Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 012516/001.

Names and composition

"SANSERT" is the commercial name of a drug composed of METHYSERGIDE MALEATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
012516/001 SANSERT METHYSERGIDE MALEATE TABLET/ORAL 2MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
012516/001 SANSERT METHYSERGIDE MALEATE TABLET/ORAL 2MG

Ask a doctor

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

Is Sansert/Methysergide still manufactured?
I am a nurse practitioner in the United States of America.I have a patient who comes from the UK who says that she takes Sansert as an anti-migraine medication. The generic name is methysergide.She has shown me a prescription for it and the pills which she brought over from the UK. She has asked me to... Asked by Rachelle Cercone 1 year ago.

I am a nurse practitioner in the United States of America. I have a patient who comes from the UK who says that she takes Sansert as an anti-migraine medication. The generic name is methysergide. She has shown me a prescription for it and the pills which she brought over from the UK. She has asked me to refill her prescription for her, but I don't know anything about the drug. I called a pharmacy and they said that they could get it in a powdered form, but that it would have to be compounded which would be expensive for the patient. I can't find anything about it being withdrawn from the market in the USA. Does anyone know if this is still made in pill form? Again it's methysergide or Sansert. Answered by Janeen Fipps 1 year ago.


Raw form of LSD given to patients for migranes?
One time I went to the hospital, and I had a to-die-for migrane. I mean, it was absolutely ridiculous.The doctor pumped me up in an IV with what he called a "raw form of LSD." Well, what he gave me, made me vomit and I was just wondering what it really was.What is something like LSD or considered... Asked by Alice Lempe 1 year ago.

One time I went to the hospital, and I had a to-die-for migrane. I mean, it was absolutely ridiculous. The doctor pumped me up in an IV with what he called a "raw form of LSD." Well, what he gave me, made me vomit and I was just wondering what it really was. What is something like LSD or considered the "raw form of LSD" given to ease migranes by doctors/ to patients? Answered by Chin Ovellette 1 year ago.

It's called methysergide, and it's sold under the brand names Sansert and Deseril. It usually comes in 2mg doses, which is enough to prevent headaches. Methysergide isn't used for the treatment of headaches really, but more to prevent them. In addition to methysergide, 2-Bromo-LSD, which is almost exactly related to LSD, has shown positive signs in cluster headache treatment and prevention, but is (as of yet) not a qualified and prescription-legal substance. Answered by Sharilyn Zinkievich 1 year ago.

Not sure exactly what they gave you but there are some studies showing LSD and Psilocybin can help with cluster headaches Answered by Rina Venditto 1 year ago.


Medication question?
So I have the flu, and i am taking z-pac, i am also prescribed 5mg xanax but i am afriad to mix the two. My doctor unfortunatley is not in today so i cannot call and ask him. Could anyone tell me if its alright to mix the two Asked by Cristina Samad 1 year ago.

Wait til you talk to your doctor! Before taking azithromycin (Z-Pak), tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs: · nelfinavir (Viracept); · digoxin (Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps); · ergot medicine such as methysergide (Sansert), ergotamine (Ergostat, Medihaler, Cafergot, Ercaf, Wigraine), dihydroergotamine mesylate (D.H.E., Migranal Nasal Spray); · triazolam (Halcion); · carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); · cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune); · phenytoin (Dilantin); · cholesterol-lowering medicines such as lovastatin (Mevacor), atorvastatin (Lipitor), or cerivastatin (Baycol); · a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Cartia XT, Diltiazem, Tiazac), felodipine (Plendil), nicardipine (Cardene), nifedipine (Procardia, Adalat), nimodipine (Nimotop), verapamil (Calan, Covera-HS); · HIV medicines such as indinavir (Crixivan), ritonavir (Norvir), saquinavir (Invirase); ***· alprazolam (Xanax), diazepam (Valium), midazolam (Versed), triazolam (Halcion); · • If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use azithromycin, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment Xanex interacts BADLY with antibiotics such as fluconazole (Diflucan), itraconazole (Sporanox) or ketoconazole (Nizoral); Answered by Ashlie Politis 1 year ago.

im not a pharmacist, but i am knowledgeable about medication, i'm not sure what z-pac is, but if its for the flu, i dont think any severe interactions would occur with any benzodiazepines like xanax. I'm prescribed to 4mg a day but i've never mixed it with flu medicane. i hope that helped some Answered by Jeromy Tattersall 1 year ago.

