
Asked by Babara Harian 1 year ago.

Septra is a broad spectrum antibiotic, so it is very likely to kill off any bacterial gum or tooth infection. However, sometimes people have bacterial strains that are not affected by certain antibiotics, so there is always a chance that some other antibiotic might be needed after finishing the Septra. If you still have symptoms of an infection when you are getting close to the end of the medicine, give your doc/dentist a call and let them know. Answered by Sharron Jared 1 year ago.

as long as it isnt sore or anything you should be fine, most of the whitish stuff is just the layers of your gums healing up, the same thing happens when you get your wisdom teeth out, its basically a wet scab haha just try not to mess with it too much, and follow whatever stuff the surgeon told you too and you will be fine Answered by Suzy Delnoce 1 year ago.


Septra ds antibiotic and sudden leg/muscle pain?
I started septra 3 days ago and today the muscles of my right leg hurt so muchhh. I havent been alble to sleep at all! It especially hurts on my upper thigh. Ive been very nauseus and tired and now in pain...is this normal? should I go to the doctor? can it cause muscle spasms? I really havent done any physical... Asked by Herschel Torrico 1 year ago.

I started septra 3 days ago and today the muscles of my right leg hurt so muchhh. I havent been alble to sleep at all! It especially hurts on my upper thigh. Ive been very nauseus and tired and now in pain...is this normal? should I go to the doctor? can it cause muscle spasms? I really havent done any physical activity. Thanks! Answered by Matha Schwerd 1 year ago.

Yes, it could be Septra that is causing it. All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome when using Septra: Appetite loss; nausea; vomiting. Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur when using Septra: Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); blistered, peeling, red, or swollen skin; bloody or black, tarry stools; chest pain; chills, fever, or sore throat; decreased urination; depression; hallucinations; irregular heartbeat; *joint or muscle pain*; painful or stiff neck; purple patches under the skin; seizures; severe diarrhea; severe or persistent cough; severe or persistent headache; severe or persistent nausea or vomiting; shortness of breath; stomach cramps/pain; unusual bruising or bleeding; unusual tiredness or weakness; unusually pale skin; vaginal irritation or discharge; yellowing of the skin or eyes. : ( Answered by Eileen Maciasz 1 year ago.

Septra Ds Antibiotic Answered by Karri Hasychak 1 year ago.


Have you had problems with Bactrim/Septra?
Bactrim is in fact an antibiotic. Antibiotics are given to get rid of acne caused by bacteria in the skin. There are other antibiotics that are taken for acne such as doxycycline, minocycline, etc. Asked by Charmain Hubl 1 year ago.

I have been taking Bactrim (Septra) for 2 weeks now for acne and I have had a headache for 3 days and am really fatigued. I also feel like I have had significant weight gain and increased appetite since I have been taking it. I took it previously for about a week and had to stop since I couldn't get rid of the headaches. I decided to take it again (2 weeks ago) since my acne had gotten really bad. I am also taking Spironolactone for acne as well. I just poured the rest of the bottle into the toilet so I won't be tempted to take Bactrim again. (I know I sound stupid for taking it again, but I've had acne my whole life and it scares the hell out of me when my face breaks out.) Any suggestions??? Answered by Dolly Schindler 1 year ago.

I had the exact same problem, and my doctor tried to tell me it wasn't the Septra, but I am sure it was. I was taking it for a skin infection and I got very ill. For the 2 week course of medicine I was so tired, fatigued, couldn't get off the couch, and couldn't work out like normal at all. I felt so ill I thought I was going back into hypothyroidism like I had experienced a few years back. Since it wasn't a typical "allergic" reaction my doctor said it couldn't have been the Septra, but literally the day I went off it, I already was feeling better. I wasn't taking it for acne, but it did really help my problem skin! That was the only positive thing about it, but definitely not worth it! Answered by Mara Pazos 1 year ago.

My Bactrim septra is an antibiotic,why would you take that for acne? Answered by Nohemi Romberg 1 year ago.


Septra-DS, how long to get it out of my system?
I've developed a skin rash after using Septra-DS. This rash reminds me a lot of the ones I used to get because of tetracycline family. I even told my doctor I'm allergic to those. Is Septra-DS related to tetracycline? Also, how long does it take for an antibiotic to leave your system and get rid of any... Asked by Janae Madrueno 1 year ago.

I've developed a skin rash after using Septra-DS. This rash reminds me a lot of the ones I used to get because of tetracycline family. I even told my doctor I'm allergic to those. Is Septra-DS related to tetracycline? Also, how long does it take for an antibiotic to leave your system and get rid of any reaction like this one? It makes me sooo mad! Answered by Laraine Pehowich 1 year ago.

