Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 018917/001.

Names and composition

"SECTRAL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of ACEBUTOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018917/001 SECTRAL ACEBUTOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 200MG BASE
018917/003 SECTRAL ACEBUTOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 400MG BASE

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018917/001 SECTRAL ACEBUTOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 200MG BASE
018917/003 SECTRAL ACEBUTOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 400MG BASE
074007/001 ACEBUTOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE ACEBUTOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 200MG BASE
074007/002 ACEBUTOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE ACEBUTOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 400MG BASE
074288/001 ACEBUTOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE ACEBUTOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 200MG BASE
074288/002 ACEBUTOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE ACEBUTOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 400MG BASE
075047/001 ACEBUTOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE ACEBUTOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 200MG BASE
075047/002 ACEBUTOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE ACEBUTOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 400MG BASE

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Answered questions

I want info about non prescription blood pressue control products?
Asked by Wade Balowski 1 year ago.

Trying Googling the following: * atenolol (Tenormin), * propranolol (Inderal), * metoprolol (Toprol), * nadolol (Corgard), * betaxolol (Kerlone), * acebutolol (Sectral), * pindolol (Visken), and * bisoprolol (Zebeta). Most BP meds are categorized as: ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, Beta–blockers, Diuretics, Calcium channel blockers (CCBs), or Alpha–blockers Go to www.rxlist.com and search those or you can also try Googling "PDR Online". A PDR is what docs use to narrow down a prescription for a given ailment. Hope that helps. Answered by Aurora Coant 1 year ago.

Keep weight in normal range, exercise as your doctor allows, get enough sleep, and limit sodium intake - can all make a big difference. The drugs the next person lists all require a prescription. The only non-prescription medications I'm aware of are the over-the-counter diuretics, which dehydrate you and may temporarily lower blood pressure. Don't overdo, you can really hurt yourself. Answered by Blake Kitamura 1 year ago.


Does a sudden fast heart rate mean palpitations?
I just found out the drug I'm going to be taking is called Acebutolol (Sectral). Asked by Gisele Wodskow 1 year ago.

My cardiologist said my heart beats fast every once in while and is prescribing a beta blocker for me to take. ( I was on a 24 hr monitor a couple weeks ago) Does that mean I'm having palpitations? I'm going to see my regular doc. tom. and I plan on asking her too. I just want to get an idea if anyone here knows. Answered by Roscoe Arline 1 year ago.

What you are experiencing is called tachycardia. If the tachycardia (big word for increased heart rate) causes your heart to pound in your chest, it is called a palpitaion. Tachycardia can be caused by many things: medications, caffeine, hyperthyroidm, and of course a heart problem among other things. Make sure they checked you thyroid levels b/c this is a major contributor. Answered by Asha Scheffert 1 year ago.

I was on beta-blockers for palpitations quite a few years ago now, My doctor explained to me, that it was delayed stress that was causing mine, as there were nothing wrong found with my heart after having a few different tests done!! Anyhow looking back, I was going through a difficult time with family problems.......... Beta blockers can regulate our heartbeat..... They can be quite alarming, they were for me!!.... I don't know if you are aware of yours or it was the monitor that picked up on them?? We can take palpitations for different medical reasons..... I no longer take palpitations thank goodness!! I hope this helps in some way to put your mind at rest....I think mine were called propananol? Answered by Tonie Genga 1 year ago.

The American Heart Association's guidelines do not mention target heart rates, that is something that the various diet and exercise sellers came up with. If you are experiencing discomfort, ie shortness of breath, then something is wrong, I suspect that you are approaching a heart rate that is clinically identified as SVT, super ventricular tachycardia. This means that the heart is beating too fast to deliver a full stroke that completely empties the chambers of the heart with each beat. This, in turn, means that enough oxygen is not being transported to your major organs, especially the brain. Continuing to push past this point WILL result in organ damage, especially to the heart and brain. Answered by Mercy Rando 1 year ago.

soda and things with caffeine will cause palpitations smoking will to Answered by Camila Bierwirth 1 year ago.

it does to me i have had them Answered by Benjamin Ellerbusch 1 year ago.


Question about vitamins..?
RedAngel..I don't have high blood pressure..I am taking the bets blocker for arrythmias..and the name of it is Sectral..but thank you for your answer.Tink..thank you for your answer, just watching Dr.Oz and he had suggested 1000 mg of Vit.C lol..and the beta blocker is for arrythmia(fast ♥ rate). and the... Asked by Kirsten Yantis 1 year ago.

I am currently taking 1 Flintstones Complete vitamin, 1 B50 B-Complex, and 1000 mg Vitamin C..is this ok together and what should I add or take away? I take the Flintstones cause regular vitamins "don't agree with me"..I am a 38 year old female in good health I reckon. I do have anxiety issues, which I wish would go a way lol..Only "real" medicine I take is a beta blocker for fast heart rate. Thanks in advance and God Bless!:) Answered by Tanesha Barre 1 year ago.