The label on your prescription will have warnings for common interactions, however, your best bet would be to read the inserts given to you with your receipt. The pharmacist will know better (even more than the doctor) the problems with drug interactions. Call your pharmacist first. There are websites such as drug checker, but they may not be up to date, so read the disclaimer before you bet your life on it. Answered by Elton Kana 1 year ago.

there should be no problem. but I think you have something wrong. Xanax is available in tablets as 0.25, 0.5, 1 and 2 milligrams. Are you taking 0.5 mg tablets (they are salmon colored) or is your total daily does 5 mg.. Doctors often write the zero before the decimal and not after. This avoids confusion so pharmacists and nurses do not mistake a half milligram for five milligrams, or ten milligrams for one milligram. Answered by Beatris Jarrell 1 year ago.

Please ask your pharmacist about drug interactions, and he or she can tell you if they two are ok to take together. (He or she may give you the ok to take both since I believe that the z-pac is an antibiotic medication while xanaz is a tranquilizer. Though don't take advice from us laypeople :) Answered by Charles Staenglen 1 year ago.

Call a pharmacist. Answered by Samatha Monckton 1 year ago.


What could/can't you do on antibiotic treatments?
I'm on z-pak, and my infection isn't bad at all, I don't even really feel sick, I just have a slight balance problem and had hot flashes, doc says it's probably sinus infection, but I hardly feel it.1) Is it okay to drink milk products, have yogurt on this med, and eat basically anything, or... Asked by Ka Jendrick 1 year ago.

I'm on z-pak, and my infection isn't bad at all, I don't even really feel sick, I just have a slight balance problem and had hot flashes, doc says it's probably sinus infection, but I hardly feel it. 1) Is it okay to drink milk products, have yogurt on this med, and eat basically anything, or should you stick to non-milk and non-acidic products? 2) Is it okay to exercize and exert onesself, as long as they feel okay and are taking in enough fluids? 3) Is sexual intercourse okay? (my theory is if god forbid you get anything else, you're already on the antibiotics so it won't stand a chance) 4)Can you go about your life without making any modifications, and slowing yourself down? Answered by Sally Moscovic 1 year ago.

What should I avoid while taking Zithromax Z-Pak (azithromycin)? Antibiotic medicines can cause diarrhea, which may be a sign of a new infection. If you have diarrhea that is watery or has blood in it, call your doctor. Do not use any medicine to stop the diarrhea unless your doctor has told you to. Avoid exposure to sunlight or artificial UV rays (sunlamps or tanning beds). Azithromycin can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight and sunburn may result. Use a sunscreen (minimum SPF 15) and wear protective clothing if you must be out in the sun. Zithromax Z-Pak (azithromycin) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using azithromycin and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: diarrhea that is watery or bloody; chest pain, uneven heartbeats; or nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes). Continue using azithromycin and talk with your doctor if you have any of these less serious side effects: mild nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, or stomach pain; dizziness, tired feeling, or headache; vaginal itching or discharge; or mild itching or skin rash. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect Zithromax Z-Pak (azithromycin)? Do not take antacids that contain aluminum or magnesium within 2 hours of taking azithromycin. Before taking azithromycin, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs: nelfinavir (Viracept); digoxin (Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps); ergot medicine such as methysergide (Sansert), ergotamine (Ergostat, Medihaler, Cafergot, Ercaf, Wigraine), dihydroergotamine mesylate (D.H.E., Migranal Nasal Spray); triazolam (Halcion); carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune); phenytoin (Dilantin); cholesterol-lowering medicines such as lovastatin (Mevacor), atorvastatin (Lipitor), or cerivastatin (Baycol); a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Cartia XT, Diltiazem, Tiazac), felodipine (Plendil), nicardipine (Cardene), nifedipine (Procardia, Adalat), nimodipine (Nimotop), verapamil (Calan, Covera-HS); HIV medicines such as indinavir (Crixivan), ritonavir (Norvir), saquinavir (Invirase); alprazolam (Xanax), diazepam (Valium), midazolam (Versed), triazolam (Halcion); theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theolair, Theochron); warfarin (Coumadin); pimozide (Orap); or another antibiotic, especially clarithromycin (Biaxin) or erythromycin (E-Mycin, E.E.S, Ery-Tab). If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use azithromycin, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment. There are many other medicines that can interact with azithromycin. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list with you of all the medicines you use and show this list to any doctor or other healthcare provider who treats you. Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has additional information about azithromycin written for health professionals that you may read. What does my medication look like? Azithromycin is available with a prescription under the brand name Zithromax. Other brand or generic formulations may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you. Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. Answered by Josephina Hossain 1 year ago.