Septra DS (sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim) is not related to tetracycline so please make sure your doctor and pharmacist note on your file that you are allergic to both drugs. Since Septra DS is a combination of 2 drugs you could be allergic to either component. It will take approximately 72 hours for the sulfamethoxazole to clear your system and 84 hours for the trimethoprim. Answered by Clair Coghlan 1 year ago.


Can you become immune to Septra DS?
I take a septra ds tablet every day for acne for the past year. The doctor tried to take me off over the summer and my acne got worse. Can the break in taking the pill cause me tobe immune. Asked by Elvia Krumrine 1 year ago.

people do not become immune to antibiotics. bacteria become resistant to antibiotics. By definition, just about every bacteria on you and in you is resistant to Septra, because you've been taking it for the past year. If the bacteria were NOT resistant, they could not be living on you. But the important thing is , for you, that this antibiotics has reasonably good activity against propionibacterium, the bugs that cause acne. So it is inhibiting growth of them, and making your acne. Continue to take it. There is no harm at periodically stopping it to see what happens. How else would you know if you still need it or not? Your goal is to get off of it as soon as you can, but be aware that this drug is safe to take for years at a time. Answered by Fleta Reigner 1 year ago.

You do not become immune, but the bacteria the antibiotics are treating become immune (acne has a bacterial component). Answered by Lashonda Wubbel 1 year ago.

Well all i know is that if you take a pill so many times, your body will be used to it, and not have the same effect anymore. So maybe that's it, i didn't really answer your question wel maybe i did I'm not sure i understand the question Answered by Corey Millikan 1 year ago.

yupp.. i would thikn so dont know for usre tho Answered by Anthony Gillison 1 year ago.


What is the drug septra used for?
what is septra? Asked by Norman Carne 1 year ago.

Septra is a Sulfa based antibiotic,also used as Bactrim and it is used for treating bacterial infections.It is dangerous for pregnant women to take because it is supposed to cause failure to thrive condition in infants. Given to kill mild to very serious bacteria.It's great for treating urinary tract infections to strep to bronchitis and other bacterial lung infections. Also used in treatment of some condition associated with HIV. Answered by Jason Knierim 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: what is the drug septra used for? what is septra? Answered by Samira Landau 1 year ago.

Septa is a sulfa based antibiotic. It is used to treat infections. Answered by Jinny Jefford 1 year ago.

Cocaine? That's bad, really, really bad to even be asking this question. You have a disease which is called addiction, and need help before you continue killing yourself. If your doc knows that you have this problem, ask him/her about the effects while you GET HELP for yourself...good luck. Answered by Lucio Dichiara 1 year ago.

I believe its an antibiotic used for ut infections. Answered by Hisako Kenne 1 year ago.

what is the side effect Answered by Luci Boock 1 year ago.


What are the long term effects of Bactrim/Septra.?
My mother (she's 50) has been on Bactrim for several years now due to reoccurent UTI caused by a bladder ulcer. What are the major concerns for taking this over the long term (other than bacteria resistant infections) Also she had an episode of tachycardia (160-172) for an hour and the next day she checked... Asked by Dina Tian 1 year ago.

My mother (she's 50) has been on Bactrim for several years now due to reoccurent UTI caused by a bladder ulcer. What are the major concerns for taking this over the long term (other than bacteria resistant infections) Also she had an episode of tachycardia (160-172) for an hour and the next day she checked her B/P and it was 86/72. Her pulse is usually in the 60's and her B/P is normally 110/70-ish. Could this have anything to do with her long term Bactrim use? (And yes I already told her to go to the Dr.'s, she is there at this moment...I am just trying to find out for my own information) Thank you everyone who answers. Answered by Corey Diani 1 year ago.