RedAngel..I don't have high blood pressure..I am taking the bets blocker for arrythmias..and the name of it is Sectral..but thank you for your answer. Tink..thank you for your answer, just watching Dr.Oz and he had suggested 1000 mg of Vit.C lol..and the beta blocker is for arrythmia(fast ♥ rate). and the b50 is a b complex with B1,B 2,B3,B6, folic acid, B12, and pantothenic acid. thanks again. Answered by Dona Castanio 1 year ago.

If the Flintstones don't upset your stomach - then you have found a solution that works for you on your own. I think a B-50 is a bit much - if you find you have an increase in appetite I wouldn't be surprised - and thats an awful lot of C to be taking (the new guidelines are that 500 should be the top amount people take) but none of those things are going to conflict with the beta-blocker. Answered by Selena Brownley 1 year ago.

"Natural source" vitamins (as opposed to cheap chemical synthesized ones) taken with food shouldn't cause any stomach upset. It's always best to take vitamins with a meal anyway. Linus Pauling, the Nobel Prize winning discoverer of the benefits of vitamin C took over 10,000 mg/day. The RDA is nonsense and is does not correspond with any scientific data at all. You can find a huge amount of natural health information at Mercola.com regarding vitamins and plenty of other issues. I'd add at least 2,000 mg/day of Vitamin D3 and up the Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) to 3,000 mg/day especially during cold/flu season. Many people are vitamin C deficient. You can tell if you've reached your body's limit if you experience diarrhea. This is no big deal, just scale back the dose. Most natural health practitioners recommend a 25(OH)D test to determine whether your blood levels of D are in the optimal range. Answered by Ryann Tyrer 1 year ago.


Heart Echo results, please help me understand the results?
Heart echo results, please help me understand?so i was having a racing heart at work and called paramedics and they did an echo at the hospital that day and this is what it said..normal chamber sizes2. normal sized left ventricular with mild concentric left ventricular hypertrophy with an ejection... Asked by Cristina Pomales 1 year ago.

Heart echo results, please help me understand? so i was having a racing heart at work and called paramedics and they did an echo at the hospital that day and this is what it said.. normal chamber sizes 2. normal sized left ventricular with mild concentric left ventricular hypertrophy with an ejection fraction of 45%. 3. mild diastolic dysfunction 4moderate systolic dysfunction 5no definite ecocardiography evidence or valvular vegetation. another from my doctor a month later and after being started 25mg metoprolol the beta blocker once a day. ejection fraction estimated 65%, no significant valvular regurgitation or stenosis, no hemodynamically significant doppler velocities or sectral waveforms, conclusions no significant left ventrcular wall motion abnormalities, no hemodynamically significant valvular pathology. normal left ventricualr cavity size with wall thickness with no regional wall motion abnormalities and overall normal systolic function. but i do have a few daily premature beats, Dr said pvcs and don't worry about them but they scare me no matter what the cardiologist says. im a 21 year old male with panic and anxiety disorder. Ekg reads early repolarazation, minimum voltage criteria for left ventricular hypertrophy, normal sinus rhythm. waiting for the 24hour monitor. these pvcs scare me and i cant really cope with them at all and has caused their own anxiety disorder in themselves as i fear i will drop dead or my heart is bad or something. Answered by Jamal Tuckerman 1 year ago.

What is it going to take to convince you? You've had a cardiologist clear you. The last echo is what I'd expect from a young man. Talk to your doc about two things. 1) More beta blocker. They can suppress the PVCs. 2) meds for the anxiety/panic A healthy heart can do a lot of strange things. For example, when I used to do cardiology, I'd get panicked calls from a nurse "Mr. Jones is in V-Tach (a potentially fatal rhythm)" If he had an echo like yours, I'd tell him/her to relax, it was harmless. I take a beta blocker myself for palpitations. My heart is also healthy. I chose the med because they were annoying, not scary. Answered by Jen Mclaird 1 year ago.


Apprehension about abdominal/pelvic CAT scan with IV Contrast?
I was ordered an abdominal/pelvic CAT scan with IV Contrast for pain in my lower right back. Doc thinks it might be kidney related. I did some reading up on the test like I always do with all my tests and I'm a little afraid. Studies have shown that people with asthma, allergies, high blood pressure, and... Asked by Maryln Banfill 1 year ago.

I was ordered an abdominal/pelvic CAT scan with IV Contrast for pain in my lower right back. Doc thinks it might be kidney related. I did some reading up on the test like I always do with all my tests and I'm a little afraid. Studies have shown that people with asthma, allergies, high blood pressure, and potential kidney and/or liver disease could have serious adverse affects. My asthma is not very controlled, my blood pressure is 170/95 on Sectral and Lisinopril/Hydrochlorothiazide, and I don't take anything for my allergies cept Benedryl. Should I be worried and refuse the test or just have it done and risk serious health problems and maybe even death? My doc knows about my health and he still ordered it, so he either isn't too worried or doesn't care. By the way, I'm only 30 and an alcoholic if that doesn't make things worse. Well, any doctors or health professionals please help me out here. Thanks.... Answered by Sumiko Schink 1 year ago.

I have high BP,, the contrast does make me sick at my stomach but that is all,, sometimes the side effects is necessary, , your do knows best, surely He wouldn't have ordered one if it was dangerous to your health,,trust your doc,, and you definitely need to stop drinking, that can never be a good thing.. Answered by Phylis Cassells 1 year ago.