Whats the best way to cure a headache?
Not asprin, or advil etc. Asked by Sharen Tredo 1 year ago.

Well there are several ways to "cure" a headache. The best thing you can do is prevent them from happening. Prophylactic Treatment Preventative medication may be prescribed for patients who have frequent headaches (3 or more a month) that do not respond to abortive treatment. Studies have shown that as many as 40% of these patients may benefit from preventative treatment. Using one medication (monotherapy) is tried first, but a combination of medicines may be necessary. Many of these medications have adverse side effects. If migraines become controlled, the dosage is often reduced or the drug discontinued. Beta blockers (e.g., propranolol [Inderal®], atenolol [Tenormin®]) are the preferred medications. These drugs produce an effect on heart rate. They should not be taken by patients with asthma and should be used with caution in patients with diabetes. Antiseizure drugs such as valproic acid (Depakote®), topiramate (Topamax®), and gabapentin (Neurontin®) may be used to treat migraine. Calcium channel blockers (e.g., verapamil, amlodipine [Norvasc®]) inhibit artery dilation and block the release of serotonin. They should not be taken by patients with heart failure or heart block. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs; e.g., amitryptaline [Elavil®], nortryptaline [Pamelor®], desipramine [Norpramin®]) block serotonin reabsorption and take 2–3 weeks be effective. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs; e.g., paroxetine [Paxil®], fluoxetine [Prozac®], sertraline [Zoloft®]) are usually better tolerated than TCAs, but may not be as effective. Methysergide maleate (e.g., Deseril®, Sansert®) may be prescribed for patients with frequent, severe migraines. But, you take those and still get a headache...these are some quick fixes called Abortive Treatments: Mild, infrequent migraines may be relieved using over-the-counter medication. Severe headaches with accompanying symptoms may require prescription medication. During a migraine, people often prefer to rest or sleep alone in a dark, quiet room. Applying cold packs to the head or pressing on the bulging artery in front of the ear on the painful side of the head may provide temporary pain relief. Analgesics (e.g., aspirin, ibuprofen, acetaminophen) provide symptomatic relief from headache pain and should be taken at the first sign of a migraine. They are most effective for infrequent migraines (less than 3 a month) and breakthrough headaches (i.e., headaches that occur despite using prophylactic medications). Frequent use of analgesics (i.e., more than 4 times a week) can cause rebound headaches and may interfere with prophylactic treatment. Acetaminophen is sometimes combined with other drugs to form an analgesic compound (e.g., Midrin®). Serotonin receptors (e.g., Imitrex®, Amerge®, Axert®, Zomig®), are fast-acting, usually well- tolerated medications commonly used to treat migraines. They are available in oral, injectable, and nasal spray forms and can be taken any time during the headache. Ergots (e.g., Cafergot®, Mioranal®) may be administered orally or as a suppository and is often combined with antinausea drugs, such as prochlorperazine (Compazine®). This medication should be taken at the first sign of a migraine and may not be effective if the headache has moved into the throbbing stage. Prevention is key. Avoiding triggers, managing stress, and taking prophylactic medications can help prevent migraines. Keeping a migraine journal can help identify triggers and gauge the effectiveness of preventive measures. Patients should monitor the following: -Activities -Emotional factors (e.g. stressful situations) -Environmental factors (e.g., weather, altitude changes) -Foods and beverages -Medications (over-the-counter and prescription) -Migraine characteristics (e.g., severity, length) -Physical factors (e.g., illness, fatigue) -Sleep patterns -Stress management techniques (e.g., biofeedback, hypnosis) and stress-reducing activities (e.g., meditation, yoga, exercise) may help prevent migraines. Naturopathic Treatment for those who do not like tradition treatments. Migraines are caused by excessive dilation of the cerebral blood vessels, though scientists do not fully understand what causes the dilation in the first place. Blood vessels don't just dilate spontaneously - they are presumably responding to chemical changes that are occurring in the body. A naturopathic physician or holistic medical doctor will want to take a complete medical, family, menstrual, and diet history before considering the cause of migraine. Some of the illnesses to be ruled out are bowel problems, mold allergies, vitamin deficiencies, hypertension, TMJ misalignment, food allergies or intolerances, dehydration, spinal subluxations, coffee/caffeine intoxication, and aspartame (Nutrasweet, Equal) toxicity