SANCTURA Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 021595/001.

Names and composition

"SANCTURA" is the commercial name of a drug composed of TROSPIUM CHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
021595/001 SANCTURA TROSPIUM CHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 20MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
021595/001 SANCTURA TROSPIUM CHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 20MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
022103/001 SANCTURA XR TROSPIUM CHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
091289/001 TROSPIUM CHLORIDE TROSPIUM CHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
091513/001 TROSPIUM CHLORIDE TROSPIUM CHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
091573/001 TROSPIUM CHLORIDE TROSPIUM CHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
091575/001 TROSPIUM CHLORIDE TROSPIUM CHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
091635/001 TROSPIUM CHLORIDE TROSPIUM CHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
091688/001 TROSPIUM CHLORIDE TROSPIUM CHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
201291/001 TROSPIUM CHLORIDE TROSPIUM CHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
204945/001 TROSPIUM CHLORIDE TROSPIUM CHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 20MG

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A licensed doctor will try to answer your question as quickly as possible.

Answered questions

Does the medication Sanctura cause loss of vision?
2 things to add: -I have been taking this medication for about 4 months (but was taking vesicare for several months before that) -I also take a daily multivitamin and an iron supplement Asked by Brigida Molek 1 month ago.

I am currently taking Sanctura for an overactive bladder. Since I have starting taking these types of medications, I have noticed my vision becoming worse. I know one of the side effects is blurred vision, but it seems to be getting worse. Does anyone know if this loss is permanent? I have an appointment to see my doctor next week but I just wanted to get some feedback as soon as possible. And I am not sure if I should just stop taking it altogehter. Any information is appreciated. Answered by Armanda Wichland 1 month ago.


I have a 10 year old bedwetter. The pediatric urologist has prescribed Sanctura.?
From what I'm reading, it says it should not be given to children as adequate studies have not been done on its safety for children. Have any of you given this drug to your children? This happened once before with a drug she prescribed, and when I checked with my pediatrician, he said it's used all the... Asked by Dan Agosta 1 month ago.

From what I'm reading, it says it should not be given to children as adequate studies have not been done on its safety for children. Have any of you given this drug to your children? This happened once before with a drug she prescribed, and when I checked with my pediatrician, he said it's used all the time in children, and it's just a labeling requirement. Any feedback you can provide to me would be appreciated. Answered by Toby Marcone 1 month ago.

All I would like to say because i am not familiar with this either is that you should monitor your childs intake of fluids from the time he has supper until bedtime. Do not allow him to have sodas and juices and large amounts of water before he goes to sleep. If he goes to bed at 9 p.m. don't let him drink past 7:30 and tell him to use the bathroom before he goes to sleep. Practice this with him every night. I know it's more than just that but it can help, and will help in the future because unless there a medical condition, which there may be, this child needs a strict regiment on his intake of fluids every evening and I'll bet you see quick changes! Answered by Janetta Schwuchow 1 month ago.

there is a device that sounds an alarm when he pees at night it may take a few days for this to correct this problem but it works you will have to get up and get him changed but he is sleeping too deeply. Dont let him drink a couple hours before bed and make sure he tries to empty his bladder first. after a few nights of waking up after he pees and having to change etc his body should take care of this. Dont embarrass him or yell at him, a calm supportive voice will do best. Answered by Alaina Wisnewski 1 month ago.

use simple natural things like 12x1 biochemic cell salts, buckwheat with cranberries and organic coconut cream this fixed my sons bedwetting in a week Answered by Oscar Egerton 1 month ago.

just get them rubber sheets. Answered by Dyan Ebeid 1 month ago.


Why can't I poop? (even on medication)?
I have gone to a urologist because i had a bladder problem (not being able to hold it in) and he concluded that i needed to poop more. so he gave me sanctura to take 1 hr before i eat every day (i forget on weekends) still can't poop and i'm having lower back pains when i lay down in bed at night. im pretty... Asked by Harriette Griseta 1 month ago.

I have gone to a urologist because i had a bladder problem (not being able to hold it in) and he concluded that i needed to poop more. so he gave me sanctura to take 1 hr before i eat every day (i forget on weekends) still can't poop and i'm having lower back pains when i lay down in bed at night. im pretty sure this is related, but can someone tell me what to do? A scientific description would be nice Answered by Maryjo Teo 1 month ago.