Beta blockers for anxiety/migraines?
Also, I get migraines/cluster headaches on a weekly/bi-weekly basis. I've never had headaches this bad before and they are seriously no fun. Asked by Santiago Virani 1 year ago.

Some time ago, my doctor mentioned beta blockers as a possible aid for anxiety. At the time, I dismissed this because I was not living in a high-stress environment. Currently, however, I am finishing my final semester of engineering school, and I am under a ton of stress/anxiety. I have some bad anxiety problems (which contributes to my depression disorder), for which the doctor put me on citalopram (Celexa) and clonazepam (Klonopin) over a year ago. Recently, someone told me that clonazepam is addictive, which worries me because I don't want to be addicted to any drug. I researched beta-blockers, and was interested in the 2nd-gen varieties that block only the beta-1 receptors. Not being a doctor, I can't presume to know what medication would work best for me, but the following 3 seemed potentially promising. -Sectral -Kerlone -Inderal Can anyone relate personal experiences with these medications? Another thing I was happy to read is that beta blockers dull/shut down emotions. I am under so much stress that I desperately want to just turn that emotional "switch" off, and not have to worry about pesky emotions and crap like that. Answered by Nikki Fleischer 1 year ago.

beta blockers can help some people with cluster headaches. Answered by Dorethea Burnworth 1 year ago.


Is there any over the counter medicine for high blood pressure?
Asked by Reggie Sacramento 1 year ago.

There are 8 types of over-the-counter medicine, available by a doctor's prescription, to treat high blood pressure: Diuretics (water pills) helps your body to get rid of extra sodium (salt) and water so your blood vessels don't have to hold too much fluid. Some examples of diuretics include chlorthalidone (brand name: Thalitone), furosemide (brand name: Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (brand name: Esidrix) and indapamide (brand name: Lozol). Your doctor may also prescribe a combination of diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide combined with triamterene (brand names: Dyazide, Maxzide). Beta-blockers makes the heart beat slower so that blood passes through your blood vessels with less force. Some examples of beta-blockers include acebutolol (brand name: Sectral), atenolol (brand name: Tenormin), carvedilol (brand name: Coreg), metoprolol (brand names: Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (brand name: Corgard), propranolol (brand name: Inderal) and timolol (brand name: Blocadren). Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also called ACE inhibitors) keeps your body from making angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ACE inhibitors include benazepril (brand name: Lotensin), enalapril (brand name: Vasotec), lisinopril (brand names: Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (brand name: Accupril), ramipril (brand name: Altace) and trandolapril (brand name: Mavik). Angiotensin II receptor blockers (also called ARBs) protects your blood vessels from the effects of angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ARBs include candesartan (brand name: Atacand), irbesartan (brand name: Avapro), losartan (brand name: Cozaar), olmesartan (brand name: Benicar), telmisartan (brand name: Micardis) and valsartan (brand name: Diovan). Calcium channel blockers (also called CCBs) helps to keep your blood vessels from constricting (becoming narrow) by blocking calcium from entering your cells. Some examples of CCBs include amlodipine (brand name: Norvasc), diltiazem (brand names: Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, Tiazac), felodipine (brand name: Plendil), nicardipine (brand name: Cardene), nifedipine (brand names: Adalat, Procardia) and verapamil (some brand names: Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan). Alpha-blockers helps to relax your blood vessels by reducing nerve impulses. This allows your blood to pass through more easily. Some examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin (brand name: Cardura), prazosin (brand name: Minipress) and terazosin (brand name: Hytrin). Centrally acting drugs may affect your brain and central nervous system to reduce the nerve impulses that can cause your blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of centrally acting drugs include clonidine (brand name: Catapres) and methyldopa. Direct vasodilators relaxes the muscles in the blood vessel walls. This causes the blood vessels to widen. Some examples of vasodilators include hydralazine (brand name: Apresoline) and minoxidil (brand name: Loniten). Good Luck ! Answered by Jayne Khela 1 year ago.

Drop Blood Pressure Below 120/80 Answered by Sacha Sulser 1 year ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Lamar Fruman 1 year ago.

Hey I'm here for the first time. I found this question and I find the answers really helpful. I am hoping to give something back and assist others too. Answered by Wendy Lanham 1 year ago.

Not for that particular purpose. Some drugs may lower blood pressure as a side effect. To control high blood pressure without drugs, one can exercise, watch your weight, and avoid salty foods. DK Answered by Katharine Helie 1 year ago.

I have heard that garlic can lower blood pressure, which is why you should tell your Dr. if you are taking any herbal, or natural remedies. They may either assist or combat the effects of the medicine they prescribe for you. I hear that you should not drink grapefruit juice if you are taking hypertension medicine as well. Answered by Efren Cartez 1 year ago.

No; certainly nothing safe and effective. High blood pressure is serious business, to be managed by real prescription medications under a doctor's care. Answered by Alise Schuur 1 year ago.

"Over the Counter" means without doctor s prescription, if anybody didn t know. Answered by Sarai Levandoski 1 year ago.