among others. All of these problems can cause migraine symptoms and usually can be treated very easily without the use of drugs. Paradoxical as it may seem, a surprising percentage of migraine headaches may be caused by migraine medication. The "rebound effect" of analgesic and ergotomine compounds has been implicated as a contributing factor for sufferers of daily headaches. Discuss this phenomenon with your prescribing doctor if you are taking more than 30 analgesic tablets a month or if you regularly use ergotamine derivatives. Withdrawal from these products can temporarily make headaches worse, but eliminating these products altogether may ultimately mean no more headaches -- ever. How & What You Eat Can Give You Migraines When exploring the causes of headaches, the easiest, cheapest place to start is diet. Food reactions are a significant contributor to headaches and some improvement in symptoms, if not complete remission, can always be achieved by eliminating problematic dietary items. The elimination/challenge trial described below is a good way to identify food reactions that may be causing your headaches. Foods that most commonly induce migraines: -cow's milk -wheat -chocolate -egg -orange -benzoic acid -cheese -tomato -tartrazine (yellow food dye) -rye -Foods like cheese, beer, and wine induce migraines in some people because they contain histamines and/or vasoactive compounds that cause blood vessels to expand. Women tend to react to histamine-containing foods more frequently than men do, on account of a deficiency in an enzyme (diamine oxidase) that breaks histamine down. Taking supplemental B6 may be helpful in these situations, as it can increase diamine oxidase activity. -Nitrites, which are common ingredients in lunch meats and smoked/cured meats, dilate blood vessels, and may trigger migraine. Nutritional supplements for the relief of migraines Wobenzyme: 5 tablets 3 times a day between meals; or, if this dose causes loose stools, 3 tablets 5 times a day Magnesium citrate: 250mg to 500mg 3 times a day with meals Vitamin B6: 25mg 3 times a day with meals; vitamin B6 supports the enzymatic breakdown of histamine. 5-HTP (5- Hydroxytryptophan): 100mg to 200mg 3 times a day; 5-HTP increases seritonin and endorphin levels in the brain and has been shown to be as effective as commonly used migraine drugs and with none of the side effects. Physical medicine Submerge the feet in a bucket of very hot water while applying an ice compress to the back of the neck. This actually draws the blood down to the feet away from the head. Reduction of pain coincides with the duration of application. Acupressure can be helpful. See a trained acupressure therapist for instructions on procedures to do at home. Chiropractic adjustments and maintaining correct spinal alignment can be very supportive in the prevention of headaches that are triggered by muscle stress and spasm. Miscellaneous treatment options Intravenous magnesium: IV magnesium can be very helpful for migraine patients who have low-grade magnesium deficiencies. Physician monitoring is needed for this procedure. Biofeedback therapy: Look for a certified biofeedback practitioner to learn how to reduce pain with a relaxation response that is as effective as Inderol without the side effects. TENS Unit: Electrical nerve stimulation units can reduce muscle spasm in patients with tension and migraine headaches. A health care practitioner's prescription is needed for insurance coverage of these units, which should be available through medical supply companies. Some chiropractors and physical therapists loan these devices out to patients for a small deposit. Acupuncture: Acupuncture can balance underlying hormonal deficiencies, tone the gastrointestinal system, and calm reactive blood vessels. A word of caution: When selecting an acupuncturist, be very careful to research the training and qualifications of your practitioner. Medical doctors can take weekend courses in acupuncture and call themselves certified acupuncturists. A weekend course is NOT enough to time to understand the complex philosophy or practice of Chinese medicine. These doctors can do harm, so be careful. Choose a practitioner who holds a full doctorate degree in Chinese medicine, an O.M.D. (Oriental Medicine Doctor), or Lic.Ac (licensed acupuncturist). These practitioners are required to complete several years of training and often have completed internships in China, Japan, or Korea. The letters TCM (Traditional Chinese Medicine) after the name means that the doctor has additional training in prescribing Chinese herbs. The more knowledge a practitioner has about Chinese medicine and its supporting philosophy, the more able they are to diagnose and treat your symptoms. Also, as with all health care practitioners, check their practice's reputation in the community. Answered by Melva Lanigan 1 year ago.