For best result and best consultation, go personally to your doctor and relate the necessary things in relation to that matter. Answered by Shelia Corzo 1 month ago.

Your constipated...You should go to the doctor and have it checked out. Don't wait much longer..Just go to the doctor before something bad happens. Answered by Dorsey Drowne 1 month ago.


Is this anything to worry about?
You last two posters are idiots. I gave him his new medication last night, but didn't throw the old medication away. He thought I forgot to give him the first one, so he came back down and got it himself. And only told me that he did it tonight when I failed to give him the second pill again. Asked by Roseanne Kautz 1 month ago.

call the poison control center or e.r and ask Answered by Florine Fasci 1 month ago.

No that is not a good. Thing. What is your 10 year old son doing taking meds without supervision. You are careless as a mother. If Children services found there will be questions. Answered by Amelia Pinkston 1 month ago.

Call his Doctor he will tell you if you need to worry ...why would you wait so long? Answered by Troy Poux 1 month ago.


What is another prescription medication, for urinary incontinence, that would do the same thing as Detrol LA?
I take care of my mother. She was given samples of Detrol LA (for urinary Incontenence). Her doctor gave her a prescription, only to discover that her insurance will not pay for it. She has both Tenncare & Medicare (Wellcare). I called & left a message for the doctor, asking him if he could call in something... Asked by Ammie Marungo 1 month ago.

I take care of my mother. She was given samples of Detrol LA (for urinary Incontenence). Her doctor gave her a prescription, only to discover that her insurance will not pay for it. She has both Tenncare & Medicare (Wellcare). I called & left a message for the doctor, asking him if he could call in something similar, that Wellcare would pay for. His nurse called me back & said for me contact the insurance, find out what a good substitute was & call them back to let them know & the doctor would call it in. Odd he doesn't know. But I'm too busy to call & be placed on hold w/the insurance co, so I was hoping someone on here would know & could tell me some other prescription urinary incontinence medications, that work the same as Detrol LA. I can check online if Wellcare pays for it for a not. So just some prescription names would be very helpful. Thank you! Answered by Beverly Pottichen 1 month ago.

Ditropan, Ditropan XL, Oxytrol, Sanctura, Vesicare, and Enablex. They all run at varying costs, one of them should be cheaper than Detrol. Answered by Alica Trube 1 month ago.


Misdiagnosed with interstitial cystitis?
I'm a 21 year old female, with a history of bladder infections that were cured easily with Ciproflaxin. Usually, they were contracted by drinking sodas.Ciproflaxin stopped working in March. No infection was found. I was referred to a urologist. Keep in mind, I worked for a doctor who prescribed this medicine... Asked by Julene Holmstrom 1 month ago.

I'm a 21 year old female, with a history of bladder infections that were cured easily with Ciproflaxin. Usually, they were contracted by drinking sodas. Ciproflaxin stopped working in March. No infection was found. I was referred to a urologist. Keep in mind, I worked for a doctor who prescribed this medicine for me as an alternative for missing work to go to the doctor. Overuse of an antibiotic = Immunity to its effects. April 2008 - At first, I was told I developed an over-active bladder overnight. I was put on Vesicare, Urelle, Sanctura XR, Nitrofur. Nitrofur helped. But he only left me on it for a week, I got worse afterwards. I determined he was an idiot, so I went to another urologist. April - July 2008 I was diagnosed with Interstitial Cystitis or "IC" in April after a 2 second examination of my vagina. Literally a glance. No forceps, no nothing. They put me on Elmiron, Urelle, Prosed, and tried to do Bladder instillations (directly injecting medicine into the bladder through a cathader). Everything made it 500% worse. I went to another urologist, because this one was never in the office to explain why nothing was working. Aug 2008 - Third urologist said it's all in my head and gave me an anti-depressant and prescribed pelvic-floor exercises and electrical stimulation therapy. I told him he was an idiot, and went to another doctor. Recently, I went to another gynecologist. She said let's start over from scratch. She put me on Macrobid for 2 weeks, and to chug baking soda 6 times a day. Surprisingly, I feel better. 80% better. She found also blood in my urine, which indicates infection. Nobody else seemed to be able to find infection. Am I going crazy? Or was I misdiagnosed? Has anyone else had an experience like this? Please help. I need to know if I'm on the right track. Thanks. Answered by Bryon Ichikawa 1 month ago.