Can high blood pressure medication cause nervous system side effects?
I am taking a high blood pressure medication, and it seems/appears that since I have been taking the medication I have had headaches all over, dizziness/light headedness, numbness in parts my face, as well as a stiff neck. These symptoms arent consisently there, maybe 1-2 times a day for an hour or so. Can a high... Asked by Melony Hartpence 1 year ago.

I am taking a high blood pressure medication, and it seems/appears that since I have been taking the medication I have had headaches all over, dizziness/light headedness, numbness in parts my face, as well as a stiff neck. These symptoms arent consisently there, maybe 1-2 times a day for an hour or so. Can a high blood pressure medication cause such or is this some unrelated condition that I should seek out? Answered by Shanita Merida 1 year ago.

Possible Side Effects of Drugs That Lower Blood Pressure Some of the drugs listed below can affect certain functions of the body, resulting in bad side effects. However, drugs that lower blood pressure have proven effective over the years. The benefits of using them far outweigh the risk of side effects. Most people who’ve taken these drugs haven’t had any problems. Diuretics — Some of these drugs may decrease your body's supply of a mineral called potassium. Symptoms such as weakness, leg cramps or being tired may result. Eating foods containing potassium may help prevent significant potassium loss. You can prevent potassium loss by taking a liquid or tablet that has potassium along with the diuretic, if your doctor recommends it. Diuretics such as amiloride (Midamar), spironolactone (Aldactone) or triamterene (Dyrenium) are called "potassium sparing" agents. They don’t cause the body to lose potassium. They might be prescribed alone but are usually used with another diuretic. Some of these combinations are Aldactazide, Dyazide, Maxzide or Moduretic. Some people suffer from attacks of gout after prolonged treatment with diuretics. This side effect isn't common and can be managed by other treatment. In people with diabetes, diuretic drugs may increase the blood sugar level. A change in drug, diet, insulin or oral antidiabetic dosage corrects this in most cases. Your doctor can change your treatment. Most of the time the degree of increase in blood sugar isn't much. Impotence may also occur in a small percentage of people. Beta-blockers — Acebutolol (Sectral), atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Lopressor), nadolol (Corgard), pindolol (Visken), propranolol (Inderal) or timolol (Blocadren) may cause insomnia, cold hands and feet, tiredness or depression, a slow heartbeat or symptoms of asthma. Impotence may occur. If you have diabetes and you’re taking insulin, have your responses to therapy monitored closely. ACE inhibitors — These drugs, such as captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Zestril or Prinivil), may cause a skin rash; loss of taste; a chronic dry, hacking cough; and in rare instances, kidney damage. Angiotensin II receptor blockers — These drugs may cause occasional dizziness. Calcium channel blockers — Diltiazem (Cardizem), nicardipine (Cardene), Nifedipine (Procardia) and verapamil (Calan or Isoptin) may cause palpitations, swollen ankles, constipation, headache or dizziness. Side effects with each of these drugs differ a great deal. Alpha blockers — These drugs may cause fast heart rate, dizziness or a drop in blood pressure when you stand up. Combined alpha and beta blockers — People taking these drugs may experience a drop in blood pressure when they stand up. Central agonists — Alpha methyldopa (Aldomet) may produce a greater drop in blood pressure when you're in an upright position (standing or walking) and may make you feel weak or faint if the pressure has been lowered too far. This drug may also cause drowsiness or sluggishness, dryness of the mouth, fever or anemia. Male patients may experience impotence. If this side effect persists, your doctor may have to change the drug dosage or use another medication. Clonidine (Catapres), guanabenz (Wytensin) or guanfacine (Tenex) may produce severe dryness of the mouth, constipation or drowsiness. If you're taking any of these drugs, don’t stop suddenly, because your blood pressure may rise quickly to dangerously high levels. Peripheral adrenergic inhibitors — Reserpine may cause a stuffy nose, diarrhea or heartburn. These effects aren't severe and no treatment is required other than to change the amount of drugs taken. If you have nightmares or insomnia or get depressed, tell your doctor. You should stop using the drugs. Guanadrel (Hylorel) or guanethidine (Ismelin) may cause some diarrhea, which may persist in some people. This side effect usually becomes less of a problem if you continue treatment. These drugs reduce blood pressure more when you stand. Consequently, you may get dizzy and lightheaded and feel weak when you get out of bed in the morning or stand up suddenly. If you notice any of these reactions — and if they persist for more than a minute or two — sit or lie down and either reduce or omit the next dose of the drug. If symptoms continue, contact your doctor. When you're taking guanethidine, don't keep standing in the hot sun or at a social gathering if you begin to feel faint or weak. These activities cause low blood pressure. Male patients may experience impotence. Contact your doctor if this occurs. These drugs are rarely used unless other medications don’t help. Blood vessel dilators — Hydralzine (Apresoline) may cause headaches, swelling around the eyes, heart palpitations or aches and pains in the joints. Usually none of these symptoms are severe, and most will go away after a few weeks of treatment. This drug isn't usually used by itself. Minoxidil (Loniten) is a potent drug that's usually used only in resistant cases of severe high blood pressure. It may cause fluid retention (marked weight gain) or excessive hair growth. Answered by Sammy Arelleano 1 year ago.