It depends on the source of headache. A lot of headaches are caused by mild dehydration (I'm going to asses about 50% of them, in fact, are cause or enhanced by mild dehydration) Drinking more fluids will ease, and help prevent headaches. Nicotine in small quantities can help ease a headache. If you're a regular smoker, chances are it's going to enhance the headache. Avoid smoking during headaches, largely because it increases blood pressure Caffiene is good in small doses as it does inprove blood flow. In large doses it will cause your blood pressure to go high, and could cause pounding or prolonged headaches. Ibuprofin (Advil), is a great anti-inflamatory but isn't that useful for headaches. It helps, but not nearly as much as other medications. Aspirin and Aceteminiphene are both popular and useful headache relief medication. Excedrin is a multi-painkiller. I think it contains Aspirin, Aceteminiphene and caffiene. Ideal for bad headaches if you don't have them frequently. Potentially bad long term if you take it on a regular basis. As a rule of thumb, you should never take a pain medication more than once a day, and not more often than 2-3 days in a row without at least 2-3 days downtime without the pain medication. Exceeding that amount can create a dependancy (Even though it's perfectly acceptable for the drug limits. The labels don't take into consideration dependancy though) Be careful if you take pain killers frequently. Frequent use of pain killers will cause a dependancy on them, and will result in more headaches more frequently. If you take a lot of pain killers, you might want to consider cutting back. Vitamins may help if you suffer frequent headaches. A lack of B and C vitamins are link to frequent headaches, and simply just taking a multi-vitamin daily (especially if you're on a fast food diet), might help your overall body functions. Stress relief is always useful. I recommend short meditations, or naps. A quick nap in the afternoon is linked with incredible stress reduction, and is even shown to assist in getting better sleep at night. Personally, I both meditate and take an afternoon nap, and since I've begun doing these things I'm always far more rested, and yet still manage to get a lot more done. Answered by Susann Vint 1 year ago.