Actually, what happened to me was just the opposite. I had IC for over 9 years but was only diagnosed with it within the last year. I'm one of those rare males (90% of those with IC are female) who has IC. It's hard to diagnose in males because so many other things have symptoms similar to IC. I suffered through multiple medications to include antibiotics that were no help. I had 9 different surgeries and procedures to aleviate my symptoms. Still no help. Finally I found a doctor who listened to my symptoms and tied it all together and diagnosed me with IC. I now take Elmiron and have bladder intillations through a catheter when the symptoms are severe. Good luck to you and I hope you find the answer. Just keep trying and eventually you'll succeed. Answered by Alycia Parody 1 month ago.

Interstitial Cystitis Misdiagnosis Answered by Thao Barbie 1 month ago.

I was diagnosed with ic in 2005. Baking soda is actually one of the remedies or helps for ic. It helps to lower the ph of your urine. I think it is a tricky situation. Sometimes antibiotics can inflame ic. When I was 18 I kept getting what felt like uti's sometimes there was blood/protein, infection. Sometimes there wasn't. I seriously was at the doctors every other week. pain killers, elmiron, anti bodies, everything. Its very tricky to diagnosis ic. The only way is to have your bladder checked for ulcers. Some people with ic have them some don't. Its a complicated disease, that has only become popular in the last few years. No one knows what causes it or how to cure it. I think you got put through some crappy doctors, like I did, who know this is the new up and coming disease and instead of looking indept just prescribed you pills. ic-network is a great website where you can look up some of this stuff on. good luck. Answered by Jade Hansis 1 month ago.


Is it testicular cancer?
five weeks ago i got symptoms of what look like UTI. I went to doctor i he did a test and everything was clear and he sad it could be chlamydia and because one of my testis was swollen and gave me Azithromycin. I was still have burning sensation while peeing. The i went back and he gave me CiproXR for 5 days to... Asked by Ty Freemyer 1 month ago.

five weeks ago i got symptoms of what look like UTI. I went to doctor i he did a test and everything was clear and he sad it could be chlamydia and because one of my testis was swollen and gave me Azithromycin. I was still have burning sensation while peeing. The i went back and he gave me CiproXR for 5 days to cover gonorrhea. Burning sensation was still here and i had dull pain in my groin. Then i went back again and he gave me sanctura saying that is urethritis. for 10 days. Burning sensation was here off and on it depended from day to day. Two days ago i went back to do additional tests to check and i got the the test back and everything is clear and he said that my urethra is irritated. So i decide to masturbate because i haven't had sex or masturbate in 5 weeks and i was going crazy. After masturbation everything was o.k. but now i have the slight dull pain in my groin on right side. it is the same place as before. burning sensation when peeing this morning was not there but now it is but i remember from before every time i came i had this burning sensation regardless if it was sex or masturbation. also i have back pain for last 2 weeks. Answered by Francisco Graeter 1 month ago.

You do not mention anything that has to do with testicular cancer. Take your concerns to your doctor as they do not know treatment is not working unless you tell them. Drink as much cranberry juice as you can. Answered by Chin Cerminaro 1 month ago.

Symptoms of testicular cancer vary and may include any of the following: * Small, hard lump that is often painless * Change in consistency of the testicles * Feeling of heaviness in the scrotum * Dull ache in the lower abdomen or the groin * Sudden collection of fluid in the scrotum * Pain or discomfort in a testicle or in the scrotum Many of these symptoms are not cancer, but if you notice one or more of them for more than two weeks, see your doctor. Answered by Dorcas Dubbin 1 month ago.

Best thing to do is visit you nearest medical doctor Answered by Louie Erdner 1 month ago.


What are the symtoms of urge incontinence?
Btw I don't pee on myself or anything like that its just I have the strong urge to urinate, but when I go nothing much comes out, and I feel like I have to after I just went. Sometimes it feels like i'm peeing on myself when I'm not... Asked by Lucio Kasula 1 month ago.

