SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 019334/001.

Names and composition

"SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019334/001 SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
074537/001 SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
074565/001 SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
074641/001 SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
074672/001 SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
074744/001 SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
074756/001 SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
074866/001 SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
074871/001 SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
074912/001 SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
075145/001 SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 5MG
075321/001 SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 5MG
075352/001 SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 5MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019334/001 SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020647/001 ELDEPRYL SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 5MG
074537/001 SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
074565/001 SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
074641/001 SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
074672/001 SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
074744/001 SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
074756/001 SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
074866/001 SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
074871/001 SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
074912/001 SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
021479/001 ZELAPAR SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 1.25MG
075145/001 SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 5MG
075321/001 SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 5MG
075352/001 SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 5MG

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Answered questions

How to check whether a generic pill is selegiline hydrochloride and not some other chemical?
what does it mean when a medication has "hydrochloride" as a last word in its name such as selegiline hydrochloride? It must mean it can behave distinctly in a certain solvent so the hydrocloride part is removed, the question is which solvent? and what is the behavior? Asked by Melonie Thorin 1 month ago.

To analyse a drug you would need to use a procedure such as Thin layer chromotography, its easy to do but you need to know what youre doing really... If the pills were supplied from a legitimate pharmacy such as Boots the chemist they would be fine, however from you saying you had bought the pills i would probably assume you didnt get it from somewhere legitimate as its a prescription only medicine. Buying from random websites is really quite risky, their medicines do not neccesarily go through the strict safety checks that are legally required and they may contain incorrect doses, contamination or Impurities and all of the above can be very dangerous. If you did not get the pills from a legitimate pharmacy i thoroughly recommend you dispose of them and do not take them, as taking sugar pills is the least of your worries =] Answered by Lasonya Thom 1 month ago.

Simple answer- Crush one, it has citric acid in it, it should be very sour. If it's a sugar pill it will not be sour. If you throw it in water and it's sugar, it will dissolve. selegiline hydrochloride has silicate in it which is not soluble and will leave a visible dust. and HCl is the solvent and it stabilizes the compound. Answered by Verdell Seely 1 month ago.


What are treatments for a dog with dementia?
Asked by Joanie Trautner 1 month ago.

Treatment for Cognitive Dysfunction Syndrome... Selegiline hydrochloride (L-deprenyl), a drug that's sometimes used to treat Alzheimer’s and Parkinson's Disease in humans, is marketed for dogs as "Anipryl®". Anipryl® works by increasing the level of dopamine, an essential neurotransmitter. It has been shown to temporarily reverse some of the changes of CDS and improve behavior in about 75% of affected dogs in one month, although it can sometimes take up to sixty days to see improvement. Studies suggest that antioxidant treatment can also result in significant improvement. Some veterinarians treat affected dogs with a supplement of omega-3 fatty acids. Foods fortified with complex mixtures of antioxidants can effectively counteract the effects of brain aging. New pet foods are being formulated for dogs with Canine Cognitive Dysfunction. Pet owners who participated in a study using a prescription diet reported that 74% of older dogs with a history of house soiling accidents experienced a reduction in accidents after 30 days. Enthusiasm in greeting family members increased by 61%. For pet owners who seek a more natural therapy, studies have shown that supplementation with the B vitamin choline supplement, CholodinR, is a safe and effective method of for reversing signs of cognitive dysfunction in dogs. The following solutions can help senior dogs feel better and enjoy a better quality of life whether they are suffering from canine Cognitive Dysfunction Syndrome or not. Provide mental stimulation.... Play with your dogs - Go for short walks - Talk to them - Pet them - hug them! Prevent wandering away by keeping the dog on a leash or in a fenced area when outdoors. Attach a bell to the dog's collar to help keep track of him indoors. Minimize stress and change... Don't rearrange furniture or change familiar surroundings. Stick with a daily routine. Take more frequent potty breaks. Watch your dog. Remind her why she's outside and tell her what she must do. Praise good behavior. Feed a senior formula pet food that's designed to combat signs of aging. Provide raised food and water bowls so large dogs won't have to reach down uncomfortably to eat and drink. Provide a soft, comfortable bed, away from drafts and at a height your dog can easily get in and out of. You might want to place doggy beds or cushions in several rooms of the house to provide comfortable, convenient places to sleep and relax - always near you. For a dog who has always been allowed on furniture but can no longer jump up, place a ramp or a small set of steps near the bed, sofa, or chair your senior dog is unable to reach. Some old dogs, like some old people, age successfully and continue to function well. They remain bright and mentally alert throughout their natural life span, while there is an accelerated form of dementia in others. This devastating, progressive disease causes behavioral changes that disrupt the lives of dogs and of the people who love them and yearn for their companionship. Timely veterinary treatment plus love and patience, can give an aging dog extra quality time and a fuller, happier life. Answered by Quinn Beichner 1 month ago.