Well I have suffered from migranes my whole life, and if you're not willing to take pain killers (which are perhaps the fastest way), then the BEST way to cure headaches is to sleep them off. Headaches are pretty much caused by muscle tension so getting someone to massage your head and your temples (side of your head near the ears)/ or doing it yourself always worked wonders for me (My dad used to do it for me). Drink water as well since headaches are very often caused by dehydration and hunger. Don't use caffeine, one you get hooked and 2) it often makes it worse. The principle behind caffeine working is that it is a stimulant and should eleviate tiredness related headaches but when you come down from your caff-high you'll feel worse/ and caffeine burns faster than gasoline. If you don't have time to rest/ i.e. you're at work and in desperate need of some relief don't suffer - take a pain killer/ not necessarily aspirin because that stuff is nasty but something like panadol or paracetamol - provided you are not allergic to it. But in response to your question the best natural way is massage and sleep. Answered by Maybelle Diffee 1 year ago.

If you are looking for a prescription try Midrin . They are for severe head aches though. You take 2 pills at the onset and then if it does not work you take 1 more. At least that is how it is prescribed to my husband. He has really bad headaches and the first 2 usually works within 30 minutes. Over the counter meds never worked for him. The good thing about this medication is that it is non narcotic. Answered by Jessie Furer 1 year ago.

First of all, it is important to figure out what kind of headache it is. If it is pulsing, you have sensativity to light or sound, it is on one side of your head, or you are nausous, it is a migrane. If it is a dull band around your head, it is a tention headache. Tention headaches are usually easier to treat. Drink a cup of coffee to contract the blood vessels, but only drink one or 2 cups a week. Then take a pain reliever. Over the counter ones work for many people, but if they don't work, ask a doctor. I currently take Indocen (I used to take midrin, but it made the headache worse) If it is a migraine have a cup of coffee, and take a pain relever. Alleve tends to work well. But if you go to the doctor ask for a triptain. It is spacifically for migraines. Zomig and Amerge are a couple of good ones. You spray them up your nose. The important thing for both types of headaches is to relax. Tention makes it much worse. So take a breather, a couple of pills, and good luck! Answered by Catherine Kilver 1 year ago.

Inhaling Peppermint Oil Of The Best Natural Headache Remedies Answered by Carla Feldkamp 1 year ago.

My mom always said sex...it relieves tension that causes headaches... Answered by Dyan Korhonen 1 year ago.

1) Have enough food in right time 2) Avoid stress 3) Be relax Answered by Armando Ford 1 year ago.

massage temples,apply ice at temples,massage your neck,r u hungry maybe hunger headache,or try caffeine Answered by Sherryl Roswell 1 year ago.

try lying down, eyes closed and put a cool rag on your forehead. Answered by Louise Dorazio 1 year ago.


Any drug interaction with Inderal and Diphenhydramine?
I take a low dose of inderal and I'm wondering if I can take one benadryl that only has one ingredient (diphenhydramine)....will there be any bad side affects besides drowsiness??? I can't get through to my pharmacist tonight for some reason... Asked by Danita Clubs 1 year ago.

Diphenhydramine Drug Interactions Answered by Ronna Schram 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Any drug interaction with Inderal and Diphenhydramine? I take a low dose of inderal and I'm wondering if I can take one benadryl that only has one ingredient (diphenhydramine)....will there be any bad side affects besides drowsiness??? I can't get through to my pharmacist tonight for some reason... Answered by Marin Kidder 1 year ago.

You are (already) overdosing. You shouldn't take more than 1 kind of antihistamine, they all do the same thing. Taking 2 of X and 2 of Y is the same as taking 4 of X. You can take an antihistamine and decongestant at the same time, and even a pain relieving tablet, but not 2 anti-histamines, unless a doctor is monitoring your situation. You're asking for trouble, your poor liver. I hope you don't drink alcohol too. Look for antihistamines that people complain cause drowsiness, unfortunately these are the most effective, but you would have to put up with the drowsiness in exchange for better relief. Answered by Tobi Tonelson 1 year ago.

don't take your drug advice from anonymous people with dubious qualification to answer. Are there no 24 hour pharmacies where you live? btw aside from the drowsiness, they are OK to take together. That's what you pharmacist told you......right? Answered by Mario Balford 1 year ago.