Urge incontinence involves a strong, sudden need to urinate, followed by a bladder contraction, which results in leakage * Sudden and urgent need to urinate (urinary urgency) * Frequent urination, in the daytime and at night * Abdominal distention or discomfort * Involuntary loss of urine A physical examination will include examination of the abdomen and rectum. Women will also have a pelvic exam. Men will also have a genital exam. In most cases the physical exam reveals nothing abnormal. If there are neurologic causes, other neurologic abnormalities may be found. Tests include the following: * Post-void residual (PVR) to measure amount of urine left after urination * Urinalysis or urine culture to rule out urinary tract infection * Urinary stress test (the patient stands with a full bladder and coughs) * Pad test (after placement of a pre-weighed sanitary pad, patient exercises, then pad is weighed to determine urine loss) * Pelvic or abdominal ultrasound * X-rays with contrast dye * Cystoscopy (inspection of the inside of the bladder) * Urodynamic studies (measurement of pressure and urine flow) * EMG (myogram) - rarely needed Further tests will be performed to rule out other types of incontinence. These tests may include the "Q-tip test," which measures the change in the angle of the urethra at rest and when straining. An angle change of greater than 30 degrees often indicates significant weakness of the muscles that support the bladder, which is common in stress incontinence. Treatment Medications used to treat urge incontinence are aimed at relaxing the involuntary contraction of the bladder and improving bladder function. There are several types of medications that may be used alone or in combination: * Anticholinergic agents (oxybutynin, tolterodine, enablex, sanctura, vesicare, oxytrol) * Antispasmodic medications (flavoxate) * Tricyclic antidepressants (imipramine, doxepin) Oxybutynin (Ditropan) and tolterodine (Detrol) are medications to relax the smooth muscle of the bladder. These are the most commonly used medications for urge incontinence and are available in a once-a-day formulation that makes dosing easy and effective. SURGERY The goal of any surgery to treat urge incontinence is aimed at increasing the storage ability of the bladder while decreasing the pressure within the bladder. Surgery is reserved for patients who are severely debilitated by their incontinence and who have an unstable bladder (severe inappropriate contraction) and poor ability to store urine. Augmentation cystoplasty is the most frequently performed surgical procedure for severe urge incontinence. In this reconstructive surgery, a segment of the bowel is added to the bladder to increase bladder size and allow the bladder to store more urine. Possible complications include those of any major abdominal surgery, including bowel obstruction, blood clots, infection, and pneumonia. There is a risk of developing urinary fistulae (abnormal tubelike passages that result in abnormal urine drainage), urinary tract infection, and difficulty urinating. Augmentation cystoplasty is also linked to a slightly increased risk of developing tumors. DIET Some experts recommend a regimen of controlled fluid intake in addition to other therapies in the management of urge incontinence. The goal of this program is to distribute the intake of fluids throughout the course of the day, so the bladder does not need to handle a large volume of urine at one time. Do not drink large quantities of fluids with meals -- limit your intake to less than 8 ounces at one time. Sip small amounts of fluids between meals. Stop drinking fluids approximately two hours before bedtime. Additionally, it may be helpful to eliminate your intake of foods that may irritate the bladder, such as caffeine, spicy foods, carbonated drinks, and highly acidic foods such as