You really should speak to your doctor, while yes, high blood pressure meds do have "Side Effects" to some of those effects, you really should make doubly sure that you can take them, and they will not harm you. So speak to your doctor. I take blood pressure meds and the least I get is light headiness, when my blood pressure drops to "Normal" from being too high. Answered by Risa Spargur 1 year ago.


I want info about non prescription blood pressue control products?
Asked by Azalee Bondi 1 year ago.

Trying Googling the following: * atenolol (Tenormin), * propranolol (Inderal), * metoprolol (Toprol), * nadolol (Corgard), * betaxolol (Kerlone), * acebutolol (Sectral), * pindolol (Visken), and * bisoprolol (Zebeta). Most BP meds are categorized as: ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, Beta–blockers, Diuretics, Calcium channel blockers (CCBs), or Alpha–blockers Go to www.rxlist.com and search those or you can also try Googling "PDR Online". A PDR is what docs use to narrow down a prescription for a given ailment. Hope that helps. Answered by Nilda Belhumeur 1 year ago.

Keep weight in normal range, exercise as your doctor allows, get enough sleep, and limit sodium intake - can all make a big difference. The drugs the next person lists all require a prescription. The only non-prescription medications I'm aware of are the over-the-counter diuretics, which dehydrate you and may temporarily lower blood pressure. Don't overdo, you can really hurt yourself. Answered by Kourtney Sunier 1 year ago.


Does a sudden fast heart rate mean palpitations?
I just found out the drug I'm going to be taking is called Acebutolol (Sectral). Asked by Delcie Mehlhaff 1 year ago.

My cardiologist said my heart beats fast every once in while and is prescribing a beta blocker for me to take. ( I was on a 24 hr monitor a couple weeks ago) Does that mean I'm having palpitations? I'm going to see my regular doc. tom. and I plan on asking her too. I just want to get an idea if anyone here knows. Answered by Hilton Weeks 1 year ago.

What you are experiencing is called tachycardia. If the tachycardia (big word for increased heart rate) causes your heart to pound in your chest, it is called a palpitaion. Tachycardia can be caused by many things: medications, caffeine, hyperthyroidm, and of course a heart problem among other things. Make sure they checked you thyroid levels b/c this is a major contributor. Answered by Echo Stires 1 year ago.

I was on beta-blockers for palpitations quite a few years ago now, My doctor explained to me, that it was delayed stress that was causing mine, as there were nothing wrong found with my heart after having a few different tests done!! Anyhow looking back, I was going through a difficult time with family problems.......... Beta blockers can regulate our heartbeat..... They can be quite alarming, they were for me!!.... I don't know if you are aware of yours or it was the monitor that picked up on them?? We can take palpitations for different medical reasons..... I no longer take palpitations thank goodness!! I hope this helps in some way to put your mind at rest....I think mine were called propananol? Answered by Dianna Cosper 1 year ago.

The American Heart Association's guidelines do not mention target heart rates, that is something that the various diet and exercise sellers came up with. If you are experiencing discomfort, ie shortness of breath, then something is wrong, I suspect that you are approaching a heart rate that is clinically identified as SVT, super ventricular tachycardia. This means that the heart is beating too fast to deliver a full stroke that completely empties the chambers of the heart with each beat. This, in turn, means that enough oxygen is not being transported to your major organs, especially the brain. Continuing to push past this point WILL result in organ damage, especially to the heart and brain. Answered by Ellsworth Bennie 1 year ago.

soda and things with caffeine will cause palpitations smoking will to Answered by Maren Boarts 1 year ago.

it does to me i have had them Answered by Hanna Chrislip 1 year ago.


Question about vitamins..?
RedAngel..I don't have high blood pressure..I am taking the bets blocker for arrythmias..and the name of it is Sectral..but thank you for your answer.Tink..thank you for your answer, just watching Dr.Oz and he had suggested 1000 mg of Vit.C lol..and the beta blocker is for arrythmia(fast ♥ rate). and the... Asked by Ariane Mallen 1 year ago.

I am currently taking 1 Flintstones Complete vitamin, 1 B50 B-Complex, and 1000 mg Vitamin C..is this ok together and what should I add or take away? I take the Flintstones cause regular vitamins "don't agree with me"..I am a 38 year old female in good health I reckon. I do have anxiety issues, which I wish would go a way lol..Only "real" medicine I take is a beta blocker for fast heart rate. Thanks in advance and God Bless!:) Answered by Floria Ganner 1 year ago.

RedAngel..I don't have high blood pressure..I am taking the bets blocker for arrythmias..and the name of it is Sectral..but thank you for your answer. Tink..thank you for your answer, just watching Dr.Oz and he had suggested 1000 mg of Vit.C lol..and the beta blocker is for arrythmia(fast ♥ rate). and the b50 is a b complex with B1,B 2,B3,B6, folic acid, B12, and pantothenic acid. thanks again. Answered by Piper Slocumb 1 year ago.