Dog Dementia Treatment Answered by Roxy Verdino 1 month ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: What are treatments for a dog with dementia? Answered by Avelina Dann 1 month ago.

Yes, there is treatment. The disease is called Canine Cognative Dysfunction and there are medication(s) that can help. The med that I gave my very elderly dog was Anypril. Talk to your vet. Also, keep him on a schedule, keep him on a feeding schedule, walking schedule etc., so that everything is done at the same time of the day. Changes in routine are hard for old dogs. Answered by Gerald Torrey 1 month ago.

Really the only thing you can do is keep a close eye on them, and watch for signs that his mental state is deteriorating further. Sorry but once dementia has begun there's no stopping it. Answered by Jacinda Retterath 1 month ago.

# Treatment of dementia may include one or more of the following: # Specific treatment of any concurrent illness # Behavior modification exercises # Specific exercise recommendation # Drug therapy, which may require one to two months before improvement is noted Answered by Shanika Felila 1 month ago.

if ur dog is older and forgetting lots of things i'm not sure what u can do. a vet check up will clear up any other problems that might come up. call and make an app. good luck Answered by Jenifer Doorn 1 month ago.


What drugs increase dopamine besides...?
I know there are drugs such as L-Dopa (Selegiline Hydrochloride) that increase dopamine levels and cross the blood-brain barrier. What other medications increase dopamine levels? Asked by Anneliese Catino 1 month ago.

Almost all of them dopeamines make you happy that's why people do drugs Answered by Dania Apelian 1 month ago.


Help me figure out what illness/disease Im talking about?
sorry if the question comes off as confusing..but Ive heard of a patient (young girl) who had to take a medicine in order to help the disease she had.. but.. the medication has her lose memory of what happened before she took it in the first place...what kind of illness/disease can that be.. and what kind... Asked by Johnathon Carridine 1 month ago.

sorry if the question comes off as confusing.. but Ive heard of a patient (young girl) who had to take a medicine in order to help the disease she had.. but.. the medication has her lose memory of what happened before she took it in the first place... what kind of illness/disease can that be.. and what kind of medication had her lose her memory that way?? Answered by Emogene Trimmer 1 month ago.