Can I mix these prescription medications?
I take seroquel and lamictal, bipolar medications. I have a really bad sinus infection. Does mucinex mix with these medications? I know there's only certian over the counter meds that mix with mine. If anyone who knows about these prescriptions could help me out that would be great. Please only answer if you know... Asked by Lyndsey Henslin 1 year ago.

I take seroquel and lamictal, bipolar medications. I have a really bad sinus infection. Does mucinex mix with these medications? I know there's only certian over the counter meds that mix with mine. If anyone who knows about these prescriptions could help me out that would be great. Please only answer if you know for sure if you don't move on to the next question don't make a stupid comment about nothing you know. Answered by Danyell Checo 1 year ago.

Mucinex is a multi-ingredient drug consisting of pseudoephedrine and guaifenesin. If you'd like to know more about how either one interacts with other medication, Google "pseudoephedrine drug interactions" and "guaifenesin drug interactions," although I don't believe you should be having any problems while on seroquel and lamictal. Here's a list of medication that WILL, however, interact with Mucinex, which I have looked into to double-check myself. I didn't see either of the two medications that you are on on any of the three lists, but here they are anyway, in case you'd like to see so for yourself: Major Interactions Atapryl, Azilect, Carbex, Eldepryl, Emsam, furazolidone, Furoxone, isocarboxazid, Jumex, linezolid, Marplan, Matulane, Nardil, Parnate, phenelzine, procarbazine, rasagiline, selegiline, Selgene, tranylcypromine, Zelapar, Zyvox Moderate Interactions acarbose, acetoHEXAMIDE, Aldomet, Amaryl, Apidra, Apidra OptiClik Cartridge, bromocriptine, chlorproPAMIDE, Citra pH, Citrate-Phos-Dex, D.H.E. 45, deserpidine, DiaBeta, Diabinese, dihydroergotamine, Dymelor, epoprostenol, ergoloid mesylates, Ergomar, ergonovine, ergotamine, Ergotrate Maleate, EXUBERA, EXUBERA Combination Pack 12, EXUBERA Combination Pack 15, EXUBERA Kit, Flolan, Fortamet, glimepiride, glipiZIDE, glipiZIDE extended release, GlipiZIDE XL, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL, Glumetza, glyBURIDE, glyBURIDE micronized, Glynase PresTab, Glyset, guanadrel, guanethidine, Harmonyl, Humalog, Humalog Cartridge, Humalog KwikPen, Humalog Pen, Humulin L, Humulin N, Humulin N Pen, Humulin R, Humulin R (Concentrated), Humulin U, Hydergine, Hydergine LC, Hylorel, Iletin II Lente Pork, Iletin II NPH Pork, Iletin II Regular Pork, Iletin Lente, Iletin NPH, Iletin Regular, iloprost, insulin, insulin analog, insulin aspart, insulin aspart protamine, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, insulin glulisine, insulin inhalation, rapid acting, insulin isophane, Insulin Lente Pork, insulin lispro, insulin lispro protamine, Insulin Purified NPH Pork, Insulin Purified Regular Pork, insulin regular, insulin zinc, insulin zinc extended, insulin, lente, insulin, NPH, insulin, ultralente, Inversine, Ismelin, Januvia, Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen, Lente insulin, Levemir, Levemir FlexPen, Levemir InnoLet, Levemir PenFill, mecamylamine, Meridia, metformin, metformin extended release, Methergine, methyldopa, methylergonovine, methysergide maleate, Micronase, midodrine, miglitol, Migranal, nateglinide, Neut, Novolin L, Novolin N, Novolin N Innolet, Novolin N PenFill, Novolin R, Novolin R Innolet, Novolin R PenFill, NovoLog, NovoLog FlexPen, NovoLog PenFill, NPH insulin, Orinase, Orvaten, oxytocin, Parlodel, Pitocin, potassium citrate, Prandin, Precose, ProAmatine, prostacyclin, protamine zinc insulin, Rauwolfemms, Rauwolfia 1X, rauwolfia serpentina, regular insulin, Relion Novolin N, ReliOn/Novolin R, Remodulin, repaglinide, reserpine, Riomet, Sansert, sibutramine, sitagliptin, sodium acetate, sodium bicarbonate, sodium citrate, sodium lactate, Starlix, Syntocinon, Tham, Tol-Tab, TOLAZamide, TOLBUTamide, Tolinase, treprostinil, Tricitrasol, tromethamine, Twin-K, Ultralente insulin, Urocit-K, Velosulin BR, Ventavis Minor Interactions Acerola, ammonium chloride, Ascor L 500, ascorbic acid, Ascorbic Acid Quick Melts, Ascot, atomoxetine, C-Time, C/Rose Hips, Cardoxin, Cecon, Cee-500, Cemill 1000, Cemill 500, Cenolate, Centrum Singles-Vitamin C, Cevi-Bid, Cotameth, Digitek, digitoxin, digoxin, digoxin capsule, Ester-C, K-Phos Original, Lanoxicaps, Lanoxin, M-Caps, Mega-C/A Plus, methionine, N Ice with Vitamin C, Pedameth, potassium acid phosphate, sodium acid phosphate, sodium ascorbate, Strattera, Sunkist Vitamin C, Vicks Vitamin C Drops, Vitamin C, Vitamin C TR, Vitamin C with Rose Hips Answered by Lyndsey Schroeder 1 year ago.