Sulfamethoxazole (as in Bactrim, Septra, Septrin etc) Adverse effects and treatment Nausea, vomiting, anorexia, and diarrhoea are relatively common following the administration of sulfamethoxazole and other sulfonamides. Hypersensitivity reactions to sulfonamides have proved a problem. Fever is relatively common, and reactions involving the skin may include rashes, pruritis, photosensitivity reactions, exfoliative dermatitis, and erythema nodosum. Severe, potentially fatal, skin reactions including toxic epidermal necrolysis and the Stevens-Johnson syndrome have occurred in patients treated with sulfonamides. Dermatitis may also occur from contact of sulfonamides with the skin. Systemic lupus erythematosus, particularly exacerbation of pre-existing disease, has also been reported. Nephrotoxic reactions including interstitial nephritis and tubular necrosis, which may result in renal failure, have been attributed to hypersensitivity to sulfamethoxazole. Lumbar pain, haematuria, oliguria, and anuria may also occur due to crystallisation in the urine of sulfamethoxazole or its less soluble acetylated metabolite. The risk of crystalluria can be reduced by the administration of fluids to maintain a high urine output. If necessary, alkalinisation of the urine by administration of sodium bicarbonate may increase solubility and aid the elimination of sulfonamides. Blood disorders have occasionally occurred during treatment with the sulfonamides including sulfamethoxazole, and include agranulocytosis, aplastic anaemia, thrombocytopenia, leucopenia, hypothrombinaemia, and eosinophilia. Many of these effects on the blood may result from hypersensitivity reactions. Sulfonamides may rarely cause cyanosis due to methaemoglobinaemia. Acute haemolytic anaemia is a rare complication which may be associated with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. Other adverse effects which may be manifestations of a generalised hypersensitivity reaction to sulfonamides include a syndrome resembling serum sickness, liver necrosis, hepatomegaly and jaundice, myocarditis, pulmonary eosinophilia and fibrosing alveolitis, and vasculitis including polyarteritis nodosa. Anaphylaxis has been reported only very rarely. Other adverse reactions that have been reported after the administration of sulfamethoxazole or other sulfonamides include hypoglycaemia, hypothyrodism, neurological reactions including aseptic meningitis, ataxia, benign intracranial hypertension, convulsions, dizziness. drowsiness, fatigue, headache, insomnia, mental depression, peripheral or optic neuropathies, psychoses, tinnitus, vertigo, and pancreatitis. Sulfonamides may displace serum-bound biluribin, resulting in jaundice and kernicterus in premature neonates. As with other antimicrobials, sulfamethoxazole may cause alterations of the bacterial flora in the gastrointestinal tract. There is, therefore, the possibility, although it appears to be small, that pseudomembranous colitis may occur. Slow acetylators of sulfamethoxazole may be at greater risk of adverse reactions than fast acetylators. Precautions In patients receiving sulfamethoxazole, adequate fluid intake is necessary to reduce the risk of crystalluria; the daily urine output should be 1200 to 1500 mL or more. The administration of compounds which render the urine acidic may increase the risk of crystalluria; the risk may be reduced with alkaline urine. Treatment with sulfonamides should be discontinued immediately a rash appears because of the danger of severe allergic reactions such as the Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Sulfamethoxazole should be given with care to patients with renal or hepatic impairment and is contra-indicated in patients with severe renal or hepatic failure or with blood disorders. Dosage reduction may be necessary in renal impairment. Complete blood counts and urinalyses with microscopic examination should be carried out particularly during prolonged therapy. Sulfamethoxazole should not be given to patients with a history of hypersensitivity to sulfonamides as cross-sensitivity may occur between drugs of this group. Care is generally advisable in patients with a history of allergy or asthma. Caution is also needed in the elderly, who may be more likely to have other risk factors for reactions. Some authorities consider sulfamethoxazole to be contra-indicated in lupus erythematosus as it may exacerbate the condition. Patients with glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency may be at risk of haemolytic reactions. Sulfamethoxazole and other sulfonamides are not usually given to infants within 1 to 2 months of birth because of the risk of kernicterus; for the same reason, they are generally contra-indicated in women prior to delivery, and in breast-feeding mothers. Patients with Aids may be particularly prone to adverse reactions, especially when sulfamethoxazole is given in combination with trimethoprim as co-trimoxazole. Sulfonamides have been reported to interfere with some diagnostic tests, including those for urea, creatinine, and urinary glucose and urobilinogen. Answered by Marjory Labruzzo 1 year ago.

I assume you know all the typical side effects such as hair loss (though not all chemo regimes cause hair loss), tiredness, nausea, depression etc- side effects vary from person to person. A few people breeze through it, others find it very difficult. It is three and a half years since I finished chemotherapy, and yes there can be some long term effects. I suffered a certain amount of mental confusion - what is often referred to as 'chemo brain' ; it affected my short term memory, including my memory for everyday words. Many chemo patients have amusing stories to tell about this; a few weeks after chemo ended I stood in a coffee shop struggling to remember the word for the sort of coffee I wanted - in the end I asked for 'unleaded'. The word decaff just wouldn't come. This can continue for some time after chemo ends; I still have attacks of 'chemo brain' but they are getting much fewer and far between. I had to leave a new job a year after chemo because I couldn't manage mental arithmetic and would get tearful trying. I don't have a problem with mental arithmetic now and I assume in time the occasional mental fogginess will end completely. Even if chemo brain never went away, I don't regret having chemotherapy. I'm fit and well and as far as I know cancer-free. Answered by Anglea Dalrymple 1 year ago.

