Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 017247/001.

Names and composition

"SANOREX" is the commercial name of a drug composed of MAZINDOL.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017247/001 SANOREX MAZINDOL TABLET/ORAL 1MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
017247/002 SANOREX MAZINDOL TABLET/ORAL 2MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017247/001 SANOREX MAZINDOL TABLET/ORAL 1MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
017247/002 SANOREX MAZINDOL TABLET/ORAL 2MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
017980/001 MAZANOR MAZINDOL TABLET/ORAL 2MG
017980/002 MAZANOR MAZINDOL TABLET/ORAL 1MG

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Answered questions

Is my workout plan ok? PLEASE HELP!?
All i eat is wheat bread, bananas, yogurt, tuna, chicken, macoroni, fruit, a few vegetables but not as much as fruit, and alot of oatmeal products and granola products. also alot of milk Asked by Sheron Northcraft 1 year ago.

I am 19, 5'8 172lbs, going to the gym 3 times a week working triceps, biceps, chest, back, abs, shoulders, and occasionally legs. I take creatine before workouts and on non workout days, and whey protein after workouts and on non workout days. I take in more calories then i used to, and have gained a few pounds because of it. I do not, however, take in the reccommended amount for my age, but does this matter since im taking in more than i used to? Will i get bigger by using this plan? Answered by Doreatha Reikowsky 1 year ago.

FDA has approved several prescription drugs for obesity. Those available on the market include: Dexedrine and other amphetamines Ionamin and Adipex-P (phentermine), Sanorex (mazindol), Tenuate (diethylpropion), Prelu-2 (phendimetrazine) and other amphetamine derivatives meridia (sibutramine). In mostly short-term studies of obese adults following a calorie-restricted diet, those who took the appetite suppressants lost more weight on average than those who took a placebo. The amount of weight lost varied from study to study. FDA approved the drugs only for use with calorie-restricted diets. The drugs are "not magic pills," warns Leo Lutwak, M.D., Ph.D., of FDA's division of metabolism and endocrine drug products. "They don't work unless you make dietary and exercise changes." Also, they should be used only for a few weeks because the drugs are addictive and have the potential for abuse. They shouldn't be used in combination with each other or with other drugs for appetite control because such combinations have not been evaluated for safety. And the drugs should be used only in people who are obese--not people looking to lose a few pounds, Lutwak says. "Weight-loss drugs are serious medicine for a serious disease," he says. Also, he points out that while obesity may be associated with other serious diseases, studies have never shown that weight loss produced with the use of prescription weight-loss drugs benefits obesity-associated conditions. However, changes in diet and activity may improve associated diseases, such as diabetes and high blood pressure, even with only modest changes in weight, Lutwak says. Until September 1997, two other drugs, fenfluramine (Pondimin and others) and dexfenfluramine (Redux), were available for treating obesity. But, at FDA's request, the manufacturers of these drugs voluntarily withdrew them from the market after newer findings suggested that they were the likely cause of heart valve problems in a large proportion of people using them. FDA recommended that anyone taking the drugs stop and that they contact their doctor to discuss their treatment. (For the latest information on this topic, visit www.fda.gov/cder/news/feninfo.htm on FDA's Website.) Answered by Pattie Villaire 1 year ago.

It appears like a beautiful well exercise. It appears like you're doing only a few reps regardless that, I'd perhaps do extra reps with much less weight when you consider that you wish to completely exhaust your muscle tissue so they are going to develop higher. Also, I observed this video beneath that is going into a few lovely well abs workout routines and talks approximately food plan slightly and what to devour whilst figuring out: Answered by Trevor Limesand 1 year ago.


Has anyone tryed Healthy Curb?
does it really help you loss weight Asked by Deloris Cierley 1 year ago.