These drugs can cause memory loss. As you can see, there are far too many to list all the possible illnesses for which any of these medications might be prescribed. * Abilify® - Otsuka America (aripiprazole) Tablets * Ambien® see note below - Sanofi-Synthelabo (zolpidem tartrate) * Abilify® - Bristol-Myers Squibb (aripiprazole) Tablets * Cogentin® Injection - Merck (Benztropine Mesylate) * Copaxone® - Teva Neuroscience (glatiramer acetate injection) * Copaxone® tablets - Roche Laboratories (ribavirin, USP) * Copegus® tablets - 6% - Roche Laboratories (ribavirin, USP) * Cozaar® tablets - Merck (losartan potassium tablets) * Eldepryl® capsules (Somerset) (SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE) * Eskalith® - GlaxoSmithKline (lithium carbonate) * Eskalith® - GlaxoSmithKline (lithium carbonate) * Gleevec® - Novartis (imatinib mesylate) * Hyzaar® tablets - Merck (losartan potassium-hydrochlorothiazide tablets) * Imitrex® Nasal Spray - GlaxoSmithKline (sumatriptan) * Imitrex® tablets - GlaxoSmithKline (sumatriptan succinate) * Klonopin® tablets - 4% - Roche Laboratories (clonazepam) * Klonopin® wafers - 4% - Roche Laboratories (clonazepam orally disintegrating) * Lamictal® tablets - GlaxoSmithKline (lamotrigine) * Lamictal® chewable dispersible tablets - GlaxoSmithKline (lamotrigine) * Lupron Depot® 3.75 mg - 6% - TAP (leuprolide acetate for depot suspension) * Lupron Depot®-3 Month 11.25 mg - TAP (leuprolide acetate for depot suspension) * Lupron® injection - TAP (leuprolide acetate) * Maxalt® tablets - Merck (rizatriptan benzoate) * Maxalt-MLT® orally disintegrating tablets - Merck (rizatriptan benzoate) * Parcopa™ orally disintegrating tablets - Schwarz (carbidopa-levodopa) * Pegasys® - 5% - Roche Laboratories (peginterferon alfa-2a) * Prinivil® tablets - Merck (Lisinopril) * Prinzide® tablets - Merck (Lisinopril-Hydrochlorothiazide) * Rifamate® capsules - Aventis (rifampin and isoniazid) * Rifater® tablets - Aventis (rifampin, isoniazid and pyrazinamide) * Roferon®-A - Roche Laboratories (Interferon alfa-2a, recombinant) * Seromycin® capsules - Lilly (Cycloserine) * Stalevo® 50, 100 and 150 tablets - Novartis (carbidopa, levodopa and entacapone) * Timolide® tablets - Merck (Timolol Maleate-Hydrochlorothiazide) * Topamax® tablets - 3.2% - Ortho-McNeil (topiramate) * Topamax® sprinkle capsules - 3.2% - Ortho-McNeil (topiramate capsules) * Transderm Scop® - Novartis (scopolamine 1.5 mg Transdermal Therapeutic System) * Vesanoid® capsules - 3% - Roche Laboratories (tretinoin) * Wellbutrin® - GlaxoSmithKline (bupropion hydrochloride) * Wellbutrin SR® sustained-release tablets - GlaxoSmithKline (bupropion hydrochloride) * Wellbutrin XL™ extended-release tablets - GlaxoSmithKline (bupropion hydrochloride) * Xanax® - 33.1%- Pharmacia & Upjohn (alprazolam) * Xanax XR® - 15.4% extended-release tablets - Pharmacia & Upjohn (alprazolam) * Zonegran® capsules - 6% - Eisai (zonisamide) * Zyban® Sustained-Release tablets - GlaxoSmithKline (bupropion hydrochloride) Note: Although not expressed as a percentage, Ambien has been documented to cause a "significant decrease in next-morning recall" of information presented to subjects. Answered by Jenise Quercioli 1 month ago.

there are numerous medications that can have that side effect, without more information no one can answer your questions. Answered by Sandee Schoo 1 month ago.


How to find out where drug came from if I only know drug imprint and that it is not from USA?
Its Selegiline 5mg but the box is rectangular and it says selegiline mylan 5mg on it along with strange language, ie "tabletta szelegilin hidroklorid". the imprint on the tablets is" SN 5, I wander if it is what it claims to be and not something horrible that they put in just to make money off of me,... Asked by Claudia Sileo 1 month ago.

Its Selegiline 5mg but the box is rectangular and it says selegiline mylan 5mg on it along with strange language, ie "tabletta szelegilin hidroklorid". the imprint on the tablets is" SN 5, I wander if it is what it claims to be and not something horrible that they put in just to make money off of me, unless they would not put in anything horrible but rather a sugar pill provided that sugar pills are the cheapest substance on Earth or else it might be poison that is even cheaper than sugar pill. It also says Generics [UK] limited on the box. Answered by Alfredia Madia 1 month ago.

That strange language on the box is Hungarian and it says: Tablet Selegeline hydrochloride. The SN 5 corroborates with Selegeline 5mg. It's used to treat Parkinson's disease. Answered by Marvella Henline 1 month ago.


Possible to be permanently tolerant to a med?
i used to take cyproheptadine for medicine side effects and i believe it helped me because of the effects 5ht2c antagonism has on dopamine release. now i took it for 6 months and slowly raised my dose to increase its effectiveness. now its bee 8 months since i took it and i'm still tolerant to the dose i was... Asked by Ingeborg Egnor 1 month ago.

i used to take cyproheptadine for medicine side effects and i believe it helped me because of the effects 5ht2c antagonism has on dopamine release. now i took it for 6 months and slowly raised my dose to increase its effectiveness. now its bee 8 months since i took it and i'm still tolerant to the dose i was on, and some of the good effects it had on me are still with me but theyre slowly going away day by day, yet i'm pretty sure some of its effects arent going to go away. is it possible i could be permanently tolerant or do i just have to wait til all the effects it had on me go away? but like i said, some of the good effects it had on me are permanent. HOPE THIS ALL MAKES SENSE! i just really need this med to start working for again. Answered by Kelly Fairley 1 month ago.