Septra Side Effects Answered by Shandi Muldoon 1 year ago.

Wow! That's a long time to be on Septra for a UTI. I'm surprised it's still working for her. Hopefully she will get a good answer from her doctor. Answered by Jaqueline Kasimis 1 year ago.


Will taking Septra affect my birth control pills???
My dermatologist prescribed Septra for acne.... will taking this alter the effectiveness of my birth control pills? Only answer if you are completely sure! Thanks! Asked by Lynn Szubinski 1 year ago.

It can, septra is an antibiotic and all antibiotics can decrease the absorption of the oral contraceptives. Are you on septra SS (meaning the lower dose) if so it wouldn't be that big of a problem and how many times throughout the day do you take the septra. For antibacterial uses septra is always dosed twice daily but for acne uses it could be given just once daily. If it is once daily then I would suggest taking your birth control pill as far apart from the septra as you could preferably 9-12 hours apart. If it's dosed twice daily then I would take the birth control as close to the middle of the two as you could. Also make sure you take the septra w/ a lot of water and if you still have concerns simply take other precautions (condoms) during sexual activity to further decrease the chances of conception. Hope this helped. Answered by Enid Lamattina 1 year ago.


Will Septra DS help infection in your gums and teeth?
Asked by Risa Heynen 1 year ago.

Septra is a broad spectrum antibiotic, so it is very likely to kill off any bacterial gum or tooth infection. However, sometimes people have bacterial strains that are not affected by certain antibiotics, so there is always a chance that some other antibiotic might be needed after finishing the Septra. If you still have symptoms of an infection when you are getting close to the end of the medicine, give your doc/dentist a call and let them know. Answered by Humberto Kostenko 1 year ago.

as long as it isnt sore or anything you should be fine, most of the whitish stuff is just the layers of your gums healing up, the same thing happens when you get your wisdom teeth out, its basically a wet scab haha just try not to mess with it too much, and follow whatever stuff the surgeon told you too and you will be fine Answered by Rosann Dearring 1 year ago.


Septra ds antibiotic and sudden leg/muscle pain?
I started septra 3 days ago and today the muscles of my right leg hurt so muchhh. I havent been alble to sleep at all! It especially hurts on my upper thigh. Ive been very nauseus and tired and now in pain...is this normal? should I go to the doctor? can it cause muscle spasms? I really havent done any physical... Asked by Collene Gouty 1 year ago.

I started septra 3 days ago and today the muscles of my right leg hurt so muchhh. I havent been alble to sleep at all! It especially hurts on my upper thigh. Ive been very nauseus and tired and now in pain...is this normal? should I go to the doctor? can it cause muscle spasms? I really havent done any physical activity. Thanks! Answered by Shirlee Babecki 1 year ago.

Yes, it could be Septra that is causing it. All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome when using Septra: Appetite loss; nausea; vomiting. Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur when using Septra: Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); blistered, peeling, red, or swollen skin; bloody or black, tarry stools; chest pain; chills, fever, or sore throat; decreased urination; depression; hallucinations; irregular heartbeat; *joint or muscle pain*; painful or stiff neck; purple patches under the skin; seizures; severe diarrhea; severe or persistent cough; severe or persistent headache; severe or persistent nausea or vomiting; shortness of breath; stomach cramps/pain; unusual bruising or bleeding; unusual tiredness or weakness; unusually pale skin; vaginal irritation or discharge; yellowing of the skin or eyes. : ( Answered by Ranae Blasco 1 year ago.

Septra Ds Antibiotic Answered by Dierdre Ulses 1 year ago.


Have you had problems with Bactrim/Septra?
Bactrim is in fact an antibiotic. Antibiotics are given to get rid of acne caused by bacteria in the skin. There are other antibiotics that are taken for acne such as doxycycline, minocycline, etc. Asked by Louanne Giscombe 1 year ago.

I have been taking Bactrim (Septra) for 2 weeks now for acne and I have had a headache for 3 days and am really fatigued. I also feel like I have had significant weight gain and increased appetite since I have been taking it. I took it previously for about a week and had to stop since I couldn't get rid of the headaches. I decided to take it again (2 weeks ago) since my acne had gotten really bad. I am also taking Spironolactone for acne as well. I just poured the rest of the bottle into the toilet so I won't be tempted to take Bactrim again. (I know I sound stupid for taking it again, but I've had acne my whole life and it scares the hell out of me when my face breaks out.) Any suggestions??? Answered by Chang Swenor 1 year ago.