FDA has approved several prescription drugs for obesity. Those available on the market include: Dexedrine and other amphetamines Ionamin and Adipex-P (phentermine), Sanorex (mazindol), Tenuate (diethylpropion), Prelu-2 (phendimetrazine) and other amphetamine derivatives meridia (sibutramine). In mostly short-term studies of obese adults following a calorie-restricted diet, those who took the appetite suppressants lost more weight on average than those who took a placebo. The amount of weight lost varied from study to study. FDA approved the drugs only for use with calorie-restricted diets. The drugs are "not magic pills," warns Leo Lutwak, M.D., Ph.D., of FDA's division of metabolism and endocrine drug products. "They don't work unless you make dietary and exercise changes." Also, they should be used only for a few weeks because the drugs are addictive and have the potential for abuse. They shouldn't be used in combination with each other or with other drugs for appetite control because such combinations have not been evaluated for safety. And the drugs should be used only in people who are obese--not people looking to lose a few pounds, Lutwak says. "Weight-loss drugs are serious medicine for a serious disease," he says. Also, he points out that while obesity may be associated with other serious diseases, studies have never shown that weight loss produced with the use of prescription weight-loss drugs benefits obesity-associated conditions. However, changes in diet and activity may improve associated diseases, such as diabetes and high blood pressure, even with only modest changes in weight, Lutwak says. Until September 1997, two other drugs, fenfluramine (Pondimin and others) and dexfenfluramine (Redux), were available for treating obesity. But, at FDA's request, the manufacturers of these drugs voluntarily withdrew them from the market after newer findings suggested that they were the likely cause of heart valve problems in a large proportion of people using them. FDA recommended that anyone taking the drugs stop and that they contact their doctor to discuss their treatment. (For the latest information on this topic, visit www.fda.gov/cder/news/feninfo.htm on FDA's Website.) Answered by Lakenya Lerner 1 year ago.


Is this safe? And how do i take it?
I wanna use this tetracyclic anti-depressant to help me sleep tonight. I forgot the name. This will be a one time thing, can i do it? Asked by Autumn Pape 1 year ago.

The tetracyclics (TeCas)are closely related to the tricyclic(TCAs) antidepressants which are known for the side effect of sleepiness. It would help if you knew which medication it is as there are several and they have different affinities on binding sites, including: Amoxapine (Asendin) - common side effect of drowsiness Maprotiline (Deprilept, Ludiomil, Psmion) - common side effect of sedation Loxapine - common side effect of sedation Mazindol (Mazanor, Sanorex) - similar to amphetamine, no sleepiness Mianserin (Bolvidon, Norval Tolvon) - common side effect of drowsiness and sedation Mirtazapine (Remeron, Avanza, Zispin) - sedation is a common side-effect Setiptiline (Tecipul, Teciptiline) - sedation All but Mazindol will help you sleep. Just take one pill. Answered by Esta Wagers 1 year ago.

sure, ultrasounds are secure..there are relatively no part effects on the fetus..I had dissimilar ultrasounds with my 2d being pregnant..toddler grew to become into wonderful. I even have never heard of any problems with the toddler from ultrasounds...this is in contrast to an xray so there is not any radiation or something. Answered by Moriah Hough 1 year ago.

Is it over the counter or prescription? Either way, make sure you only take as much as your doctor recommends! Answered by Anthony Dyen 1 year ago.


Is my workout plan ok? PLEASE HELP!?
All i eat is wheat bread, bananas, yogurt, tuna, chicken, macoroni, fruit, a few vegetables but not as much as fruit, and alot of oatmeal products and granola products. also alot of milk Asked by Lean Perry 1 year ago.

I am 19, 5'8 172lbs, going to the gym 3 times a week working triceps, biceps, chest, back, abs, shoulders, and occasionally legs. I take creatine before workouts and on non workout days, and whey protein after workouts and on non workout days. I take in more calories then i used to, and have gained a few pounds because of it. I do not, however, take in the reccommended amount for my age, but does this matter since im taking in more than i used to? Will i get bigger by using this plan? Answered by Hobert Alcazar 1 year ago.

FDA has approved several prescription drugs for obesity. Those available on the market include: Dexedrine and other amphetamines Ionamin and Adipex-P (phentermine), Sanorex (mazindol), Tenuate (diethylpropion), Prelu-2 (phendimetrazine) and other amphetamine derivatives meridia (sibutramine). In mostly short-term studies of obese adults following a calorie-restricted diet, those who took the appetite suppressants lost more weight on average than those who took a placebo. The amount of weight lost varied from study to study. FDA approved the drugs only for use with calorie-restricted diets. The drugs are "not magic pills," warns Leo Lutwak, M.D., Ph.D., of FDA's division of metabolism and endocrine drug products. "They don't work unless you make dietary and exercise changes." Also, they should be used only for a few weeks because the drugs are addictive and have the potential for abuse. They shouldn't be used in combination with each other or with other drugs for appetite control because such combinations have not been evaluated for safety. And the drugs should be used only in people who are obese--not people looking to lose a few pounds, Lutwak says. "Weight-loss drugs are serious medicine for a serious disease," he says. Also, he points out that while obesity may be associated with other serious diseases, studies have never shown that weight loss produced with the use of prescription weight-loss drugs benefits obesity-associated conditions. However, changes in diet and activity may improve associated diseases, such as diabetes and high blood pressure, even with only modest changes in weight, Lutwak says. Until September 1997, two other drugs, fenfluramine (Pondimin and others) and dexfenfluramine (Redux), were available for treating obesity. But, at FDA's request, the manufacturers of these drugs voluntarily withdrew them from the market after newer findings suggested that they were the likely cause of heart valve problems in a large proportion of people using them. FDA recommended that anyone taking the drugs stop and that they contact their doctor to discuss their treatment. (For the latest information on this topic, visit www.fda.gov/cder/news/feninfo.htm on FDA's Website.) Answered by Ruthe Skroch 1 year ago.