I don't completely understand everything you wrote but I get the idea. How do you know that you are still tolerant to the dose you used to take? Have you tried to take the medication again to see if you tolerance has changed? And are you taking about the cyproheptadine, in another question you said you were currently taking it. And what do you mean that some of the "good effects it had on me are still with me?" Are you saying even though you have not taking it for eight months you can still feel beneficial effects? No you are not going to be permanently as tolerant to the medication as you are now. It may take a long time but your tolerance should start to go down. However it is unlikely your tolerance will go back to were it was before you had ever taken the medication and if you develop tolerance as rapidly as you say once you start taking it you will become tolerant quickly. You might want to look into either getting a second opinion from another psychiatrist, especially if your current psychiatrist has no ideas about what to do. You said you took the cyproheptadine to treat Mirapex (pramipexole) induced anhedonia and you initially took Mirapex to treat anhedonia. What is the cause of your anhedonia? What other treatments have you tried? Serzone (nefazodone) might be a good option for you, it is an antagonist of 5-HT2 receptors so it would be having a similar effect as cyproheptadine (although cyproheptadine might be an inverse agonists rather than an antagonist). Serzone also works by antagonizing alpha1-adrenergic receptors, and by inhibiting neuronal uptake of serotonin and norepinephrine. So it will increase the effects of serotonin although NOT at the 5-HT2 receptors. Methysergide is also a 5-HT2C antagonist. Even tramadol may be beneficial. Tramadol has also had some limited study for treatment-resistant depression since it has some opioid actions (which can be mood elevating), it is a 5-HT2C antagonist, and it (to some extent) inhibits neuronal uptake of serotonin and norepinephrine much like venlafaxine does. You and your doctor may also need to come at your problems from other angles and you may simply need to try some medications and see if they help. You might have already tried several but medications like Dexedrine (dextroamphetamine), Aventyl, Pamelor (nortriptyline), Emsam (selegiline transdermal), Wellbutrin (bupropion hydrochloride), Remeron (mirtazapine), Seroquel (quetiapine), Provigil (modafinil), Focalin (dexmethylphenidate), lithium carbonate, Lamictal (lamotrigine), Xanax (alprazolam), BuSpar (buspirone), and scopolamine are some examples of medications that can help mood although some are not effective when taken alone for depression. Answered by Noel Kottsick 1 month ago.

Yes this is what happened to me with Advil...well its a less severe medicine. But still what your body does is...it treats the medicine like a friendly alien to put it in simpler so it basically lets the medicine do its job and the body gets used to what the medicine is doing there forth it kindda repels/resists it which is why you find that a dosage that would have worked a month ago no longer does, its because your body has found a way to get around it. What I would do is try to find another drug that benefits you the same way, and continue switching both of them so your not just using one drug at all time...so it restrains your body from resisting the medicine you are currently taking. Answered by Kathyrn Lippert 1 month ago.

so long as you are taking an extended holiday from the cure your tolerance will leave. however even as you're nonetheless taking it you are going to maintain to construct the tolerance. for this reason medical professionals are continuously upping dosages and exchanging drugs Answered by Thea Shrewsberry 1 month ago.


Different types of anti-depressents?
Can anyone tell me what different types of anti-depressents there are (SSRI's, beta blockers or whatever) and which brand names fall into each category? Asked by Lavern Taucher 1 month ago.

Classes of antidepressants (in order of most commonly prescribed) with lists of types followed by brand names: SSRI (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor) -Sertraline - Zoloft®, Lustral®, Apo-Sertral®, Asentra® -Escitalopram - Lexapro®, Cipralex® -Fluoxetine - Prozac®, Sarafem®, Fluctin® -Citalopram - Celexa®, Cipramil®, Talohexane® -Paroxetine - Paxil®, Seroxat®, Aropax® SNRI (Selective Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitor) -Venlafaxine - Effexor XR®, Efexor® Tetracyclic -Trazodone® - *used as a sleep agent, prescribed like crazy nowadays Tricyclic -Amitriptyline - Elavil® imipramine - Tofranil® desipramine - Norpramin®, Pertofrane® trimipramine - Surmontil® clomipramine - Anafranil® lofepramine - Gamanil®, Lomont® amitriptyline - Elavil®, Endep®, Tryptanol®, Trepiline® nortriptyline - Pamelor® protriptyline - Vivactil® dothiepin hydrochloride - Prothiaden®, Thaden® doxepin - Adapin®, Sinequan® DRI/NRI (Dopamine/Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitor) -Bupropion - Wellbutrin®, Zyban® MAOI (Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitor) -Phenelzine - Nardil® -Tranylcypromine - Parnate® -Isocarboxazid - Marplan® -Moclobemide - Aurorix®, Manerix®, Moclodura® -Selegiline - Selegiline®, Eldepryl®, Emsam® Answered by Rudy Blackwell 1 month ago.