If the Flintstones don't upset your stomach - then you have found a solution that works for you on your own. I think a B-50 is a bit much - if you find you have an increase in appetite I wouldn't be surprised - and thats an awful lot of C to be taking (the new guidelines are that 500 should be the top amount people take) but none of those things are going to conflict with the beta-blocker. Answered by Lesli Trethewey 1 year ago.

"Natural source" vitamins (as opposed to cheap chemical synthesized ones) taken with food shouldn't cause any stomach upset. It's always best to take vitamins with a meal anyway. Linus Pauling, the Nobel Prize winning discoverer of the benefits of vitamin C took over 10,000 mg/day. The RDA is nonsense and is does not correspond with any scientific data at all. You can find a huge amount of natural health information at Mercola.com regarding vitamins and plenty of other issues. I'd add at least 2,000 mg/day of Vitamin D3 and up the Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) to 3,000 mg/day especially during cold/flu season. Many people are vitamin C deficient. You can tell if you've reached your body's limit if you experience diarrhea. This is no big deal, just scale back the dose. Most natural health practitioners recommend a 25(OH)D test to determine whether your blood levels of D are in the optimal range. Answered by Sona Flansburg 1 year ago.


Heart Echo results, please help me understand the results?
Heart echo results, please help me understand?so i was having a racing heart at work and called paramedics and they did an echo at the hospital that day and this is what it said..normal chamber sizes2. normal sized left ventricular with mild concentric left ventricular hypertrophy with an ejection... Asked by Shelia Pollitt 1 year ago.

Heart echo results, please help me understand? so i was having a racing heart at work and called paramedics and they did an echo at the hospital that day and this is what it said.. normal chamber sizes 2. normal sized left ventricular with mild concentric left ventricular hypertrophy with an ejection fraction of 45%. 3. mild diastolic dysfunction 4moderate systolic dysfunction 5no definite ecocardiography evidence or valvular vegetation. another from my doctor a month later and after being started 25mg metoprolol the beta blocker once a day. ejection fraction estimated 65%, no significant valvular regurgitation or stenosis, no hemodynamically significant doppler velocities or sectral waveforms, conclusions no significant left ventrcular wall motion abnormalities, no hemodynamically significant valvular pathology. normal left ventricualr cavity size with wall thickness with no regional wall motion abnormalities and overall normal systolic function. but i do have a few daily premature beats, Dr said pvcs and don't worry about them but they scare me no matter what the cardiologist says. im a 21 year old male with panic and anxiety disorder. Ekg reads early repolarazation, minimum voltage criteria for left ventricular hypertrophy, normal sinus rhythm. waiting for the 24hour monitor. these pvcs scare me and i cant really cope with them at all and has caused their own anxiety disorder in themselves as i fear i will drop dead or my heart is bad or something. Answered by Monroe Scholin 1 year ago.

What is it going to take to convince you? You've had a cardiologist clear you. The last echo is what I'd expect from a young man. Talk to your doc about two things. 1) More beta blocker. They can suppress the PVCs. 2) meds for the anxiety/panic A healthy heart can do a lot of strange things. For example, when I used to do cardiology, I'd get panicked calls from a nurse "Mr. Jones is in V-Tach (a potentially fatal rhythm)" If he had an echo like yours, I'd tell him/her to relax, it was harmless. I take a beta blocker myself for palpitations. My heart is also healthy. I chose the med because they were annoying, not scary. Answered by Lynna Billotti 1 year ago.


Beta blockers for anxiety/migraines?
Also, I get migraines/cluster headaches on a weekly/bi-weekly basis. I've never had headaches this bad before and they are seriously no fun. Asked by Diann Mousa 1 year ago.

Some time ago, my doctor mentioned beta blockers as a possible aid for anxiety. At the time, I dismissed this because I was not living in a high-stress environment. Currently, however, I am finishing my final semester of engineering school, and I am under a ton of stress/anxiety. I have some bad anxiety problems (which contributes to my depression disorder), for which the doctor put me on citalopram (Celexa) and clonazepam (Klonopin) over a year ago. Recently, someone told me that clonazepam is addictive, which worries me because I don't want to be addicted to any drug. I researched beta-blockers, and was interested in the 2nd-gen varieties that block only the beta-1 receptors. Not being a doctor, I can't presume to know what medication would work best for me, but the following 3 seemed potentially promising. -Sectral -Kerlone -Inderal Can anyone relate personal experiences with these medications? Another thing I was happy to read is that beta blockers dull/shut down emotions. I am under so much stress that I desperately want to just turn that emotional "switch" off, and not have to worry about pesky emotions and crap like that. Answered by Christine Bidwell 1 year ago.

beta blockers can help some people with cluster headaches. Answered by Marcella Fragnoli 1 year ago.


Apprehension about abdominal/pelvic CAT scan with IV Contrast?
I was ordered an abdominal/pelvic CAT scan with IV Contrast for pain in my lower right back. Doc thinks it might be kidney related. I did some reading up on the test like I always do with all my tests and I'm a little afraid. Studies have shown that people with asthma, allergies, high blood pressure, and... Asked by Bradly Sichel 1 year ago.