It appears like a beautiful well exercise. It appears like you're doing only a few reps regardless that, I'd perhaps do extra reps with much less weight when you consider that you wish to completely exhaust your muscle tissue so they are going to develop higher. Also, I observed this video beneath that is going into a few lovely well abs workout routines and talks approximately food plan slightly and what to devour whilst figuring out: Answered by Myron Mcfarling 1 year ago.


Has anyone tryed Healthy Curb?
does it really help you loss weight Asked by Linsey Chadderton 1 year ago.

FDA has approved several prescription drugs for obesity. Those available on the market include: Dexedrine and other amphetamines Ionamin and Adipex-P (phentermine), Sanorex (mazindol), Tenuate (diethylpropion), Prelu-2 (phendimetrazine) and other amphetamine derivatives meridia (sibutramine). In mostly short-term studies of obese adults following a calorie-restricted diet, those who took the appetite suppressants lost more weight on average than those who took a placebo. The amount of weight lost varied from study to study. FDA approved the drugs only for use with calorie-restricted diets. The drugs are "not magic pills," warns Leo Lutwak, M.D., Ph.D., of FDA's division of metabolism and endocrine drug products. "They don't work unless you make dietary and exercise changes." Also, they should be used only for a few weeks because the drugs are addictive and have the potential for abuse. They shouldn't be used in combination with each other or with other drugs for appetite control because such combinations have not been evaluated for safety. And the drugs should be used only in people who are obese--not people looking to lose a few pounds, Lutwak says. "Weight-loss drugs are serious medicine for a serious disease," he says. Also, he points out that while obesity may be associated with other serious diseases, studies have never shown that weight loss produced with the use of prescription weight-loss drugs benefits obesity-associated conditions. However, changes in diet and activity may improve associated diseases, such as diabetes and high blood pressure, even with only modest changes in weight, Lutwak says. Until September 1997, two other drugs, fenfluramine (Pondimin and others) and dexfenfluramine (Redux), were available for treating obesity. But, at FDA's request, the manufacturers of these drugs voluntarily withdrew them from the market after newer findings suggested that they were the likely cause of heart valve problems in a large proportion of people using them. FDA recommended that anyone taking the drugs stop and that they contact their doctor to discuss their treatment. (For the latest information on this topic, visit www.fda.gov/cder/news/feninfo.htm on FDA's Website.) Answered by Brent Mackedanz 1 year ago.


Is this safe? And how do i take it?
I wanna use this tetracyclic anti-depressant to help me sleep tonight. I forgot the name. This will be a one time thing, can i do it? Asked by Laura Leflore 1 year ago.

The tetracyclics (TeCas)are closely related to the tricyclic(TCAs) antidepressants which are known for the side effect of sleepiness. It would help if you knew which medication it is as there are several and they have different affinities on binding sites, including: Amoxapine (Asendin) - common side effect of drowsiness Maprotiline (Deprilept, Ludiomil, Psmion) - common side effect of sedation Loxapine - common side effect of sedation Mazindol (Mazanor, Sanorex) - similar to amphetamine, no sleepiness Mianserin (Bolvidon, Norval Tolvon) - common side effect of drowsiness and sedation Mirtazapine (Remeron, Avanza, Zispin) - sedation is a common side-effect Setiptiline (Tecipul, Teciptiline) - sedation All but Mazindol will help you sleep. Just take one pill. Answered by Madison Sherbert 1 year ago.

sure, ultrasounds are secure..there are relatively no part effects on the fetus..I had dissimilar ultrasounds with my 2d being pregnant..toddler grew to become into wonderful. I even have never heard of any problems with the toddler from ultrasounds...this is in contrast to an xray so there is not any radiation or something. Answered by Santiago Birkhead 1 year ago.

Is it over the counter or prescription? Either way, make sure you only take as much as your doctor recommends! Answered by Willia Degori 1 year ago.


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