I suffered intense melancholy for a decade. when you consider that being given anti depressants i'm living a classic existence. I in no way think of of suicide anymore, I actually have a job a dream and that i study. They actual paintings yet for some it takes time to detect the dazzling ones. additionally I see a psychiatrist as nicely and that helps immensely. Answered by Jeannette Louck 1 month ago.

It is too hard to answer that question completly... In fact, daily practice they can be seperated in two main groups.. SSRIs and tricyclics.. but many drugs which can not be icluded in these groups (e.g. bupropion, buspiron, RIMAs and other MAO inhibitors). Fluoxetine, sertraline, citalopram, s-citalopram, venlafaxine-a SNRI-, fluvoxamine, are SSRI s and most common using antidepressants. Tricyclics are also effective drugs but since they have many side effects, it is not possible to use them so often, and patients who took them, can give up to use tricyclics easily.. Answered by Venice Mangum 1 month ago.

SSRIs are Selective Serotonin Reuptake inhibitors, they include prozac, paxil and many others. There are also SNRIs, or selective nor-epinephrine reuptake inhibitors, including cymbalta. There are Tricyclics, including imiprimine, clomiprimine (alot of iprimines basically). Also there are MAOIs, monoamine oxadase inhibitors. This group includes old medication with names I can't remember. Answered by Deangelo Degado 1 month ago.

Wait let me ask my husband he knows about things like this. Answered by Rachell Heidgerken 1 month ago.


How many anti depressants is there on the Market?
Asked by Rusty Anestos 1 month ago.

•Amitriptyline (Elavil®) •Amoxapine (Asendin®) •Bupropion (Aplenzin™, Budeprion XL®, Budeprion™ SR, Buproban®, Wellbutrin SR®, Wellbutrin XL®, Wellbutrin®, Zyban®) •Citalopram (Celexa®) •Clomipramine (Anafranil®) •Desipramine (Norpramin®) •Desvenlafaxine (Pristiq™) •Doxepin (Sinequan®, Silenor®) •Duloxetine (Cymbalta®) •Escitalopram (Lexapro®) •Fluoxetine (Prozac®, Sarafem®, Selfemra™) •Fluvoxamine (Luvox®, Luvox® CR) •Imipramine hydrochloride (Tofranil®) •Imipramine pamoate (Tofranil PM®) •Isocarboxazid (Marplan®) •Maprotiline (Ludiomil®) •Mirtazapine (Remeron®) •Nefazodone (Serzone®) •Nortriptyline (Pamelor®) •Paroxetine (Paxil®, Paxil CR®, Pexeva®) •Phenelzine (Nardil®) •Protriptyline (Vivactil®) •Selegiline (Emsam®) •Sertraline (Zoloft®) •Tranylcypromine (Parnate®) •Trazodone (Desyrel®) or trazodone ER (Oleptro™) •Trimipramine (Surmontil®) •Venlafaxine (Effexor®, Effexor XR®). •Citalopram (Celexa®) •Escitalopram (Lexapro®) •Fluoxetine (Prozac®, Sarafem®, Selfemra™) •Fluvoxamine (Luvox®, Luvox® CR) •Paroxetine (Paxil®, Paxil CR®, Pexeva®) •Sertraline (Zoloft®). Serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) include: •Duloxetine (Cymbalta®) •Desvenlafaxine (Pristiq™) •Venlafaxine (Effexor®, Effexor XR®). There is one SNRI, milnacipran (Savella™) that is not approved for treating depression, although it may be used "off-label" for this purpose. Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) used for depression include: •Isocarboxazid (Marplan®) •Phenelzine (Nardil®) •Selegiline (Emsam®) •Tranylcypromine (Parnate®). Tricyclic antidepressants include: •Amitriptyline (Elavil®) •Amoxapine (Asendin®) •Clomipramine (Anafranil®) •Desipramine (Norpramin®) •Doxepin (Sinequan®, Silenor®) •Imipramine hydrochloride (Tofranil®) •Imipramine pamoate (Tofranil PM®) •Maprotiline (Ludiomil®) •Nortriptyline (Pamelor®) •Protriptyline (Vivactil®) •Trimipramine (Surmontil®). Miscellaneous other antidepressants include: •Bupropion (Aplenzin™, Budeprion XL®, Budeprion™ SR, Buproban®, Wellbutrin SR®, Wellbutrin XL®, Wellbutrin®, Zyban®), a norepinephrine and dopamine reuptake inhibitor (NDRI) •Mirtazapine (Remeron®) •Nefazodone (Serzone®) •Trazodone (Desyrel®) or trazodone ER (Oleptro™). Answered by Diann Mith 1 month ago.