I was ordered an abdominal/pelvic CAT scan with IV Contrast for pain in my lower right back. Doc thinks it might be kidney related. I did some reading up on the test like I always do with all my tests and I'm a little afraid. Studies have shown that people with asthma, allergies, high blood pressure, and potential kidney and/or liver disease could have serious adverse affects. My asthma is not very controlled, my blood pressure is 170/95 on Sectral and Lisinopril/Hydrochlorothiazide, and I don't take anything for my allergies cept Benedryl. Should I be worried and refuse the test or just have it done and risk serious health problems and maybe even death? My doc knows about my health and he still ordered it, so he either isn't too worried or doesn't care. By the way, I'm only 30 and an alcoholic if that doesn't make things worse. Well, any doctors or health professionals please help me out here. Thanks.... Answered by Thaddeus Heberle 1 year ago.

I have high BP,, the contrast does make me sick at my stomach but that is all,, sometimes the side effects is necessary, , your do knows best, surely He wouldn't have ordered one if it was dangerous to your health,,trust your doc,, and you definitely need to stop drinking, that can never be a good thing.. Answered by Jordan Waldenberg 1 year ago.


Is there any over the counter medicine for high blood pressure?
Asked by Florence Kats 1 year ago.

There are 8 types of over-the-counter medicine, available by a doctor's prescription, to treat high blood pressure: Diuretics (water pills) helps your body to get rid of extra sodium (salt) and water so your blood vessels don't have to hold too much fluid. Some examples of diuretics include chlorthalidone (brand name: Thalitone), furosemide (brand name: Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (brand name: Esidrix) and indapamide (brand name: Lozol). Your doctor may also prescribe a combination of diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide combined with triamterene (brand names: Dyazide, Maxzide). Beta-blockers makes the heart beat slower so that blood passes through your blood vessels with less force. Some examples of beta-blockers include acebutolol (brand name: Sectral), atenolol (brand name: Tenormin), carvedilol (brand name: Coreg), metoprolol (brand names: Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (brand name: Corgard), propranolol (brand name: Inderal) and timolol (brand name: Blocadren). Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also called ACE inhibitors) keeps your body from making angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ACE inhibitors include benazepril (brand name: Lotensin), enalapril (brand name: Vasotec), lisinopril (brand names: Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (brand name: Accupril), ramipril (brand name: Altace) and trandolapril (brand name: Mavik). Angiotensin II receptor blockers (also called ARBs) protects your blood vessels from the effects of angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ARBs include candesartan (brand name: Atacand), irbesartan (brand name: Avapro), losartan (brand name: Cozaar), olmesartan (brand name: Benicar), telmisartan (brand name: Micardis) and valsartan (brand name: Diovan). Calcium channel blockers (also called CCBs) helps to keep your blood vessels from constricting (becoming narrow) by blocking calcium from entering your cells. Some examples of CCBs include amlodipine (brand name: Norvasc), diltiazem (brand names: Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, Tiazac), felodipine (brand name: Plendil), nicardipine (brand name: Cardene), nifedipine (brand names: Adalat, Procardia) and verapamil (some brand names: Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan). Alpha-blockers helps to relax your blood vessels by reducing nerve impulses. This allows your blood to pass through more easily. Some examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin (brand name: Cardura), prazosin (brand name: Minipress) and terazosin (brand name: Hytrin). Centrally acting drugs may affect your brain and central nervous system to reduce the nerve impulses that can cause your blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of centrally acting drugs include clonidine (brand name: Catapres) and methyldopa. Direct vasodilators relaxes the muscles in the blood vessel walls. This causes the blood vessels to widen. Some examples of vasodilators include hydralazine (brand name: Apresoline) and minoxidil (brand name: Loniten). Good Luck ! Answered by Moriah Tabuena 1 year ago.

Drop Blood Pressure Below 120/80 Answered by Charlyn Mccargo 1 year ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Roberto Crafts 1 year ago.

Hey I'm here for the first time. I found this question and I find the answers really helpful. I am hoping to give something back and assist others too. Answered by Katlyn Baessler 1 year ago.

Not for that particular purpose. Some drugs may lower blood pressure as a side effect. To control high blood pressure without drugs, one can exercise, watch your weight, and avoid salty foods. DK Answered by Eloise Deavers 1 year ago.

I have heard that garlic can lower blood pressure, which is why you should tell your Dr. if you are taking any herbal, or natural remedies. They may either assist or combat the effects of the medicine they prescribe for you. I hear that you should not drink grapefruit juice if you are taking hypertension medicine as well. Answered by Denver Slappey 1 year ago.

No; certainly nothing safe and effective. High blood pressure is serious business, to be managed by real prescription medications under a doctor's care. Answered by Reed Betker 1 year ago.

"Over the Counter" means without doctor s prescription, if anybody didn t know. Answered by Margherita Yepes 1 year ago.


Can high blood pressure medication cause nervous system side effects?
I am taking a high blood pressure medication, and it seems/appears that since I have been taking the medication I have had headaches all over, dizziness/light headedness, numbness in parts my face, as well as a stiff neck. These symptoms arent consisently there, maybe 1-2 times a day for an hour or so. Can a high... Asked by Keira Cuoco 1 year ago.