citrus fruits and juices. BLADDER RETRAINING Management of urge incontinence usually begins with a program of bladder retraining. Occasionally, electrical stimulation and biofeedback therapy may be used in conjunction with bladder retraining. A program of bladder retraining involves becoming aware of patterns of incontinence episodes and relearning skills necessary for storage and proper emptying of the bladder. Bladder retraining consists of developing a schedule of times when you should try to urinate, while trying to consciously delay urination between these times. One method is to force yourself to wait 1 to 1 1/2 hours between urinations, despite any leakage or urge to urinate in between these times. As you become skilled at waiting, gradually increase the time intervals by 1/2 hour until you are urinating every 3 to 4 hours. KEGEL EXERCISES Pelvic muscle training exercises called Kegel exercises are primarily used to treat people with stress incontinence. However, these exercises may also be beneficial in relieving the symptoms of urge incontinence. The principle behind Kegel exercises is to strengthen the muscles of the pelvic floor, thereby improving the urethral sphincter function. The success of Kegel exercises depends on proper technique and adherence to a regular exercise program. Another approach is to use vaginal cones to strengthen the muscles of pelvic floor. A vaginal cone is a weighted device that is inserted into the vagina. The woman contracts the pelvic floor muscles in an effort to hold the device the place. The contraction should be held for up to 15 minutes and should be performed twice daily. Within 4 to 6 weeks, about 70% of women trying this method had some improvement in their symptoms. BIOFEEDBACK AND ELECTRICAL STIMULATION For people who are unsure if they are performing Kegel exercises correctly, biofeedback and electrical stimulation may be used to help identify the correct muscle group to work. Biofeedback is a method of positive reinforcement in which electrodes are placed on the abdomen and the anal area. Some therapists place a sensor in the vagina (for women) or the anus (for men) to assess contraction of the pelvic floor muscles. A monitor will display a graph showing which muscles are contracting and which are at rest. The therapist can help identify the correct muscles for performing Kegel exercises. About 75% of people who use biofeedback to enhance performance of Kegel exercises report symptom improvement, with 15% considered cured. Electrical stimulation involves using low-voltage electric current to stimulate the correct group of muscles. The current may be delivered using an anal or vaginal probe. The electrical stimulation therapy may be performed in the clinic or at home. Treatment sessions usually last 20 minutes and may be performed every 1 to 4 days. Another form of electrical stimulation called sacral neuromodulation involves the placement of a "bladder pacemaker," which stimulates the bladder nerves. This device may provide excellent relief of symptoms for those who do not respond to other therapies. BOTOX An experimental therapy involves injecting botulinum toxin (Botox) into the bladder muscle to help stop the involuntary contracts that lead to urge incontinence. Early study results suggest this is a promising treatment option for those who do not respond to other therapies. ACTIVITY People with urge incontinence may find it helpful to avoid activities that irritate the urethra and bladder, such as taking bubble baths or using caustic soaps in the genital area. in your case say ur mind is pissed off in literary sense.....even i get those when exams are near...... its due to generally anxiety/ mind problems usually....... its not urge incontinence from what u just said..... see your counsellor/psychologist maybe Answered by Colby Humburg 1 month ago.