Being that this alt med web page has been hijacked by means of druggies, I am now not certain what so as to add. Do your due diligence regarding drug results. If you arn't suidical and are open to "choices", check out one million hr full of life rigorous activity according to day that could be running, get a few solar, or typical gentle in your dermis, and watch much less TV. Make certain your bod can tolerate activity, get a pressure scan if integral. Answered by Venetta Bravender 1 month ago.


Help my eyes hurt I need help now?
Ok I already saw the nurses and doctor. They see nothing wrong with my eyes. So what's wrong with my eyes? Every time I use my eyes they start to hurt. And every time I read long they hurt. Is it my eye muscle? I need your help. I need to know what's wrong with them. Help. Asked by Hans Orlin 1 month ago.

Are you taking any of these drugs? * Adrenaline eye drops * AK-Dex * AK-Pred * Alphagan * Alphagan P * Alpidine * Alpraclonidine Hydrochloride * Alrex * Antabuse * Antispas * Apoven * ApraClonidine tablets * Atapryl * Atrobel Forte * Atropine Sulphate * Atrovent * Azopt * Bemote * Bentyl * Brimonidine * Byclomine * Caramiphen and Phenylpropanolamine * Carbex * Celexa * Combivent * Contac Cold Capsules * Cosopt * Dalmane * Decadron * Di-Spaz * Dibent * Dicyclomine * Dicyclomine Hydrochloride * Disulfiriam * Donnalix Infant Drops * Econopred * Econopred Plus * Eldepryl * Enidin * Estazolam * Etabonate * Flarex * Flecainide * Flecatab * Flomax * Flumadine * Fluor-Op * Fluorometholone * Flurazepam * FML * FML Forte * FML-S * Framycetin * Gefitinib * HMS * Iopidine * Ipratrin * Ipratropium - inhalation * Ipratropium Bromide * Ipravent * Iressa * L-Deprenyl * Levocabastine * Lexapro * Livostin * Lotemax * Luvox * Maxidex * Merbentyl * Minims * Neoquess * Ocuflox - Temporary eye pain * Ofloxacin - Temporary eye pain * Optivar * Or-Tyl * Ordrine AT Extended Release Capsule * Otodex * Paxil * Paxil CR * Pred Forte * Pred Mild * Prednisolone * ProSom * Prozac * Prozac Weekly * Rescaps-D S.R. Capsule * Rimantidine * Rimexolone * Sarafem * Selegiline * Sertraline * Sofra-Tulle * Sonata * Spasmoject * Tambocor * Tamsulosin * Tobispray * Topamax * Topamax Sprinkle * Topiramate * Tuss-Allergine Modified T.D. Capsule * Tuss-Genade Modified Capsule * Tuss-Ornade Liquid * Tuss-Ornade Spansule * Tussogest Extended Release Capsule * Vexol * Zaleplon * Zoloft Answered by Loren Humiston 1 month ago.

Sleeping in touch lenses lowers the volume of oxygen getting via on your eyes, as a result placing you at a bigger danger for eye infections. The simplest approach to inform whether it is an illness or if you happen to quite simply indignant your eyes is to visit an eye fixed surgeon. If it's an illness it's fundamental to have it checked out instantly; a few forms of infections can get very extreme and purpose scarring and blindness. There are distinct manufacturers of contacts that may be accurately slept in (made from more moderen, extra breathable elements) however you have to speak together with your surgeon to look if you are a well candidate. Answered by Beatriz Dino 1 month ago.


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