No interactions were reported. I also checked Mucinex D and Mucinex DM too, just in case. (I am a pharmacist, BTW) Answered by Josue Acey 1 year ago.


Please help ten points for the best answer...what are the 38 drugs that can cause drug induced lupus?
Asked by Cassi Oehlenschlage 1 year ago.

Please note that this list is only partial - there now appear to be at least 70 meds which can cause DILE or DIL, drug-induced Lupus Erythematosis Atenolol (Tenormin) Captopril (Capoten) Carbamazepine Chlorpromazine HCl (Thorazine) Clonidine HCl (Catapres) Danazol (Danocrine) Diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren) Disopyramide (Norpace) Ethosuximide (Zarontin) Gold compounds Griseofulvin Hydralazine HCl (Apresoline) Ibuprofen Interferon alfa Isoniazid (Laniazid, Nydrazid) Labetalol HCl (Normodyne, Trandate) Leuprolide acetate (Lupron) Levodopa (Dopar, Larodopa) Lithium carbonate Lovastatin (Mevacor) Mephenytoin (Mesantoin) Methyldopa (Aldomet) Methysergide maleate (Sansert) Minoxidil (Loniten, Rogaine) Nalidixic acid (NegGram) Nitrofurantoin (Furadantin, Macrobid, Macrodantin) Oral contraceptives Penicillamine (Cuprimine, Depen) Penicillin Phenelzine sulfate (Nardil) Phenytoin sodium (Dilantin) Prazosin (Minipress) Primidone (Mysoline) Procainamide HCl (Procan, Pronestyl) Promethazine HCl (Anergan, Phenergan) Propylthiouracil Psoralen Quinidine Spironolactone (Aldactone) Streptomycin sulfate Sulindac (Clinoril) Sulfasalazine (Azulfidine) Tetracycline Thioridazine HCl (Mellaril) Timolol maleate (Betimol, Timoptic) Tolazamide (Tolinase) Tolmetin sodium (Tolectin) Trimethadione (Tridione) One thing I happened to notice is that several meds used to treat Parkinson's disease are in this list. And the problem is that although Lupus is not curable, in DILE, the symptoms are reversible once the medications are discontinued. Of course in PD, that might not be possible, The most common problems are caused by only a handful of the above. Answered by Delcie Razon 1 year ago.


Related

Browse by letter
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

© Medications.li 2015-2017 - All rights reserved