I had the exact same problem, and my doctor tried to tell me it wasn't the Septra, but I am sure it was. I was taking it for a skin infection and I got very ill. For the 2 week course of medicine I was so tired, fatigued, couldn't get off the couch, and couldn't work out like normal at all. I felt so ill I thought I was going back into hypothyroidism like I had experienced a few years back. Since it wasn't a typical "allergic" reaction my doctor said it couldn't have been the Septra, but literally the day I went off it, I already was feeling better. I wasn't taking it for acne, but it did really help my problem skin! That was the only positive thing about it, but definitely not worth it! Answered by Rodger Pavlik 1 year ago.

My Bactrim septra is an antibiotic,why would you take that for acne? Answered by Liz Knepp 1 year ago.


Septra-DS, how long to get it out of my system?
I've developed a skin rash after using Septra-DS. This rash reminds me a lot of the ones I used to get because of tetracycline family. I even told my doctor I'm allergic to those. Is Septra-DS related to tetracycline? Also, how long does it take for an antibiotic to leave your system and get rid of any... Asked by Carmelo Limesand 1 year ago.

I've developed a skin rash after using Septra-DS. This rash reminds me a lot of the ones I used to get because of tetracycline family. I even told my doctor I'm allergic to those. Is Septra-DS related to tetracycline? Also, how long does it take for an antibiotic to leave your system and get rid of any reaction like this one? It makes me sooo mad! Answered by Blythe Bozich 1 year ago.

Septra DS (sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim) is not related to tetracycline so please make sure your doctor and pharmacist note on your file that you are allergic to both drugs. Since Septra DS is a combination of 2 drugs you could be allergic to either component. It will take approximately 72 hours for the sulfamethoxazole to clear your system and 84 hours for the trimethoprim. Answered by Rosalia Goolesby 1 year ago.


Can you become immune to Septra DS?
I take a septra ds tablet every day for acne for the past year. The doctor tried to take me off over the summer and my acne got worse. Can the break in taking the pill cause me tobe immune. Asked by Clinton Guinan 1 year ago.

people do not become immune to antibiotics. bacteria become resistant to antibiotics. By definition, just about every bacteria on you and in you is resistant to Septra, because you've been taking it for the past year. If the bacteria were NOT resistant, they could not be living on you. But the important thing is , for you, that this antibiotics has reasonably good activity against propionibacterium, the bugs that cause acne. So it is inhibiting growth of them, and making your acne. Continue to take it. There is no harm at periodically stopping it to see what happens. How else would you know if you still need it or not? Your goal is to get off of it as soon as you can, but be aware that this drug is safe to take for years at a time. Answered by Patrick Dowland 1 year ago.

You do not become immune, but the bacteria the antibiotics are treating become immune (acne has a bacterial component). Answered by Roland Hennecke 1 year ago.

Well all i know is that if you take a pill so many times, your body will be used to it, and not have the same effect anymore. So maybe that's it, i didn't really answer your question wel maybe i did I'm not sure i understand the question Answered by Flo Couron 1 year ago.

yupp.. i would thikn so dont know for usre tho Answered by Antonio Rucky 1 year ago.


What is the drug septra used for?
what is septra? Asked by Lavonia Abboud 1 year ago.

Septra is a Sulfa based antibiotic,also used as Bactrim and it is used for treating bacterial infections.It is dangerous for pregnant women to take because it is supposed to cause failure to thrive condition in infants. Given to kill mild to very serious bacteria.It's great for treating urinary tract infections to strep to bronchitis and other bacterial lung infections. Also used in treatment of some condition associated with HIV. Answered by Mica Sharpnack 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: what is the drug septra used for? what is septra? Answered by Carolynn Watt 1 year ago.

Septa is a sulfa based antibiotic. It is used to treat infections. Answered by Jimmie Berlingeri 1 year ago.

Cocaine? That's bad, really, really bad to even be asking this question. You have a disease which is called addiction, and need help before you continue killing yourself. If your doc knows that you have this problem, ask him/her about the effects while you GET HELP for yourself...good luck. Answered by Felicitas Gledhill 1 year ago.

I believe its an antibiotic used for ut infections. Answered by Tisha Dodd 1 year ago.

what is the side effect Answered by Keeley Bayona 1 year ago.


What are the long term effects of Bactrim/Septra.?
My mother (she's 50) has been on Bactrim for several years now due to reoccurent UTI caused by a bladder ulcer. What are the major concerns for taking this over the long term (other than bacteria resistant infections) Also she had an episode of tachycardia (160-172) for an hour and the next day she checked... Asked by Bari Teeples 1 year ago.