Uncontrollable Bladder Function?
This is extremely embarrassing for me, so I would really appreciate responses from people with the same problem, or someone educated that might have a possible resolution.I am a track and field and cross country runner, and about 5 years ago whenever I would be racing and get in a very nervous situation I would... Asked by Elden Mcdermid 1 month ago.

This is extremely embarrassing for me, so I would really appreciate responses from people with the same problem, or someone educated that might have a possible resolution. I am a track and field and cross country runner, and about 5 years ago whenever I would be racing and get in a very nervous situation I would start to pee while running. Whenever I won the race or there was not a lot of pressure, this would not happen. But when I was in a big race and a girl passed me that I should be beating or need to beat, this would happen. I've seen a few doctors about this, and none had a resolution. I was given some bladder control medicine and this didn't work. I even went down to the local GNC store and bought some StessTabs to help reduce stress, and this also did not work. This is a very embarrassing thing for me to accept, and if there is anyone out there that has had this same problem, please help! Answered by Ebonie Hadad 1 month ago.

The major types of medications used to manage urinary incontinence are anticholinergics, alpha-adrenergic agonists and estrogen. Other options include the antidepressant imipramine and the synthetic hormone desmopressin, which is more commonly used for bed-wetting in children. have you tried any of these? I got this from another yahoo answer. so i can't really take the credit for it.... but i hope it helps!! =) Anticholinergics Overactive bladder is characterized by abnormal bladder contractions, which make you want to urinate even when your bladder isn't full. Anticholinergic drugs block the action of a chemical messenger — acetylcholine — that's instrumental in sending the signals that trigger these contractions. Two commonly prescribed anticholinergics are oxybutynin (Ditropan) and tolterodine (Detrol). Alpha-adrenergic agonists Instead of blocking a chemical messenger, as anticholinergic drugs do, alpha-adrenergic agonists mimic a different chemical messenger, norepinephrine. The norepinephrine-like properties of these drugs stimulate alpha-adrenergic receptors. This has the effect of contracting the urethral smooth muscle, thus tightening the urinary sphincter and the muscular valve that prevents urine from leaking. Imipramine Imipramine (Tofranil) is a tricyclic antidepressant that has both anticholinergic and alpha-adrenergic effects. It makes the bladder muscle relax, while causing the smooth muscles at the bladder neck to contract. As such, it may be used to treat mixed — urge and stress — incontinence. Imipramine may cause drowsiness, so it's often taken at night. Because of this, imipramine may be useful for nighttime incontinence, as well. It may also be helpful for children who bed-wet at night (nocturnal enuresis) Desmopressin Desmopressin is a synthetic version of a natural body hormone called anti-diuretic hormone (ADH). This hormone decreases the production of urine. Your body normally produces more ADH at night, so the need to urinate is lower then. In children, bed-wetting may be caused by a shortage of nighttime production of ADH. Desmopressin is commonly used to treat bed-wetting in children and is available as a nasal spray or pill for use before bedtime. Selective anticholinergics. One of the limitations of current anticholinergic drugs is that they affect multiple parts of the body in addition to the bladder. Their effect on the salivary glands, for example, can produce dry mouth, and their effect on the central nervous system, can cause dizziness. Darifenacin (Enablex), solifenacin (Vesicare) and trospium (Sanctura) are three more recently approved anticholinergics that target the bladder specifically in order to treat overactive bladder, without affecting other organs and systems. Capsaicin. Some studies have shown that instilling an extract of capsaicin, the spicy component of hot chili peppers, numbs a hypersensitive bladder. The extract is placed in the bladder through a thin tube (catheter) inserted through the urethra. At first, it stimulates the sensory nerves of the bladder, but after a while, it produces a long-term resistance to sensory activation, which may last for two to seven months. Capsaicin has been used successfully as a treatment for overactive bladder associated with nerve disorders, such as multiple sclerosis or spinal cord injuries. Temporary side effects include discomfort and a burning sensation in the pubic area when the capsaicin is instilled. Instilling the local anesthetic lidocaine before the capsaicin can help alleviate this problem. You also might experience a temporary worsening of your symptoms before they get better. However, at this time, capsaicin isn't readily available — due in part to the severe bladder pain it can cause — and is rarely used outside of clinical studies. Resiniferatoxin. Resiniferatoxin, an extract from a cactus-like plant, has effects similar to those of capsaicin, but a thousand times more potent. Remarkably, though, burning sensations do not occur when resiniferatoxin is infused in the bladder. Studies of resiniferatoxin have found that it doesn't produce the temporary worsening of bladder symptoms seen with capsaicin, and its beneficial effects may last up to three months. Resiniferatoxin is still under investigation and available only to those in clinical studies at this time. Botulinum toxin type A. Injections of botulinum toxin type A (Botox) into the bladder muscle may benefit people who have an overactive bladder. Botox blocks the actions of acetylcholine and paralyzes the bladder muscle. Preliminary studies have found that Botox significantly improves symptoms of incontinence and causes few side effects. Benefits can last up to nine months. Scientists speculate that in cases of severely overactive bladder unrelated to a neurological condition, Botox may be helpful for people who haven't responded to other medications. 3 weeks ago Answered by Elise Sallaz 1 month ago.