I am taking a high blood pressure medication, and it seems/appears that since I have been taking the medication I have had headaches all over, dizziness/light headedness, numbness in parts my face, as well as a stiff neck. These symptoms arent consisently there, maybe 1-2 times a day for an hour or so. Can a high blood pressure medication cause such or is this some unrelated condition that I should seek out? Answered by Tiffiny Maggard 1 year ago.

Possible Side Effects of Drugs That Lower Blood Pressure Some of the drugs listed below can affect certain functions of the body, resulting in bad side effects. However, drugs that lower blood pressure have proven effective over the years. The benefits of using them far outweigh the risk of side effects. Most people who’ve taken these drugs haven’t had any problems. Diuretics — Some of these drugs may decrease your body's supply of a mineral called potassium. Symptoms such as weakness, leg cramps or being tired may result. Eating foods containing potassium may help prevent significant potassium loss. You can prevent potassium loss by taking a liquid or tablet that has potassium along with the diuretic, if your doctor recommends it. Diuretics such as amiloride (Midamar), spironolactone (Aldactone) or triamterene (Dyrenium) are called "potassium sparing" agents. They don’t cause the body to lose potassium. They might be prescribed alone but are usually used with another diuretic. Some of these combinations are Aldactazide, Dyazide, Maxzide or Moduretic. Some people suffer from attacks of gout after prolonged treatment with diuretics. This side effect isn't common and can be managed by other treatment. In people with diabetes, diuretic drugs may increase the blood sugar level. A change in drug, diet, insulin or oral antidiabetic dosage corrects this in most cases. Your doctor can change your treatment. Most of the time the degree of increase in blood sugar isn't much. Impotence may also occur in a small percentage of people. Beta-blockers — Acebutolol (Sectral), atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Lopressor), nadolol (Corgard), pindolol (Visken), propranolol (Inderal) or timolol (Blocadren) may cause insomnia, cold hands and feet, tiredness or depression, a slow heartbeat or symptoms of asthma. Impotence may occur. If you have diabetes and you’re taking insulin, have your responses to therapy monitored closely. ACE inhibitors — These drugs, such as captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Zestril or Prinivil), may cause a skin rash; loss of taste; a chronic dry, hacking cough; and in rare instances, kidney damage. Angiotensin II receptor blockers — These drugs may cause occasional dizziness. Calcium channel blockers — Diltiazem (Cardizem), nicardipine (Cardene), Nifedipine (Procardia) and verapamil (Calan or Isoptin) may cause palpitations, swollen ankles, constipation, headache or dizziness. Side effects with each of these drugs differ a great deal. Alpha blockers — These drugs may cause fast heart rate, dizziness or a drop in blood pressure when you stand up. Combined alpha and beta blockers — People taking these drugs may experience a drop in blood pressure when they stand up. Central agonists — Alpha methyldopa (Aldomet) may produce a greater drop in blood pressure when you're in an upright position (standing or walking) and may make you feel weak or faint if the pressure has been lowered too far. This drug may also cause drowsiness or sluggishness, dryness of the mouth, fever or anemia. Male patients may experience impotence. If this side effect persists, your doctor may have to change the drug dosage or use another medication. Clonidine (Catapres), guanabenz (Wytensin) or guanfacine (Tenex) may produce severe dryness of the mouth, constipation or drowsiness. If you're taking any of these drugs, don’t stop suddenly, because your blood pressure may rise quickly to dangerously high levels. Peripheral adrenergic inhibitors — Reserpine may cause a stuffy nose, diarrhea or heartburn. These effects aren't severe and no treatment is required other than to change the amount of drugs taken. If you have nightmares or insomnia or get depressed, tell your doctor. You should stop using the drugs. Guanadrel (Hylorel) or guanethidine (Ismelin) may cause some diarrhea, which may persist in some people. This side effect usually becomes less of a problem if you continue treatment. These drugs reduce blood pressure more when you stand. Consequently, you may get dizzy and lightheaded and feel weak when you get out of bed in the morning or stand up suddenly. If you notice any of these reactions — and if they persist for more than a minute or two — sit or lie down and either reduce or omit the next dose of the drug. If symptoms continue, contact your doctor. When you're taking guanethidine, don't keep standing in the hot sun or at a social gathering if you begin to feel faint or weak. These activities cause low blood pressure. Male patients may experience impotence. Contact your doctor if this occurs. These drugs are rarely used unless other medications don’t help. Blood vessel dilators — Hydralzine (Apresoline) may cause headaches, swelling around the eyes, heart palpitations or aches and pains in the joints. Usually none of these symptoms are severe, and most will go away after a few weeks of treatment. This drug isn't usually used by itself. Minoxidil (Loniten) is a potent drug that's usually used only in resistant cases of severe high blood pressure. It may cause fluid retention (marked weight gain) or excessive hair growth. Answered by Ruby Dundlow 1 year ago.

You really should speak to your doctor, while yes, high blood pressure meds do have "Side Effects" to some of those effects, you really should make doubly sure that you can take them, and they will not harm you. So speak to your doctor. I take blood pressure meds and the least I get is light headiness, when my blood pressure drops to "Normal" from being too high. Answered by Dung Hoelscher 1 year ago.


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