My mother (she's 50) has been on Bactrim for several years now due to reoccurent UTI caused by a bladder ulcer. What are the major concerns for taking this over the long term (other than bacteria resistant infections) Also she had an episode of tachycardia (160-172) for an hour and the next day she checked her B/P and it was 86/72. Her pulse is usually in the 60's and her B/P is normally 110/70-ish. Could this have anything to do with her long term Bactrim use? (And yes I already told her to go to the Dr.'s, she is there at this moment...I am just trying to find out for my own information) Thank you everyone who answers. Answered by Tabetha Kercy 1 year ago.

Sulfamethoxazole (as in Bactrim, Septra, Septrin etc) Adverse effects and treatment Nausea, vomiting, anorexia, and diarrhoea are relatively common following the administration of sulfamethoxazole and other sulfonamides. Hypersensitivity reactions to sulfonamides have proved a problem. Fever is relatively common, and reactions involving the skin may include rashes, pruritis, photosensitivity reactions, exfoliative dermatitis, and erythema nodosum. Severe, potentially fatal, skin reactions including toxic epidermal necrolysis and the Stevens-Johnson syndrome have occurred in patients treated with sulfonamides. Dermatitis may also occur from contact of sulfonamides with the skin. Systemic lupus erythematosus, particularly exacerbation of pre-existing disease, has also been reported. Nephrotoxic reactions including interstitial nephritis and tubular necrosis, which may result in renal failure, have been attributed to hypersensitivity to sulfamethoxazole. Lumbar pain, haematuria, oliguria, and anuria may also occur due to crystallisation in the urine of sulfamethoxazole or its less soluble acetylated metabolite. The risk of crystalluria can be reduced by the administration of fluids to maintain a high urine output. If necessary, alkalinisation of the urine by administration of sodium bicarbonate may increase solubility and aid the elimination of sulfonamides. Blood disorders have occasionally occurred during treatment with the sulfonamides including sulfamethoxazole, and include agranulocytosis, aplastic anaemia, thrombocytopenia, leucopenia, hypothrombinaemia, and eosinophilia. Many of these effects on the blood may result from hypersensitivity reactions. Sulfonamides may rarely cause cyanosis due to methaemoglobinaemia. Acute haemolytic anaemia is a rare complication which may be associated with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. Other adverse effects which may be manifestations of a generalised hypersensitivity reaction to sulfonamides include a syndrome resembling serum sickness, liver necrosis, hepatomegaly and jaundice, myocarditis, pulmonary eosinophilia and fibrosing alveolitis, and vasculitis including polyarteritis nodosa. Anaphylaxis has been reported only very rarely. Other adverse reactions that have been reported after the administration of sulfamethoxazole or other sulfonamides include hypoglycaemia, hypothyrodism, neurological reactions including aseptic meningitis, ataxia, benign intracranial hypertension, convulsions, dizziness. drowsiness, fatigue, headache, insomnia, mental depression, peripheral or optic neuropathies, psychoses, tinnitus, vertigo, and pancreatitis. Sulfonamides may displace serum-bound biluribin, resulting in jaundice and kernicterus in premature neonates. As with other antimicrobials, sulfamethoxazole may cause alterations of the bacterial flora in the gastrointestinal tract. There is, therefore, the possibility, although it appears to be small, that pseudomembranous colitis may occur. Slow acetylators of sulfamethoxazole may be at greater risk of adverse reactions than fast acetylators. Precautions In patients receiving sulfamethoxazole, adequate fluid intake is necessary to reduce the risk of crystalluria; the daily urine output should be 1200 to 1500 mL or more. The administration of compounds which render the urine acidic may increase the risk of crystalluria; the risk may be reduced with alkaline urine. Treatment with sulfonamides should be discontinued immediately a rash appears because of the danger of severe allergic reactions such as the Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Sulfamethoxazole should be given with care to patients with renal or hepatic impairment and is contra-indicated in patients with severe renal or hepatic failure or with blood disorders. Dosage reduction may be necessary in renal impairment. Complete blood counts and urinalyses with microscopic examination should be carried out particularly during prolonged therapy. Sulfamethoxazole should not be given to patients with a history of hypersensitivity to sulfonamides as cross-sensitivity may occur between drugs of this group. Care is generally advisable in patients with a history of allergy or asthma. Caution is also needed in the elderly, who may be more likely to have other risk factors for reactions. Some authorities consider sulfamethoxazole to be contra-indicated in lupus erythematosus as it may exacerbate the condition. Patients with glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency may be at risk of haemolytic reactions. Sulfamethoxazole and other sulfonamides are not usually given to infants within 1 to 2 months of birth because of the risk of kernicterus; for the same reason, they are generally contra-indicated in women prior to delivery, and in breast-feeding mothers. Patients with Aids may be particularly prone to adverse reactions, especially when sulfamethoxazole is given in combination with trimethoprim as co-trimoxazole. Sulfonamides have been reported to interfere with some diagnostic tests, including those for urea, creatinine, and urinary glucose and urobilinogen. Answered by Dorie Mendelsohn 1 year ago.