Identifying the primary signs of diabetes can help you avoid complications with the disease. Unfortunately, many of the diabetes symptoms that present themselves outside of the body are also symptoms of other disorders. This can lead to a lot of wrong diagnoses before properly identifying diabetes and an avenue of treatment is chosen. Still, being able to recognize the primary signs of this sickness can save you a great deal of time. When you realize you have one of the symptoms listed in this answer, get a hold of your medical professional and request to have some testing done. Some people are naturally hungrier than other people. Under the same notion, if you see that you are always hungry, this could be a syndrome of diabetes. Excessive eating is often associated with the wonky blood sugar levels that a person experiences when diabetes first starts setting in. Some people who are battling the onset of diabetes will recognize they keep eating even when they begin to feel full. More often, however, a person who is coming down with diabetes won't ever feel full. If you discover that you can't seem to stop eating or fill up, it is time to contact your primary doctor. Are you more easily irritated and don't know why? While every one has bad moods occasionally, unexplainable irritability could be caused by issues with your blood sugar levels. It is important to get checked for diabetes if your blood sugar levels are not stable. Many people find that their ability to deal with irritation goes down when they are starting to become diabetic because their body stops processing food correctly. So if there is no other reason for your mood swings, you should get tested for diabetes and hypoglycemia. How many times per day do you have to urinate? This is seemingly something you prefer not to answer out loud. You should at least answer the question in your mind. While some may believe that is actually the excessive thirst diabetes sympmtom that makes the excessive urination occur, physicians insist that it is a symptom all on it's own. It you recognize that you are always running to the bathroom--even if you aren't consuming much food or drink--you should talk to your medical professional about checking out your potassium and bladder functions. It is highly imaginable that when the physician tests you out, they may uncover diabetes. Diabetes symptoms are varied but they can be intense. The most exposed indicators (the lack of insulin production) are difficult to observe without complex medical testing. Other indicators are quite evident. At the same time, there are many distinguishable indicators of diabetes that are also apparent signs of other problems and disorders. It is crucial for you to keep an eye on your body (and the bodies of your loved ones). You do not want your disease to be misdiagnosed. Get a second opinion if you are worried your own physician may have misdiagnosed your or your kids. Answered by Lexie Dueitt 1 month ago.

Well, I am certainly no doctor, but I am an anatomy & physiology nerd. I really don't know what this could be, but it sounds like your sympathetic nervous system makes you get excited when someone passes you, obviously. The only thing I'm thinking is that urine should not be leaving your body unless you want it to. You have an external urethral sphincter, and it's a voluntary muscle. That's what you relax and contract when you need to use the restroom. To me, it sounds like it is not functioning properly. Of course, this is just the first thing that came to my mind. I honestly do not know, but I am interested to know the answer. So, no doctors have found out why this happens? Answered by Lenny Maywalt 1 month ago.

I am no doctor but in my case I realise that some of the problems is lack of hormones and also, as I am a very nervious person then taking "Aprazalam" does help me. I really feel sorry for anyone who has this problem because it has an effect on ones life and we do not wan't to go out because of the problem we have but for me the two above items do help me and I also have to take "Vericare" every day. Answered by Earlie Reeve 1 month ago.

I have this problem my DR gave me trospium it works Answered by Jadwiga Yoast 1 month ago.


Bed Wet!!!?
I am feeling very shy to ask this but any way I have to get a solution for this. I am 21 yrs old. but still i use to bed wet sometimes. I need to know how i can overcome this problem. PLease help me!!! Its very important for me since i use to go out a lot. Please!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Asked by Classie Wollenburg 1 month ago.

One of the main causes of bed wetting in adults is alcohol abuse. Being too drunk to get out of bed, or respond to the signal the body sends when one's bladder is full. Often all these people need to do is not drink as much. Of course, there are also many people who don't abuse alcohol but suffer from nocturnal urination. There can be many causes, from anatomical reasons, to sleep problems. The inability to control the bladder is a very common condition in a lot of adults. There are even medications available by prescription like darifenacin (Enablex), dicyclomine (Antispas, Bentyl), flavoxate (Urispas), hyoscyamine (Anaspaz, Levbid, Levsin), methantheline (Banthine, Pro-Banthine), oxybutynin (Ditropan, Ditropan XL, Oxytrol), solifenacin (VESIcare), tolterodine (Detrol, Detrol LA), and trospium (Sanctura). Please don't be shy about asking your doctor. With so many medications available, it should be pretty apparent that doctors have heard of the problem often. P.S. Don't even consider the answer that tells you to take Amitriptyline. It is a seditive used to treat depression and anxiety, and will only make you less aware of the need to empty your bladder during sleep. Answered by Angla Lightner 1 month ago.

Take amytryptyline 10mg tab at bed time for 45 days. Answered by Hobert Polacek 1 month ago.

try not to drink to much water before you go to bed. force yourself to go to the bathroom before you go to bed. I don't know. see your doctor. Good luck! Answered by Cecile Fromberg 1 month ago.

Do your dong in a knot if you've been drinking Answered by Lionel Massi 1 month ago.

Go see your doctor. He might be able to help!!!! Answered by Arline Spiroff 1 month ago.

see a doc there is pills for that Answered by Thanh Huner 1 month ago.


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