I assume you know all the typical side effects such as hair loss (though not all chemo regimes cause hair loss), tiredness, nausea, depression etc- side effects vary from person to person. A few people breeze through it, others find it very difficult. It is three and a half years since I finished chemotherapy, and yes there can be some long term effects. I suffered a certain amount of mental confusion - what is often referred to as 'chemo brain' ; it affected my short term memory, including my memory for everyday words. Many chemo patients have amusing stories to tell about this; a few weeks after chemo ended I stood in a coffee shop struggling to remember the word for the sort of coffee I wanted - in the end I asked for 'unleaded'. The word decaff just wouldn't come. This can continue for some time after chemo ends; I still have attacks of 'chemo brain' but they are getting much fewer and far between. I had to leave a new job a year after chemo because I couldn't manage mental arithmetic and would get tearful trying. I don't have a problem with mental arithmetic now and I assume in time the occasional mental fogginess will end completely. Even if chemo brain never went away, I don't regret having chemotherapy. I'm fit and well and as far as I know cancer-free. Answered by Eufemia Musulin 1 year ago.

Septra Side Effects Answered by Althea Fuente 1 year ago.

Wow! That's a long time to be on Septra for a UTI. I'm surprised it's still working for her. Hopefully she will get a good answer from her doctor. Answered by Obdulia Justian 1 year ago.


Will taking Septra affect my birth control pills???
My dermatologist prescribed Septra for acne.... will taking this alter the effectiveness of my birth control pills? Only answer if you are completely sure! Thanks! Asked by Petrina Cadelina 1 year ago.

It can, septra is an antibiotic and all antibiotics can decrease the absorption of the oral contraceptives. Are you on septra SS (meaning the lower dose) if so it wouldn't be that big of a problem and how many times throughout the day do you take the septra. For antibacterial uses septra is always dosed twice daily but for acne uses it could be given just once daily. If it is once daily then I would suggest taking your birth control pill as far apart from the septra as you could preferably 9-12 hours apart. If it's dosed twice daily then I would take the birth control as close to the middle of the two as you could. Also make sure you take the septra w/ a lot of water and if you still have concerns simply take other precautions (condoms) during sexual activity to further decrease the chances of conception. Hope this helped. Answered by Ardella Deaguero 1 year ago.


Will Septra DS help infection in your gums and teeth?
Asked by Makeda Bessire 1 year ago.

Septra is a broad spectrum antibiotic, so it is very likely to kill off any bacterial gum or tooth infection. However, sometimes people have bacterial strains that are not affected by certain antibiotics, so there is always a chance that some other antibiotic might be needed after finishing the Septra. If you still have symptoms of an infection when you are getting close to the end of the medicine, give your doc/dentist a call and let them know. Answered by Denny Murillo 1 year ago.

as long as it isnt sore or anything you should be fine, most of the whitish stuff is just the layers of your gums healing up, the same thing happens when you get your wisdom teeth out, its basically a wet scab haha just try not to mess with it too much, and follow whatever stuff the surgeon told you too and you will be fine Answered by Luke Coressel 1 year ago.


Septra ds antibiotic and sudden leg/muscle pain?
I started septra 3 days ago and today the muscles of my right leg hurt so muchhh. I havent been alble to sleep at all! It especially hurts on my upper thigh. Ive been very nauseus and tired and now in pain...is this normal? should I go to the doctor? can it cause muscle spasms? I really havent done any physical... Asked by Bret Hendrick 1 year ago.

I started septra 3 days ago and today the muscles of my right leg hurt so muchhh. I havent been alble to sleep at all! It especially hurts on my upper thigh. Ive been very nauseus and tired and now in pain...is this normal? should I go to the doctor? can it cause muscle spasms? I really havent done any physical activity. Thanks! Answered by Caroyln Georgl 1 year ago.

Yes, it could be Septra that is causing it. All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome when using Septra: Appetite loss; nausea; vomiting. Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur when using Septra: Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); blistered, peeling, red, or swollen skin; bloody or black, tarry stools; chest pain; chills, fever, or sore throat; decreased urination; depression; hallucinations; irregular heartbeat; *joint or muscle pain*; painful or stiff neck; purple patches under the skin; seizures; severe diarrhea; severe or persistent cough; severe or persistent headache; severe or persistent nausea or vomiting; shortness of breath; stomach cramps/pain; unusual bruising or bleeding; unusual tiredness or weakness; unusually pale skin; vaginal irritation or discharge; yellowing of the skin or eyes. : ( Answered by Milton Murton 1 year ago.

Septra Ds Antibiotic Answered by Yolanda Ollivier 1 year ago.


Have you had problems with Bactrim/Septra?
Bactrim is in fact an antibiotic. Antibiotics are given to get rid of acne caused by bacteria in the skin. There are other antibiotics that are taken for acne such as doxycycline, minocycline, etc. Asked by Domenica Stripling 1 year ago.

I have been taking Bactrim (Septra) for 2 weeks now for acne and I have had a headache for 3 days and am really fatigued. I also feel like I have had significant weight gain and increased appetite since I have been taking it. I took it previously for about a week and had to stop since I couldn't get rid of the headaches. I decided to take it again (2 weeks ago) since my acne had gotten really bad. I am also taking Spironolactone for acne as well. I just poured the rest of the bottle into the toilet so I won't be tempted to take Bactrim again. (I know I sound stupid for taking it again, but I've had acne my whole life and it scares the hell out of me when my face breaks out.) Any suggestions??? Answered by Kecia Lecocq 1 year ago.

I had the exact same problem, and my doctor tried to tell me it wasn't the Septra, but I am sure it was. I was taking it for a skin infection and I got very ill. For the 2 week course of medicine I was so tired, fatigued, couldn't get off the couch, and couldn't work out like normal at all. I felt so ill I thought I was going back into hypothyroidism like I had experienced a few years back. Since it wasn't a typical "allergic" reaction my doctor said it couldn't have been the Septra, but literally the day I went off it, I already was feeling better. I wasn't taking it for acne, but it did really help my problem skin! That was the only positive thing about it, but definitely not worth it! Answered by Earleen Brubeck 1 year ago.

My Bactrim septra is an antibiotic,why would you take that for acne? Answered by Allegra Reagin 1 year ago.


Septra-DS, how long to get it out of my system?
I've developed a skin rash after using Septra-DS. This rash reminds me a lot of the ones I used to get because of tetracycline family. I even told my doctor I'm allergic to those. Is Septra-DS related to tetracycline? Also, how long does it take for an antibiotic to leave your system and get rid of any... Asked by Dotty Norstrand 1 year ago.

I've developed a skin rash after using Septra-DS. This rash reminds me a lot of the ones I used to get because of tetracycline family. I even told my doctor I'm allergic to those. Is Septra-DS related to tetracycline? Also, how long does it take for an antibiotic to leave your system and get rid of any reaction like this one? It makes me sooo mad! Answered by Arlean Majeski 1 year ago.

Septra DS (sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim) is not related to tetracycline so please make sure your doctor and pharmacist note on your file that you are allergic to both drugs. Since Septra DS is a combination of 2 drugs you could be allergic to either component. It will take approximately 72 hours for the sulfamethoxazole to clear your system and 84 hours for the trimethoprim. Answered by Kendrick Lundrigan 1 year ago.


Can you become immune to Septra DS?
I take a septra ds tablet every day for acne for the past year. The doctor tried to take me off over the summer and my acne got worse. Can the break in taking the pill cause me tobe immune. Asked by Reena Whaltey 1 year ago.

people do not become immune to antibiotics. bacteria become resistant to antibiotics. By definition, just about every bacteria on you and in you is resistant to Septra, because you've been taking it for the past year. If the bacteria were NOT resistant, they could not be living on you. But the important thing is , for you, that this antibiotics has reasonably good activity against propionibacterium, the bugs that cause acne. So it is inhibiting growth of them, and making your acne. Continue to take it. There is no harm at periodically stopping it to see what happens. How else would you know if you still need it or not? Your goal is to get off of it as soon as you can, but be aware that this drug is safe to take for years at a time. Answered by Ross Vassall 1 year ago.

You do not become immune, but the bacteria the antibiotics are treating become immune (acne has a bacterial component). Answered by Deeann Jaskolka 1 year ago.

Well all i know is that if you take a pill so many times, your body will be used to it, and not have the same effect anymore. So maybe that's it, i didn't really answer your question wel maybe i did I'm not sure i understand the question Answered by Ed Phelp 1 year ago.

yupp.. i would thikn so dont know for usre tho Answered by Karissa Puorto 1 year ago.


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